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Full text of "Duluth Evening Herald"

I .* 



-^ 



THE DULUTH HERAL 




VOLUME XXXI— NO. 313. 



WEDNESDA'if EVENING, APRIL 8, 1914. 



AMERICANS LIVING 
NEAR TAMPICO SEEK 
REFUGE IN THE CITY 



Fighting Has Begun and 

Real Assault Is 

Expected. 



REEIECTEO MAYOR 

BY REDUCED MAJORITY 



ITYj 



SIXTEEN COUNTIES 
AODED TO DRY yST 
BY ILLINOIS VOTERS 



Washington Makes Protest 

Against Expulsion of 

Spaniards By Villa. 



Six Hundred Refugees 

From Torreon Reach 

Juarez. 



ITflshlngton. April 8. — American 
women and . htldren In l>ona Cecilia, a 
•uburb of Tampico, have been brought l 
Into the city by order of Rear Admiral 
Mayo. In order that their lives may 
not be endangered by flghlinsr In pro- 
gress there. 

Admiral Fletcher forwarded to the 
navy department this report he re- 
ceived yesterday from Admiral Mayo 
at Tamploo: 

■Sharp fighting during the day until 
6, Vera Cruz firing all day. Do not 
believe this Is serious attafk on Tam- 
pico. as nothing Indicates rebels have 
artillery, but report is persistent they 
mill have some soon. (;overnor Cabal- 
leros is In command of the rebels. Some 
alarm In town, but not acute. Have 
brought American women and chil- 
dren from Dona Cecilia into Tampico. 
Some non-combatants injured." 
Protent for SpanlardH. 

Vifrorous represtntatiuns have b°on 
sent from the American government to 
tJen. Carranza. the Constitutionalist 
chief, urging that he modify the order 
of Gen. Villa expelling Spaniards from 
Torreon. 

This situation is giving grave con- 
cern to authorities here. The United 
States has undertaken to extend to 
Spaniards In Mexico the s.aine protec- 
tion It afford."* .America n.'< resident there, 
and Aniba.osador Kiano has bee"n as- 
surtrd that nothing will be left undone 
to Insure for the unfortunates at Tor- 
reon every right to which they are 

(Continued on page 12, fifth column.) 

COLO KllirFRUiT 
NEAR OALHART, TEX. 

Snow Falls and Mercury 

Gets Down to 10 

Above Zero. 




Two-Thirds of Townships 

Holding Elections Put 

Ban on Liquor. 



Thirty Women Elected 

to Office; Springfield 

Women for Saloons. 



Anti-Liquor Forces Pleased 

at Result; Other States' 

Returns. 



* 
* 



.MORK VOTE.S TH\X * 

VOTKRS I.\ .VI RORA. # 

^ 

Anrora. III., .\pril 8. — \%'lth a ^ 



NO WCMEN 
LANHFFICE 

Seventy-Ttiree Per Cent of 

Them Vote in Chicago 

Er^ion. 

'. 

Help Beat Subway Plan- 
Few e'de With 
Progressives. 



LEE OPENS 
BAHLE FOR 
NOMINATION 



Scores the Eberhart Ad- 
ministration in Address 
at Owatonna. 




TWO CENTS. 



TO END OLD 



?mmk DISPUTE IS 






dIGNED AT BOGOTA 



GERHARD A. BADING 
Of Milwaukee. 



SEIDEL FAILS 
TO COME BACK 

Cuts Bading's Majority in 

Two in Milwaukee 

Mayoralty. 



^ TOte of 16.575 caat at the Hertion ^ 
Mf on the nnlooii yewtcrday, the dry* ^ 
4f declare (hat their aHsertion that ^ 
;V the ivetn brought Illegal voterM 4t 
^ here Im subxtantlated, ai« their * 
■ifc canvaMH of the tt»TnMlilp before ^k 
^ election iiho««ed only 15.54)0 of rot- ^ 
)K Ing age living In .Vnrora. The ^ 
■jk tOMn.-ihIp ^vent wet by 1.259. with jjf 
■W: women of the Raitt wide diMtrlot. 
^vhere two-thlrdn of the popula- 
tion llveH, giving the mhIooh a ma- ^ 
Jorlty.- In the town an a whole 4H I 
the women voted the dr>-a a 808 ^ { 
majority. ^ 



% 



'•* 

I* 

« 

Chicago, April 8. — Women voting for 
the first time In Illinois township elec- 
tions demonstrated their power yes- 
terday by closing the doors of more 
than a thousand saloons outside of 
i Chicago, adding sixteen counties to the 
I thirty already dry, and barring the 
sale of intoxicants In approximately 
200 of the 300 townships in which lo- 
cal option was an Issue. 

Their victory Included eleven of the 
larger cities of the state, which until 
the votea.were counted last night, were 
wet territory. They were: Blooralng- 
ton, <}alesburg, Elgin, Decatur, Canton, 
Freeport, Belvidere, Monmouth, 
wanee, Lockport, 
Rockford 



Chicago, April 5f. — Although 73 per 
cent of the Chicato women eligible to 
vote took advani ge of their newly 
gained franchise 'at yesterday's mu- 
nicipal election, n'","!* of the nine wom- 
en candidates foi membership in the 
city council was pacceasful. 

The women can :^9,tes received only 
a scattered votn. Alderman John 
(Bathhouse) Coughlip, who for a score 
of years has rep/*i«nted the First 
ward, won by nearly 4,000 votes over 
Miss Marlon Drake, a court stenog- 
rapher who made a spectacular cam- 
paign. Miss Harr >t E. Vittum, head 
resident of Nor^'iU'estern University 
settlement, went d.'wn to defeat before 
Alderman Stanley :>. Walkowiak in the 
Seventeenth ward. 

Xearly 50r>,e00 Votes. 

The vote in Chicago yesterday to- 



Would Drive Brewery Con- 
trol of State's Affairs 
From Capitol. 



NEGOTIATED TREATY 
WITH THE COLOMBIANS 



Says the People Demand 

Clean Politics and Honest 

Government. 



Owatonna, Minn., April 8— (Special 
to The Herald.) — William E. Lee of 
Long Prairie opened his carnpaign for 
the Republican nomination for gover- 
nor with an address at the opera house 
here last night. Mr. Lee was accom- 
panied to this city by a delegation of 
supporters from at. Paul and Minne- 
apolis and was welcomed by a band 
and a parade of enthusiastic friends. 
The crowd was eo great that the opera 
house would not hold all who desired 
to hear the anti-machine candidate, 
and an overflow meeting was held. 

Senator O. A. Lende of Canby also 
addressed the gatherings in support 
of Mr. Lee, who was given a splendid 
reception. 

The Paramount TfiMue. 

In his address, Mr. Lee Insisted the 
paramount i«?sue of the campaign was 
finding out whether Minnesota ha«l a 
government it could control, and 
through which It could act; he opposed 
state control of local public utilities- 
argued the need of an efficient civil 
service, adding that the state now had 
enough useless boards to wall It up and 
roof it over again. The candidate con 




Minister Thomson Acts 
Behalf of United 
States. 



in 



Payment of $25,000,000 Is 

Promised Instead of 

$90,000,000. 



Taft's Declaration of Hope- 
lessness of Situation 
Proves Error. 



Bogota, Colombia, April 8. — Th* 
treaty between the United States and 
Colombia settling the Panama contro- 
versy was signed yesterday at the state 
department of Colombia by the Amer- 
ican minister, Thaddeus A. Thomson, 
and representatives of the Colombiaa 
government. 



taled nearly 600,00. Out of a total of „^_ ^ ^ 

217,614 women who had qualified, 168,- t demn'ed the state's aiitlqulited'Vovern- 
toe ,.„*„-. The number of men vvho cental organism, and said, if elected, 
328,S8<, or ,2 per cent of i he purposed to give Minnesota a busi- 
ness man's and not a politician's ad 



Twenty-Seven Wisconsin 

Cities Vote to Bar 

Saloons. 



Ke- 

and East Galena. 

Mattoon and Oalva were 



Dalhart, Tex.. April 8. — Winter came 
back to Texas Panhandle today with 
a temperature of 10 above zero. All 
the fruit in this section, it is believed, 
has been killed. An inch of snow has 
fallen. The snow is of great benefit 
to the cattle ranges which have lacked 
moisture. 

altmanTsTateTs 

OV ER $2 5.000,000. 

New York. April 8. — A tentative 
valuation of between $25,000,000 and 
130,000,000 is placed on the estate of 
the late Benjamin Altman, merchant 



York on Oct 
announcement by 
trustees 



Milwaukee. Wis., April 8.— The 
counting of the votes from the paper 
ballots In yesterday's municipal elec- 
tion in Milwaukee Is a very slow 
process and far from being complete, 
but unofficial though reliable returns 
do not change the estimate of last 
night, which gave Mayor Gerhard A. 
Bading, non-partisan candidate for re- 
election, a majority of over 6,000 ahead 
of Emll Seldel, Social-Democrat. 

J. P. Carney and Louis M. Koteckl 
are elected treasurer and city comp- 
troller, respectively, beyond a doubt. 
City Attorney Daniel W. Hoan, So- 
cial-Democrat, appears to have been 
elected over William II. Timlin, Jr.. 
non-partisan, according to returns up 
to 10 a. m. With seven precincts to 
hear from in strong Social-Democratic 
I wards, Hoan it appears, will win by 
I approximately 200 majority. 
i New Board of Aldermen. 

. J. . , vT ! Th«» new board of aldermen probably 
and art connoisseur, who died In >?ewi TheJI^eY^^'^oa'-ag J,on-partlsans and 9 

1913, according to an go^^ij^i. Democrats. At present there are 
the executors and ill Social-Democrats on the board. 

Among those who failed for re-elec- 
Thes*. figures include the value of 'tion is John Koerner, non-partisan, who 



(Continued on page 12, sixth column.) 



figures mviuuc iiic *anic ui ;>•■"'■•" " . ■• »i,_' „_.,_„;i >^r.m 

Mr. Altmans art collection, which Is ! has been a member of th^e council fr^ 
ef.5lly worth $10,000,000 and whieh the Fourth ward for many years. How 
eventuallv will become the property • 
of the Metropolitan Museum of Art, ! 

where It is now on exhibition. | bj^bbi MfPU VUElf OEilT 

The necessity for an Immediate ap- | ||1||| Hpll I HC f oCli I 
pralsal of the estate was obviated WVlll lllkll I Mfc ■ Wfcitw ■ 
M« nday by the action of the trustees 
In sending to the state comptroller an 
advance payment of $569,000 on ac- 
count of the inheritance tax. 



kept in the dry column by women's 
votes. 

Xo Kfew '"Wet" TownMhipa. 

No city nor township which was dry 
before the election was lost by the 
anti-saloon forces, but the cities of 
Springfield, Quincy, Rock Island, Au- 
rora, Alton, Moline, Dixon and West 
Galena remained wet. 

Complete returns from country town- 
ships and from more remote sections 
of the state were not available, but 
detailed figures of the vote in fifty- 
seven townships placed the women's 
vote at 40,681 dry and 18.181 wet, 
showing that in those townships ap- 
proximately 70 per cent of the wom- 
en's votes favored the anti-saloon 
ticket. 

Where the accurate figures were 
available, the men's vote was shown to 
be about one-eighth greater than the 
women's and to have been divided Into 
approximately 60 per cent wet and 40 
per cent dry. 

Thirty Women Eleeted. 

In addition to their victories over 
the saloons, the women elected thirty 
women officials — twenty-six township 
collectors, three town clerks and one 
woman member of a city board of ed- 
ucation, Mrs. Mary L. Morrison of 
Springfield. 

Anti-saloon leaders yesterday morn- 



686 voted 
voted w.a8 

those eligible. Although not as large 

as they had expec»-d: suffrage leaders 

expressed themselves as highly pleased 

V Ith the Interest sfens'n by the women. 

Chicago women -^^mocrats at the 

' polls yesterday sfc.V.vtd a slight ma- 

; Jorlty over women Republicans, while 

, Progressives were » bad third. The 

figures Indicated, in round numbers, 

about 65,000 womer. Democrats, 61,000 

Republicans, 20,000 I'rogressives and 

! 13,000 Independents. The balance of 

' the woman vote wa, .xoattered. 

Chicago's new c.>i. i. 11 will be over- 

; whelmlngly DenAic: l.c, aa it has been 

for the last several e rs. Of the sue- 

I cf ssful candidAte^, j^ .oixtecn served 

in the last city ^ Wv ^^^ ^^^ "♦■"^ 

(Continued on pagC'^ -^cond column.) 

YmillGlHliTISilAIIIIY 
AVIATOR IS KILLED 



ministration, 
trol of the 
capitol. 



and to drive brewery con- 
state's affairs from the 



Mr. L,ee told his hearers he : 
: believed In law enforeement. : 
: the right of the majority to.: 
: rule, a conservation of the : 
: state's natural rexourees, good : 
: niid even better Mchoolfi, and In : 
: addition had mneh to nay of the : 
: value of Kclentlflc farming, add- : 
.: Ins by way of parenthoatx, that : 
: the beat prodnetn of the farnt : 
: were the hoyn and girlK raised : 
: and educate^l there. i 

* 

"Nero fiddled while Rome v/as burn- 
ing," s&td Mr. Lee. in dlscusKlixg state 
extravagance, "but the chief executive 
i of Minnesota has outfiddled Nero, and 



THADDEUS A. THOMSON 

Of Texas, United States Minister at 

Bogota. 



FLAY METHODS 

IN mjmi 

Barnes and Ha[l Declare 

Railroads Strangle 

Boat Business. 



Tell Commerce Comif»ission 

Rates Are High 

Enour*' Now. 



Washington, April 8. — Great I^kes 
package boat lines independent of the 
railroads, are making, according to 



as a result the taxpayers of Mlnne- > testimony submitted today to the in- 



Last Flight as Pupil Ends 

in the Sergeant's 

Death. 

London, April 8. — Sergeant Deane of 
the British army flying corps was in- 



sota are crying out for a business ad 
ministration. 

"The one great issue of this cam- 
paign Is to find out whether or not we 
have a government we can control and 
through which we can act. The ma- 
chine has but one issue — control of the 
government. When we have wrested 
the control of the government from the 
bosses and greed we can move forward. 
Until then we are Impotent. It is the 
people against the machine. 

What the Machine Imt 

"Naturally comes the 



stantly killed today at the Brooklands | <^onstJ^tu^es Jhe^ macWn^^^^^ ^^^ ^^^ 

aerodrome while making his final large brewery and allied Interests, 
flight as a pupil before receiving his 1 Then, there are some corporations 
pilot's certificate. Deane. acting against , w'lose owners f^s'^'e to ^ej: "lore out 
._ , . * 1.. 1 * * J .» of the public than they are entitled 

the advice of his instructor, ascended ^^ f^j. ^y^g service they render 
to a height of 1,20« feet. He then at- ; there are the multitude of office hold 
tempted a sharp spiral descent, during | ^g mostly appointive officers, scat- 

which he lost control of the aero- i . — — . 

(Continued on page 12, fourth column.) 1 plane. 1 (Continued on page 12, second column.) 



"DRYS" GAIN 
IN MINNESOTA 

Majority of Cities Voting 
on Liquor Favor Tem- 
perance. 



MORE SIGNS OF SPRING. 
Mr. Homecrofter Is Busy With His Cellar Gardening. 



St. Peter and Other Places, 

Wet for Years, Banish 

Saloons. 



et. Paul, Minn., April 8. — (Special to 
The Herald.) — Temperance advocates 
were elated today over their victories 
In a large majority of Minnesota cities 
of the fourth class which iield munic- 
ipal elections yesterday, with the 
liquor license question the principal 

Issue. 

The mo«t notable victory of the 
anti -saloon forces was scored in 
Southern and Southwestern Minnesota, 
where Madison. Marshall, I.,uverne and 
Canby, 



for 



score of years leading 



TO STATE'S PRISON 

Flanagan and Turner Go 

From St. Paul to 

Stillwater. 

St. Paul, Minn.. April 8. — (Special to 
The Herald.) — Martin Flanagan, for- 
mer chief of the St. Paul police depart- 
ment, and Fred Turner, a former city 
detective, convicted several weeks ago 
of parttcipath:>n in the collection of 
thousands of dollars of blackmail 
from women of the underwold, today 
were .taken to Stillwater, Minn., to 
begin serving indeterminate sentences 
of from one to ten years in the state 
penitentiary. 

The two former police officials were 
driven from St. Paul to Stillwater In 
an automobile, after It had been an- 
nounced this morning that they would 
be taken to prison in the customary 
manner, aboard nn Interurban electric 
car. The change In means of trans- 
p{)rtation. It was said, was made In 
deference to the wishes of the prison- 
ers. 

♦ 

See Men They Sent There. 

Stillwater, Minn., April 8. — Martin 
Flanagan and Fred Turner, formerly 
connected with tfee St. Paul police de- 
partment, were brought to the peni- 
tentiary here shortly before noon to- 
day. They were taken to the old state 
prison, where they were "dressed in" 
according to the usual routine for new 
prisoners. 

News of the arrival of the former 
p< lice chief and his assistant in the 
St. Paul detective department spread 
tl rough both arms of the buildings 
rapidly. Much interest was manifested 
in a quiet way by inmates, particularly 
among those whom Flanagan and Tur- 
ner had been In.'^trumental In sending 



ffai.ii?n towns, and even historic St. ! here during the time the former offi- 



Ppt.-r "<»liere saloons have operated 
ror.tinuouTrv- Ipr more than sixty 

years, 
A rnaj 



wereswepririto the dry column. 

laJority of fortj^-i.'^^ee votes In 
favor""of the prohibitionists rrC^^d the 
saloons at Litchfield, which ha^ -t>cen 



BO 

"wet" for more than twenty years 
Other towns voted into the dry lists 
Included Mantorville, Tracy, fanno'*' 
Falls, Fergus Falls and Blue Karth. 
The liquor element wa.s successful in 
Sauk Center, Le Sueur, St. James and 
Hastings, and In a few of the smaller 
towns that voted for the first time on 
the license question under the local 
option law of 19 IS. 



cf rs were In 
department. 



power in the St. Paul 



COMMISSION PLAN 

FOR IRVINGTON. N. Y. 

Irvingtort, ;^ Y.. April 8.~The com- 
mission form iff ..government was 
adopted at the special el^c^lon yester- 
day by a vote of 787 to 702. The com- 
missioners will be chosen at a spe- 
cial election five weeks hence. 




terstate commerce commission, good 
profit upon investment, although they 
carry less tonnage than the lines un- 
der railroad control. The Intimation 
of witnesses for the shippers was that 
the rail lines were "starving" their 
boat lines through expensive manage- 
ment and the continuance of out of 
date methods of operation, to divert 
traffic to the rail lines. 

JuUjs H. Barnes, chairman of the 
traffic committee cf the Duluth Com- 
«. ^- u * ' "leiclal club, maintained that the at- 

quer>— What } tltude of the railroads tended to re- 
duce the lake tonnage. 

Challenges Whole Policy. 

"We chalkngie," said Mr. Barnes. 

"the whole policy of the operation by 

the railroads of package freight lines 

ThAT. I °" *^® Great Lakes. It has all the dls- 

i,"i<?' I advantages of a monopoly and none of 

a monopoly's advantages." 

He insisted that the railroad-oper- 
ated package lines had adopted no 
economies, no modern methods of 
handling freight in loading and un- 
loading, and that the 
shippers, instead of being reduced, 
constantly was being Increased. Ht 
citei four independent package freight 
lines on the Great Lakes In which he 
was a stockholder, that declared each 
a dividend of 10 per cent in 1913 on a 
business that was quite 16 per cent 
less than that dene by the railroad- 
controlled loat lines. 

Says Request Shows Xer^e. 

"Fet," he declared, "these railroad- 
owned lines have the temerit> to come 
here to ask for an advance of their 
lak3-and-rail rates." 

G. R. Hall, traffic manager of the 
Duluth Commercial club, criticized the 
"archaic methods" used by the lake- 
and-rall lines in handling freight. He 
maintained that the traffic, sclen- 
tifloally handled, would show such a 



Terms of Treaty. 

Washington, April 8. — Twenty-five 
million dollars is the amount the Unit- 
ed States agrees to pay to Colombia 
for the partition of Panama and iho 
acquisition of llie canal zone. In the 
treaty signed in Bogota by American 
Minister Thomson and the Colombiaa 
legation. 

No rights for a new interoceanlo 
canal acro.«s Colombia by the Atrato 
river route, and no coaling privileges 
on San Andreas and Provldencia isl- 
ands off the Colombian coast, It waa 
added, were contained in the treaty. 

While the Colombian minister. .Senor 
Betancourt. received a cable from his 
foreign office informing him of tho 
signing of the agreement, the .^tattt 
department still was awaiting woriS 
from Mr. Thom.son. 

Boundary Line. 

The boundary between Colombia and 
Panama is to follow the line laid down 
in an earlier treaty which was signed, 
but never approved by the Colombiaa 

congreM. 

One Important demand which the 
South American republic had been in- 
sisting on — the free passage of her 
merchant vessels through the canal— 
I was given up because of President 
I Wll.<5on'8 attitude in favor of repeal ot 
I tolls exemption. That had been A 
I stumbling block in the way of fina.1 
agreement. 
I The ('olombian congress will be 
called in special se^'slon to i->asB on the 
[treaty before it is submitted to the 
senate hert. 

} ^cieptance of the tre*.ty will «nd 
ten years of negotiations and friction 
between the L'nlted States and Colom- 
bia, and will relieve strained diplomat- 
' ic relations which have been watched 
I with the keenest Interest by all Cen- 
tral and South American republics. 
j Lvnap Sum. or The Hague. 

I Colombia has Insisted all along that 
I the United Slates either pay a lump 
! sum for the canal ^one It acquired 

; (Continued on page 12, second column.) 

ASQUltHDiCURED 
DULY REELECTED 



f profit as would preclude the possibil- 
ty of an Increase in lake-and-rall 



rates. 



WOODS BECOMES HEAD 
OF GOTHAM POLICE 



No Other Candidates for 

Seat in Parliament 

Appear. 

London, April 8. — Premier Astjultl* 
again became a member of the house 
of commons today w hen he was re- 
expense to the ' turned unoppoee<} by his old constit- 
uency of East Fife. Scotland. At noon, 
as no other candidates had put in an 
appearance, the returning officer or 
the constituency declared Herbert 
Henry Asquith duly elected. 

Premier Asquith resigned his seat In 
the house of commons on -March 30 
after he had taken over the war sec- 
retaryship from Col. .lohn Seely. Ac- 
cording to the British custom, a mem- 
ber of parliament, on accepting an 
"office of profit under the crown,' is 
compelled to give up his seat In order 
to seek the approval of his constitu- 
ents for his acceptance of office. 

While the premier was absent from 

the legislative chamber, Reginald Mc- 

Kenna. home secretary, performed the 

functions of leader of the house. Dur- 

thls short period the home rule 

passed its second reading. 

The resignation of Col. Seely, secre- 
tary for war, was brought about by 
the crisis in the army in connection 
with the Ulster situation. 



ing 
bill 



Takes Oath of Office and 

Assumes the Com- 

missionership. 

?Cew York, April 8. — Arthur H. 
Woods, appointed police commissioner 
of New York yesterday, took the oath 
and formally assumed the office short- 
ly before noon today. 



I THE DAY IN CONGRESS | 

« — « 

* SEXATE. ^ 
» Canala committee arranged ^ 

* plans for pablte hearings on the ^ 
^ Panama tolls exemption repeal, ^ 
j( which begin tomorrow. 4i 
it Senator Bryan attempted to ^ 
^ force the woman suffrage amend- ^ 
^ ment resolution off the calendar 4li 
% on a point of order, but was de- Mf 
MH ffeated by Vice l*rcsldent Mar- dt 
^ shall, who overruled him. ^ 
MH Senator Weeks continued his ^ 
^ speech on the Panama canal tolls ^ 
^ exemption repeal, analyaing treaty ^ 
^ provisions. 4l 
'* Agreed to take up the radium % 
^ conservation bill on Friday. ^ 

* 

^ HOITSB. 

^ Miscellaneous bills on the cal- 

i endar were considered. 

4n Lands confimlttec continued con- 

^ sldcratlon ot the coal and oil leas- IK 

i tng bill. « 

^ RepresentatlTe Murray ef Okla- ^ 

^ homa spoke In defease of hla vote -ijt 

j| on the Panama tolls repeal. ^ 



SUFFRAGETTE HURLS 
WHISTLE AT JUDGE 



Mrs. Drummond Raises 

Pandemonium During 

Her Hearing. 

London, April 8. — Pandemonlun> 
reigned in Marlborough street police 
court today when "Gen." Mrs. Flora 
Drummond, the militant suffragette, 
again was brought up and sentenced 
to pay a fine of $10 or go to prison for 
two months, for creating a disturbance 
in Hyde Park during the Unionist 
rally on Saturday. 

Mrs. Drummond was so violent that 
three policemen had to pinion her and 
remove her hatpins before the magis- 
trate found opportunity, during a 
pause in the uproar, to pronounce sen- 
tence. 

The "general" vehemently declared 
that she would never pay the fine. She 
was forcibly removed to a cell. 
Railed at Suffragette. 

All the time Mrs. Drummon was in 
court she keQt up a fierce struggle 
with the police and warders and 
shrieked denunciations of every one 
present. Even a sister militant suf- 
fragette, who was In court, was tho 
victim of verbal attack because she 
did not storm the prisoners' enclosure 
and rescue the "General." 

Seizing a policeman's metal whistle, 
Mrs. Drummon flung It at the magis- 
trate's head, but he dodged the mis- 
sile. 

Taking advantage of the diversion, 
Mrs. Drummond then sprang from the 
enclosure, but was seised before she 
got far away and was carried back, 
shouting and struggling. 

When Mrs. Drummond had become 
calmer she was released, as either sh» 
•r Botne one else had paid her fine. 



DEFECTIVE PAGE 



I 



i 




Wednesday, 



THE DUULUTH HERALD 



April 9. 1914. 



mm 



MOORS BUTCHER 

TWO AVIATORS. 



Rabat, Morocco. April 8. — Capt. 
UtTve a Fretu-h military aviator, and 
m lieutenant he was carrying as a pas- deavoring to 
»i iiger ^vert hafked to death by in- 
surgent Moors aftt-r they had escaped 

uninjured from an aeroplane accidtsnt them up with swords and shears. 
In the dfs.rt. [ The Moors alao destroyed the aero- 
I'he two officers were engaged In a , plane. ^ 



rtfvonuoilering Hight near Zenniour, 
when their motor became disabled 
while they were high in the air. The 
captain piloted the machine iu a glid- 
ing tlight to earth. 

Both alighted sHfel.v and were en- 
ep.iir the defective mo- 
tor when a band of Moors surrounded 
them, and after torturing them, cut 



DULUTHIAN'S $50,000 HlHTfi. AT IRONTON. COYUNA RANGE 



\\ I. V I'llKit: Tartly ch.iui.v wcath.r ii'iiis.;ht and 'I'luiis'lay ; lowest 
lemprraiure tonight 10 deg. to 15 d eg. at Uulutii-Snperlor, and 5 deg. to 
\» deg. on the Iron ranges; warmer Thursday afternoon. 



One of the largest and popular priced Clothing 
Store sends a glad Easter message 
to the men and women of Duluth. 

We arc all rcatiy with many, many 
ish. serviceable garments for Easter 
spring. Our clothing always mak 
direct appeal to the frugal and the 
ing. To the industrious head oi the 
ilv -to tlie prudent soft — to the th 
housewife — to all who use carei 
judgment in spending the clothing 
money — our store stands ready 
to give sati>faction. 

Easter Suits and Overcoats, 
iiuUuling lialniacaans. $12.00. 
$15.00. $17.00. $18.00. $20.00, 
$25.00 up to $35.00, 

Our Children's Department i^^ 
more complete than ever this spring. 
Perhaps your hoy is thinking about 
his Confirmation Suit. We have 
s»>me excellent suits entirely suit- 
able for this holv occasion, priced 
from $4.95 to $15.'00. 

Soft 1 lilts and Derbies for Easter 
Sunday- $2.00 to $5.00. 

(Jur' Black and Oxford Silk-lin 
Overcoats are neat and dressy for E 
tor. and will give splendid wea 
$12.50, $15, $18 and up. 



OAK HALL BLDQ 





^*0'>\n. * -^tuUiead *t Sullivan, Arclillrcts. 

THE SP!ltAl HOTEL. 

Ironton, Minn., April 8.— (Special to The Herald.) — Peter Spina of Duluth. who is eKten.sively interested on the 
Cuvuna and Mesabn ranges, has just completed and opened here the Spina lH>tel that c</st, Including furniture. $50,000. 
being equipped with all modern hotel improVj;menta, telephones, electric fans, private baths and other up-to-date 
convenience3. 



GRAN GIVEN 
AJVORCE 

Charges of Cruelty Brought 

By Mrs. Gran Are 

Insufficient. 






Overhaul Your Auto Now 




Judge Expresses Deep Sym- 
pathy for Both Parties 
to Case. 



Right 



now is the time you are thinking about overhauling 
and repairing your automobile for another season's duty ; 
vou will need tools, parts and repairs. As we have the largest 
and most complete line of Auto Accessories in the city, we 
ask you to come to us when you want supplies. 



AVc Soil 

MONOGRAM 
OILS 

and Grea.-*>*. Once 

you try Alonoffrum 
you will never jjse 
any other. Buy Mon- 
ogram next time you 
want good oil. 



GoODi^AR 

>« «*^ AKROVOIIIO 

TIRES 

known by every auto own- 
er a.s the beat and cheap- 
est tire on the martcet. 
They are 10% over size 
and are Xo-Rini Cut. 

See OUT window display. 



Holding that the charges of cruelty 

couiiterclalmed by Mrs. tJlga <!ran itr 

the sensational divorce suit 

against her Jay her husband, Victor 
I GrAn, a local attorney, were InaufTl-.' 
I clent to 'warrant a decree being grant* 
^d 19 rlier favor. Judge Cant In dis<- 

trlct court late yesterday afternoon 
I ajinounccd that he would grant th» 

divorce to Gran on the grounds ot 

adultery. 
[ Gran asked for an absolute divorce j 
! and the custody of their children, two : 

boys, Robert 5. and Russell, 2, alleg- ' 
! inj? that on .Ian. 31 last his wife ha<| I 



from the beginning can feel nothing 
but dcr-p sympathy for each of them— 
the one who iss tlie wrongdoer, if such 
there has been, and the on** who has 
been T^jonKcd. . .-. 

"1 sincerely ho|;»'1liiat in the furthe»- 
; progress of tl»H matter and in the fu- 
i ture g'^ings and comings of tliose two 
I people such sL*vp(i may be taken as 
will result in a not too severe treat- 
ment of eiUier-thie one or the other. 
' And yet neither, can hope wholly to 
j escape from tlie necessary conse- 
quonce:^ from their own acts. That Is 
a law which operates upon us all, and 
wliich tend."*, in ionie meature, to keep 
us In the rl^ht way. 

"As far as I can read from the evi- 
dence and hotwijen the lines It is prob- 
ably true ll»at Mr. Gran has faiiod to 
be at home as fuUy with his wife and 
childi"en as he should have been. Had 
his bringing up been somewhat differ- 
ent, and his experience other than it 
has been, he would have managed in 
some way to speitd a greater amount 
of his time at home with his wife an<l 
children. But he <?»nie up through hard 
work and rather stern experience and 
I have no doubt that as he entered 
the practice of th>e law he thought it 
necessary that lie work sometime^! both 
night and day, vand part of the time at 
least while he was away from honie 
during tho evenings he was working 
hiniie-Klr i ^^ ♦^^'^ office, and part of the time, no 
" ""^^: do'ibt, he was attending lodges where 
iR' he 



reduced to thirteen. In the la.st week 
about a dozen paiient.s liave been sent 
to Xopeming, tiie county pavilion or 
the state institution at Walker. 



WILL CONFER THE 
THIRTIETH DEGREE 



he had social intercourse, and "where, I 
suppose; he hoped to increase his ac- 
quafntanc'e and vtliereby increase his 
business and errble him the bettor to 
i^tfpport his wife end family. He is 
subject to some criticism of the gen- 
eral t<ature which I have expressed in 
reference to the matter." 

In touefilng upon Mrs. Gfan's coun- 
terclaim, tihe' <-o«rt stated:' "It seems 
to me th*t t<ie mattera upon which 
Mrs. Gran relies were incidents which 
were not.5fikc|r<^thoi» pleasing, but yet 
oiut of whl'irji, by rea-€U>n of the necessi- 



Work of Scottish Rite Ma- 
sons Ends With Maundy 
Thursday Banquet. 

The conferring of the fourteenth de- 
gree on thirty-fouj candidates last 
night at the Masonic temple was bril- 
liantly performed by Venerable Mas- 
ter E. K. Ooe and his assistants, and 
the attendance of Scottish Rite Masons 
was a heavy one. 

This morning the fifteenth degree 
was conferred and this afternoon the 
eighteeiitli — Knight Ro&e Croix — was 
conferred. This evening the thirtieth 

: degree will be conferred by C. W. Stil- 
son, commander of the council of Ka- 
dosh. Tomorrow luoining the consis- 
tory will confer the thirty-lir^st degree 
and in tlie afternoon at 2 o'clock the 
thirty-second degree will be given. 

Fifty-seven are taking the Rose 
Croix and consistory degrees. 

The spring reunion will end with 
the Maundy Thursda.v banc^uet tomor- 
row night, followed by the solemn 
ceremony of the extinguishing of the 

! lights. The relighting of the lights 

j will take place Sunday afternoon at 3 

' o'clock at the temple. 



ties of the 



has attempted to 



Auto Jacks 

.AHto HreHehes 
Anlo Clocks 
Auto Trunks 
Auto floras 
Spark Plugs 
Body Polish 

Speedometers 

' Vttlcan- 
Izers 

Weed 
Cliains 



Chamois Skins, Sponges 

Cements and other 

Auto Needs 



^^^/? 



lARDWARECa i 

IU&120 WCST SUPERiOft ST. OULU'Di.MiN^ 

Distributers of 

EXCELSIOR and 
HARLEY DAVIDSON 

MOTOR CYCLES 



ca|^J/»he 
mike more oJr C«h«in than she was' 
Justified in dolV»r^ =*• 

HARD TfGtT 
HEINO JURY 



But Three Jurors Are Se- 
cured for Criminal 
Action. 



ADDITIONAL 
SPORTS 



committed adultery with John R. 
Helno, also an attorney and his for- 
mer business associate, in the latter's : justified in dolV» 
office, 308 Sellwood building. Mrfc ! •- — ^-C 

Gran denied the charge and counter^ < 
claimed adultery and cruel and inr 
human treatment. The adultery 
charges on both sides were submitted , 
to a jury, the verdict sub.«tantiating 
Cran's charge against his wife and ex» 
onerating him from the accusatioi| 
made by her. 

Evidence was taken before Judg« 
Cant without a jury on the other ques- 
tionti Involved. After the examinaT 
tion of the last witness had been conJ^ 
eluded .Judge Cant stated that he wa»' 
ready to decide the ease. 

jMd|$e'A DeclMlon. 

Judge Cant held that the charges of 
cruel and inhuman treatment and of 
connivance which had been preferred 
i)y her were not sufficient and directed 
A. E. McManus, attorney for dran, to 
draw findings In favor of the plaintiff. 
It is understood that Attorney B. M. 
Goldberg will ask the court for a new 
trial for Mrs. tlran. Owing to the. widespread notoriety 

In announcing his decision. Judge | ^f the Gran divorce case considerable 
Cant stated that he would take under | <,.#«„, ,i*,. .„ .heinc exnerlenced todav in 
advisement for the present the matter | airnciiuj is pei/|g expeiiencea today in 
o the custody of the children and the the selection of > jury to try John R. 
question of alimony. During the ] Hiino, the co-respondent in the di- 
course of remarks at the conclusion of ^ vorce case, • oii the criminal charge 
the case. Judge Cant said: . • . . •' * •■ Tr • • *i.. 

••There has been quite a serious which he is faoi^g. He was jointly 

trxgedy enacted in this <'.ran home, ' indicted with Mess Olga Gran, wife of 
and these two poor people are In a sad , victor H. ^ran, his former business 
position. Regardless of who is at fault ' associate, oii a charge of adultery. 

b2?n'^S°cl^srtouc*h'wlt''h ihe'^sftuatton i ««'"«. wl=o has been out on bonds I xew YoT?^ Today o^ The'^rymprc' 
been in close loucn wim me 8n.uanon gj^^.^ ,^jg arrest, appeared in court this - - - 

William 




GETS ANO THER PITCHER. 

Grand Forks Manager Adds to His 
Artillery Staff. 

Grand Forks, N. D., April 8. — (Spe- 
cial to The Herald.) — Playing Manager 
Eddie Wheeler of the Grand Forks 
Northern league team added another 
to his staff of pitchers yesterday, in 
C. Misacker of Chicago. 

Wheeler, who is now at Davenport, 
had ten players in camp up to last 
night. They include Luttral, Peters, 
Albright, PeacOck, Porter, Kerin, Col- 
lins, Peterson, Jones, Nifnecker and 
Gilniore. 



OXFORD TEAM SAILS. 




Dark Closets Made Bright 
As Daylight With 



Safe Electric Lights 



Just twitch a switch and the darkest, gloom- 
iest closet or pantry is instantly flooded with tlie 
brilliance of clean, safe, steady Electric Ligiit. So 
easy to find anythincf you want — just like daylight. 
No annoyance or danger of fire as with matches. 

This is but one of the hundreds of conveniences 
available in every electrically lighted home. You 
can enjoy all these advantages in your home. Why 
not decide today to do so? Electric Light now costs 
less than ever to use — it is really the cheapest 
illuminant, everything considered. 

Let our representative call and explain it to you. 



morning with his attorneys, 
P. Crawford jof S\iperior and Waiter F. 
Dacey of this city, and demanded a 
separate tri^l. Judge Dancer granted 
the motion, which will mean that Mrs. 
Gran will b^e tried later. Warren E. 
Greene, county .^.ttorney, appeared to 
direct the prf)secution. 

Although all the corning was given 
over to the examination of jurors, only 
three were accepted to serve on the 
panel. They were Arthur E. Stock, 
D. S. McKay and Oscar A. Anderson. 
It is expected that the remainder ol 
tb^ day will be devoted to the drawing 
of the otHer nine jurors. It is expect- 
ed that the evidence on the part of the 
state will be similar to that adduced 
at the divorce trial where the same 
question was subtnitted to a jury, 

MTENDEDTO 

END IT AU. 



Relay Racers Coming for Intercol- 
legiate Ev«fit of April 25. 

Southampton, Eng., April 8. — The 
relay team from Oxford university, 
whose members are to participate in 
the intercollegiate four-mile relay race 
Philadelphia on April 26, left for 
V York today on the Olympic. The 
vessel i.s due in New York April 15. 

The team is composed of Arnold T. S. 
Jackson, president of the Oxford Uni- 
versity Athletic club, who won the 
mile race at the Olympic games; D. N. 
Gaussen. G. M. Sproule, an Australian 
and Norman S. Taber, a Rhodes scholar 
from Providence, R I, who is already 
in .iVmerica. 



ABANDONS RUGBY 
STYLE Of fOOTBALL 



But Despondent Youth Is 
Oieered By City Visit- 
ing Nurse. 



Los Angeles. Cal., April 8. — Rugby 
football, after a three years' test at 
the University of Southern California, 
has been found grievou.sly wanting, ac- 
( ording to a statement made today by 
Warren F. Bovard. Jr., athletic man- 
ager at the university, following a de- 
cision of the faculty athletic commit- 
tee yesterday to return to the Ameri- 
can 'game. ^ ^ , i. 

The main reason for dropping rugby 
is that tm^ university wants to form 
a collegiate athletic conference with 
two other Southern California insti- 
tutions that have remained loyal to 
the American game. 

Bovard made the prediction that 
while rugby is liked by the players, 
it will have disappeared from Ameri- 
can colleges within five years. 



MAY USE MILITIA. 



Duluth-Edison Electric Co 



216 West First Street. 



D. H., 4-8-14. 




"When a fello¥(*s got consumption 
T guess the best nicdicine he can take 
is a dose of leadj*' was the cheerful 
remark which was made yesterday aft- 
ernoon to Misa Louide E. Schneller, ... . . /»-„-_„«- io riAforniinoH it% 

visiting nurse of the health depart! Virginia Govemor Is Uctermined to 

ment, by a young man who had come «. Tnark Aamhlinn 

to the city hall for informaUon as StOp I rECK UamDIing. 

to the proper treatment for tuber- Norfolk, Va.. April 8.— State militia- 

^Ve 'declared that he was certain that "-.en were held in readiness today by 

he had contracted the disease and was (Jovernor Stuart to suppress the race 

in the bluest Mn^of a blue funk. Of meet at .Tamestown, If Attorney Gen- 

his own volitlfm-*ie went on to tell ^j.f^\ pollard should call for their aid. 
his story. it^-^tlH^ J^>8 parents had j Fifteen men charged with being 

died of tubCTcuioi't.'! hi the old coun- bookmakers arrested vesterday In a 
try and that when he came here he | spectacular mid 



met a "fast bunch." He made no ef- 
fort to save :<ny money and was down 
to his last $10 bill. As be proceeded 
he broke down and sobbed. 

Remorse had him in its grip and 
when he was again ai»le to control 
his voice he gave expression to his 
despondency ^y stating that he con- 
templated BiaKde. Miss Schneller ex- 
plained to 9"^4Jp^'^ ^1* the disease 
had not prorfftseftjl 
stages no reason ^ „ 
should not i^ov^r If he took care of 
himself. Wi^yj' he left ho was look- 
ing tbti^'BrViIglawoo of a brighter hue 
rmd said thVt hc.<^ould return at 4 
o'clock today, "for further instruc- 
tions." -v-i • . 

The list wfJ thfwe waiting to gain 
admittance to^U»^ Jajjitarium hum been 



much V>ast the first 
son*, existed why tie 



..^ „ on the track, were 

released on bail, for trial late today. 



^ SEATON GIVES UP. 

Goes to the Brooklyn Federals After 
Long Dispute. 

Chicago, April 8. — Pitcher Tom Sea- 
ton will 
and, 



Parid, iS'eio York, Wanhingtou, 

wi 

'^^ Correct I)re$» for Women 



Cincinnati, Dvluth 





•nd Girl* 



Late Spring Fashions 

Are now being introduced in this 
establishment. Unusual models of 
charming individuality from the great Paris 
Style-geniuses which, together with our 
widely diversified assemblage of Spring 
Styles, makes selection delightful, and one 
of genuine satisfaction to every woman. 

Tailleur and Demi-Tailleur Suits 

Clever ideas, rcprcjdiictions fiDm the late models 
sent over from Paris — Taffeta and Moire Suits, in 
black and colors — ''new" Gabardine cloths. Crepe, 
Faille and Barathea, in all the new styles and color- 
ings — featuring the W'atteau styles, bustle-back, 
Cascade flounce, etc. Priced at $25, $35, $39.50» 
$45 up. 

Gowns and Dresses for Formal 
and Informal Wear 

Charming creations in all the *'new" styles, iiia- 
terials and colorings — Taffetas in plain and change- 
able colorings — handsome Moires in black and col- 
ors — exquisite combinations of taffeta and lace and 
many other unusual ideas in Crepe de Chine, Chif- 
fon, Serge and Taffeta, etc. Priced at $19.50 up. 

Stunning Coats for Street 
and Dress 

' Featuring the new "Bell-flare," "Coolie" and new 
Cape Coats for street and motor wear. New Dress 
Coats of changeable Taffeta with neck ruches of 
lace and silk, others with bands of the old-fashioned 
puckered plaitings. Priced at $16, $19.50, $25 up. 

Late Spring Millinery 

Plateau Pokes of Tagal and Hemp straws, trim- 
med in the new Grecian Bows or French Roses. 
Other models in the various new poke effects, trim- 
med in French flowered lace, witli long ties of com- 
bination satin and moire ribbon, tiny chine flowers 
in pastel shades and suede gardenias with petals of 
blue and white, pink and white with gold centers.* 

Suit Hats in highly polished strav\^s, trimmed in 
cire ribbons, glace quills, glycerined ostrich, etc. 
Priced at $7.50, $10, $15. 

Blouses and Waists 

New features including the Bishop, Peasant and 
Surplice styles in tropical-colored French crepe, 
colored linens, etc., with new paysanne collars of 
organdie, linen and pique. Priced at $3, $3.75, $5 
and up. 

Juniors* and Girls' Wear 

Large and varied selections in Dresses for party 
and general wear — charming creations in plain tai- 
lored and embroidered linens — Rep and pique 
dresses in light and dark shades — crepe and lace 
dresses, striped and check ginghams and many nov- 
elty fabrics. Priced at $1.25 to $35. 

Coats 

In all the wanted colors, styles and materials — • 
novelty fabrics and'serges, with Roman striped silk 
trimmings, sashes and combination materials.^ 
Priced at $7.50, $10, $15 and up. 

Madame Irene and Gossard Front Laced Corsets 
— Tango Corsets — Hip-reducing Corsets — Elastic 
Corsets — Treco and many others. Gossard Front 
Laced, $2 to $18; Madame Irene, $5 to $25. 

Complete assortments of Brassieres, Corset Cov- 
ers and accessories. 



to the satisfaction of all conrerned. 
Seaton being tontented with tho ar- 
rangements, thouRh he had been 
fctrong: In favor of remaining: with the 
Chicago team and his "pal," Ad Bren- 
can. 

TWOCANADiAir 
BANK ROBBERS KiUED 



be with the Brooklyn club, 
with Walter Ward and Manager 
UradU'v. i» now on his way to join 
the Ward team, aooordingr to President 
Cllmore of the Federal leagrue. 

Gllmore made his announcement to- 
dav after h long distance telephone 
talk with Ward at tlulfport. AccqivI. 
Ing to him the dispute has beeji »i''itied 



New Har,leton, B. C, April 8. — Two 
bandits were killed here yesterday In 
a flght between a band of robbers and 
a large posse of citizens, after the 
robbery of the Union Bank of Canada 
branch. Six men held up the bank 
and four got away with $1,100 cash. 
A posse started in pursuit. 

The bank, a substantial building of 
log constrtiction, standing apart from 
other buildings, had been opened only 
a " 
robbers appeared 

The bandits were not more than a 
half minute in the bank. As^ they 
backed out the clerks began to reacn 
for their pistols and the robbers ttred 
several shots. 

The shooting alarmed the town, an** 
several cowboys who happened '„ i,' 
in a hardware store, opeaii^Mi-.. ' t-J-^ 
of the robbers fell dea-* „« \hev rJo^ 
«'-;f, ^^^S^^^-^^^-Tard 'th^blsh. '*'^ 

• Ji fh^^ ^s^""* supposed ^o have 
been XM* ones who In 



JUDGE NEEDS TIME 
TO 'HSATOH Ur 

Will Leave Bench to De- 
cide Many Old 
Cases. 

In order lo dispose of matters which 
have piled up on his desk for weeks 
and months while he has been actively 
engaged at the trial of cases. District 
Judge Cant will take a recess from 
his duties on the bench for the present. 

It is underistood that the other 

Judges of the court have agreed to so 

ler ouiiQings. naa ueen openea only | arrange matters that Judge Cant wm 

few minutes for business when the j not be called upon to sit in en *\,^ 

trial of any new cases until *»'. 'i,., ii«2 
an opportunity to deci-^;. the ma\te« 
now pending bcfj'-- x^.'^^, niaiiers 

been"a"!I^^^ '' important cases have 
P%" * -mitted to him for a decision. 
> * jaljly the most important piece of 
litigation which he has been called 
upon to decide Is the street railwav 
franchise suit. 



Ear<ha«ftke In Ftali. 

Ogden, Mali. April 8. — A slight 

the last year I earthquake, the duration of which was 

e robbed banks at New Hazelton, ; about two seconds, was felt here at 

B. C, Oranite Falls, Wash., Abbott.«»- ; 9:f>8 this mornlnir. No. damage is re- 

rd, B. C, and Elma, Wash. 1 ported. 



r- 



•-% 






DEFECTIVE PAGE { 



— ^^ 



iiiilllMWHHiiiJIiltfHIMMiHIIMHi 









! 




m 








• 


•".•■ 


1 









•'^ 



r 





Wednesday, 



f^ 





THE 



iL 



TRUTH 

MAN 



oi the Big Closing Out 
Shoe Sale which is now 
in full swing ^ 

Not a Pair Reserved p 



ir 



PLANS ARE 



APPROVED 



Scheme of the Efficiency 

Commission Move in 

Right Dirs^atlDn. 



'^ 






Tht Moith Countryi Lar^ert Shot Stow 

W^LSHOB C9 

216 West Superior Street 



Valuable Suggestions Of- 
fered By the Heads of 
Departments. 



Suggestions for Attractive, 
Inexpensive Easter Gixts 

Cloisonne Enamel Sterling Silver Jewelry— in all colors. 
Collar Pins, Shirtwaist Sets, Corsage Bouquet Pms, VeU 
Pins, Etc.— 75c, $1.25, $1.50 and $2.00. 

NOTE OUR WINDOW DISPLAY. 

Bagley ^ Company 

Jexctlera and Silvtrtmitha 
315 WEST SUPERIOR STREET. 

IJstabliahed 18S5. 



LICENSE CARRIES 

IN BORDER Gin 



cancy, Peter Juntunen; member 
beard of review, Julius Johnson; con- 
stables, Walter Nevala, Victor Talo, 
' Alfred Abramson, Peter Vanderhagen. 



International Falls Remains 

Wet By 300 

Majority. 

International Falls. Minn., April 8. — 
(Sp«>cial to The Herald.)— Yesterday's 
election was the most exciting In the 
of the town. License carried by a ma- 
jority of 300 out of a total vote of 772. 
I^ W. Wilson was elected alderman-at- 
large. The ward aldermen elected are 
R. F. C. litis, F. H. Keyes and H. J. 

Miner. 

« 

Ironwood T«»i^NMliip Election. 

Ironwood, Mich.. April 8.— 'Special 
to The Herald.)— Two tickets were in 
the field in Ironwood township elec- 
tion, Citizens' and Farmers' ticket. The 
farmers ticket was for the most part 
succssful, the following being suc- 
cessful , . _ ,,. 

Farmers — Supervisor. John Junell, 
township clerk, Charles Anderson; 
township treasurer. Peter Sillanpaaj 
highway commissioner on the Citizens 
ticket. .John Kangas; overseer of hlgh- 
wavs, Frank Berglund; Justice of the 
peaVe Kdgar Johnson, tied with Emil 
Walqulst. each receiving eighty-eight 
votes; Justice of the peace 



Superior 



MANY AHEND 

STORE OPENING 



Crowds Admire New Light- 
body-Wingate Establish- 
ment and Big Stocl<. 

Throngs of people attended the 
grand opening of the Llghtbody-Wln- 
gate department store. Fourteenth 
street and Tower avenue, this morning. 
The opening of this store marked a 

epoch In the retail dry goods i ojen. 



new 



to fill va- 



business In Superior, this city now hav- 
ing one of the most up-to-date estab- 
lishments at the Head of the Lakes. 

From the time the store opened at 
10 o'clock this morning hundreds of 
people, shoppers and others, viewed in 
wonder the beauties of the store as 



well as the goods offered to the pub- 
lic. 

One of the most Impressive features 
pf the store is the splendid, almost 
dazzling view afforded the patron on 
first entering. Glistening glass show- 
cases and adjustable shelves, rein- 
forced by scintillating mirrors, display 
their rows and rows of attractive 
goods. The mezzanine ttoor In the 
rear, with its rest rooms, lounging 
veranda, offices and special shops, is 
unrivaled by anything in the North- 

The store Is so well day-lighted that 
It might appropriately be called "The 
Daylight Store." Every nook and 
corner is Illuminated by daylight. At 
night the lighting system is equally 
effective. The first Hoor Is brilliantly 
lighted by fifty 600-kllowatt electric 
lamps, which almost rival the sun- 
light. Each showcase has a lighting 
system of its own, similar to stage 
footlights, and the display goods are U 
clear view. 

The mezzanine floor, with Its com- 
fortable lounging chairs and the splen- 
did view It gives of the entire store 
and all patrons, is expected to prove 
very popular with the patrons. Other 
modern conveniences that the store 

provides for patrons are restrooms, 

— ! marinello shops, free telephone booths 
Qf I and so forth. The half-tloor Is covered 
with a luxurious green carpet. 

The fixtures of the store are of 
golden oak. The floors are of maple. 
Twenty-four Immense pillars adorn 
the Interior, and enhance the stately 
appearance of the Immense first floor. 
In addition to having the most mod- 
ern natural and artificial lighting sys- 
tems, the new store has one of the best 
ventllatlrtg systems of any store In the 
f ity. The Garner system Is used. By 
means of an electric fan, with Its 
scores of exhaust ducts for the expul- 
sion of Impure air and as many Intake 
ducts, the air In the store is kept 
constantly pure and fresh. The steam- 
heating system is used. 

The new store has given careful at- 
tention to Its humanitarian equipment 
In the treatment of Its employes. The 
store has a restroom In the basement 
for Its girl employes. Steel lockers 
are provided for each of the more than 
100 employes. 

One convenience that will be much 
appreciated by the women shoppers is 
the Innovation of a playground de- 
partment in the basement for the chil- 
dren. The women may safely leave 
their children downstairs, while tht^ 
j make their purchases. The playground 
I will be equipped with an Indoor to- 
I boggan slide, a sand pile and other 
I contrivances that will furnish amuse- 
i ment and entertainment for the chll- 
Thl.i arangement Is one of the 
most progressive and helpful conven- 



St. Puul, Minn., April 8. — (Special to 
The Herald.) — Just on paper, the plans 
of the efficiency commission for con- 
solidating the state government into 
convenient departments look all right. 
But the real question is, will they 
work? 

Most of the officials in the state 
house believe they will. There is plen- 
ty of criticism. The members of the 
board of control believe three men 
using their Judgment In consultation 
are better than a single executive for 
that department. The railroad and 
warehouse commissioners question the 
advisability of tr^^e/erring weights 
and measures to an executive depart- 
ment. George H. Hazzard believes 
state parks are so very important and 
so much neglected that they should be 
set apart from other departments by 
themselves. 

But take It by and large, the men on 
the Job, If they do not wholly approve 
the plans, declare them a step In the 
right direction — something like the 
"80 per cent good" Judgment of Jacob 
Schiff on the currency law. 

More Approval Than Expected. 
There is in fact more approval than 
one would expect to flji<J among men 
whose duties are affected. Men don't 
like to have things moved around. In 
our family the majority Is grouchy 
every time mother moves the table 
where the whatnot used to be, and 
when she shifts the bedstead and the 
bureau father complains for weeks that 
he can't sleep. It is the same in all 
business. "We have changes to pro- 
pose from time to time," says a high 
railroad official in St. Paul, "and in- 
variably the heads of departments tell 
us it can't be done, It won't work — 
and then we go ahead and do it. And 
It works." 

Having made a plan that looks right 
on paper, the commission Is consulting 
M-ith the .department heads and any 
subordinates who have suggestions. 
"The sole aim," says C. P. Craig In a 
letter to the heads of departments, "Is 
to place every man in that relation to 
his own department and to every other 
which shall make for the maximum of 
efficiency and economy." 

Getting Vainable SuggeKtions. 
On that basis the commission Is get- 
ting valuable suggestions. One group 
has been reshaped entirely from the 
first outline. It was found that the 
health department articulated more 
closely with the Institutions than with 
such matters as fire prevention and oil 
Inspection. So It is not proposed, ap- 
parently with the same assent of all 
the departments concerned, to consoli- 
date the present health department 
with public welfare and to lump a 
group of Inspection duties in the de- 
partment of commerce, each retaining 
its proper head but all brought under 
one roof. 

There may be other changes. The 
commission maintains an open mind at 
least until every one Ipts been heard. 
It Is not expected. ho-*?ver, there will 
be any amendments torn the present 
outline, as to Its principal features. 

The Chinese puzaJe hs not nearly as 
puzzling as it was wli^n one hundred^ 
and forty activities lay befjDre the com- 
mission all In, a heap* ^ « 



Railroads 




SPRING OVERCOATS 




We offer a special 
great value in gray 
and blackf full silk 
lined, light weight 
Overcoats at only 

$16.50 

This is a real $20.00 value. 

ASTER HAT: 

For every head— Stetsons and 
Gordons, 

FLOAN & LEVEROOS 

225 and 227 WEST SUPERIOR STREET 



iences that up-to-date stores have in- 
troduced. 



Farm Board Meets. 

The Wisconsin state board of agri- 
culture Is holding a meeting In Supe- 
rior today for the first time in the 
history of the city. Many matters of 
interest to the city and Douglas county 
are being discussed Including the en- 
couragement of Northern Wisconsin 
to patronize the Wisconsin state fair. 
At noon the members of the board 
were guests of the Commercial club. 



Firemen Save Auto. 

Gasoline leaking from an automo- 
bile standing at the corner of Belknap 
and Baxter street, yesterday afternoon 
was Ignited by friction and exploded, 
enveloping the car in flames. The 
entire city fire department was called 
scene and rescued the machine 
It was badly damaged. 



to the 
before 



See the Flower Show 

at the Duluth Floral company. 
»— 

Devils Lake Hotel Rebi»ery. 

Devils Lake, N. D.. April 8. — While 
the night clerk was absent from the 
office for a few minutes, a passerby 
stepped Into Hotel Western early Tues- 
day and took away the cash register. 
He carried It to the shelter of a 
building nearby and broke it open, ap- 
propriating $26 which It contained. 
The register stood on the front of the 
office desk and the room Is exposed 
to the view of the street by a big glass 
front. 



BURY O LD EN GINEER. 

Many Railroad Men Gather About 
Bier of Robert H. Carr. 

Bralnerd, Minn., April 8. — (Special to 
The Herald.) — The funeral of Robert 
H. Carr, the Northern Pacific engineer 
was held here attended by many rail- 
way men and especially engineers from 
St. Paul. Minneapolis, Duluth, Staples. 
Bralnerd and other pohnts and was the 
largest gathering of railway men ever 
seen here. Carr died at Los Angeles, 
Cal., from Injuries received In an au- 
tomobile accident, and the remains 
were escorted from California to Braln- 
erd by a brother engineer, William 
Smith, of St. Paul, a great friend of 
Carr and who was with him In his last 
moments. The pallbearers were Charles 
Zlmlln. Harry Baxter, George Ames, 
Fred Desch, William Smltji and A. I. 
Green. The honorary pallbearers were 
H. W. Wales, Joe Yost. Michael Dur- 
kln, Sam Gorman. George Conley and 
Doc Laughlin. Mr. Carr was the sec- 
ond oldest Mason of Aurora lodge. No. 
100. A. F. & A. M. Yhe body lay In 
state In Masonic hall until the hour of 
the funeral, the services being under 
Masonic auspices and the sermon 
preached by Rev. G. P. Sheridan. 

ORGANJZESHIP LINE. 

G. N. and N. P. Make Ready for 
Canal Traffic. 

The Great Northern and Northern P.i- 
clflc railroads have prepared for the 
new traffic sltuatiortithat will be cre- 
ated through the opening of the Pana- 
ma canal next year. In the organization 
of the Great Northern Steamship com- 
pany. Its stock will be divided equal- 
ly between the two companies. 

It Is estimated that these boats will 
steam from Astoria to San Francisco 
in twentv-four hours, and three hours 
will be allowed for the train journey 
between Astoria and Portland, thus 
enabling the company to compete with 
the Southern Pacific for lower Cali- 
fornia business. 



Girl SaveH Family. 

Kenmare, N. D., April 8. — (Special to 
The Herald.) — James Brow and hl.s 
family, residing near here, were saved 
from asphyxiation by his daughter 
awakening and giving the alarm. 



Bays Blooded Hogs. 

Mlnot, N. D., April 8. — (Special to 
The Herald.) — Fifty-eight pure blood 
Poland China, Duroc Jersey and York- 
!«hlre .sows, aged from 10 to 12 months, 
have been purchased by W. A. Peck, 
agent of the Ward County Better 
Farming association, and they will be 
distributed to the boys who will par- 
ticipate In the annual pork production 
contest. 



THREE NEW TRAILS 

INT O CAR RINGTON. 

Carrington, N. D., April 8.— (Special 
to The Herald.) — There will be three 
new auto trails through Carrington 



Farmer Uored By Boar.' 

Menominee, Mich, April 8. — John 
Tesselaar, a farm employe, was gored 
by a 450-pound boar here Monday. He 
Is In a critical condition. 



i/ 



So ^reat has bt come the dcnand for I 
whals meat In Japan that there Is dan- i 
gcr of a .scarcity of whales In that part' 
of the Pacific, and the Japanese gov- i 
ernment has limited the numbtir of I 
tvb&lins vessuls. 



STANDISH 




Arrow 



COLLARlforlSi 

Clu«ttPeaboay&*Ca.InC Makers 



ilberstein&Oondy^ 



.--* 
> 



Company 



EstaNished 

I870 



Big Easter Values in the S. & B. Annex 

Hundreds of Beautiful 
Filmy Crepe and Voile 




Waists 

at 98c 



on sale tomorrow ; 
values $1.50 and 
$1.75 ; some worth as 
much as $2.00. 



All these exquisite waists are 1914 styles. You will feel as if you would want to buy a ^ozen of 
them at this very low price when you see them. Some of them have the new high neck ruffled <^*|^^^.s 
in both the crepes and voiles, with pearl buttons. Some are flowered crepes, known as the Dolly Madi- 
son styles, and very popular; others plain crepe waists in colors, and one could go on telling of dozens 
of other pretty styles. COME TOMORROW AND MAKE YOUR CHOICE. 




One Hundred Beautiful 

New^ Easter Suits 

In tke A.nnex at Low Prices. 



At $12.75 



You will find most beautiful fine French Serge Suits that you 
■would have to pay at least $5.00 or $8.00 more for elsewhere. The 
skirts of these suits are in the new tunic effects and the coats 
trimmed in the latest fashion. They come in sizes 16 to 44— navy 
and black only. 

Smart Wool Crepe Suits specially priced at $22.50. The skirts 
are in the plaited tunic styles. Coats are silk lined and very 
jaunty; navy and black only. 

Beautiful Wool Crepe Suits at $18.50, with drop shoulder 
effects; short coats, tunic skirt and comes in Copenhagen blue, 
navy and black; all sizes. 

Our Annex Suits at $25.09 are the talk of Duluth. They com- 
pare with any shown elsewhere at $35.00. They are copies after 
French models and in every way a very classy suit. Come in 
Faille Poplin, two-tier skirt effects; coats arc button trimmed iu 
back; Copenhagen, navy and black. 



A Wonderful Sliow^in^ of Ne^v Spring Coats and 
Silt and ^Vool Dresses at Special Prices 



Sale of Spring Skirts, $4.95 

Some in French Wool Crepe, French Serges, 
Shepherd Checks, in the staple colors, navy and 
black. Many are in the new peg top styles. 

Large assortment of Wool and Silk Dresses in 
all the latest styles, beginning at $8.75 up to $18.50. 



Heavy 
Messaline 



Silk Petticoats $1.98 



You could pay $3.50 or $4.00 for a Petticoat, but 
you could not find any that equal these for wear, 
and the new colors are beautiful — tango, Kelley 
green, cerise, Copenhagen . blue, navy, graj', 
black, etc. 




this summer. The black and 'w;l»Ite 
trail will be from Falrmount to Por- 
tal via the Soo main line across the 
state. The green and white will be 
through here from Jamestown to 
Leedsfand a red and white line wiU 
be along the Turtle Lakebranch from 
here, diverging to Bismarck from the 
western end. The signs and posts for 
all three trails will be placed In posi- 
tion soon. 



Special at 
The Orpheum This Week 

Send your wearing apparel to us to 
be Dry Cleaned for Easter Sunday, 
ornheiim Cleaners and Glove Special- 



Ma;-gherlta ordered that the Duchess 
Di Lltta be Informed Immediately, and 
she, after the queen, was the first per- 
son to reach the side of the dead mon- 
arch. 



Clande SeymoHr, son of Charles 
Bailey Seymour, once editor of the 
New York Tribune, died in Chicago, 
April 7. Mr. Seymour was a wealthy 
merchant. 

ROSENfiiALliXYERS 
MUST DIE NEXT WEEK 



Orpheum Cleaners - 

istfft corner Second avenue^ east and 
Superior street. 
Melrose 1168. 



Phones, Grand 976; 



GOLERAINE MAN 

FILES FOR SENATE 

W. J. stock Will Oppose Pat 
McGarry in Fifty- . 
Second. 

St. Paul. Minn.. April 8.— (Special to 
The Herald.) — William J. Stock of 
Coleralne, "Itasca county, today filed 
with the secretary of state for state 
senator from the Fifty-second district, 
comprising Itasca and Cass counties. 

Representative P. H. McGarry of 
Walker has already filed for the posi- 
tion. Dan Gunn of Grand Rapids has 
represented the district for the last 
eight years, but will not be a candi- 
date for re-election. 

— ■ ■-♦-- ■ • 

I OBITUARYJ 



Governor Glynn Refuses to 

Interfere in Gunmen's 

Behalf. 

Albany. X. T., April 8. — Governor 
Glynn refused- either to commute the 
death sentence of four gunmen who 
were convicted of slaying Herman 
Rosenthal, or to grant them a reprieve 
until after the second trial of Former 
Police Lieut. Charles Becker. They 
now must die by electrocution in Sing 
Sing prison some time next week, 
probably Monday. 

"It would have been a miscarriage of 
Justice to have granted commutation, 
and an improper exercise of executive 
power to have granted a reprieve," 



the governor said in a statment. "The 
case of the four gunmen does not 
depend In the least on the result of the 
P.ecker case, and no evidence has been 
offered tending to show that there 1* 
any reasonable probability of anvthlng 
developing In the second Becker trial 
which would change the result reached 
in the gunmen's cases." 

The full names and nicknames of th* 
condemned men are: 

Frank Ciroflcl (Dago Frank). Harry 
Horowitz (Gyp the Blood), Louis 
Rosenberg (Lefty Louie), and Jacob 
Seldenshner (Whltey Lewis). 

Included In the governor's statement 
were the texts of letters he received 
from Supreme* Court Justice Goflf and 
District Attorney Whitman, who acted 
In the case." Both men strongly op- 
posed the granting of a reprieve. 

TWINS ARE BORN TO 
MR. A ND MR S. GERRY. 

New York, April 8. — Twin boys were 
born today to Mr. and Mrs. Robert Liv- 
ingston Gerry. Mrs. Gerry was Cor- 
nelia Harrlman, daughter of the late 
E. H. Harrlman. They have two other 
children. 



French Women Cannot Vote. 

Paris, April 8. — French women have 
not the right to vote, according to a 
decision by the court of cassation. The 
women's rights league of France had 
tried to have its members register 8» 
voters for the coming elections and 
applied to the court, which ruled 
against thera. 



The Big Shoe Store. 



On Snperlor Street. 



Dr .Io»eph Bryant, formerly presi 
dent of the American Medical associa- 
tion died in St. Vincent's hospital. New 
York, April 7 of diabetes. He had been 
In the Institution since March 11. Dr. 
Bryant was one of the most eminent 
surgeons In the country. 

Dueheiiii Eugenia DI 1-Hta. who 

played a prominent role at the court 
of the late King Humbert of Italy, 
died In Milan, Italy, April 7. at the age 
of 77. The Duchess Dl Lltta was an 
ardent patriot, and during the strug- 
erle for Italian Independence led the 
women of Lombardy aristocracy In re- 
fusing to attend court balls partici- 
pated in by Austrian officers. 

Before ascending the throne. King 
Humbert was so lavish in his atten- 
tions toward the duchess that Queen 
Mar^herlta, In 1875, returned her nup- 
tial ring to her father-in-law. King 
Victor Emmanuel II, declaring that 
.she would not wear It while the 
duchess was received at court. With 
time however, this resentment wore 
awav and when King Humbert was 
assaJislaated at Monza in 1900, Queen 



A Stunning Easter-Style 

is the 

Colonial 



Pump 



n 



Milady's Favorite— it 
shows the latest idea 
in patent leather dress 
pumps so popular 
this spring. It is a 
beautiful model. 




. A $3.50 Value. 

• 

Made of flno patent kid. suede, 
dull kid and sixtin. with plain nar- 
row toe, .Spanish h«M»l and ioatlier 
buckle, as shown. Tliis Piuup is 
desl|fi»e<l exprejssly for the Soreu- 
sen stoi*es. 



L 



123 wi:sT 

SVPKKIOR 
STKEKT. 



ORENSEN 

SHOE STORES 

lAINT P^U W-M I N N EAPOLI S -DU UTTM 




Expi'rt 

Fitting in 

Every Dept. 





Wednesday, 



THE DULtJTH HERALD 



April 8, 1914. 



WEST DULVTH 



HERALD BRANCH OFriCBSi 

Jmmb. SM yn% 6Ttfc Ave. W. J. J. M«p«». SfH Wortfc Ceatral Ave. 

Herald's West Duluth reporter maj 
hour of golnff to press at Calumet 



ly be reached after 
17S-M and Cola 247. 



FREE BATHS 
FOR PUBLIC 



Women's Organizations Are 
Forming Plans to Pre- 
sent to Council. 



Bayou at Mouth of Kings- 
bury Creek Favored 
'Small Cost. 



Free public baths for men, women 
and children will be located in West 
Duluth. If the plans being formed by ; 
some of the women's organizations of 
this end of the city are adopted by the , 
city. It is proposed to ask the city , 
to set aside a part of the water f ront j 
recentlv condemned for an addition to ■ 
Fairmuiit park for a public bathing 

Trie 3ii<> i* said to be one of the best I 
that could be secured for this purpose • 
at the Head of the Lakes. It Is claimed | 
that at a small cost the bayou Into 
whi^h Kingsbury creek empties, which' 



runs througli Fairmont park and thence 
Into the bay, could be ttxed up for this 
purpose. 

It Is proposed to have the public 
bathing place divided Into two parts, 
one for girls and women and another 
for men and boys. A pavilion similar 
to those of the Harriet Island baths 
at St. Paul Is favored, to be In care of 
city employes. Small charges to cover 
the cost of soap and towels would be 
made. ^ . 

The place Is said to be the most 
adaptable for this purpose on account 
of Its location. It Is shielded from the 
winds of the north as well as from 
those oft the lake, and the water will. 
It is said, maintain a greater degree of 
warmth there than in any other place 
on account of Its distance from the 
main current of the river. The current 
In the bavou Is said to be sufficient 
from the How of the creek to carry 
off the sluggish waters. The bed of 
the inlet is said to be solid and smooth, 
with sand formation. 

It Is proposed to have a small amount 
of dredging done to remove weeds and 
other substances from the Inlet. 

The women's organizations Intend to 
petition the city commission to have 
the work done under the supervision 
of the park department. They propose 
to have the city ofticlals take some 
action In the matter this^'ear In order 
that the public baths may be a reality 
this coming summer. If possible. 

showe rTor ^bride, 

Florence Lundquist Is Recipient of 
Mdny Presents. 

Miss Florence LundQuist, whose wed- 
ding to Ernest Kuchenbecker will take 
place on April 15. was guest of honor 



last evening at a bundle shower given 
at the home of Mrs. Carl Kuchenbecker. 
m North Sixty-third avenue west. Miss 
lAindQui.<<t was the recipient of a num- 
ber of handsome presents. The guests 
wore: Mrs. George Dahl. Mrs. John 
Mattson, Mrs. Oliver Henry. Mrs. James 
t'onnolly. Mrs. R Huncordeck. Mrs. H. 
Kedi. Mrs. C. Castle. MI'S. Matt Olson. 
Mrs. Carl Dahlberg. Mrs. J. Sundstrom, 
.Mrs. Malberg. Mrs. Slmonson. Mrs. F. 
Mattson. Mrs. A. Peterson. Mrs. R. 
Klug and Mrs. J. Hormau. 

Yesterday afternoon Mrs. Henry Fedl 
entertained In honor of Miss I.undqul«t 
at an apron shower. Sixteen guests 
were present. This evening a shower 
has been planned In her honor at the 
home of Miss Kthel Nelson, of Nine- 
teenth avenue west and Pledmon* 
street. 



morning, "ffll fllftfral will be held to- 
morrow afternoon from the family 
residence, tnternient will be at Oneota 
cemetery. 



fnteiji^i 



Filled ftff^'Slnging. 



>f 



BALL FANS ORGANIZE. 

New Duluth Will Place Team in City 
League. 

Baseball fans of New Duluth met 
last night and organized a team and 
raised a sum of $100 to fit out proper- 
ly. It Is proposed by the suburbanites 
to place a team In the city league this 
summer that will give any of the ama- 
teur aggregations a hard race for the 
city championship. 

V. C. Powers was eleeted president 
of the baseball club. The other offi- 
cers are: Frank Wacha. manager; 
Fred Dystrom, secretary; Dr. George 
B. Gilbert, Carl Wanamaker and F. W. 
Damkroger, directors. 

The team will be organized within a 
few days and practice will begin as 
soon as the weather becomes warmer. 



Clarence Jones and a companion were 
singing loudly on Raleigh street at a 
late hour last night when Interrupted 
bv PatrolmaA Ji/^rry. Jones, who Is 
said to ha.\Whmn under the Influence 
of liquor, ivusU to comply with the 
patrolman's^i^rs to stop the noise 
and he was tak^ to the police station. 
In police caurtSUils morning he was 
found guilty of disorderly conduct and 
fined f 10 and costs. Sentence was sus- 
pended on promise of good behavior for 
six months. 



<s> 



Are You Cottecting 

SECURITY 
VOUCHERS? 

They are Free with 
every 10c purchase 



'THE CENTER OF ECONOMY FOR THRUTT PEOPLE." 



e^tdteUlLh 



W«^t 



De Chambeau Funeral. 

The funeral services for Mrs. Eliza- 
beth de Chambeau. wife of George de 
Chambeau. 131 South Fifty-third ave- 
nue west, who died yesterday will be 
held tomorrow morning at 9 o'clock 
from the St. James Catholic church. 
Burial will be made In Calvary ceme- 
tery. 

_ ^ 

Child Passes Away. 

Janet, the 1-vear-old daughter of Mr. 
and Mrs. Roy T. Bralnerd, 615 North 
Fifty-ninth avenue west, died this 



U;ih Briefs. 

Mesaba hive. No. 7. L. O. T. M. of 
Proctor, win m»ke arrangements at 
Its meeting this evening to entertain 
the county convention of the Macca- 
b^i's. The convention will be held on 
April 14. ^ ^ c 

Members of Euclid chapter, O. E. S., 
entertained at a "600" card party last 
evening at the West Duluth Masonic 
hall. Honors were won by Mrs. Van 
Brunt, Mrs. George Plnther and Julius 
Aman. The hostesses were Mrs. C. G. 
Futter, Mrs. H. W. Lanners, Mrs. 
(Jeorge Murray and Mrs. Charles Com- 
fort. 

Herman Nyhous returned last eve- 
ning from a short visit at Carlton. 

Mrs. Lucien Merritt, *6\1 Oneots 
street, entertained this afternoon for 
the Ladies' Aid society of the Merrltt 
Memorial M. E. churcb. 

Mrs. P. F. Lee. »IS North Fifty- 
seventh avenue west, was pleasantly 
surprised last evening by her friends 
in honor of her birthday. Cards and 
music featured the entertainment. 
There were twenty-faur guests. 

Miss Minnie Fedi, 503 North Fifty- 
eighth avenue west, Is reported ill at 
St. Luke's hospital. Miss Fedl is a 
teacher at the Ely school. 

Ernest Johnson and Nels Norman 
today completed the purchase of the 
West Duluth Cement Block works 
from H. C. Brown. Mr. Brown estab- 
lished the cement block works several 
vears ago and has built up a large 
business In this end of the city. The 
Industry will be operated with a full 
crew of men this spring and summer. 

Watch repairing. Hurst. W^est Duluth. 



Sj pecial Thursday gmt feature 

FIFTY SUITS for tomorrow's selling. Made of fine wool materials, such as 
Walrus Crepes, fine Gabardines. Pebble Crepe, fine Whipcords, Serge an^ fancy 
materials, in several shades of blues, also black, reseda, olive, tango, ' 

brown, tan and helio; very smart models, with two tier skirts; 
richly lined— most stores would price same $35.00— our price 

Also Smartly Tailored Suits and Semi-dressy Suits, with tier skirts, made in 
checks, also plain Men's Wear Serges, Poplins and Crepe weaves. Special values 
at $15.00, $17.50 and $19.50. _^ 



thing 




mm Yoy 
GO-PHER 



YOUR 



SHOE 
REPAIRING 



THE FOUR GU NMEN 

Are Proof of Guilt and Sing Sing's Chair Sufficient?— 
Do Their Lives Show What Mak^%J|urderers7 

By WINTHROP D. LANE, 
Of the Staff of the Survey. 



A Complete Showing of 

Ladies% Misses^ and 
Junior Spring Coats 

for your inspection. The colors range through 
limitless color card, while many staple black 
and navy blue are in evidence. The prices, 
$12.50, $15.00, $19.50 and upwards to $59.50. 

Special Values at $19.50 
Tomorrow 

We will offer a wide selection at this price 
tomorrow, representing the latest models and 
newest materials. 



A Sale of Waists at 75c 

New this season, waists made of white voile 
and crepe ; a large assortment of styles, slight- 
ly mussed from handling; values ^ff#^ 
$1.25 and $1.50, Thursday at / OC 

At $2.50 an overflowing table of the Hand- 
somest Waists of this season; soft voile and 
Lingerie ; turn-over collars, Medici collars, 
high collars; short and long sleeves; all ex- 
quisite embroideries used — ^O f^£\ 
a special at ^^ml m%y\J 

New Crepe de Chine and Shadow Waists — 
very latest models. Every pastel colorings — 
navy, black and white, at $3.95, $5.00, $7.50 and 
$8.50. 



MRCEST, KCA)SE lEST 







SHOE SHOPS 




(Exclusive 



S«r\'cjr PreM« 



JXLiUcK - JJU&n&m t 



F;>LC1^USIV^: feHOI^ 



105 and 107 West Superior Street 

Make this shop your down town stop. 

Winsome Easter Blouses 

Exquisite new models that are 
the last word in daintiness and pic- 
turesque charm — a special display 
for Easter. 

Models of Georgette Crepe, Chif- 
fon Crepe. Crepe de Chine, Organ- 
dies, Crepe A^oiles, Fine Batiste, 
Chiffon, Taffeta, Dainty Laces and 
fine net, etc. 

Fine Georgette Crepes, Lace and Net 
Blouses priced at $10.00, $12.50, $15.00 
and up to $39.50. 

Crcpc de Chine and Chiffon Blouses 
priced at $3.95, $5.00, $5.75 and up to $15. 

Fine Voile and Batiste Blouses priced at 
95c, $1.60, $1.95 and up to $10.00. 




Service The 
Bureau.) 

How are "gunmen" made? 
"Gyp the Blood," "Lefty Louie," 
"Whiley Lewis' 'and "Dago Frank" 
will die in Sing Sing during the week 
i of April 13 unless the governor of 
i New York Intervenes. When their 
bodies are lifted from the chair so- 
ciety will rest content in the belief 
that It has done its utmost to mak# 
their cases crime deterrents. 

All society seems to ask is, did they 
kill Rosenthal. the gambler and 
"squealer" who was shot in July, 
1912? And will they pay the penalty? 
Doubtless this Is society's first respou- 
sibility. 

But shall we stop there? Is It not 
important to learn as much as possible 
of their early lives and associations to 
discover how we may prevent more 
"gunmen" from being made? Where 
did these four boys come from? Who 
are their parents? How was their 
childhood spent? Did they become mur- 
derers In a dayT 

•*L.efty I.onle.** 
Lefty Louie was born in the heart 
of New York's congested lower East 
Side. The family Is one of respect-' 
able, orthodox Jews. The father, fi- 
nancially well off. is trustee of 9- 
synagogue. No suspicion of crime haa 
ever been lodged against any othdt 
members of the family. 

After an illness at the age of 6. the 

' doctor said that Louis must have ajM 

; the fresh air he could get. At that 

i time the family was poor and the only 

fresh air for Louie was In the street. 

The stern household discipline was 

then broken down. The myriad sights 

and sounds he had wondered about, 

he could now Investigate first hand. 

New friends were waiting to teaeh 

him the amusements of the door step 

and the side walk. 

In a couple of years he became, says 
his father, a "street fiend." The first 
misdeed his family knew about 
pened when he was 11 or 12. "With 
another boy he tried to take some 
money out of a little bank In which 
his brother kept his savings. 

All this time he was going to both 
the public and Hebrew echopl^ and 
receiving the usual religious InstruR 



arrested, one for picking a pocket, 
"UuRO Fraak," 

Dago Frank *^s confirmed 
^iscT) ' 



Protestant Epi 



tion of his race. At 12 or 13 he had soclates 



in a 
;T>pal church at the age 
Of 16. His family attended the church 
regularly and it has been said that 
Frank sang in the choir. He began 
work at 15 years of age and for four 
years was an errand boy at $3 a week 
for a news bureau. His employers 
never complained of his conduct. 

goon after he left this job he was 
convicted of carrying concealed wea- 
pons. This is the only charge except 
that of murdering Rosenthal ever made 
against him. Frank says the weapons 
we>< handed bim by an ex-convloX and 
that^h^ was daught with thejao fifteen 
minutes later. He was sent to Elmira 
reformat^!^ and after fouirf^en months 
was paroled, earning h|^ absolute re- 
lease in seven montjisj^^ 

He worked a y^a^ W( steamfitter's 
helper for a construction company and 
no complaint wair^f*hadll9 against his 
character or liM<rrtry. ^^^ 

By what stewf i*(^c«tne to be ft meTri^ 
ber of the notorious : Jack Zelig gang, 
it Is difficult to learn. The attorney 
who defended him ahd the other gun- 
men says that he Is "the pity and 
conundrum of the four." This attor- 
ney thinks that, IX was the evil as- 
sociations Frank, formed while in the 
reformatorj' that caused his undoingjf. 
Frank was one Of the f^w non-Jews 
to belong to Zelig's gang. A Jew had 
once given his mother and sister em- 
ployment and helped them with their 
rent. Frank has ever since had a 
kindly feeling for Jews. When Zelig 
was killed, a letter from Frank was 
found on his body reciting these facts, 
saying "Although Tm a wop, I know 
you'll stick by me." 

''Gyv the Blood." 

Gyp the Blood wa.s a childhood com- 
panion of Lefty Louie and the story 
of his entrance into law-breaking Is 
much the same as that of Leftj-^s. His 
father Is in the tailoring business and 
well-to-do. From the ages of 8 to 13 
hap- Gyp, who Is a Jew, received instruc- 
tion in the 'Talmud and the other usual 
religious teaching of his race. 

With Lefty be frequented poolrooms. 
For a white h^ Was an errand boy 
for a dry goods store and It may be 
that his trips to all parts of the city 
brought him into contact with evil as- 



Crepe de Chine PetticoatS 

A large yariety of New Crepe de Chine Pet- 
ticoats just receiyed. Pastel colorings, lace 
trimming, also Klosfit in the clinging models. 
The prices — 

$5, $6.50, $7.50 to $12.50 

Also black and white in extra sizes. 



Separate Skirts 

The nobby styles of the dress and street skirts 
bring them once more in fayor. Xew Moire, 
Taffeta, Poplin, Silks,' while a widely diyer>i- 
fied line of Plain Check and Plaid Skirts greet 
you at the popular prices — 

$5y $6.95 to $15 

Silk Skirts. $7.50, $12.50, $15.00 to $21.50. 



Smart Trimmed Hats "' ^^'^"^ 



* 



Tomorrow 

About 200 Ladies' and blisses' Trimmed Hats, rep- 
resenting some of the smartest models of the season, 
trimmed with special care as to style and fashions, 
Avith fancy Feathers, Quills, Flowers, A>lvet and Rib- 
bons, and consisting of Hemps, Azure Braid and Ma- 
line Braids; all the new and staple colors, inckiding 
black — on sale tomorrow at the special price of 



$ 



3,50 





Your Garments 





Can be cleaned and pressed by "Our Process** 
they will be as fresh as when new. 



so 






Have Your Last Spring 
Suit Cleaned for Easter 

ONLY FOUR D.\YS LEFT. 





become a frequenter of pool rooms, 
where he probably learned how to pick 
I pockets. He was sent away to a pri- 
, vate school for a year and after that 
worked both in the shipping depart- 
I ment of a' department store and In his 
! father's office. 

i But his passionate longing for the 
I street, continued. His first arrest was 
! in 1907, when Louis was 16. "The 
j charge was "disorderly conduct" and 
I he was sent to the house of refuge. 
I Soon after he came out he was arrested 
I for picking a pockex And sent to the 
I house of correction for nine months. 
, These were his only arrests up to the 

murder of Rosenthal. 
1 "Whiter LewlM." 

I Whitey Lewis came to this country 
j with his family from Poland in 1900, 
when he was 12 years old. In Poland, 
the family says, he never got into 
trouble. His parents are Jews and are 
i poor. The excitement of street life 
, in New York city was too much for 
I Whitey, with his rural upbringing, 
: and during his first year here he made 
I the acquaintance of professional crim- 
inals in Chinatown. He worked for a 
while In a book binding shop and then 
started to learn tin smithing with an 
uncle in Jersey City. 

His first arrest came when he was 
16. He pleaded guilty to grand lar- 
ceny In the second degree and was 
sent to Elmira reformatory. He was 
paroled and earned his At)solute release 
In seven months. Two other convictions 
for similar offenses followed and then 
Whitey entered the army and went 
to the Philippines. 

There he got Into «» struggle with a 
fellow who taunted him for being a 
Jew and Whitey, who had a knife in 
his hand, cut h\n persecutor. He wa.s 
given hard labor for three months and 
dishonorably discharged. He returned 
to this country and fell in with his old 
associates. Like Lefty Louie and Gyp 
the Blood, he declared on the witness 
stand that he had met Jack Zelig. the 
notorious gang leader, about a year 
before the murder. 

Two of Whltey's brothers have been 




PEERLESS LAUNDRY 

French Dry Cleaning Department 




"We have several thousand dollars 
worth of well-sectired first mort- 
gages bearing from 6 to 10 per cent 
interest for sale. 

Money on hand at all times to loan. 
CALI* AND SEE US. 

Sterling Lean Jk Investment Co. 

5506 Ramsey Street. 



At 17 he was arrested for the first 
time, the charge being petit larceny. 
He was disci^arged. The next year for 
a similar offense he was sentenced to 
nine months in the city reformatory. 
He perved a second term in the yefor- 
rnatory and tnen a year In the state s 
penitentiary. Two of Gyp's brothers 
have been arrested also. 

Such are the histories of four young 
men now looked upon as desperate and 
hardened criminals. Yet beyond their 
connection with one crime, the world 
has shown no concern in the stages 
by which their criminal careers de- 
veloped. None of the parents of the 
gunmen has ever been chargred with 
crime. The early years of each of .the 
four seem to have been normal and 
straightforward. Gradually they made 
the acquaintance of older boys and 
men who had mastered the trick of 
turning an easy dollar. Their own 
entrances Into crime were gradual and 
began. In every case but that of Dago 
Frank, with attempts to get spending 
money easily. None of them was given 
the benefit of prt*atioTi or a suspended 
sentence. 

Do not these facts suggest the Im- 
portance not only of punishing crim- 
inals but also of finding out why they 
are criminals? Shall we be content I 
merely with providing electric chairs | 
and other methods of dicposlng of the j 
finished criminal, or shall we attack 
the processes by *v'hlch criminals are 
made? '''■ 

IS PROTECTING 

DULUTH PROPERTY 



would Investigate the situation before 
making any recommendations. He 
was rather surprised to learn that 
there are so many houses in Duluth's 
limits adjacent to Proctor. 

WOMEJmiJRIEKS 
HALT COURT WORK 



Suffragette Throws Grip- 
sack at Judge When 
Arraigned. 

Belfast. Ireland, April 8.— Militant 
suffragettes created so much confusion 
and noise in the police court here to- 
day when Dorothy Evans and Madge 
Muir. officials of the Belfast branch 
of the Women's Social and Political 
union, were brought up for trial, that 
the proceedings had to be adjourned. 

The two women were charged with 



having in their possession explosives 
for the purpose of committing a felony. 

The court was crowded with women 
when the prisoners were brought in, 
and acting apparently on a signal, they 
raised such a din that neither the mag- 
istrate nor the prosecuting attorney 
could make himself heard. 

The suffragettes kept up the uproar 
for a long time. Forty of them were 
ejected from the court, but the noise 
still continued and the magistrate fin- 
ally decided to suspend the sitting. 

As they were led out, the two pris- 
oners shrieked that they would not 
permit the holding of a court. 

After pas:?ing a ghort period in the 
cells. Miss Muir and MiSs Evans again 
were brought into court. Both tried to 
dash through the door Into the street 
and In the struggle with the officials 
Miss Evans fainted. 

W^hen placed in the prisoner's enclos- 
ure. Miss Muir hurled a grip sack at 
the magistrate's head. The latter re- 
manded both to custody. 

>• 

Faces New Charge. 

James Sorenson, who has been held a 
prisoner by the local authorities on a 
charge of bastardy, was yesterday 



turned over to a deputy sheriff from L» 
Moure county. X. D., where he will b« 
brought to trial on a charge of seduc» 
tion. 

In district court yesterday, on th« 
motion of Mason M. Forbes, first as- 
sistant county attorney. Judge Dancer 
dismissed the charge of bastardy which 
had been preferred against him in this 
county. The young woman involved In 
the case live.s at Edgerly, N. D. She 
recently came to Duluth and caused 
Sorenson's arrest here. 



See the Flower Show 

at the Duluth Floral company. 

« 

ART APPRECIATED. 

Young's Magazine: At a recent por- 
trait show in New York, Robert Ed«- 
son told a story about the nude In 
art. 

. "An old farmer and his wife." said 
Mr. Edeson, "once visited an exhibition 
where the nude predominated. They 
seemed a good deal impressed, almost 
stupefied, by all the white and gleam- 
ing pictures. As they left I heard 
the old man say. with a sigh: 

"'Well. Hannah. I never expected to 
see as much as this for a quarter.' " 



Both Phones 428. 






PETER KINNUNEN 




118 



TAILOR 

South Fifty-eighth 



Ave. West. 



Men's and Ladles' Tailoring, also 
Repairing. Satisfaction guaranteed. 



Proctor Wants an Allow- 
ance From City for Fire 
Department. 

The village of Proctor wishes the 
city of Duluth, t« contribute towards 
the maintenance of its fire department 

and its police force. 

R. G. Wombaft'her, recorder, has 
written to Cbmmfssioner W. A. Hlcken, | 
head of the fefcfety division, explain- \ 
ing that a re^urft'ls due for the pro- i 
tectlon afforded property in the city • 
limits. He feays that about seventy- 
five houses near Proctor are in Duluth | 
torrltory, lying tretween the village 
and Bay Vle^ Heights. 

The recorder states that the village 
has a volunteer 'Are department and 
that each man Is paid $'J for each blaze 
which he helps fight. He wishes to 
know if the city will make these pay- 
ments where flr«ff;-occur in the Duluth 
limits. He adds that the village is 
contemplating, the., purchase of new 
eauipment att# thaift it is felt that the 
citv should pay part of the cost. The 
sfiiiie Rltuati<^u applies to police pro- 

*ConiniissloneT itlcken said that h« 




Your Easter Hat 

Choose it from the most diversified stock in Dulutli, every new style, popular colors 

Stetson Hats . ■ $3.50 to $6 
Dryer Hats $2.00 to $3.00 
Lanpher Hats . $1.50 to $3 



Home of the Hart Schaffner & Marx Clothes 

KENNEY-ANKER CO. 

409 and 41 1 West Superior St. 



-•/ 



* 



DEFECTIVE PAGE 



» 



BBS 





f^ 



• — 



Wednesday, 



THE DULUTH^HERALD 



April 8, 1914. 




6la$$ Block Store 



Shopping Center oj Duhith ' 



Stirring 
Exposition 

and Sale 

For Thursday, Friday 
and Saturday Selling 



High Class 

Easter 



Millinery 

This Announcement Will Surely 

Deeply Interest Every Woman 

in the City of Duluth 

The vast importance of our 
millinery exposition as a cor- 
rect portrayal of the season's 
fashions cannot be ques- 
tioned for it is one of sur- 
passing elegance and beauty, 
reflecting the latest whims 
of fashion both at home 
and abroad. 

The Styles Are Exceedingly Smart and 
Carry With them an Air of Chic Elegance 
That Cannot Be Expressed in Mere Words 

The shapes are more dashing 
than ever, high pointed ef- 
fects and marked upward 
flares at side or back and 
many quaint and picturesque 
shapes are much in evidence 
throughout the ensemble. 

And the General Effect Is One That Will 
Bring Forth the Charm of the Wearer's Face 

Every Purse and Every Taste 
Can Be Splendidly Satisfied Here 

Stunning Easter Hats 

$3, $5, $7, $8, $10.^1 $50 




Positively the Greatest Values in Duluth 

A Visit Here Will Be Convincing. 



ZU 6la$$ Block Store 






The snapping 
Center oj^ Qy-hith 



tU aim Block Store 




The Shopping 
Center of Duluth 



ClK 6la$$ Block Store 



TheEaster Sirit PrevaOs in Every Dept. 



tr.' . ■ I 

There Are Three More Days in Which 

to Prepare for Easter 

Thousands will surely be here for their Easter outfit, 
complete or in part, and we are splendidly equipped to 
meet every requirement. Especially do we anticipate 
extra activity in all departments of apparel for women 

and children. To assure <ifficiency, we 
have extra salespeople for this period. 




Smart Dresses 



Special t 
This * 
Week at 



14 



.95 



Fashioned of Crepe de Chine, 
Canton Crepe, Changeable Taf- 
feta and Floral Crepe, in the 
newest tunic, bustle and drape 
effects; all made on smart 
lines, suitable for street and 
afternoon wear. 



If you saw the beautiful garments the open- 
ing days, you may remember many of the 
smart creations shown. Furthermore, we have 
received many new suits, coats and dresses 
since, all lull of new fashion features. 

Just opened up some fine Moire Suits' in 
black, green, brown. Wisteria; all sizes; 
prices, $29.75 up to $57.50. 

Smart Cloth Suits From 
$19.75 to $57.50 

We have both the tailored and semi-tailored, as 
well as dress models from which to choose. They | 
are beautiful creations of Silk Moire, Faille Silk, 
Fancy Crepe, Serge Gabardines, Silk and Wool 
Poplins. 

* The coats are in Blouse, Eton and Cutaway 

* ' effect. The skirls show the tier, pannier and 

bouffant effects. The colors are navy. Hague, 

reseda, wisteria, taupe, blue, tan and black 

i ; »nd wliit« checks. 

Easter Frocks from $10.75 to $46.75 

We announce t-he arrival of many new and lovely creations, among 
them are charming Taffeta. Crepe de Chine, Silk Poplin, Moire, Fancy 
Crepe de Chine, in a wide diversity of unusual styles. 

lucludins lonsr Tunics. Bustle effects. Draperies; all made on very 
hmarl lines— eorrect styles for afternoon, evening and street wear 



Editorial 

Beautiful Florence Martin 

Will Be Seen at the 
Lyceum, April 9, 10, 
11 and 12. 

in the new comedv sensation, 
"PEG O' MY HEART," by 

j. Hartley Manners, which is 
now in its second year at the 
Cort theater, New Y o r k, 
where it is breaking all records 
for sustained popularity with 
Laurette Taylor in the title 
role. The entire action of the 
play is supposed to take 
place in the living room of a 
villa in Scarboro, England, and 
has as its central figure a wild, 
mischievous, whole - s o u 1 e d 
girl who has been reared amid 
poverty in New York, but, 
nevertheless has preserved the 
flower like fragrance of the wild- 
ivood. Loyalty to a lowly father 
and to her father's country, 
Ireland, is the watchword of 
her nature, and she docs not 
hesitate to express her senti- 
ments when suddenly trans- 
planted from the grip of penury to an aristocratic old home in 
England. Oliver Morosco has surrounded Miss Martin with a 
brilliant cast and the production is a tine one. 




Smart Coats 



3ILK AND 
CLOTH 



$7.98 to $39.50 



We have an immense variety of Top Coats, from the most inexpensive 
up to the finest imported models. Made on short, jaunty lines, as well 
as in the three-quarter lengths. Some tailored to the very highest de- 
gree, Mhile others are, .semi-tailored and are adapted for afternoon, eve- 
ning and street wear. 

The materials are Fi-eneh Serge. Wool Crepe. Plaids. Faney 
Worsteds. Silk Coats are of Taffeta Moire and Fancy Silks. 



The New Peg Styles 
May Be Seen Here 

in Millinery, Suits, Coats, Dresses and Blouses, Neckwear and 
New Peg Bags, Shoes and Gloves, "Peg o' My Heart Book and 
"Peg o* My Heart" song. 



Your Easter Shoes Are Here 




5 



We Are Pleased to Announce 
a Demonstration of 



I Vanta Baby Garments 



In the Infants' Department {Second Floor) 

Thursday, Friday and Saturday 

April 9, 10 and 11 



I 



USUAL CUT IN 
COALjRICES 

Duluth Gets Summer Rates; 
No Reduction in East- 
ern Cities. 



clause of the Hepburn art, control 87 , 
j per cent of the anthracite coal dug 

out of the earth. ' 

T2) That the prepared sizes, such 
I a.s are used almost exclusively by 
i small consumers, are sold at the enor- 
1 mous profit of upward of 300 per cent. 
i (3) That suppression of the combi- 
! nation, managed by forty men, will re- i 
' store competition and remove the evils , 
, that now exist. 



Despite the fact that the drop in 
coal prices which usually occurs April 
1. did not take place in th« East this 
spring, substantial cuts in all kinds of 
coal except bituminous were made In 
Duluth. Householders who make a 
practice of buying a season's supply 
of fuel after the spring cut may do 
so as usual in Duluth. 

Both the wholesale and retail prices 
have been cut. Egg, stove and nut coa 
dropped 60 cents a ton and pea coal 
25 cents. Bituminous prices are just 

"it^U^sald^that considerable agitation 
baV been aroused In the East by the 
fact that coal prices were not re- 
duced as expected on ^^^l^ \- :}\% 
maintaining of the old Prices Is sad 
to be due partly to the PennsyUanla 
tax of 10 cents a ton on the product of 
the mines and to labor troubles. 

High cost of fuel, however, is a ^ ery 
different story. If any stock Is taken 
In the report made to the New Jersey 
assembly this week by an investigat- 
ing committee. 

The investigators assert: 

(1) That eleven big railroad com- 
paiues, avoldioff the commodities 



LESS THAN HALF 
DESERVED TO PASS 

- ^ 

Ink Reduces Marks of 

Pupils Graded in Rural 

Schools. 

Although teachers In the rural 

schools In reading papers in the recent 

high school board examinations gave 

1,259 pupils a rating of 65 per cent or 

i more, less than half were deserving of 

i this mark according to L.. A. Ink. prin- 

I cipal of the unorganized schools. 

Mr. Ink after rereading the examlna* 
' tlon papers found the number who 
i passed to be 572. The papers were 
! forwarded yesterday to the state high 
! school examiner at St. Paul who will 



Hood's Pills 

Cure Constipation 
Biliousness 
Liver Ills 



As far back as we can remember, never have we seen such 
an attractive arrav of new spring fashions. An assortment made 
more attractive by the fact that every single pair is made with 
the wearer's comfort in view, and will give the best Of wear that 
reliable leathers and painstaking workmanship can bestow. 
Choose your Easter Footwear from among these : . 

Geo. W. Baker's High Grade Shoes For 
Women at $5.00 to $7,00 

New 15-button Shoes in patent leather, mat kid, black Russian 
calf, satin black buckskin; welt or turn sole; plain or tip 
toe; Kidney, Cuban and Common Sens6 heel. 
New Geo. W. Baker Pumps and Colonials in paten^ leather, 
satin, black Russia calf. These will not gap at *(? r|/\ 

sides or slip in heels. Prices $6.00 and %pu. V v 

These shoes arc carried in triple A to D widths, sizes 1^4 to 8. 
New Pumps and Colonials of patent leather, mat kid ^Jk /\Q 
and Black Russia calf ; price, pair. ^^•VMM 

J. & K. Women's Shoes of patent leather, gun mct^l, ^Jk /\/\ 
with mat kid or cloth tops ; Cuban heels, pair 4r».\/vr 

Please Note that we will give a pair of 50c Slipper Trees with 
every pair of $4.00, $5.00 or $6.00 Pumps free Thursday, Friday 
and Saturday. ' 



t 

5 

ft when Mrs. Daugherty, a trained nurse, will illustrate in 
I models "Vanta" way of dressing babies without pins or 

B buttons and will give you a working pattern of the Vanta 
Baby Diaper. This is an educational demonstration which 
should interest every mother. 

A Cabinet Photograph of 
Your Baby Free 

During these three days every 
mother visiting our Baby Depart- 
ment will be presented with a cer- 
tificate entitling her to a cabinet 
photograph of the baby from the 
AIcKenzie studio. copyrighted i9U 





Women*8 $5.00 Satin Shoet at $2.95 

For tomorrow's selling in the Shoe Store we place on sale 92 
pairs Ladies' Black Satin Shoes at the low price of $2.95, with 
flexible welt sole, Cuban he&ls, plain medium toe. 

Our regular $5.00 Shoe, special for Thursday at 



We Do Expert Shoe Repairing— 
Prompt and Efficient Service 

OUR SHINING PARLORS 

are the most convenient and best equipped 
In the city. Obliging and competent at- 
tendants. ' 



Cbe Glass Block Store ^^ ^ 



''The Shopping Center of Duluth 





l6«ue credit sUps to those who have 
Dassed. The slips will entitle the pupil 
ho?dln«r them to admission vrlthout 
fui?h"f examination to the high and 
agricultural schoola of the state. 

ASSE^oiTwisirES 

TO HEAR PROTESTS 

Will Check Up Figures With 

Property Owners This 

Week. 

City Assessor J. Allyn Scott Is re- 
ceiving many calls from property own- 
ers who wish to learn how their hold- 
ings have been valued for the pur- 
poses of the 1914 assessment. 

A complete revaluation of the entire 
city has been made under the direction 
of the assessor, as was necessary to 
comply with thf provisions of the new 
flUt« IftW v&si>*sd by Lbe la£t Icgisla* 



ture. In many cases the figures have 
been materially changed, particularly 
on buildings, which run considerably 
higher than heretofore. This is be- 
cause the statute specifies that they 
shall be assessed on a basis of 40 per 
cent, while in the past they have been 
assessed for about one-third. 

Assessor Scott is willing to check up 
his figures with any property owners 
or agents who desire It. If errors 
have been made they can be rectified. 
As the tentative figures will be entered 
for permanent record next week the 
assessor wishes to make ajiy changes 
which s«>em Just before that time. For 
that reason he wishes that those who 
have been planning to cpme to his of- 
fice to go over their assessments would 
do so this week. If the. assessor feels 
that he cannot make any changes a 
full statement of the case will be pre- 
pared and presented to the city board 
of review. 

OFFERS TO GO TO 

JAIL FOR MOTHER. 

Boston. April 8.— When Mrs. Annie 
iC. Deltcb vas ««atuice4 in luuuiclpal 



court yesterday for shop-lifting, her 
son, a college student, asked to be 
permitted to go to jail in his mother's 
place, declaring that he was better 
able to undergo the hardship than she. 
The court Informed him that It was 
Impossible. Mrs. Deitch, who was sen- 
tenced to three months imprisonment, 
gave bail. 

HONOR SYSTEM FOR 
CONVI CTS S UCCEEDS. 

Lindale, Tex., April 8.— The honor 
system among Texas convicts has 
worked so well that Governor O. B. 
Colquitt yesterday came here to pay 
in person the wages of fifty, the 
pioneer band in the system, who work 
unguarded on roads in this section. 

There has been but one attempt at 
escape In the two months the experi- 
ment has been under way, and even 
then the two runaways were captured 
by the other convicts, who wrote to 
the governor apologizing for the broken 
promise of their fellows. 

The governor is considering extend- 
ing the system to other roads in th» 



state. The convicts receive 60 cents 
per day. 



LET PRODUCERS 

MARKET OWN OIL. 

Washington, April 8.— To relieve the 
situation In the oil producing terri- 
tory of California, which affects the 
Industry In that state and elsewhere, 
Secretarv Lane, after conferring with 
members of the house land committee. 
Is preparing a bill which would enable 
independent producers to market their 
oil. 

IS SUED FOR $1,494.69, 
BUT JURY GIVES HIM $50 

A verdict for $60 was returned by a 
jury In Judge Ensign's division of the 
district court yesterday afternoon In 
favor of Albert John Young, who was 
defendant In a suit brought by the 
Crow Wing Lumber company. The 
plaintiff company sued for $1,494.69 on 
two promissory notes and Youos filed 



a cross bill, counterolaiming $760 foi 
services performed. 

The jury was out but a short time. 
It denied the company's claim an-J 
awarded Young $60. 



FARGO TO HAVE 

CENTRAL MARKET. 

Fargo, N. D., April 8. — (Special 
The Herald. > — The voters of Fargo 
having authorized a central market 
system, the city comnilsslon will prob- 
ably lose little time in the establish- 
ing a place *of that nature. Having 
been urged for years by many resi- 
dents of the city the advocates are 
elated over their success. The mem- 
bers of the commission may be some- 
what divided In sentiment as to the 
location and the cost of the site and 
the building. Many sites are suggest- 
ed. The first experiments will prob- 
ablv be as nearly central as possible 
with as economic a structure as can 
be secured to properly handle th« 
business. 




( 




Wednesday, 



THE DU^LUTH HERALD 



April 8. 1914. 



•'Polly: say who 
Is as handsome as you? 
Mention your match 
If you're able." 
And Polly, so bright 
Sings out with delight: 
*'Look for the 

red-and-ithite labfl!'* 






And that's 

good advice. 

You can't buy 
Campbell's Soups except 
under the Campbell labeL 

And that is your guaran- 
tee of quality; the guarantee 
of your own complete satis- 
faction. You know you are 
getting the best that can be 
produced when you insist 



on 



CampbelFs Tomato Soup 

Order it by the dozen, or by the case if 
you want to. Have it handy. Then you 
won t find yourself suddenly out of it some 
day when you specially want it for dinner— 
and the grocer's closed for the day! You 
can t make a mistake this way. The guar- 
antee always stands; no matter whether you 
buy a can or a case. 

Your money hack if not satisfied, 

21 kinds 10c a can 



NEARLY 1 ,000 
SEEKJ>RIZES 

Commercial Club Garden 

Contests Are Attractive 

to Sciiools. 



^ Many Boys Will Raise Vege- 
tables and Girls 
Flowers. 



Nearly 1,000 children of the West 
end will participate in the garden con- 
test to be held under the auspices of 
the West End Commercial club accord- 
ing to reports being received from the 
various schools where the children are 
registering their entries. So far more 
than 700 names of children who wiU 
become amateur gardeners this year, 
have been received by the committees. 

At five of the West end schools a 
special committee of pupils has charge 
of taking these names. These schools 
are the Adams, Ensign, Lincoln, Mun- 
roe and Bryant. The largest registra- 
tion of names is reported from the 
Lincoln school where nearly 300 pupils 
Intend raising garden truck on the 
back lots of their homes. 

A complete report of the names en- 
tered will be given at the next meet- 
ing of the club. The committee in 
charge is already receiving subscrip- 
tions for the prize fund and has assur- 
ances of nearly the entire amount, as 
well as offers of a number of special 
prizes. 

At the schools several of the chil- 
dren have submitted plans of their 
proposed gardens this year. Some of 
these will raise vegetables exclusively 
while others will grow vegetables and 
flowers. Most of the girls entered in 
the contests Intend to try for the 
flower garden prizes. The contestants 
are being furnished with seeds through 
members of the committee. 



>^-' -^i^r R? "' 




W&^MM6vp;$ 



LOOK FOR THE RED-AND-WHITE LABEL 



PREFER ANOTHER 

SITE FOR DEPOT 



1^ 

AT 



\eXcdUL S^re 



^■> 



This Is Rexall Week 

atTredway*s 

Rexall Week is being celebrated by 7,000 Rexall stores throughout the United States, Canada and Great Britain. 
There is a Rexall Remedy for every ordinary ill. We sell them under a positive guarantee to refund your money if they 
faiLto give satisfaction. You are to be the judge. Come in and let us tell you about them. 





MMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMB 



■j Easter Clothes Now Ready! 



H 



Fitwell Clothes 
at Fitwell Prices 

- — SATISFY EVERYBODY ! 



Hi 







20*25 



See Fitwell Clothes and Be Convinced! 



QUAUn 




CLOTHES 



112 West Superior St., Dnluth 



■ 

m 
m 
m 
m 
m 
m 
m 
m 
m 
m 
m 

M 

m 
m 
m 
m 
m 
m 
m 
m 
m 
m 
m 
m 



Club Will Ask Soo to Build 

at Twenty-First 

Avenue. 

The West End Commercial club will 
attempt to Induce the Soo Line to 
build its proposed West end passenger 
and freight depot at Twenty-first ave 
nue Instead of Twenty-fourth avenue, j 
as announced by the road. A petition 
to that end will be circulated among , 
the business men and forwarded to the j 
company. ! 

The officials of the road announced 
some time ago that a depot would be 
erected In this end of the city. It was 
intimated that the depot would be lo- 
cated at Twenty-fourth avenue. 

Business men of the West end say 
that they have appreciated the an- 
nouncement, but would rather have 
tha depot closer to the center of busi- 
ness and also that by locating it at 
Twentv-flrst avenue, It would be closer 
to the" intersection of two street car 
lines. The matter is to be taken up at 
the next meeting of the club. 

"The depot, if located closer to the 
business section, would do us a great 
deal more good," caid John Moir. "The 
business center of the West end Is in 
the neighborhood of Twentieth ave- 
nue, and the closer we can get the 
depot to that point the better it would 
be for the community." 

• — 

Swedish M. E. Notes. 

The Young People's Society of the 
Swedish Methodist church. Twentieth 
avenue west and Third street, will be 
entertained at a social and literary 
meeting this evening at the home of 
Mi^s Minnie Johnron, 332 .North Twen- 
ty-first avenue west. 

The ladies' aid society will meet to- 
morrow afternoon at the home of Mrs. 
A. Lundholm, 2303 West Seventh street. 

Rev. C. W. R. Wermlne will conduct , 
midweek prayer meeting in the church , 
tomorrow evening. I 

The Swerlish Methodist congregation ■ 
win take part In union services on ; 
Good Friday at 10:30 a. m. to be held 
in the Swedish Mission church, Twen- ! 
ty-flrst avenue and Second street. 

Special Easter programs are being 
arranged for the various services to 
be held Sunday. The Sunday school 
will hold a union meeting with the 
congregation In the forenoon and In 
the evening the choir has planned a 
special musical program. 



Rexall Remedies 

S5« Arnica Salve 17e 

aSr Baby Laxative 17c 

•1.00 Beef, Iron and Wlne...69e 

60r Blood Tablets. 34e 

25c Bunion Ease 17e 

25c Carbolic Salre ITc 

SSc Catiiartie Pills 17c 

91.00 Celery and Iron Tonic. .69c 
60c Cherry Bark Congli Syrup .34c 
91 Cherry Bark Coagh Syrap.Oac 
91 KniulHlou Cod Liver Oil..<t8c 

25c Cold TabletM 17c 

2Sc Com Solvent 17c 

60e Kciiema Ointaient 34e 

S5e Ky-e WahH 17c 

26c Foot Tablets 17c 

2Sc Foot Powder 17c 

25e La Orippe Pills 17c 

25e Headache Tablets 17c 

2Sc Headache Powders 17c 

25c Headache t%'aCers 17c 

25c Hculius' Salve 17c 

91.00 Heart Remedy «0c 

SOc Kidney Pills 34c 

50c Kidney Remedy 34c 

91.00 Kidney Remedy ODc 

25c Larkspar Lotion 17c 

25c Little Liver PUIs 17e 

25c .Liver Salts 17c 

fOv 'Liver Salts 34c 

f 91.00 Liver Salts 6l#c 

'91.00 ObcNlty Treatment 69c 

SOc Rheumatic Rcme«1y 34c 

91.00 Kheumatic Remedy 09e 

25c Rubbing Oil 17c 

91.00 Sarxaparilla 69c 

60e Effv. Soda Phos 34c 

-25c Kidney and Liver Tea. . . .17c 
91.00 VeKctabic Compound. . .69c 

26c \%'orm Candy 17c 

25« Worm Syrup 17e 

25c Seidlits Ponders 17c 



Stationery 

50c Symphony Lawn 35c 

35c Initial Stationery 19c 

35c Initial Correspondence 

Cards 19c 

15c Package Knvelopes 9c 

25c lb. Pkg. Baltimore Linen. 19c 
25c Pkg. 60 Baltimore En- 
velops 19e 

10c Writing Tablets 2 for lie 

5e Lead Pencils 2 for 6c 

35e Foreign Correspondence 

Paper and Envelopes 19c- 

25e Bicycle Cards 17c 

25e Fifth Avenue 17c 

25c Bridge Whist 17c 

SOc Country Club 34e 



Rexall Toilet 
Articles 

25e Blemish Soap t7c 

25c Camphorated Cream 17c 

25c Rexall -Mce 17c 

25c Cream of Almonds 17c 

25c Toilet Cream 17c 

25c Tooth Paste 17c 

25c Tooth Poi» der 17c 

25c Violet Talcum Powder... 17c 

25c Tooth Wash 17c 

25c Shaving Stick 15e 

25c ShavlnK Powder ISo 

25e Sliavlng Cream 15c 

SOc Shaving liOtloii 34c 

SOc Tliymo-Uentaline 34c 




Violet Dulce Toilet Articles 

With each 25c purchase of Violet Dulce Toilet Articles we 
will give free your choice of a Silver Orange Spoon, Teaspoon 

«" or After Dinner Coffee Spoon. 
These are very fine spoons and are well worth 25c each at 
any store. 

Violet Dulce Taleam Powder 2.5c 

Violet Dolce Toilet Water 75c and $1.25 

Violet Duke Extract, oz 5()c 

Violet Dulce Complexion Powder SOc » 

Violet Dulce Liiquid Complexion Powder 50c and $1.00 \ 

\'iolet Dulce Complexion Powder in cakes SOc 

Violet Dulce Dry Rouge, No. 18 2S<' 

Violet Dulce Sachet Powder, oz SOc 

A'lolet Dnk*e Toilet Soap 2.>(' 

\'iolet Dulce VanisWiig Cream SOc 

Violet Cold Cream 25c and SOc 



Toilet Waters 

75« N. E. Lily of Valley SOc 

75c X. E. Rose 50e 

75c Wood Violet Wc 

75c N. E. Trailing: Arbutus. . .60c 
SOc Florida Water 34c 

Perfumes 

50c Tralllns Arbutus 29e 

BOe Lilac 29c 

SOc Carnation 29c 

60c White Rose 29c 

50c Lily of Valley 2»c 

SOc Heliotrope 29c 

SOc Sandalwood 29c 

50c Crabapple 29c 

SOc Peau d'Espasne 29e 

SOc Chimes 29c 

SOc Jockey Club 29« 

SOc Oranee Blossom 29c 

50c Sunklst Bonnet 29c 



\ 



With each $1.00 bottle 
of Rexall "53" Hair Tonic 
we will give free one 25c 
jar of "93" Shampoo 
Paste. 



Dog Remedies 

50c Canine Laxative 34c 

SOc Distemper Remedy 34c 

25c Eye \%'ash 17c 

25c Flea Destroyer 17c 

50e Mange Lotion 34c 

SOc Worm Remedy 34c 



Cigars 



lOc Official Seals 9c 

10c La Marca 6c 

With each 60c purchase of La 
Flor dc Murat CIsars %ve will 
Srlve free a collapsible drinking 
cup in a leather case. 



Saehet Powders 

50c Heliotrope 29c 

SOc violet 29c 

SOc Rose 29c 

Rubber Goods 

91.00 Hot Water Bottle «9C 

91.S5 Hot Water Bottle 89c 

91.50 Hot Water Bottle 91.13 

91.73 Hot W^ater Bottle 91-20 

9*^.00 Hot \%ater Bottle 91.43 

91.25 Fountain Syrliigre 89c 

91.50 Fountain Syringe 91.19 

91.75 Fountain Syrini^e 91.29 

$'J.00 Fountain Syringe 91.43 

92.25 Fountain Syrlnee 91.03 

91.0O Rubber Cloves 99c 

SOc Rubber Gloves 37e 

Klpples 2 for Sc 



Candy 



SOc lb. Smooth Jordan Al- 
monds 39c 

SOc Cadet Chocolates In bulk, 
per lb 29e 



Service 



You Tilll find that yon 
are money ahead by trad- 
ing with us. It ^vUl be our 
policy to run special sales 
during: the comtns: summer. 
Much may be saved by 
taking adrantasc of these 
low-prlccd sal<^*. 



Mail Orders Are Sent Out the Same Day They Are Received. 

E. M. TREDWAY 

DRUGGIST 
108 WEST SUPERIOR STREET, DULUTH 



Prescriptions 

!Vone but rcKistered 
pliarniacists are employed 
in this department. Our 
lnimen!«e business enables 
us to use the best of every- 
thing: at the most reason- 
able prices. See tlint your 
next prescription bears the 
Tred^ay label. 



1^ 



: >o fr . 



h^caJUL ^siwedie^ 



members of Frldhem lodg-e. Order of 
Svlthoid, for Friday evening at Sloan's 

hall.- , , ^, 

Rev. Swaney Nelson, pastor of the 
First Swedish Baptist church, is ex- 
pected to return home tomorrow from 
Minad9,polis, ^rhere he attended the 
state Baptist, board raeetiftg. 

Miss Agnes Iverson of Eau Claire, 
Wis left for her home this morning 
after spending a week visiting rela- 
tives In this end of the city. 

Mrs. Joseph Olson. 2118 West 
street, is visiting relatives at 
ginla, Minn. 

Central Plumbing & Heating 



First 
Vir- 

com- 



pany, 2004 W. Superior St. Lincoln 693. 



-Vr 



WANTED 

young niJiri* 18 to 20 y^ars of age 
to learn biisliiCijs: good chance for 
advancemeiU. Address W 482, 
Herald^. .-.\ 



PASSOVER TO 
BE OBSERVED 

Jews Will Begin Celebration 

of Feast Friday 

Night. 



Surprise Party. 



THIEF RIVER ELKS 



against. 120. It was argued by the 
men offering the motion that the spe- 

• kio-TAl I nCCiPCDC c'*l suasion would spend more money 

INSTALL UrrlCEnO. than U would save. 



Thief River Falls. Minn.. April 8.— 
District Deputy Grand Exalted Ruler 
J. D. McPhee of Crookston installed 
the following officers of the local Elks' 
lodge, the youngest lodge in the state: 
E. R.. Joseph Feeley; E. leading 
knighr. (Jeorge Johnson; E. loyal 
Louis Hanson; E. lecturing 
C. A. Pitkin; secretary. Ed 
treasurer. M. Barzen; trustee. 



knight, 
knight, 
Dolan; 



Louis Hanson. 



Chautauqua For Brainerd. 

' Brainerd. Minn., Apirl 8. — (Special to 

The Herald.) — A Chautauqua Is assured 

j for Brainerd this summer. The Red- 

i path-Vawter Chautauqua system will 

' have a seven days' session, using a 

largo tent capable of seating 2,000 to 

2.500 people. The dates are June 9 to 

16. The company has held chautauquaiS 

the past eight years in Austin, Man- 

kato, Marshall and Luverne. 



SPECIAL SESSION 

BEATEN 120 TOO. 

La Crosse, Wis.. April 8. — The town 
of Campbell. La Crosse county, voted 
on th-d propo.^al of Governor McGovern 
to call a special session of tha legis- 
lature to reduce state expen.'je.n as 
follow.: For the special session, 0; 



Mr. and Mrs. John Paulson, 2231 
West First street, were pleasantly sur- 
prised by a number of their friends 
fast night at their home. They were 
presented with a handsome electric 
lamp. The guests were Messrs. and 
Mesdamea Peter Nelson, John Paulsoni 
August Nelson, Anton Johnson, Adolph 
Bjorlln and Conrad Nordvall, Mes- 

\ dames A. Wieberg, E. Lundberg, John 
Forsen, O. A. Carlson, Misses Hilda 

I Tygerson. Agnes SJodahl, Jennie Grif- 
fith, Lydla Stolhanske. Manda Stol- 
hanske, Anna Wahl. Christine Ander- 
son Muriel Johnson, Helen Johnson 
and Messrs. Axel Carlson. Frank Carl- 

I son. Hugo Olson, August Anderson, 
Ernest Nelson and Elmer Nelson. 



Big Ha.stings. Minn., Fire. 

I Hastings, Minn., April 8. — The south- 
western section of the buildings of 

, the Brandt Manufacturing company, 

I on West Second street, was destroyed 
by fire of an unknown origin early 

; yestfrday. The loss on building and 
machinery is estimated at $60,000, fully 

; covered by insurance. Sixty men are 
temporarily thrown out of employ- 

i raent. 



Soyka Funeral. 



Tired? — Nature's Sweet Restorer 



^j^ 



Mrs. Mary Soyka, 44 years old, wife 
of Thomas Soyka of Thirty-first ave- 
nue west and Eighth street, died yes- 
1 terday. The funeral was held this 
morning from the Polish church with 
burial in Calvary cemetery. 

Tells "Sermon Story." 

Rev. George E. Silloway, pastor of 
the Grace Methodist church. Twenty- 
second avenue west and Third street^ 
gave a "sermon story" last night at 
the revival meeting, which was at- 
tended largely by children of the Sun- 
dav school. The services last night 
were planned especially for the chil- 
dren. The revival meetings will be 
continued tonight, tomorrow evening 
and Friday evening. 



TEA 



6 



{ 



Abounding In stimtdatin^ goodness, a most health* 

lul and pleasing t>everage. Its sustaining and 

invigorating qualities are beyond dispute. 



Big Attendance Nightly. 

Passion week meetings are being 
held nightly at the Second Presby- 
terian church. 1615 West Superior 
street, and .Saturday evening will be 
the onlv exception. The meetings have 
grown "to such an extent that the lec- 
ture room had to be abandoned and 
the auditorium of the church is being 
used. 

West End Briefs. 

Charles Benson of the West end has 
left for St. Cloud on business. 

Lars Anderson of West Fifth 'street 
returned yesterday from a two months' ; 
I visit to his farm in Itasca county. 
The St Luke's Guild of St. Peter's 
Episcopal church. Twenty-eighth ave- i 
nue west and First street, will enter- I 
1 tain tomorrow afternoon at the last 
of a series of Lenten teas. It will be 
held in the guild rooms of the church. I 
A smoker has been planned for the | 



PARCEL POST RULES 
FOR B OOKS DEFINED. 

"Books Is books." 

This i? the decision of the postal 
authorities at Washington regarding 
the question Ibat recently arose as to 
the distinction that is to be made in 
the parcel post rules regulating the 
sending 6t books. All books are in- 
cluded in the ruling, no matter if they 
are bound in leather or in paper, or 
whether they are catalogs or adver- 
tising publications. All the govern- 
ment demands is that the book weigh 
eight ounces or more to be included in 
the parcel post ruling. 

If a book weighs less than eight 
ounces, the rate will be 1 cent for two 
ounces, just as was the ruling before 
parcel post went into effect, and which 
BtlU regulates third class mail matter. 

FOUR SALOON 

LICENSES REFUSED. 

Brainerd, Minn.. April 8. — (Special 
to Tlie Herald.) — The county commis- 
sioners refused four applications for 
saloon licenses in Oak Lawn town- 
ehlp that ot M- H. Spalding in the 
new town of Woodrow. C. J. Evensta, 
Lewis Danielscn and Julius^ Holz. at 
points in the township. The Canadian - 
Cuyuna Ore ..company also objected to 
saloons. 



Many Symbols of Flight 

of the Jews From 

Egypt. 



DAVIDSON'S 



5T THIRD ST. 

n«»ne« L.lnc«la 448-Y. 



You 
llnery . 
the new 
Easter. 

pRin 



hted to visit our mll- 

.thls week and inspect 

beautiful styles for 

heasonable. 



YottWill Remember 



by the 
when h| 
serve 
Photos 



rraph how he looked 
home. Always pre- 
jnlly picture. Group 
tecialty. 



IMPSON, 



THE. PHOTOGRAl'HER. 
aoaO v*<^t Superior Street. 



At sundown Friday Jews throughout 
the world will begin celebrating the 
Feast of Passover, which will continue 
until April 18. In Duluth the reformed 
Jews will hold a public Seder or feast 

Friday evening at 6:30 at Temple 
Emanuel, while special services will 
be held at the orthodox synagogues, 
followed by the feast at the home of 
each individual. On Saturday and Sun- 
day morning services will also be held 
at the local Adath Israel synagogue 
and again the following Friday and 
Saturday mornings. Friday evening. 
April 17, a special Passover service 
will be held at Temple Emanuel, Rab- 
bi Maurice Lefkovits speaking. 
OldeKt Hebrew Feast. 
Passover, or Pesach, as It is called, 
is the oldest Hebrew feast. It dates 
back 3,300 years and celebrates the de- 
liverance of the Jewish race from the 
despotic rule of Pharaoh. Upon the 
stories of the flight of the Jews from 



SAGE TEA TURNS 

CRAY HAIR DARK 

It's Grandmother's Recipe to Bring 

Back Color and Luster 

to Hair. 



That beautiful, even shade of dark, 
glossy hair «.an only be had by brew- 
ing a mixture of Sage Tea and Sul- 
phur. Your hair is your charm. It 
makes or mars the face. When it 
fades, turns gray, streaked and looks 
dry, wispy and scraggly, Just an ap- 
plication or two of Sage and Sulphur 
enhances its appearance a hundred- 
fold. 

Don't bother to prepare the tonic: 
you can get from any drug store a 
50 cent bottle of "Wyeth's Sage and 
Sulphur Hair Remedy," ready to use. 
This can always be depended upon to 
bring back the natural color, thick- 
ness and lustre of your hair and re- 
move dandruff, stop scalp itching and 
falling hair. 

Everybody uses "Wyeth's Sage and 
Sulphur" because it darkens so nat- 
urally and evenly that nobody can tell 
It has been applied. You simply damp- 
en a sponge or soft brush with it 
and draw this through the hair, tak- 
ing one small strand at a time; by 
morning the gray hair has disap- 
peared, and after another application 

I it becomes beautifully dark and ap- 

I pears glossy, lustrous and abundant. 

1 Agent, Wlrth's drug store, 13 West 

L^uperior street. 



Egypt, their subsequent wanderings 
for forty years, and the leadership of 
Moses, depend the later stories of the 
acceptance of the Ten Commandments 
on Mount Sinai and the final building 
of the temple at Jerusalem. The ob- 
servance of Passover follows closely 
the details of the Biblical tale through- 
out the entire week, 

Friday night the first Seder Is hela 
at the homes of all the Jews of the 
world. The observance of this Seder 
or feast has hardly changed in the 
slightest since it was originated. The 
members of each family make this 
event a home-coming, and the ema^ 
cipation of the Jewish race and praises 
of its leaders are sung during the 
feast. At the close a prayer is offered 
for the re-establishment of Jerusalem 
as the home of the Jew as of old. This 
means more to the Jews oppressed in 
Russia and Roumania than it does to 
the free citizens of America. To those 
still pining in slavery, Passover still 
sings the song of ultimate redemption, 
while to those living under a free flag, 
it teaches the undying lesson of grati- 
tude. 

CharaeterUties Domestic. 

The main characteristics of the cele- 
bration of the Passover are mostly 
domestic. In orthodox homes the feast 
will be observed both Friday and Sat- 
urday evening, • while the reformed 
Jews hold but one feast. On the fol- 
lowing Friday and Saturday more spe- 
cial services are held at the syna- 
gogues, while in the reformed temples 
onlv Friday is observed. The symbols 
of the Seder service are the roasted 
lamb bone, reminding the Jew of the 
iamb that was slaughtered as a sacri- 
fice of the covenant; second, the matzah 
or unleavened bread, to be eaten during 
the whole week in place of ordinary 
bread, recalling not only the hasty 
preparations with which the Israelites 
hurried out of Egypt, but their abso- 
lute reliance on God; and the bitter 
herbs, suggesting vividly the bitter 
life of Moses and his brethren while in 
the land of Pharaoh. 

Two other symbols of the table 
should be noted, namely, the four cups 
of wine allowed each member at the 
feast, symbolizing the four-fold phase 
in which God couched the first "dec- 
laration of independence," and the cup 
of wine set aside for the prophet Elijah, 
who. ever present in spirit, always 
brings anew, the message of undying 
hope of the Messianic reign of uni- 
versal peace, freedom and justice. 

GASOLiNF 
PRICES FALL 

Increased Production Has 

Caused Drop of Two 

Cents Since March. 



Mo., the Standard Oil Company of In- 
diana has cut its wholesale gasolina 
figure down to 13 cents a gallon, mak- 
ing its fifth reduction since the down- 
ward movement began. That result 
has been brought about through es- 
pecially severe competition in that ter- 
ritory. 

That the oil companies generally 
made enormous profits last year is evi- 
denced in the annual report of the 
Prairie Oil & Gas company, just Issued. 
Its net earnings for the year were 
$15,933,630, equivalent to 88 per cent 
on its $18,000,000 capital stock. This 
came on top of profits of $22,802,513 
earned by that company in 1912, equal 
to 127 per cent on its stock. 



As a result of increased production 
and a slackening in demand at some 
of the larger centers, there have been 
general reductions in gasoline prices 
all over the country. Duluth automo- 
bile owners and other consumers are 
now buying gasoline in a retail way at 
20 cents a gallon, a reduction of 2 
cents since the first of the month. 
From present indications, dealers are 
of the opinion that the product will 
sell cheaper yet, and they are buying 
In quantities to cover their immediate | 
requirements only. This is a consid- 
erable change In the situation from a ! 
year ago, when advances In quotations i 
came along with painful regularity to 
autoists and other users. 

It is to be noted that at St. LK>ula, 



See the Flower Show 

at the Duluth Floral company. 

. RAISES uq'uorTssue; 

Personal Rights League of North Da- 
kota Is in Politics. 

Bismarck. N. D., April 8. — (Special 
to The Herald.) — The liquor question 
will be made an issue in Xorth Dakota 
politics aga'n as a result of the organi- 
zation here of the Personal Rights 
league, a body fostered by the North 
Dakota German Alliance and several 
lodges of The Verein. a German fra- 
ternal order. 

Support of resubmission and opposi- 
tlon to women suffrage are cardinal 
virtues which the league will Insist 
candidates for office must have if thejr 
wish the support of the body. 

The German Alliance has a big mem- 
bership throughout the Missouri Slopa 
district. Morton, Sheridan. Mcintosh, 
Logan, Stark, Sonthern Emmons and 
Southern Kidder, portions of McLean. 
Pierce and McHenry county, have par- 
ticularly heavy German votes, and in 
those counties the league will be a 
material influence. 

Desire to avoid politics in the fra- 
ternal orders is responsible for the 
organization of the league, which will 
conduct an active campaign. 



COMBING WON'T RID 
HAIR OMANDRUFF 

The Easiest and Best Way U 
to Dissolve It 

The only sure way to get rid tof 
dandruff is to dissolve it, then you 
destroy it entirely. To do this, get 
about four ounces of ordinary liquid 
arvon; apply It at night when retir- 
ing; use enough to moisten the scalp 
and mb it in gently with the fingdr 
tips. . 

Do this tonight, and by morning 
most if not all of your dandruff will 
be gone, and three or four more ap- 
plications will completely dissolve and 
entirely destroy, ever>' single sign and 
trace of It, no matter how much dan* 
druff you may have. 

You will find, too, that all itching 
and digging of the scalp will stop at 
once, and your hair will be fluffy, lus- 
trous, gloMiy, silky and soft, and look 
and feel a hundred times better. 

If you want to preserve your hair, 
do by all means get rid of dandruff, 
for nothing destroys the hair moro 
quickly. It not only starves the hair 
and makes it fall out, but it makes it 
stringy, straggly, dull, dry, brittle and 
lifeless, and everyone notices it. You 
can get liquid arvon at any drug 
store. It is inexpensive and never 
falls to do the work. 



n- 



m 



»•»■ 



7 



jta^tm^mmmtMamma 



-•- 



Wednesday, 



THE DULUTH ^HERALD 




SAN FRANCISCO WOMAN PLAYS-^LE OF DETECTIVE TO 
GATHER EVIDENCE FOR SUIT AGAINST M'ALPINE ESTATE 




mas chosen 
btcase it ts 
one of the 
centers and 
membership 



At the meeting of the Drama JeaRue 
he'd yesterday afternoon at the homo 
of Mrs. S. R. Holden^ 1932 East Supe- 
rior street, delegates were named to 
represent the local organization at the 
convention of the Drama I^eague of | 
America to be held in Philadelphia 
Ayril 23, 24 and 25. Those chosen were ; 
Mrs. F. A. Patrick. Mrs. E. H. Wol- i 
forth and Mrs. W. N. Ryerson, all of 
whom are now In New York and can 
easily attend the meetings at Phila- 
delphia. , 
Up to tins time all conventions of 
the Drama Lt-ague of America have 
been held in Chicago. Seventeen large 
cities extended invitations to the or- 
t^aniKatlon. Philadelphia 
as the place of meeting 
one of the oldest and 
largest of the producing 
ranks third in point of 
tn the league. 

Subjects to be discussed at the con- 
vention are Hudiences of today, the 
drama that is presented to them, con- 
ditions that control both the audiences 
and the plays they attend and prob- 
lems that confront drama centers. 

In addition to discussions of the 
drama and things pertaining to It di- 
rectly and indirectly there will be sev- 
eral Interesting entertainments, .\nnie 
Russell and her company will give a 
special performance at the Little 
Theater. Plays and Players, the 
famous Phlladelpiiia group of ama- 
teurs, will presfni a French fifteenth 
centurv plav. "Monsieur F'atelln." j 

The "talk by Mrs. Otis Skinner. "Be- ; 
hind the Scenes in a One N'ight Stand": 
promises to be Interesting and to give 
the delegates a good Idea of something 
of the real lives of players. Miss Fola j 
La Follette will speak on "The 1 
Psychology of Audiences." ', 

Other pri>minent names on the pro- 
gram are P«?rclval Ohubb. Harrison 
Gray Fiske, Fenedict Papot. Meredith 
Nicholson. Augustus Thomas and 
Fercv MacKave. 

Dr. Richard Burton, head of the de- 
partment of English of the University 
of Mmnes-ota, has been named by the 
nominuting committee as candidate 
for president of the national organ- 
ization. As Dr. Burton 's the only one 
named f^r the office Minnesota may 
even now claim the honor of having 
one of her citizens as the head of the 
Drama league. Dr. Burton has lectured 
in Duluth. 

The board of directors who will hold 
their offices until 1015 are Brander 
Matthews. Perclval Chubb. Mrs. Otis 
Skinner. Raymond M. Alden. S. H. 
Clark, Gilson Gardner, William S. Hef- 
feran. J. Creighton Matthews. Benedict 
Papot. Mrs. James Harvey Robinson. 
Mrs. Frederick Vaughan and Mrs. 
William Vaughn Moody. 



ON GOOD TERMS WITH 
HER FORMER HUSBAND 








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Established I88U 



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Refrigerators 



EUGENIA GLIDDEN TITUS. 



JAN KUBELIK AND WIFE. 

Jan Kubelik. the famous violinist. 
sailed for Europe this week after a 
most successful tour of America. Part 
of the time he played with Mme. Melba. 
the great soprano. Wherever he went 
he confirmed the reputation he has 
made in the last season as a musician 
of wonderful technique. Mme. Kube- 
lik, who was the divorced wife of 
Count Czaky when she married the 
violinist, accompanied her husband on 
his tour. During their visit to Amer- 
ica they met the Count Czaky and 
entertained him. The count and Mma 
Kubelik are still good friends. 



When Mrs. Mattie B. Titus of San 
Francisco, Cal., widow of the late W. 
H. Titus, a California lumberman, 
found that it was necessary for some 
one to come to Duluth to obtain cer- 
tain Information to be used at a trial 
of a lawsuit In the California courts 
against the estate of the late John 



losis hospital reported favorably upon 
the conditions there. It was decidod 
to send tlowers to the tuberculosis 
hospital at the county farm for Easter. 
At the Informal reception that fol- 
lowed the business meeting the 
hostesses were: Mrs. Oscar Peterson, 
Mrs. A. Saltwick and Mrs. B. i. 
Rossom. Pink carnations were used on 

the tea table. , ^ ^w ^. 

officers will be elected at the next 
meeting. May 15. This meeting wi» be 
held at 2 o'clock to accommodate the 
delegates to the Federation of W om- 
en's clubs at Cloquet. The hostesses 
at this meeting 
SJosellus, Mrs. P. 
Swenson. 



McAlpine of this city, she did not leave 
the matter to her ».^tprneys, but came 
here personally to attend to matters. 
Mrs. Titus and her 12-year-old 
daughter. Eugenia <jlidden Titus, who 
accompanied her. returned yesterday 
to California, after having spent ten 
days In the city. Qn April 20, Mrs. 



Titus expects to appear as a witness 
at the trial of the McAlpine lawsuit, 
which win occur in the Federal court 
of the Northern district of California. 
Titus and McAlpine were associated 
together In a California land deal and 
the lawsuit Involves their transactions. 
Mrs. Titus and Mrs. McAlpine are sis- 
ters. 



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We claim superiority, and chal- 
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1. Low and uniform temperature. 

2. Pure atmosphere. 

3. Economy in the consumption of 
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4. Perfect drainage. 

5 Durability of construction and general appearance. 
* THE BOHN SYPHON REFRIGERATORS are 
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made 



will be Mrs. P. 
C. Smith and Mrs. 



A, 
A, 



Surprise Party 

^9)Tz<i Fredcricksen of 108 Twenty- 
seventh avenue west was surprised by 
his friends la-«t evening. He was pre- 
sented Avith n handsome gift. Games 
anJ music were enjoyed and a lunch- 
eon was served to the following 
guests: 
Mi'«ses — 

Julia Tilseth. 

Blanche Eltinger, 

Bertha Chris- 
tophfer.«^on. 

Elizabeth Ander- 
son, 
Messrs — 

A. WahLstrom. 

E n g w a 1 d Her- 
sied. 

Clarence Nelson, 

S. Soberg, 



-SPEAKER- 
REV. ROBERT YOST 

— SUBJECT — 

'The Things Chrisi Refused' 

Tonight S p. m. 

FIRST PRi:SB\TERIA\' CHVRCH. 

Voa Are Welcome. 



Eva Giving. 
Anna Soberg. 
Sisne Xelson, 
Lyda Olson, 
Olga Hendricks. 
Clar.a Hendricks. 

Louis Widdel. 
Oscar -Bostrom, 
I. Hansen. 
Richard Hansen, 
Henry Tilseth. 



i Robert To.'t of the First Presbyterian 
church performed the ceremony. The 
bride was attended by Miss Marian 
Bain of Portland. Or. The best man 
was Bernhard Fayne, brother of the 
bridegroom. There were about thirty 
guests. Those from out of town were 
Mrs. P. H. Gray of Minneapolis and 
Perry Payne of St. Paul, sister and 
brother of the bridegroom. 



Mission Band. 

The Mis»!on band, or Light Bearer 
society will meet in the Glen Avon 
church parlors tomorrow afternoon at 
2:3) o'clock. A Japanese program has 
be^a arranged 

• 

Executive Board. 

Tho ex'»cutive board of the Twen- 
tieth Century club will meet tomor- 
rovv morning at 10 o'clock In the li- 
brary clubroom. This meeting is for 
the members of both the old and new 
executive boards. 



Thimble Bee. 

The women of the First Baptist 
church will have a thimble bee this 
afternoon at 2:30 o'clock at the homo 
of Mrs. R. G. Chambers in the St. 
R(gis apartments. 

— .• ■ 

Meeting at Bethel. 

The regular woman's meeting will 
be held at the Bethel tomorrow after- 
noon at 2:30 o'clock. Rev. W . W . 
1 siwrence. pastor of Glen Avon Presby- 
Ur7an church. wiU be the speaker. The , 
mothers of Bethel Sunday sohool ■ 
pupils and all women who are Jnter- 
ested In the work of the institution 
are cordially Invited to attend the 

meeting. 

• 

Ladies' Aid. 

The Ladies' Aid Society of St. Paul's 
German Evangelical church will meet 
tomorrow afternoon with Mrs. ( harles 
Teske of 11 East Fourth street. 

» 

Lecture at Lakeside. 

E Dudley Parsons of Minneapolis, 
author and historian, will «iye an il- 
lu.strated lecture on "The History of 
Minnesota" at Lakeside school this 



Christensen, Emily Johnson. Laura 
Wagner: floor, A. MacGllvr/iy. W. A. 
Plttenger and George E. Llndberg. 

Personal Mention. 

Mrs. S. Eklund. 18*23 West Second 
street, left yesterday for a few days' 
visit ai the Twin Cities. 

* * * 

I Samuel C. Ellis, 420 East First 
street, has gone to Marquette, Mich., 
where he will make his home. 
« o • . 
Mr and Mrs. C. Jeronlmus, 17 East 
Fourth street, have relurned from a 
three weeks' trip to Seattle, Wash. 

♦ * *., 

Mr and Mrs. William Plnder have 
gone to St. Paul, "Where they will 
make their home. 

♦ • • 
Mrs O. A. Baumelster of Council 

BluflTs! Iowa, is visiting her sister, 
Mrs. A. G. McCoy, »IB East Fifth 

street. 

* ♦ • 

Lieut. George Joerngf, U. S. N., and 
wife are visiting Lieut. Joerns' father, 
W. G. Joerna of 114-'^'est Superior 

street. 

♦ * • 

Mrs W. N. Ryerson and children and 
Miss Bess Lee have gone East for sev- 
eral weeks. 

* • • 

Mrs. Edward Myrick of Minneapolis 
is visiting friends here. Mrs. Myrick 
formerly lived in Duluth. 

* * * 
Miss Grace Wright Is spending the 

week in Southern Wisconsin. j 

♦ * • t,' 
Miss Marv Goodhue is visiting in 

Northfield, Minn. 

♦ ♦ • 

Miss Carrie Castle is spending the 
week at St. Cloud. Minn. 

* * ♦ 



! The youi:g' '«Tonien 

— will (terv* a- 



^ .. . w 1 evening at 8 o'clock. 

of I.lnnaca branch ^^ attend the lecture 



All are invited 



are visiting at Fort~Dodge, Iowa. 



Miss 
wDoc 



Pork & Bean Luncheon 

at the K. P. hall, 118 West Snpei 
street. Saturday, April 11, from 11 a. 
m. to 2 p. m. The net proceed* will go 

' to aid In their an*l-tuberouloHl."« work. 

I TlCKE'rS 25c. 



For Bride-Elect. 

Miss Blanche Ryan of 311 East Third 
eti^eit entertained Monday eveniLig for 
Mis-i Sae Thorp of Virgini.i. Minn., 
whose wedding to G rover McCarthy 
will take place April 21. A color 
scheme of white and yellow was car- 
ried out with yellow and white tulips 
and wlih Easier decorations. There 
were twelve gueits. 
* 

Bain-Payne. 

Miss Elizabeth Bain and Percy- O. 
Payne were married last evening at 
7:30 o'clofk at the home of the brtide's 
parents. 1127 East Fifth street. Rev. 



Silver Anniversary. 

In honor of the twenty-flfth wedding 
anniversary of Mr. and Mrs. Paul A. 
Vogt of 105 West Superior street a 
nine-course dinner was given at Camp 
Bertha Monday. The decorations were 
evergreens, carnations and tulips, also 
silver to carry out the idea of the 
silver anniversary. J. Schumacker 
was toastmaster. Edward Vogt re- 
sponded for ilia parents. Those pres- 
ent were: 
Messrs. and Mesdame 



Lecture Postponed. 

The University Extension lecture 

that was to have been given by Dr. 

West Superior IF. H. Swift Friday evening. April 10, 

has been postponed until Monday, 

April 13, on account of a death in the 

iecturer's family. 

' • ■ 

Shakespeare Class. 

The Shakespeare class of the Twen- 
titth Centurv club will study next sea- 
son "Julius- Caesar," "The Jernpest 
"Anthony and Cleopatra'' and Homeo 
and Juliet." Mrs. H. L. Gage is chair- 
man of the department and Mrs J. C. 
Shimonek the secretary. Mrs. William 
Fisher will be the leader the opening 
day. 



Mrs. Clapp and Miss Addie Smith 
It 

Miss Ethel Rockwood is in Minne- 
apolis. , .^ ,_ 

* • • 

Miss Emllv Smith of Lester Park is 
visiting Mrs. Lilly Langlcy at Madi- 
son, »Vis. 



tistic imaylnable. The little Irish 
girl brimful of wit. which flows from | 
her rosy lips as the crystal water from ^ 
a spring, "Peg" tells a story that mnde ; 
old Manhattan, staid and blase, forget i 
the more sensational attractions for ; 
this beautiful story of refreshing 

youth. 

* • * 

For the first time In twenty-five 
years of his vaudeville life, James , 
H. CuUen was disconcerted Sunday. | 

Mr. Cullen has toured the Orpheurn 
circuit fifteen limes, and has faced j 
vaudeville audiences for a quarter of i 
a century, so it takes something un- j 
usual to disconcert hm. During near- 
ly all of that t^lme he has worn a long 
black frock coat on the stage, and has 
used a little black notebook from | 
which he reads jokes at the finish of j 
his act. Last Saturday somebody stole . 
the frock coat from his dressing room 1 
in Minneapolis, and the book went j 
with It. Arriving here Sunday he was ; 
unable to get another coat in time for j 
his opening performance, and for the | 
first time in nearly a quarter of a cen- | 
tury he appeared without his frock I 
coat and his book. Monday he got 
a new book, and ordered a new frock j 
coat, but for the first time since he 
used to .ippear with Mclntyre & Heath ! 
when the three of them first went into I 
the business, he admits he was nerv- 
ous in facing an audience. I 
Next week It expected to be the ban- ' 
ner week of the Orpheum season. The 
Orpheum Road Show will open a 
wek's engagement at the local theater. 
It Is headlined by "Romeo the Great," 
said to bo the most wonderful trained 
monkev in captivity. Claude and Fan- 
nie Usher, two favorites with Duluth 
audiences, will also return with the 
Road Show. 

FLOWERS^ARE 
PLENTIFUL 



The Gibson Refrigerator 

is within reach of all and contains all the practical 
advantages that are embodied in the more expensive 
makes. The Gibson "Cambria" is Hned with either 
their celebrated "Porceloid" lining or galvanized 
iron. Gibson's "Porceloid" lined refrigerators are 
built to give perfect refrigeraton and the best of sat- 
isfaction. Prices very moderate. 



■JEWEL; 



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jfttiuscments 



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Detroit Jewel 

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TWENTY years of specialization in Gas Appli- 
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New patterns and 
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Qash or Easy Terms 



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GASSER 



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BARGAINS IN GROCERIES 

25-ib. sack Granu- <gi ^ C 

lated Sugar ^X.XU 

49-lb. sack Duluth ^\ OA 
Imperial Flottr ^J.«AlV 

Fine Potatoes, per fiO#* 

bushel OW 

Tall -Milk, three 25C 

cans arfV^V* 

Baker's Chocolate, QAo 

pound tfVV 

Coffee, a dandy, ^^O 

pound AlUV 

Our cut prices on all kinds of 
canned goods will appeal to 
yon. Phone us your order. 



Harry Raisky of 
Yorkton, Sask. 

A. Kirkabe of 
Miunewau- 
kon. N. D.. 

Park Paine of 
Paine, Wyo. 



J. Schumacker, 

Ba^nel, 

Purdy, 

Kuckenbecker, 

G. Largerqui.«t 
of Minneapolis, 

J. Haley of 
Minneapolis, 

Mrs. A. D. Aldrkh 
Ml.^seg — 

Luske, 

McCarthy, 

Anne Bcrglof, 
M»^ssrs. — 

McCarthy, 

Kalkbrenner, 

Master Erwln Schmacker. 
"^ 

Linnaea Society. 

At the meeting of the Linnaea so, 
ciety yesterday arrangements were 
completed for tag day. May 16. A re- 
port given yesterday showed $16o was 
realized at the buffet luncheon given 
March 13. This money and the pro- 
ceeds of tag day will be devoted to 
sufferers from tuberculosis. The com 
mittee 



Wllhelmena 
lierfelof, Mpls. 



Andrew Ferglof, 
Charles Berglof. 



Special af 
The Orpheum This Week 

Send vour wearing apparel to us to 
be Dry Cleaned for Easter Sunday. 
Orpheurr. Cleaners and Glove Special- 
ists, corner Second avenue east and 
Superior street. Phones, Grand 976; 
Melrose 1168. 



TONIGHT'S ATTRACTIONS. 



ORPHEUM- 
EMPRESS- 
ent." 



-Vaudeville. 
"The Slaves 



of the "Orl- 



Easter Monday Ball. 

Majestic Rebekah lodge, No. 60, and 
Canton North Star. No. 14, I- O- O. F., 
will give an Easter Monday ball at 18 
Lake avenue north. Music will be 
furnished by La Brosse's orchestra. 
The following committees have been 

named: ^ ^, ,> xxr 

Arrangement, Elizabeth Green, \v . 
H. Konkler. J. A. MacGUlvray. Ma- 
thilda Julln. J. A. Braff; reception. 
Commandant Col. A. H. Paul. A. W. 
Johnson. Lieut. J. F. McDonald; re 
freshments. Elizabeth Green, 
Drown. Nellie Anderson, Nettle 



•3 from tuoercuiosis. * '"i^ '-""' i C» "CnVio T.iin Alma Glbbs 
appointed to visit the tubercu- I Mathilda Juin, Alma uidds. 



Mabel 
Shaw, 
Alma 




OBSERVATIONS 

By PEGGY PEABODY 



Amusement Notes. 

Among the coming attractions soon 
to be seen at the Lyc«um Is William 
A. Brady's production ,<«f "Little Wom- 
en," direct from its ^lecord-breaklng 
six xomtnhs' run at Mr. Brady's play- 
house in New Tork, and, with the orig- 
inal company and prftfluction. The 
dramatization of "Little Women" was 
made by Marian de Forest, a well 
known magazine and newspaper writer 
of Buffalo, and awakens many mem- 
ories among the readers*of Louisa M. 
Alcott's famous story, many of whom 
still journey to the old homestead at 
Concord, Mass., now preserved as a 
permanent museum.. Whjpn "Little 
Women" was presented for the first 
time in New York It was 'commended 
as a faithful reproduction of the 
novel, carrying no attempt at theatri- 
cal effects, but aiming solely at sim- 
plicity and the vivyfying of Miss Al- 
cott's long endeared personages. 
* • *' 
Oliver Morosco will send J. Hartley 
Manners' exquisite comedy "Peg O' My 
Heart" to the Lyceum, Thursday, Fri- 
day, Saturday and Sunday. 

So much that is good has been said 
of this New York success in the metro- 
politan papers and magazines that a 
detailed description Is not necessary. 
Suffice to say that popularity of the 
show is, largely due to its freedom 
from the slightest suspicion of the un- 
clean or sensational. "Peg" is por- 
trayed by Florence Martin, and her 
interpretation of the character is said 
to be one of the most loving and ar- 



Big Easter Demand Has Not 

Caused Much Change 

in Prices. 



LORD BYRON'S HOME 

IN ROME IS FOUND. 



For nearly a century literary men have 
searched for its site, which has now 
been found through a letter. 



There Is no scarcity of flowers for 

Easter, according to local florists, and 

best of all, the prices for all varieties 

are slightly below the .iverage. with 

the exception of violets, for which 

i there is usually a large demand at I 

i this time of the year, causing the reg- ! 

I ular prices to soar. 

I Local florists said this morning that 
their supply of violets is about fifteen ' 
to twenty times that ordinarily car- 
j rled. It is the only flower, however, j 
I that has not been reduced slightly in 
I price or has kept the average. Violets i 
will sell for |1.50 a bunch and they \ 
are the most popular for corsages on ' 
Easter Sunday. ' 

Lilles-of-the-valley, w'hlch also make ! 
a beautiful corsage, are selling for $1 
a dozen, while sweet peas cost $1 a ; 
bunch. 

Easter lilies are selling for 25 cents 
a bloom and from 50 cents to $1.50 a 
pot, the price depending on the number 
of blooms to a pot. There is a large 
supply of lilies on hand and the price 
is no higher than usual. 

Spring Jonquils, daffodils and tulips 
are now on hand and are reported to 
be selling much cheaper than usual. 
Local florists have n large supply of 
the flowers and also of the pots, 
which sell from 25 to 76 cents each. 

The ever popular roses are plentiful 
and are selling for $1.60 to $2 a dozen 
for the common varieties. 



Rome, April 8. — At a meeting of lit- 
erary men here yesterday, including 
the American ambassador. 
Nelson Page, and the British ambas- ; 
sador. Sir Rennell Rodd, the announce- | 
ment was made by Nelson Gay of Bos- l 
ton, secretary of the Rome committee 
of the Keats-Shelley association, of 
the discovery of the house where Lord 
Byron lived when In Rome. This • 
house Is in the Piazza di Spagna. fac- ' 
ing the house where John Keats died. ■ 



Drnper'H Condition Fnehanfced. 

(ireensville, S. C. April 8. — Littla 
change was reported today in the con- 
dition of Eben S. Draper, former gov- 
Thomas ' ernor of Massachusetts in a critical 
■ condition Uere. after an attack of 
paralysis. Physicians said he had an 
even chance of recovery. 



Pnrlty Meeting; «t Kansas Cl«y. 

La Crosse. Wi.-^.. April 8. — Announce- 
ment is made by B. S. Steadwell. presi- 
dent of the World's Purity federation, 
that the eighth purity congress will 
convene at Kansas City, Nov. 5. 





„ , «• o u- i?„«,/<;c- o«J ; oine for any cause whatsoever, is that 

Fresh Air, Sunshine, Exercise and i ^^^y ^^e taking medicine. The knowi- 

BathS Are Curses for Ills. \ edge that they are taking something 

With the coming of spring there Is 
a decided increaae in the number of 



that they 
spring 



or 



Grafonola $25 

EASY TERM3 

Double-Faced Records 63c 

Ask for Catalogue 



EDMONT 

18 Third Avenue West 



I people who seem to think 

i are In need of a medicine, 

I tonic, as It is called. 

j It Is true, too. 
that after a long 

I winter of hearty, 

! heavy eating and 

I confined living, th* 

'blood and general 

I system may be ben - 

i eflted by some of 
the very simple 

I remedies that have 

■ been handed down 
from our grand 
mothers and great- 
grandmothers. 

; A concoction of 
.sulphur, molasses 
and soda, a valued remedy the country 

1 over In olden days, as a preventive, if 
not a cure-all, of every 111 to which 
the fle-^h Is heir. Is making Its appear- 
ance In many homes today. But I 
have heard Its value very much dis- 
puted by medical authority as too 
harsh a remedy for any but the thick 
nnd sluggish blooded. 

I The main point with the very large 

! percentage of the women, and men. 




that a doctor has prescribed for them 
or that some of their many friends 
and fellow-sufferers have recommend- 
ed as magical in its effects. Is suffi- 
cient to work a cure. More often than 
not the 111 Is a subterfuge, albeit an 
unconscious one. 

Many of us have heard It affirmed 
that in very many cases where doc- 
tors are called upon to recommend a 
course of treatment or a remedy, they 
more times than not proscribe to re- 
lieve the mind and not to cure a real 
phvslcal dl.'^ablllty. Very often none 
exists, except that which the Imagina- 
tion and a life devoid of Interest and 
ambition creates. Though we are con- 
vinced that this state of affairs exists. 
we seldom think to apply the truth of 
it to ourselves. 

Tonics are In order, and they may 
be necessary In some cases at this sea- 
son. But let me give you -a prescrip- 
tion that will do you more good than 
any a physician can write, and which 
iM well within the means of all. It Is 
concocted of fresh air, sunshine and 
exercise, and the use of those great 
essentials, soap and water. These are 
essentials of health that too few avail 
themselves of. Pin your faith to these 
things from now on and see If they 
do not serve you better than the most 




HOLIDAY PROGRAM 
AT THE Y. M. C. A. 



too for that matter, who take medl- j carefully comyuuuded spring tonic. 



FLORENCE MARTIN 
In "Peg o' My. Heart." 



The Boys' Department Y. M. C. A. 
special program attracted a large 
number of the boys yesterday. Special 
games were conducted In the gymna- 
sium in the morning; swimming and a 
game tournament In the afternoon; 
and In the evening an Easter social 
consisting of a rooster crowing con- 
test, egg race, roofeter fight, set the 
hen, chase the feather and an egg tug. 
Each boy brought a boiled egg which 
was returned to him when the refresh- 
ments were served. • 

This morning there was a game con- 
test In the gymnasium. At 2:30 a large 
number of boys in charge of Mr. 
Batchelor took ah observation trip 
through the Northern shoe factory. 
Twenty-five members of the Knights 
of Sir. Galahad In charge of Mr. Mc- 
lieod left for a hike to the Spirit Lake 
branch of the boat club, w^here they 
will spend the night, returning tomor- 
row morning. Each boy will carry 
blankets and lunch for two meals. To- 
night there will be a masquerade party 
at the boys' building. All members of 
the club are Invited. The program for 
tomorrow will be, a swimming period 
at 10 a. nv, 2:30 p. m. a trip through 
the Butternut bread factory and 
through the Patrick mills. Monday a 
trip was made through the woolen 
mills. The boys saw the wool as it 
came from the sheep's back and 
watched It until It became cloth. To- 
morrow they will se It being made Into 
garments. At 4:30 there will be a 
game tournament In shuffle board. The 
winner will receive five points in the 
Hustler club. At 8 o'clock there will 
be a "stunt" night, any member or 
group of members can put on a stunt. 
"The Sunday club committee will present 
a little play entitled "Dixy's Dilemma." 
Those taking part will be: Warren 
Moore, Edwin Pearson, Harold Coe and 
John Shields. 



CHILDREN'S 

SHOES 








IE ARE READY to answer the 
call for Spring Shoes with the 
best children's shoes that were 
ever put together, fl Parents can pur- 
chase here with the satisfaction of 
knowing that they get the 



BEST CHILDREN'S 
FOOTWEAR! 



Shoes, Pumps and Sandals; black leathers 

and tans. 

Misses, Little Girls, Big Boys, Smaller 
Boys and Infants can be fitted here, in the 
way all children's feet should be fitted 1 

Bous^ and Girls^ Shoes— 
$1.50 to $3.50 

Children's Shoes- * 

$1.25 to $2.50 

Infa nts'-75c up to $ 2.00 

Wieland Shoe Co., 

222 WEST FIRST STREET. 




II 



71 





Wednesday, 



THE DUrrUTH inrRALD 



— iroiii rcappurtioniucnt than the 

Nortiuvcstcrn part of llie state, many 

AN iNOEP^MO£NT NEWSPAPER j ^^ t^e representatives of which have 

r«i>ii:<hed evtry rv(>iiinK except »•■- always inclined to favor every nieas- 



THE DIUJTH HERALD 



Amy b> The Herald Company. 

Both Tolephunes — Husiness Office, 524; 
Editorial Rooms. 1126. 



Erilerett as second clMs matter at the PiUuth post- 
tffltTW uinier ihe «it of coiigresa of M»roh o. 18T0. 



OFFICIAL PAPEI, CITY OF BUUITH 



ure that was aimed at the prosperity 
and security of the people of the iron 
range comnumities. 



buch an erratic individual uS Mr. ilob- 
son. 

The saloon got some hard raps yes- 
terday, especially where the women 
voted. They voted in Illinois — sev- 
enty-three per cent of those who reg- 
istered in Chicago, and probably a 



Whe^aii^n 



April 8, 1914. 



Wheif fja ]^n Comes 

to Christiania 



■M 



I* Soli." by Knnt Ham.iun. 



Statesmen, Reat and Near 



By Fred C. KeII». 



It is not the Mcighen attack on re- larger percentage in the smaller towns I ^^^v '» ^«ltl»inlng to stir; al 

idle and can- j where license was the issue. A good JL ^o? t,-.u, ' m'*""*) f^\'u . * 
I » I Die or t^yt-ka. rolling into the streets 

lo coiWtry, large farm wagons 



apportionment, which is idle and can- j where license was the issue. A good 

not possibly prevail, nor his talk of i many saloons in Illinois were put out j from th 



A faint, golden, metallic rim appears 
n the East WTiere the sun is rising. The 

ready can 
stance rum- 



Si 



BSCRIPTIOX BATKS— By Mail, pay-, the "steel trust, which is ridiculous, of business bv yesterday's voting, and ^'^"•^"y -i*?^*^^*' ^'^^ supplies for the 
lb!, Ill advance, one month, 35 cent.s; , „.„.^.» ..^ t* .i,„ !„«..- „ u • »f . l I »"*fK«ta-f>*rit)| hay and meat and cord- 

hree months. ?i. six months. $-•; that interests US. It is the e\ idence quite a number in Minnesota, where wood. And these wagons make more 



a 

th 

one year. |4; yaturday Herald. $1 per ^vhich his un-American and un-dcmo 

year; Weekly Herald. |l per year. 

Daily by carrier, city and suburbs, 10 
oents a week; 46 cents a month. 

Sn'tiiTlhors will crnfet » favor by nialil!!S taown 
a::jr ri>mi<la>:tt of aenrisre. 

When fhaiifing Use !»'.Mres< of ymir paper, it t> 
lm;iur'ant Id ci^^ botti oUl tmd new •dtlre^ae.s. j 



The DuUith Herald accepts adver- 
tisinjr contracts with the distinct guar- 
amy that it has the largest circulation 
in Miiiike;-ota outside the Twin Cities. 



^^<^k^^>^^^^>^>^>^»^^^^^^^^»^^0^^^^^^S^^S^^>^ 



The Herald t^lll be glad t» have 
ItK attention ealled to any nilHiead- 
Inf; or untrue Mtatewent >vhleh may 
.ippear in Uk news, editorial or ad- 
^rrtl.'sInK eolumnn. 



THE RICH PROMISE OF THE FIELDS. 

The y.ucrnnieiu reports that the 
average condition of winter wheat 
April I was 95.6 "of normal," against 
91.0 per cent last year. 80.6 in 1912, 
and i!>S-7- the ten-year average. 

In other words, the winter wheat 
crop on April i was pretty nearly in 
perfect condition. The acreage is 
high, and the outlook for a banner 
winter wheat crop could hardly be 
better. 

Spring wheat of course is not 



cratic effort has produced that the 
people of his neighborhood are fair 
and just and honest. This is what 
interests us in this episode. 

For instance. M. J. Grattan. a splen- 
did citizen of Fillmore county, writes 
in the Preston Times as follows: 

Taxation without representatioi» 
is tyranny, whether imposed by 
King <;eorge on the colonies or by 
Fillmore and Houston eounlies 
upon their neighbors on the north. 
Where one voter here equals four 
or five in representation, that con- 
stitutes taxation without fair rep- 
resentation and is Indefensible 
from any standpoint of cyui»y and 
Justice. Any attempt on our part 
to defeat reapportionment by a 
legal technicality betrays a grasp- 
ing, selfish spirit which is not con- 
tent with what is due us but seeks 
more by devious means. A square 
deal, equal representation, is all 
we are entitled to. and attempting 
to grasp more brings us Into bad 
odor with falrminded men of other 
sections whose good will we desire 
and may often need. To use the 
knife of legal chicane to cut out 
the pound of flesh will in the long 
run bring us the tribution meted 
out to Shylock. And It would be 
deserved; make no mistake about 
tliat. Let our friends upon the 
north understand, unqualifiedly, 
that this move Is not backed by 
public opinion. 

The people of the north, we are 



fourth class cities voted on license 
for the first time since the local op- 
tion law was expanded to include 
them. 

Congressional elections were a ; 
stand-off — one Democrat and one Re- ; 
publican. However, this is a loss of ' 
one to the Democratic majority, as 
the Republican elected fills a Demo- 
crat's place. In Boston, a Democrat 
got more votes than the Republican 
and Hull Moose candidates combined. 
In New Jersey a Republican got a 
sul^stantial plurality over a Democrat, 
with a Socialist third and the Bull 
Moose candidate among the "scatter- 
ing. 



No doubt some people will be duly 
shocked to And that Illinois continues 
on the map after allowing the women 
to vote on some things there. 



A Jewel from Jadam 

New York Sun: The pursuit of poetry 
in the barren pages of the Congres- 
sional Record is a w^eary task. The 
average congressman knows a few 
stock pieces from old school readers; 
these serve his turn when his hour 
,„,^ , ,• »u * r n Til- ' °^ eulogy and obituary eloquence 

planted but the outlook there is for ' ''"'^^- '^'^''^^e that fully. To believe • strikes. Short cuts from "Thanatop- 
remendous acreace and if nature • otherwise is to believe that we live in «»* •" "The Psalm of Life." Whlttler's 
rtmenaous acreage, ana it nature _^„,,„ ,„„.„,,,. ,,^- ^. . , , 1 "I know not where His islands lift 

kind to it as it has been to win- ' ^ commonwealth stained by a type of their fronded palms In air." and so on; 



a 
is as 



noise than usual because the pave- 
ments aj-e etllt brittle from nightly 
frosts. It is the latter part of March. 

Everything is quiet around the har- 
bor; here and there a sleepy sailor 
tumbles out of a forecastle; smoke Is 
rising from the galleys. A skipper puts 
his head out of a companionway and 
sniffs toward the weather; the sea 
stretches In undisturbed calm; all the 
winches are at rest. 

The first wharf gate is thrown open. 
Through it one catches a glimpse of 
sacks and cases piled high, of cans and 
barrels; men with ropes and wheel- 
barrows are moving around, still half 
asleep, yawning openly with angular, 
bearded jaws. And barges are warped 
In alongside the docks; another army 
begins th^ hoisting and stowing of 
goods, the loading of wagons, and the 
moving of freight. • • • 

The sun climbs higher. Now people 
begin to swarm In all directions; shrill 
whistles are heard, now from the fac- 
tories in the city suburbs, now from 
the railways and docks; the traffic in- 
creases. Busj- ts^orkers dart hither and 
thither — some munching their break- 
fasts f^om newspaper parcels. A man 
pushes an enormous load of bundles on 
a push cart — he Is delivering groceries; 
he strains like a horse and reads ad- 
dresses from a notebook as he hurries 
along. A child is distributiug morning 
papers. • • •y 

Traffic and noise Increase and 
spread; beginning at the factories, the 
wharves, the shipyards and the saw- 
mills, "they mingle with wagon rum- 
blings and human voices; the air is 
rent by steam whistles whose agoniz- 
ing wails rise skyward, meeting and 
blending above the large squares in a 
booming diapason, a deep throated. 



Washington, April 8. — (Special to 

I The Herald.) — Only one man In our 

I midst, so far as can be learned, after 

a diligent and painstaking inquiry, has 

ever found the United States Marine 

I band placed as a huge bunker In his 

path when he tried to niblick his way 

into congress. 

The one man who had to scale or 
dodge the United States Marine band 
was, or is, Charles Martin Borchers of 
Decatur, 111. 

Borchers ran for congress against 
Former Representative William B. Mc- 
Kinley, who was known during his 
term in congress as the Human Christ- 
mas Tree because of the alacrity with 
which he showered food and other 
high-priced gifts on his associates. Mc- 
Kinley felt that If concerts by the 



Keeping Up With 

Minnesota Editors 



Prcaa Commcnu on Current Srenta, 



I 



Jingoes Seldom Fight. 

Waseca Herald: If the United States 
is forced Into war With Mexico it is 
the poor men's sons in this country 
whose lives will be sacrificed. The 
wealthy manufacturers, mine owners 
and contractors who will profit by the 
war, will see that their loved ones are 
kept far from the scene of battle. 
Think this over, neighbor. 




Twenty Years Ago 



From Tbe Herald of thla date. 1891. 



In Keeplav With His Chief. 

Detroit Herald: The attendance of 
Secretary Daniels at the funeral of 
William Wilkes, for thirty-seven years 
faithful keeper of the door of the sec- 
retary of the navy, which was held in 



a negro cottage on the afternoon of 
United States Marine band would add | March 6, is mute testimony to the gen- 



ter wheat it is easily nossible for this ' *^^^^^"^"'P deserving only the con- the didactic, religious and mortuary throbbing roar that enwraps the entire 

' .71- .r. r ... . I vera** of mncr*»ao la arkim,1 Kiif \* ia _ii_- .»,_• , j .. i.tii 



' * temnt nf 1riv*«r8 nf UKprf^. »,of..,..i,«,» | verse of cougress is sound, but it is 

growing s.-ason to lay broad and deep t ^'^"'P^ °^ '^'^'^^^ °* '•''^'^^> every\\here. j ^i^.-^yg the same. True, once in a great 

tlie foundations of the rosiest reign ! ^^"^"el A. Langum, himself a can- , while a statesman breaks into "orig- 

,. , I didate for the lecislature and one of *"*^ comic verse, which is *uTe to 

01 prosperity this countrj- ever ^^^\\^^l^_^l___^,^\^^^^^^^ been written by somebody else. 

enjoyed. 

FolIi»wing Republican precedents, 



the best known citizens of Minnesota, I On Tuesday, however, the Record en- 
in his newspaper the Preston Times, j »hrined a real, though none of the 



city. Telegraph messengers dart hither 
and yon, scattering orders and quota- 
tions from distant markets. The power- 
ful and vitalizing chant of commerce 
booms througli the air; the wheat in 
India, the ctfffee in Java promise well; 
the Spanish markets are crying for 



after a feeline review of the lnn<r u<^ht ! fr^w!***;, ^^^^f'^^^- The Hon. Benjamin fiesh— enormous quantities of fish dur 

we suppose we ought to make great , *^*^ ^ _^ '^^^ 01 tne long tight 1 Grubb Humphreys of the Third Mis-' 



for 



claims for the Wilson administration ! """ ■'"* 
as a producer of good crops, but we'll " ' 

let that rest until the harvest. 

In the meantime, it is well 40 re- 
member that agricultural prosperity 
is the basis of all prosperity, that 
when the fields are fruitful business 
is good, and that it is hardly possible 
to parallel a great crop year with a 
year of business depression. 

It is a lime for lading plans of bus- 
iness conquest, not for microscopic 
hunting for reasons for alarm. 



legislative representation, [ sissippl district said for himself and a 

Gopher statesman of immortal mem- 
ory; 



From his owner's assertions of pro- 
prietorship, one would almost infer thnt 
the Houn' Dawg dug the canal. 



AN ATTACK OW FAIR REPRE- 
SENTATION. 

One Thomas J. Meighen of Fillmore 



No one claims that the apportion- 
ment was not as fair and equit- 
able as circumstances permitted, 
or tliat we were undulv distrim- 
Inated against. This being the 
ca.;*e, will it pay us to continue 
this dog-in-the-manger policy* 
How would we feel if conditions 
were reversed and our Northern 
neighbors should Insist in keeping 
us in subjection by th* mere brute 
force of numbers, without regard 
to justice or decency? Have we no 
regrard for the feelings or good 
opinion of the balance of the state? 
And If by chance and chicanery 
we should be able to hold on for" 
a little while, what would it bene- 
fit us in the long years to come? 
For the ultimate good of South- 
ern Minnesota, and because of the 
fair name of Fillmore countv, the 
Times hopes that Tom Meighen 
will fail miserably in his attempt 
to undo the tardy justice, how- 
ever grudgingly bestowed, of the 
reapportionment act of 1913. 

These assurances are good to hear. 
No Northern Minnesota man be- 



"I have alwara bellered that .Vd.im B«(1e had my 
constituent'* In nitnd wlieti he told us a few years ago 
on Uw floor of this house the bard luck story of Uie 
man 

" '\Miose howe went dead and hU mule went lame 

And he lost Ids cow in a poker same, 

And a I'.vclone came on a summer day 

And blew the hoit<;e where he lived auay. 

Then an farthnuake came when that was done. 

And shallowed the ground that the house atood on: 

Then a tux collector. l»e raroe 'round 

Ajid charu'd him up wl(h Uie hole In the ground.' " 

This is a pathetic and a noble poem, 
direct in Its appeal, and as overwhelm- 
ingly cumtilative as "The House That 
Jack Built." What brilliant obscure 
genius poured it forth in one gust of 
flame, himself incinerated in a corus- 
cating crater? It is instinct with the 
fatalist humorous American spirit; yet 
what anthology registers it? What 
temple rises to its author? 

The Hon. Adam Bede. also known 
as Jadam, the Venerable Bede, was 
sketched from life by George Eliot. [ married 
Famous as a Republican member of 
congress and its joy from 1903 to 
1909, he now lives in health and 
wealth at Pine Hill, Minn. So far as 



ing Lent. 



• • • 



The Gold Spoon No Mascot 



i "trousers," but a ruder name. Can the 
Hon. Jadam Bede throw a ray of light 
upon the entire and perfect chrysolite 
which the Hon. Benjamin Grubb Hum- 
phreys has enchased? 



county has begun legal proceedings lieves that such activities as those of ' ***^ ^""^ knows he is the only living 

in the hope of defeating the legislative ; Meighen are in -irrnrrl ^.irh r.„uv ; P^*'''^' a"d,f*5« ^^o wears birch bark 
^ » & I ..Tici^utu are m accord with public , trousers, although he calls them not 

reapportionment law which was ^ sentiment in Southern Minnesota 
passed last year after a generation of } What the man Meighen proposes is 
struggle by the northern part of the i to substitute injustice for justice, in- 
state against the unfairness of the ap- ! equality for equality, oppression' for 
portionment law of 1897. I freedom, foul play for fair play. But 

The ground on which he proceeds-' manifestly we need not concern our- 

is a mere technicality, too trifling to ' selves about Meiehen Hi*; vJcrorr.„c 

r*.rwMro ^^ncJ.!^,-, t.Vr, T* ;c «-.* ♦i,^* • 1-. ^^'^'gncn. XI li, \ igorous jn congress from a California district, an Income of not more than J600 a year, 

require consideration. It is not that neighbors are fully equal to the task has the happy faculty of getting di- He added, speaking of Raymond: "He 
which interests us, but the spirit of I of handline him Yet r»n«. fV,,„^ , .- I rectly at the heart of a question when 

^ . . . ^ ;"'"8: ^veijie begins to discuss it. For example. 



Tite Taine of L.eaderMhlp. 

Chicago News: William Kent, for 
merly of Chicago, now representative ' other claims had been met, and meant 



Brooklyn I&.gle: A boy born with a 
wooden spoon In l^is mouth must make 
his own way. Self-dependence is an 
education In itself. A boy born with 
a silver spoon in his mouth, assured 
of early educational advantages, may 
still be free from the anemia that 
atrophies ambition. A boy born with a 
gold spoon in his mouth is most luck- 
less of the three. Only the strongest 
characters can overcome the obstacles 
that such a boy must face; only the 
heritage of a marvelously quick mind 
and marvelously keen ej'ea can elude 
the pitfalls that threaten him every- 
where. 

We suppose that all fathers will 
sympathize sincerely with August Bel- 
mont, i)ut on the stand as a witness in 
the suit for separation brought against 
his son by a woman whom that son 
There is no romance of a 
rich young man in the story. Romance 
Is an exalted word. Romance con- 
temns counsel fees. It abhors alimony. 
It laughs at litigation. 

With the frankness of a great man of 
affairs, Mr. Belmont testified as to the 
provision he had been making for his 
son. He had allowed him |3,000 a year, 
and had paid him $76 a month as a 
clerk, but had stopped both the al- 
lowance and the salary wlien he 
learned of the marriage. He know 
what Raymond Belmont's personal re- 
sources were; they did not exceed 
about $14,000 after overdrafts and 



one whit to the sum total of happi- 
ness and joy throughout his district, 
and increase his chances of re-elec- 
tion one Jot or tittle, the least he 
could do would be to provide the con- 
certs. Being a multi-millionaire and 
being also the manager of the Taft 
presidential campaign, he was able to 
arrange for the band to shift its field 
of operations from the District of Co- 
lumbia to Illinois. 



Everybody agreed that It was per- 
fectly lovely of Mr. McKinley to let 
the home folks in on the same music 
that is played for functions at the 
White House, but all this was tough 
on Borchers. His cow was causing 
him enough handicap, even without the 
United States Marine band to figure 
on, and there were days when he 
feared he wouldn't reach congress at 
all. 

There is no animal that Borchers 
dotes on as he does a cow. The cow 
is a patient dumb animal that pro- 
vides us with milk and cream and but 



uine democracy of one of our nation's 
greatest officials, 



Bnt They're Worried Now. 

Cambridge North Star: It is said 
that the brewers' association holds the 
key to the political situation in Min- 
nesota. W^e have heard that few ap- 
pointments to political situations in 
this state are made without the con- 
sent of these brew-masters. 



***The colonization scheme whlctt 
has been under way at West Duluth 
for some time was fully matured las! 
evening at a meeting held in John- 
son's hall. F. Bjorge was elected 
president. L. L. Aune secretary and 
Gust Bergren treasurer. A proposi- 
tion from t^e Associated Railway 
Land department of Florida was vir- 
tually accepted as the most promising 
opportunity offered the colonists. Tha 
terms comprl.«ie the gift of a whole 
township in Manatee county, a few 
miles from Tampa bay, to be divided 
into parts of forty acres each. The 
meeting was attended by about 200 
people, 85 of whom, nearly all Scan- 
dinavians, agreed to go. 



♦♦•William E. Lee of Long Pralrla 
will be a candidate for representative 
this fall, and again a candidate for 
speaker* of the house. 



OJi, "Sot The Governor Wantii His Job. 



•♦♦Dr. John F. Fulton of St. Paul 
has been commissioned surgeon gen- 
eral of the Minnesota National Ouard 
to succeed the late Dr. Murphy. He 
will rank as brigadier general. 



•♦♦John Shea, the popular roadmas- 
ter of the Duluth & Iron Range road, 
will leave in a few days for Bing- 



Roseau Times: While Governor j hamton, N. Y., where he will be mar- 
Eberhart's state reform committee is j ried on April 18 to Miss Katie Cecil 
at it, why not work out a plan for a ] Carroll of that place. ,She Is a niece 



state government under a commission. 
It is the only solution to a business 
way of conducting the affairs of the 
state. The coming legislature may 
have a majority so far removed from 
the influence of the railroads and 
liquor interests as to permit of the 
calling of a constitutional convention 
which is badly needed, and such a con- 
vention might possibly give the state 
a progressive and workable common 



ter, and sleeps in stables .on nests of | sense constitution. 

straw, while horses and mules are 

used more as beasts of burden, and 

from the hen we obtain nice fresh eggs 

with which we can make eggnogs, 

custard pies and — 

Well, anyway, Borchers was greatly 
attached to his cow. Up to the time 
he entered his campaign for congress 
he had always milked the cow with 
his own hands, and he took great pride 



Rlnen' Estimate of Gordon. 

Mora Times: Sam Y. Gordon, for- 
mer lieutenant governor, has decided 
to run for the house. Sam is one of 
the real big men in Minnesota politics 
and he will be a power for good in the 
next legislature, as we feel confident 
that his district will be glad of the op- 
portunity of having him serve it. He 
in the fact that none but he had per- 1 w'as a progressive when it took cour- 
formed that simple yet consequential i age to advocate progressive policies. 



of Mrs. Theodore Hannon of Two Har- 
bors. 



•♦♦B. F. E. Bauer, well known to 
the shoe trade of Duluth, left last 
evening for Rochester, X. Y., from 
which city he will travel for a lead- 
ing shoe manufacturer. 



•♦♦H. Thorson of the State bank re- 
turned yesterday from California, 
where he has been visiting for sev- 
eral months. 



the attack — and the reaction against ' w 



. , <^"'" t)e interested in having them in a recent article in Harper's Weekly, 

It which is evident m that section of discover— the voice is the v«;,.» ^f dealing with the Wilson administra- 



the state. 

Meighen offered to file for the sen- j — whom? 
ate from Fillmore county, which wa; 



voice of 



has no personal property, no real es- 
tate and no prospective interest in any. 
thing." 

Sympathy Ip^ indeed, Mr. Belmont's 
Thntmt- I iif ♦! 1 J ' u 1 I tion, Mr. Kent writes: "The chief [ due. If we turn to the young man 

i.iunias. Dui t.ie hand is the hand of complaint made against Woodrow Wii- [ himself, it is Impossible to restrain the 

son is that he Is dominating legisla- \ reflection that his la one of the hun- 

tlon and is acting as a leader. If j dreds of cases where the gold spoon 

.» ..^■r.'.t ^■.^^ ,!;-.»-• * .. J 1.1. o -I ■»-:,„• • -.,. there is any one thing needed under has proved itself the reverse of a mas- 

a senatorial district under the 1807 ^ 'rgima. Minn., is among the latest our system of hampering checks and cot. Opportunities have been thrown 

balances, it is leadership. Our house away. YJet wtoever blames Raymond 
and senate have been so pitted against Belmont mus^ '.do so with some doubt 
each other by the doubts and fears whether fate .is not too strong for all 
that are evidenced In the Constitution j of us. "Ooujd :I have evaded the gold- 
that somewhere there must be effi- j spoon hoodoo?" is a very wholesome 
ciency and leadership. If the man who, question in self-examination. 



apportionment, but which is now part j ^^^^^'^ ^o indulge in a new Easter lid. 

of a new senatorial district including ■ • 

Houston county. His filing was of I YESTERDAY'S ELECTIONS. 

course refused, and he has gone to ' ^layor Konkel of Superior got 

court on the ground that the new ap- , '^^'''^t l''^ supporters call "a sweeping alone among all elected officials in 

portionment is invalid. If his suit vindication" in yesterday's recall ' ^^^ nation, owes his election to the 

cU/-..,!.^ .^,«„.^:i *i, • • -^ i- ^1 ' p]t>rt;nn TT„„., • . . ' entire people and not to any specific 

should prevail, the miquity of the , election. Lpon examination, how- ; district or state_lf this man, who 

1897 apportionment would be re- ever, this victory fails to disclose good «-lo"e is free from the pressure of locjil 

stored, and the equity of the 1913 ap- »eason for the use of the adiective "1*^''!^^ /"*^u/''^*!u "^^'"f "<'■''' /■.••^""ot outside I thrust those things that hin- 

, ■' y'o oi* ^. . „ "'^J <-'-"*£ afford leadership, then the ship of dered me 

portionment would be lost. j sweeping. [state is indeed without a pilot." 

We have utterly no idea that this' ^^'^^t happened is that Mr. Konkel ' ^ ^?- ^o°»c,^«l^ ^^ governor of New 
^ -., -,1 -It-. . . ^.. r ti • . . '-"••vci York and later as president of the 

suit will prevail, but it is paintul to ; S"<^<-^s*^"'ly resisted the attempt to 'United States, Mr. Hughes as governor 



Coniselenee. 

I built a wall, and it took many years. 
So strong, so grimly fortified its 
stony face 



chore. No matter how important a law 
suit had engaged his attention all day 
he liked to go to the barn in the eve- 
ning and listen to the squsz, squsz, 
squsz, squsz of the warm milk into 
the large tin pail. 

♦ ♦ • 

Imagine the situation. On the one 
hand was McKinley and the United 
States Marine band, making it neces- 
sary for him to campaign vigorously 
in all parts of the district, or else be 
lost sight of amidst so much musical 
competition. And on the other hand 
was the milking to be done night and 
morning. 

He finally compromised on 'making a 
few quick dashes out over the district, 
intrusting the milking to his wife, who 
also was reared on a farm and could 
milk a cow jivst as well as Borchers 
could himself. 

And that, by the way, brings us to a 
touch of romance. Borchers spent his 
early life as a farmhand and got his 
education mostly at noon hours while 
the plow horses were resting and mas- 
ticating their oats. In the autumn he 
used to go about from one farm to 
another and hire out to assist in huskr 
ing the golden corn. The last place 
he ever did corn husking was at a 
farm where there were six attractive 
young daughters in the family. Borch- 
ers was particularly impressed by one 
of these and he used to follow her 
about and engage her in conversation 
while watching the deft manner in 
which she milked the cows. When the 
time came for him to be separated 
from his cow to campaign for con- 
gress, Borchers thought of those ear- 
lier days, and he felt that his wife 
w^as the one person to whom he could 
intrust the milking. 

* • « 

Since reaching Washington Borchers 
has had to face another trying situa- 
tion and has been compelled to change 
the style of his mustache as a pos- 
sible solution of his troubles. 

He and James Wickersham, delegate 
to congress from Alaska, are almost 



He is not the bombastic kind of a pro 
gressive but believes in doing things 
rather than talking about what ought 
to be done. As presiding officer of the 
senate he was a power in aiding the 
passage of good legislation. 



Safe Odds. 

Cambridge Independent-Press: Last 
week a gentleman by the name of 
Johnson (not Scandinavian) filed for 
the Republican nomination for state 



♦♦•On April 10 Miss Lucia .Tudd, 
daughter of Mr. and Mrs. C. E. Judd. 
and Dr. James McAuliffe will be mar- 
ried by Bishop Shanley of Fargo, 
uncle of the bride. Miss May Costello 
will be bridesmaid and John Mc- 
Auliffe will be best man. The ushers 
will be O. C. Hartman, Joseph Engles, 
C. F. Macdonald and H. C. Huot. 



♦♦*H. A. Ware has gone to Missis- 
sippi to join his family. 



♦♦*Mlss Anna Manthey of Ashland. 
Wis., is visiting her sister, Mrs. J. L. 
Hort of Duluth Heights. 



♦♦♦Minnesota Methodists are dis- 
cussing division of the Minnesota con- 
ference. It has been proposed to di- 
vide it bv a line running north and 
treasurer against Walter Smith, the j south, the Eastern conference Includ- 
present incumbenfa The Johnsons and | ing the St. Paul, Winona and Duluth 



Smiths have a long list in Minnesota 
and it remains to be seen what's in a 
name. Ten to one Smith will be the 
victor in this contest. 



If It Im! 

Madison Independent-Press: If the 
outcome of the present jangle among 
the Republicans of this state shall be 
a united party then the present un- 
pleasantness will not have been in 
vain. 



districts, and the Western district in- 
cluding the Minneapolis. Mankato and 
Fergus Falls district. 



Eastertide 

Oh, rare as the splendor of liUes 

As sweet a-s the violet's breath. 

Comes the jubilant morning of Easter, 

A triumph of life over death; 

For fresh from the earth's quickening some empty, dimly lighted alley 

bosom 
Full baskets of fliTrers we bring. 
And scatter their satin-soft petals 
To carpet a patch for our king. 

In the countless green blades of the 

meadows. 
The sheen of the daffodill's gold. 
In the tremulous blue on the mountains. 
The opaline mist on the wold. 
In the tinkle of brooks through the 

pasture. 
The river's strong sweep to the sea. 
Are signs of the day that is hasting 
In gladness to you and to me. 



So dawn in thy splendor of lilies. 
Thy fluttering violet breath. 
Oh, jubilant morning of Easter, 



exact doubles. Both have — or did j Thou triumph of life over death! 
have — short little stubby mustaches. For fresh from the earth's quickened 
a heavy coating of hair and a similar | bosom, 

arrangement of facial features. They Full baskets of flowers we bring, 
are exactly the same height and ! And scatter their satin-soft petals 



weight, and one can scarcely tell them 
apart, even though Wickersham is 
about twelve j'ears the elder. A few 
weeks ago Wickersham delivered a 
vigorous speech in support of thr prop- 
osition for a government railroad in 
Alaska. The speech made a strong 



To carpet a path for our king. 

— Margaret E. Sangster. 

— ♦ 

A Patient. Moderate Man. 

Cleveland Plain Dealer: Ohio chal- 
lenges the world to produce the most 
patient man. And, in full confidence 



The Cat in Kitty. 

Dallas Lore Sharp in Atlantic: Stroke 
kitty the wrong way and she spits. Yet 
she sleeps in the kitchen by the fire. 
What of it: The very lap of her mis- 
tress has not counted with the cat in 
her. The cat in kitty is wild to the 
tip of her twitchtail. Watch her — if 
she hasn't already scratched you — as. 
crouched in the grass, she makes her 
v.'ai',, tq ward some unsuspecting bird. 
A ehiver runs through you. You can 
fesel her clawe^ — bo -tiger-like is she. so 
wi>d and savage, so bent on the kill. 
Or come upon her at dead of night in 

She 
is on the prowl. The light of the nar- 
row, gnlch-like street falls on her 
with a startling largeness and marks 
her silent shadow on the flags. She 
moves stealthily out to the corner, 
and, well within the shadows, stops 
to glance furtively up and down the 
open cross street. But the people are 
all within the shut doors. There is no 
one for her to devour. 



Sometiilug \e«v. 

Harper's Magazine: The new minis- 
ter was asked to dine at the hc»me of 
one of his parishioners, and, of course, 
responded to the request to say grace. 
In the little pause which succeeded the 
"amen" the small daughter of the fam- 
ily exclaimed naively: 

"Well, my papa don't know that 
piece.'" 



AMUSEMENTS. 



think that there is a single citizen in I recall him by the slender plurality of ^^ ^^^ ^^^^ ^^^ ^'"- '^''son as gov- 
Southern Minnesota who would at- ' "-ety-one votes out of a total of raXn's^WeT eSfivrha^rwrn V^- 

Had fifty voters switched he '^*^^^'" because they assumed responsi- 



tempt to restore the evil conditions of 
rank injustice that prevailed under the 
old apportionment. 

However, we do not believe for a 
moment that this man Meighen rep 



The country would be In a far worse 
condition than it is if the president 
had failed to take the responsibility 
for leadership which he has assumed 
with courage and wisdom. 

• . 

Only a Sliglit Reduction DeMired. 

.appor,i„„„en,, I, could not be j ;han half of its voters wanted it to HoXTlo^pn.l\ToZZ, tLLT^n 

which- the Joke is on the doctor. He 
tells this one: 

One patient fancied there was some- 
thing the matter with his heart. His 
physician made a cursory examination 
which disclosed a large swelling in the 
patient's cardiac region. 

"There certainly appears to be an 
extraordinary swelling right here," 
said the doctor, tapping with his finger 
on the patient's side. "We must re- 
duce this at once." 

Whereupon a faint smile appeared 
on the patient's worried countenance. 
"Oh. Doctor," he exclaimed, "that 
swelling is my pocketbook. Please 



bors, we are sure. 

Assailed for his act by believers in 
fair play, Meighen in a bitter coin- 



And in my busy life had no abiding 
place. 
Tears, Sympathy and Leniency were 
first to go; 
Then Generosity and Trust, and, last- 
ly. Truth. 
I drove them forth with many a lusty 
blow — 
Mortised the last stones tight. I had 
no ruth. 
Unhampered now my gold and fame 
could grow! 

Fast sped my days — faster my coffers 
filled. 
Within the shadow of my wall I 
plied a thriving trade — 
All the long working hours I wove a 
glittering web. 
Not till the^ dark shut down was I 
dismayed. 



That would not loose Its grip upon 
my soul. 



5^203- . ._ 

«.v->itlH li-i,o !.«,»., K„ i. Tr 1 T "^ 1 bilitles of leadership. Under our sys 

^ouldhaxe been beaten. Had a hun- I tem. the chief executive must be a 
dred of-his 2,692 supporters forgotten ■ deader if the government is to func- 

to vote, he would have been beaten ^'?"",'" ^'i^ interest of the people as a 
Tt ^""i ii<t\e ueen ueaten. ^ ^^hole. If the executive does not lead, 

Ine result is hardly more than the legislative body either flounders in 
resents in this action the sentiment of ^"o"Sli to indicate a state of doubt in ! ^^ope^^ss incompetency, or the reins of 
y,- n/^lrrV,!.^..^ T u f .1 , . ' fi,« ™- I r ... '"'power are taken in hand by some ir- 

hi^ neighbor^. To believe that would ^he minds of our neighbors across the ! responsible party boss. 

be to assail every resident of Fill- t>ay about the "wide open" policy on **'"■ ^'^'*''<'" '^ proving himself a 
more connty as a friend of injustiee ; -hich Mayor Konkel was attacked- ?!'«>• f/aHr.'n 'r"i'e°,t"sci^e''<,?7h" 
and oppression, an enemy to fairness i ^"^1 'Silver Joe" got the benefit of the ' ^e""- and also a great popular leader. 
and equal representation, and a trait- doubt. 

or to American ideals of government, i There is no question whatever what 
The Herald never believed that the <^id it. Superior believes that it is 
people of Southern Minnesota were at ! making money out of Duluth's tight 
fault for the long delay of an honest ^^^r as no doubt it is, and a few more 
re " 

lieve that and still believe them to be i ^^^^P o" making money that way. It 

honest and fair. And it does believe j was a narrow squeak for Mayor Kon- 

them to be both honest and fair. They ! kel and his policy of keeping open 

are fellow citizens of a great state in i town for those who like plenty of to- 

whose glory we have a common '• basco and pepper to season their di- 

pride. The fellow Mcighen is made j versions. 

of different material from his neigh- 1 The most interesting things about 

yesterday's elections concerns Mon- 
day's election in Alabama— the remov- 
al beyond doubt of the fact that Lead- 

munication in a Preston newspaper ' er Underwood was nominated by the 

chooses to put his opposition to the ' I>emocrats of Alabama to be their ^ don' t reduce it'too'^'muchr 

reapportionment law not on the j candidate for United States senator ' * 

ground that it is unequal or unfair. ; They chose him in preference to - , 

but, forsooth, that it was "the work ! "Hero" Hobson and thev chn<in ,v;ft, ' ™"'*'"*^ ^^^' ^'^^^^^ ^^^ »"" shone and | of vermilion, and the almost" 

of the agents of the «:t#»el ,-^r ' ev, p^^;,.« , • i' r^ V. ,, ^^'^"iwhen they had finished a high hay- fire that leaps up from the sinkin 

,» ^^^"^^. °^ ^^*^ ^*<^<^' corpora- I exceeding wisdom. Oscar F. Under- 1 stack the boy shouted from the top: as from a fountain. Behold the fi 

tionr It IS impossible to take that ! wood is a big man and a valuable 

as anything but a joke. The home of man. and it would have been a great 

the "steel trust" is in St. Louis coun- I loss if he had been crowded out of'*"** finally solved it: 

[public life by defeat at the hands of i "''*'• ■"'' "''"' '"" 



impression, but scarcely a word of j that her own first entrant will win all 
congratulation did he receive. Every- the honors in the contest, Ohio makes 
body showered the congratulations on known the man and the evidence of his 
Borchers who was unable to get any- patience. I 

thing done for a day or two. but de- He is George F. Brown of Canton ' 
vote himself to explaining that he is I He hired out to a farmer In 1889 at 
not Wickersham, but Borchers. If he I $30 a month, has not had a pavday i 
walks along the street, he cannot pro- since, but has delayed till now suing J 
ceed far until somebody stops him to ! his employer. Three hundred months 
discuss the situation in Alaska. The at $30 a month equals $9,000 and pa 



"^^^^^^k^^^^^AnA^^^^^ 



I V^FIIIIA 4 Dny« rommene- 

*■ ' ^»fcWWl injf Tiium.. April 9 

Matinem Saturday and Snnday. 
Nights. 2Se to f IJSO) Mat»., 50e to fll. 



Alaskan territory has become such a 
nuisance to him that he fairly hates 
the place. 

Wickersham similarly wastes a lot 
of time conveying assurance to people 
that he is not Borchers. 

One day recently the two met to 
see what could be done in the waj' of 
arbitration. Both agreed that, come 
what may, they will never forsake 
the high principles that have actuated 
them thus far in life. So it was no 



tient Mr. Brown wants the court to 
get him that amount. 

Think of a payday once In twenty- 
five years. Think of a "ghost" which 
refuses to "walk" oftener than once in 
a quarter century. Think, further, of 
the supermannish patience of an em- 
ploye who would wait so long to bring 
his boss before a jury for an account- 
ing. 

The Canton man, one takes It, has 
a moderate disposition. He has not 



use to talk any farther about either Uared to do anything hasty. He prob- 
one raising side whlskens Inasmuch' bly liked his position and rather than 
as Wickersham was here first, it was embarrass his employer by Inconsld" 

conceded to be no more than fair that p.yai^ HoTnnn/ia er^T «,^ ■"v-vfuaiu 

Borchers should make most of tha ' demands for money, preferred 

±3orchcrs snouia maite most or the . „<,,„, ^^^d then to give him eight or ten 



OLIVER MOROSCO 

oenns 

A Superb Pi-otfuotion of 
the Motft Brilliant Comec^ 
yel Written In Amerio* 



PEG 



MY 
HEART 



For there remained just one most fool- facial sacrifices. So Borchers Is eo-]"'"""'"'^",;:^ ^''%,"'"" *"k""' ""^ ^""^ 
i-vi tiiinc- > i , i. •-• i 1. ^ i > cars more for meeting the pavroll 

isn ining ling to let his mustache grow to two — .... ^ '■"^ p«t>roii 



Each night It waked from sleep with necessary he may let it grow until 
dreadful clamoring 
And endless gibings at my puerile 
goal. 
For those without it mourned In con- 
stant sorrowing; 
Naught could I do to quiet or console. 



or three times Its normal size in the I ?ratron*'L''r'nrs.r'f* *"""^' °/ *'"*»'- 

tratlon as a peace agency pale into 

with such 



hope that it will end the confusion. If | • "«A+o"'^^- ^^k^^ ^ \v, :, 

„..^<.«o.^ h« r^oxr i«f li .r^«« „.,fii "npotency when compared 



Thus driven desperate. I razed my wall 

with travail sore! 
Back trooped those pardoning, hopeful 

things to me once more — 
And lo! Upon my threshold stood an 

angel blotting out a score! 
— E. H. Wolff in New York Times. 



he has a long drooping clrcus-propri 
etor-mustache like that worn by Sena- 
tor Walsh of Montana. 
(i,'op}Tlght, 1914. by Fred C. Kelly. All rights reserved.) 



monumental patience as this. 




"Say, mister, how am I going to get 
downr' 

The farmer considered the problem 



ty. which gained no more— if so much , public life by defeat at the hands of l around a bit!" 



;r eyes an' walk 



Kind Word*. 

Youth's Companion: It Is often told 
that Eugene Field one day wandered 
into a basement restaurant, sat down i 
at a table, put his chin in his hands i 
and gazed moodily into space. A wait- 
er came to him and after the manner ' 
of his kind enumerated the long list 
of dishes that were ready fro be served ' 
"a\o, no," said Field, dejectedly "f i 
require none of those things. All I ' 
want is some sliced oranges and a few • 
kind words." ^ • 

Whether or not the Incident be true 
It Is suggestive. Unqufestionablv, deeds 
weigh far more than words, and yet It 
is almost tragic to think how much 
happier and better this struggling 
world would become if kind words 
were more often heard. W^e all, every 
day, come in contact with those who 
are in Eugene Field's state of mind 
They are in our own homes: mother^ 
ng sun you," said the man of the house, "be- ■ and fathers anfl children. They are be 
frame- I cause these pipes need looking after. ' hind the counters of stores- thev or 
work of darkening skies and of deep There's a leak somewhere and a lot of employes on trains- they are QorV«!!* 

gas going to waste." »- '-'*"^ « ser\ants 



EMPRESS/ 



L.AST 
TIMES 



Natnre. 

LIpplncett's: He was enraptured 
with the scenery. His fair companion 
at the country resort sat upon the 
stone wall beside him. 

"Behold that exquisite sunset!" he 

Tile Qnlekeat Way. exclaimed. "Note the delicate fle.-^h- 

Pltt.'^burg Chronicle: They had been tints, the creaiia shades, the long dashes 

living 



"W^anted to Know. 

Savannah Press: Blushing, she hid 
her face on her father's shoulder. 

"He lover me," she breathed. 

"Wants to marry you, eh?" the old 
man grunted. 

"Yes, papa." 

"What's his income?" 

She started. 

"I don't know," she murmured, "but 
the coincidence is very strange." 

"What coincidence?" asked her 
father. 

"Clarence," she answered, "asked the 
very same question about your In- 
come." 



The Re-treaiilns Comedy Drama 

"THE SLAVES W THE 
ORIEHT" 

— WItfc— 
CRGSTKR BISHOP 
And an Able ComiMiny. 



M5W SHOW Till RSUAV, 

4 A'avdeville Aetn and tke Feature 

FiiH»^ "THE Tt HMXG POIXT." 



All In the Bill. « 

Milwaukee Journal: "I have sent for 



green. Isn't \i wonderful?" 

His fair 'companion sighed heavily. 
"You just bet it is!" she exclaimed. 



"No, sir," replied the gas company's 
Inspector, meditatively; "maybe there's 



"It looks just like a great big lobster a leak, but there ain't any gas going to 
salad!" j waste— you'll find it all in tbe bill." 



in kitchens; they are everywhere and 
their name Is legion. A word of ap- 
preciation would brighten the whole 
day and would make It easier for them 
to keep on taring. ™ 



, w- -* •* 





■»■ 



Wednesday, 



THE DULUTH HERALD 



April 8, 1914. 




THE OPEN COURT 



T 



(Ttravlrrs of "Hie H»r»lJ »re In»H»<1 to mtke fr*« 
UM i>C This columu to e\pr««» t etr t«l««» about tlie 
loph-» of ge-ieril ii:t*;psi. but aiicua^ona of •ectarlan 
l«Uclou3 illffemu-** tr» barrfd. Utter* must rot 
escMd 3«0 words -fli« «hon#r tlie barter. T\wj niusi 
IM wrtittn rn one tf-J* ol iJm ff«P*I.^iii{. »"^ '•^^J 
B»u>t be ■ccuui>anlrd lu eterj oaa« Ty tuj !l«u^ '"<• 
adiirois of the writer tUiueh th(»e iieetl net be i«uTf» 
lislteU. A sljiied letter is alw»y» mors effettUe. Uorr- 

THE SWOkFrROBLEM. 



To the Editor of The Herald: 

In vour issue of April 6 I notice an 
artiolo headed. -Will Give Talk on 
Sn.oke rrevention." which stated that 
U'^orge S. Conley. fuel inspector for 
the Northern Pacific Railroad com- 
pany, would dfllver a lecture on sniokc 
prevention before the Duluth cltj 
council. I wondered why he had sc- 
lecied the city council to instruct in 
that subject. 

Further alonjr In the article I read 
that Mr. Conley had been In our city 
several days, and I immediately con- 
cluded that he had bt^en present at 
Saturday night's tire and observed that 
the fire engines made more smoke than 
the confiagration. or possibly he may 
have spent a few mintites watching 
that outfit that goes arotind ihawlng 
out st^wers. If he missed aeelnj both 
those, then ho must have wandered 
down to Michigan street and Seconc. 
avenue east and been rendered 
thoughtful at the sight of the atmos- 
phere in vicinity of the smoke in- 
spector's and other ofticials' headquar- 
ters. 

Many of us will watch eagerly for 
the better observance of smoke ordi- 
nance by the city's steam operators 
hereafter, and. no doubt, when the city 
has found out how to operate its steam 
engines, steam boilers, steam road 
rollers and sewer thawers (smokeless- 
ly) that the public will sit up and 
take notice. 

Tours for a clearer atmosphere, 

J. E. FALARDEAU. 

Duluth. April 7. 

THE LEGION OF THE UNEMPLOYED 



To the Editor of The Herald: 

Mr. Editor. I have another bee in my 
bonnet. This time it Is a desire to say 
* few words on the great and grow- 
ing subject of "the unemployed" that 
Induces me to take up the pen and 
diffuse a little of my vast (?) sum of 
knowledge. In looking over The Her- 
ald of March 24 I saw an article by 
Algot Enge entitled "The Unemployed," 
and I confess that until th^n I had not 
noticed the subject 6n the editorial 
page of March 21. also called "The 
Unemployed.' So digging back among 
some papers of different sorts I found 
the edition of the 2lst and read both 
through carefully. I noted what Mr. 
Enge said about bringing the man and 
the job together, by separating the 
child from the job. I also considered 
his ideas in the second phase, where 
he says. "Pass a law — an effective 
law — against the exploitation of. prison 
labor for the enrichment of private In- 
dividuals." I wl-sh to say that I agree 
with what he says In his first idea. 
but I don't know enough on the sub- 



ject of prison-made goods to express , 
myself in full on this point, thoufh.it 
does look reasonable on the face of It. 
I believe moat of the readers wlli 
agree with me that, from the language 
and ideas of Air. Enge, Ihcy would ^ 
judge he yv&s a Socialist. That Is no . 
disgrace. I admire many of the So- ' 
Clnllst |dfa3 mvqelf, «"<! I PQinetinics 
fear' that I m.iy become a full-fledged 
member If this poverty, crime and mis- 
ery keeps on as they are lit many 
places — (shall I say the most of 
places?) There are things about the 
Socialist doctrine that I don't like; 
yes, there are two or three points 
about It that I consider foolish, almost 
crazy, but I haven't got the time nor 
inclination just now to tell what they 
are, nor to argue It out. But now to 
return to the editorial of the 21st. The 
editoi' says that "one good thing at 
least will How out of" all this noise 
about the unemployed. This Is, that 
more thought for the luckless lot of , 
the man out of a job is being taken 
than ever before. And it may be that 
something tangible will come of it— , 
jioraething practically and conttructlve- ' 
ly helpful. Let us hope so — and also 
work for It. The Cood Book tells us 
that "F'aith without works Is dead. " 
Farther on the editor tells us that 
"There are many jobless men in the 
country, even when prosperity is at 
the fuH of its tide; even when, at | 
many points, grain rots In the fields or 
needed work goes undone for lack of 
help. " Next the editor says. "This is , 
s^o because there is no organizr^d plan j 
for getting the man and job together." 

would not attempt to say that l\ 
know more than the editor on this j 
subject, but there are many things} 
that need explaining. considering, 
turning It about, and viewing It from I 
different angles. And this reminds me 
of something, but before 1 go straight 
to that "something" I'll put in a few 
words on the other ride, as it were. A 
few days ago I was talking to one of 
my neighbors about the idle and out 
of work, when he quickly came back 
with the remark. "You know. George, 
there are men who won't work." I 
answered, "You're right, there are, but 
etc." Then I went and got a copy of 
Appeal to Reason, No. 953, and read a 
small Item to him entitled, "What a 
Social Worker Thinks." Here It is: 
"Ten per cent are hopeless wrecks. 
Another 10 per cent are booze victims, 
drug victims, vice victims — pretty far 
gone — too far to be able to brace up 
without steady and patient help. But 
80 per cent have simply lost their 
nerve because of the haunting uncer- 
tainty of employment. They are men 
who would make good if they could 
get steady jobs at fair wages and with 
fair treatment." Then my neighbor 
said, "Yes, there's a lot to that 'fair 
treatment.' " Which brings me back 
to a reminder of that "something," — 
and this Is it: AVhen a laboring man 
applies for a job — no, I mean when he 
I tacklee his job— after he has got It. 
I (I don't claim to know exactly how- 
many times In a hundred, but I'd place 
'it at eighty-five anyhow) — he Is ex- 
i pected to do just as much the first day 
[as he did on the fifth or the tenth 
! day — and his muscles are not used to 
I it. Once in a while a good-hearted 
I boss will go easy on 9- man till he 



Throat 
Is Common Trouble 

Should Be Treated in Blood 
To Prevent Recurrence. 




SCORESHADE 
BY DAIRYMEN 

Milk Inspector Mqlkes Public 

Records for the First 

Quarter. 



There are euocpssful garglos that atop 
aorencss in the throat, but to prevent their 
Inces.oant return, the blood must be put in 
order. Qlte best remedy Is S. S. 8.. as It 
Influences ail the functions of the body to 
nputralize the Irritants or waste products 
and to stimulate their excretion through 
the proper channels. 

Rheumatic sore throat Is a dangfrous 
Indication, as It means that the blood Is 
loaded with more uric acid than the kid- 
neys can excrete, and may thus lead to 
serious general disturbance. ^^ j, Anton 

The action of 8. S. S. stimulates cellular '^^"'^ ana Anion 
actlTlty. It prevents the accumulation of <--""—' «""* 
Irritants in local spots. It enables ths 
arteries to supply quickly the new rea 
blood to replace worn out tissue. 

For this reason uric acid that finds ths 
throat an easy prey to Its breaklne-down 
Influence, Is scattered and eliminated. In 
other words. S. S. S. prevents chronic con- 
ditions by enabling all the mucous linings 
of the body to secrete healthy mucus. Its 
Influence Is shown In a marked Improve- 
ment of the bronchial tubes, whereby the 
huBkiness of voice with thick, grayish ex- 
pectorations Is overcome. ». S. S, well 
diluted with water, means a blood bath, 
since it is welcome to any stomach and at 
once gets into the blood. 

8 S. S. Is free of all minerals and con- 
tain's Ingredients wonderfully conducive to 
well-balanced health. , ^ ^ ^ / 

You can get It at any drug store, but do 
not accept anything else. There is danger 
In substitutes. S. P. S. is prepared only by 
The Swift Specific Co.. 528 Swift Bldg., 
Atlanta. Ga. Our Medical Dept. will give 
you free Instruction bv mall on any subject 
of blood disorders. Write today. 



Only Two Above 90 Mark- 
Spring Cleaning in 
Progress. 




Yes.daughter.thats 

HNEfor SPRAINS 



Helped Her Knee 

Mrs. T. E. Wil- 
liams, of Chicago. 
III., writes: "This 
%vinter I sprained 
my knee, and a 
friend recom- 
mended Sloan's 
Liniment. 1 used it 
at^d it did me lots 
of good." 



A Quick Improvement 



You ve only put it on 
twice, and the pain's all 
gone, and my arm's "bout 
as well as ever. I sure never 
saw anything so quick as 
Sloan's." 

So say thousands of oth- 
ers who have used Sloan's 
Liniment for many years 
for barns, scalds, cuts and 
sprains. 

Best for Sprained Wrist 



Mi-iS H. S. Spoke»fleld. 

of Liiiwood. Mass... writes: 

'The other day I called on 



Mr. L. Roland Bishop, of Scranton, 
P»., writes: "As I was leaving my 

office for lunch, I slipped and fell, „-i„hhnr « beautiful 

spraining my wrist. and at four "> ,"^\^-, J' " T^f. Uh„ 

o'clock could not liold a pencil in my S'i*.' fnn;n\fnrt« i i^ Tnd 

hand. At five o'clock I purchased a ^*^:'^ 1" "^H*?'f' l"d 

bottle of your Liniment, used it five K^,.^Xt af.rX«2rt«in^ for 

or six tiiAes before I went to bed. ^.'^nS ,be s^id »^e JaS 

and the next day I was able to use "'•*"„ c/!lti?.'_ »',',* h^t? 

«,., h,nH =« .,a..oi •• using Sloan f— the best 



gets c. little hardened in or limbered 
up, as the case may be. I have known 
of two or three section bosses when 
they received a new hand, also a man 
who had Just returned from a "spree" 
and felt like a physical wreck for the 
time being, to plainly remind him to 
"take it a little easy for today — 1 
know how you feel." Right here I 
realize, like Savoyard, that I've been 
"drifting away" — so let's return to 
that editorial. The editor says — away 
down toward the last — "Therefore some 
system of labor distribution is needed. 
To be helpful, it must be national In 
Its scope. To be permanent and ef- 
fective. It must be governmental." 
Um! Hold on! I guess I'll let go of 
that. I don't believe the digestive ap- 
paratus In my mind is strong enough 
to handle that yet. But for all that, 
it may be that The Herald Is right. 
And time and trial may yet prove the 
wisdom in the words that sums the 
matter up, to wit: "To be permanent 
and effective It must be governmental." 
That doesn't sound very good when 
we consider the stacks of millionaires 
in this country, does It? Some of those 
swell-headed, big-bellied, walking 
money-bags, who are possessed of 
such a low, mean nature that they 
would like to make either prosperity 
or a panic just for the satisfaction 
there Is In it, should read and con- 
sider Gen. Iv., 9-10 — "And the Lord 
said unto Cain. Where Is Abel, thy 
brother? And he said, I know not; am 
I my brother's keeper? 10. And He 
said. What hast thou done? The voice 
of thy brother's blood crleth unto me 
from the ground." The rich men of 
this country have been sowing greed, 
pride, haughtiness, cruelty and care- 
Icsnees. And they are reaping antag- 
onism, brute force, distrust, strikes. 
Socialism, union labor, loss of confi- 
dence, hatred, bombs and dynamite. 
"Be not deceived — God is not mocked. 
For whatsoever a man sowcth that 
shall he also reap." 

Thanking you for the space. If it is 
satisfactory to be printed, and prom- 
ising to try and abstain from suc',- 
long harangues in the future. I re- 
main, a being of sympathy for the 
poor, GEORGE W. McKAY. 

Kelsey, Minn., April 6. 



But two Duluth dairymen scored 'JO 
per cent or better in 'the quarterly 
scoring which has been completed by 
Milk Inspector Gust Hedman. J. U. 
Sebenius was given a mark of 94.a per 
Moe was next with »0.3. 

Several went below 70 per cent, but 
enables ths | the majority were between 70 and 'JO 
per cent. , , 

The milk Inspector explains that this 
is the most unfavorable time of the 
year for the dairymen, which accounts 
for the falling off from the previous 
scorings. The cows have been In the 
barn all winter, and It has been diffi- 
cult to keep the stables In the best 
condition. The milk Inspector is con- 
fident that the next quarterly scoring 
will show a material Improvement. 

Tlie svstem used In rating the dairies 
Is that "followed by the Federal gov- 
ernment. It takes into consideration 
all conditions of the dairy, such as 
light, ventilation, equipment and sani- 
tation. The report also shows the num- 
ber of cows in each herd, the quality 
of milk furnished daily by each dairy- 
man, the average butter fat and the 
average or last bacteria count. 

Housewives can ascertain the ratings 

of their dairymen from the following 

table: 

Ave. or 

LASt 

B.C. 

3,000 
17,000 
48,000 
€3,000 
99,000 
10.000 

i;!,ooo 

69,000 

40,000 

12,600 

wh 

6,250 

82,000 

134,000 

8,000 
19.600 
27,000 

7,000 
13,000 

2,000 
10,000 
18,000 



Name — 
Anderson, And.. 
Anderson, Alb. . 
Anderson, O. A. . 
Anderson, Dave. 
Anderson J. H. . 
Anderson, O. . . . 
Anderson, O. M. . 
Anderson, Sivert. 



m 

I Ave. 

Score. Butter 
March. Fat. 



.80.8 
.80.1 
.73.8 
.66.3 

8n ■» 
*.. .J 

.82.2 

.74.7 

.76.5 



my hand as usual. 



liniment there is." 



SLOANS 

UNIMENT 

has great antiseptic power. Use it for cuts, wounds, bums, and 
the sting of poisonous insects 

M al! dealers. Price, 25c., 50c and $1.00 
DR. EARL S. SLOAN, Inc., BOSTON, MASS. 



^1 



'/ 



\\. 



^. 



b 



Ol 



.'^Z 



5,918,098 

gallons sold in 1913 

1,536,232 

gallons more ihan 1912 



-"PiCTIOS REDUCINC MOTonOil 



Lubricates perfectly slW makes and types 
of motor .cars, motor trucks, motor- 
cycles and motor boats. 

Inferior lubrication means not only deteri- 
oration of thousands of gasoline motors 
every year, but extravagance in main- 
tenance cost. 

Reliable oil is vital. Let the mak- 
er's name be your guide in buying. 

POLARINE maintains the cor- 
rect lubricating body at 
any motor speed or tem- 
perature and remains \\1 
hquid at zero. 



PASTOR ONLY 
ADMONISHED 

Dr. Price Convicted of "Im- 
prudent and Unminis- 
terial Conduct." 



Bergtold & Ryan.. 84 

Bergson. G 80.5 

Bolander. P. A. ...70.9 

B. & R. Co 

Brown, Sam 76.8 

Bjorken, John ...67.4 

Cohen, Abe 70.6 

Carlson, Carl 79.7 

Claus, Carl 71.6 

Clausen, Louis ...80.8 
Dinkel & Ingram. 78. 8 

Drown. E. D 76.1 

Duty, Peter 75.9 

Erickson & Bellls.68.8 ■ 
Forsman & Chel- 

strom 77.2 

Grady, J. R 73.8 

Gould. Harry 80.a 

H. & M. Co 

Hlckey, J. P 77.4 

Hunhila. Elias .. .72.9 
Hallberg. John ..74.7 

Huilford. L 69.3 

Huttel Bros 74 

Hendrickson, Ad.. 86. 7 

Holder, T 67. B 

Johnson, C. R. . . 80 
Johnson, N. J. ...76. 5 
Johnson, T. H. . . .81.2 
Johnson, C. A. ...78.1 
Johnson, Ernest.. 80. 8 
Kurosky, Mike ..81 

Keller, S 81.7 

Klosowsky, Anton.73.1 
Lindgren Bros. ...74.9 

La Tour Bros 71.2 

Llghthearth, L. ..87.7 

McLain, W. D 82.3 

McMinn, C. E. ... .66.4 

Moe, Anton 90.3 

Martin, F. T 78 

Muckart, \Vm. ...84.3 

Xorman, S. J 76.8 

O'Brien, A. S 87.2 

Owen. G. E 79.9 

Oliver, Harry 81.1 

Olson, O. M 76.1 

Peterson, M. C. .. .72.7 
Plkkarainen, John.78.3 
Ruhnke, F. W. ..66.3 
Rlverness, John ..77.7 
Riverness & John- 
son 78.7 

St. Louis Co. farm. 85. 6 
Sisters' farm ....78.4 

Solem, Ellas 80.7 

Stebenfeldt, T. .. .78.3 
Sebenius. J. U. ...94.9 
Singleton Bros. . .89.8 
Sargent, W. H. ...86.3 

Salin, Axel 78.3 

Smith, Harry 72 

Tranmel, Ole ...."g^T 

Unden, N 72.9 

Wlckman & Oak.. 83.7 
Windom, W. L. ...72.7 



4.2 
4.0 
3.7 
3.9 
4.2 
4.2 
3.9 
3.6 
3.7 
3.9 
4.1 
3.7 
4.2 
3.6 
4.0 
4.0 
3.9 
3.7 
4.4 
4.2 
4.4 
4 

3.65 

4.0 

3.7 

8.56 

3.65 

4.1 

3.6 

4.1 

4.3 

4.4 

* • • 

3.5 

3.5 

4.0 

4.2 

3.95 

3.4 

4.5 

3.6 

4.0 

6.0 

4.2 

4.0 

4.2 

4.2 

4.1 

3.9 

4.1 

4.8 

3.65 

4.3 

3.6 

8.76 

3.6 

S.7 

4.0 



10.800 

wh 

2,000 

43,000 

129,000 

7,000 

63,000 

wh 

17,000 

•;' 20,000 

wh 

99,000 

222,000 

1,000 

33,000 

21,500 

12.000 

28,000 

wh 

66,000 

wh 

8.000 

18.000 

7,000 

3,500 

7,000 

16,000 

4,000 

6,000 

88.000 

13,500 

27,000 



Your Boys' Easter Clothes 

ARE READY 
AT THE BIG DULUTH 

Your boy needs a new Suit for Easter, Confirmation or the 
last day of school, and you can't buy anything so serviceable 
as one of The Big Duluth Suits, made especially for Duluth 
boys who are extremely hard on their clothes. 

Special for Easter ^S^£^» C4 OC 

Suits— Special for Easter at ^/^♦ / \J 

Other grades from $6.45 to $15. 

Great assortment of Nobby Mixtures in Boys' Summer 
Suits from $2.45 to $18. 

Young Men's Easter or Con- tf t /^ftan^ 1 1 4^ 
firmation Long Pant Suits at "^ ^ ^^3 V ^^^ i$ J J* 

Other grades from $10 to $35. 

ADVANCE SHOWI NG OF BOYS' WASH AND PLAY SUITS 

A host of Nobby Easter Hats and Caps, White Shirts and 
Blouses, Nifty Easter Neckwear, Gloves, Shoes and all the 
fixings a boy will need are here in great variety. 






WILLIAMSON & MENDENHALL 



M'GILVRAY 
IS SELECTED 

Will Be in Charge of Con- 
struction of Fond du 
Lao Bridge. 



County Board Authorizes 

Structure Which Will 

Cost $35,000. 



120.000 

wh 

15,000 



Own use. 
Own use. 



14,500 



4.2 
4.6 
4.4 
4.1 
4.8 
3.8 
3.4 
4.2 
3.7 
4.1 
4.4 



8,000 

309,000 

2,000 

21,000 

132,000 

12.000 

114.000 

6.000 

4.000 

1,000 

13,500 



Thomas F. McGilvray of the Duluth 
Engrlneering: company, former city en- 
gineer, was appointed by the board of I 
county commissioners yesterday after- 
noon to take charge of the construc- 
tion of the proposed wagon and foot 
bridge across the St. Louis river at 
Fond du Lac, which will give Duluth 
and St. Louis county a direct highway 
into Carlton county and through to the 

Twin Cities. . , 

The board selected a special engi- 
neer for the work owing to the fact 
that E. K. Coe, county road and bridge 
engineer, would be unable to devote as 
much of his time to it as the board 
would like, on account of a number 
of other projects which he is now 
handling. ., , ,. 

The commissioners, as had been ex- 
pected, passed the resolution offered 
by Commissioner Kauppi authorizing 
the construction of the bridge which 
will cost 136,000 exclusive of engi- 
neering expenses. The board directed 
Charles E. Adams, its attorney, to get 




ODONNELL'S 



Fine Home Made\ 

Candies and Home \ 

Made Bakery 

Goods 



FRESH PIES, CAKES, ROLLS and HOME 
MADE BREAD READY AT 3 P. M. DAILY 



Oy^ EASTEIR SFEOB^L— irR^^oV^Ss^s 



■ See Window Display 

23 Second Avenue West oppeMie Rex iiieaier 



MAMMA, DADDY AND CHILDREN ALL 

LOVE "CAUFORNrA SYRUP OF HGS" 



Harmless 'Truit Laxative" Cleanses 

Stomach, Liver and 

Bowels. 



A delicious cure for constipation, 

_. ^__ .. _ biliousness, sick headache, sour stom- 

tnto touch with the war department so I ach, indigestion, coated tongue, sal- 



>r>i 



\'\W!^ 



•r^'/l 



STANDARD OIL COMPANY 

UK SraiAlTA COKTOXATIOR) 

Maker* of LikricatiBj Oils for Leading Eagioeeriag and 
bdattrial Works of the World 



>^ 



y// 



(2151 



^^^ 



New York, April 8. — "Guilty of im- 
prudent and unminlsterlal conduct," 
was the verdict of the court of the 
New York conference of the Methodist 
Episcopal church against Rev. Dr. 

Jacob E. Price, pastor of the Washing- 
ton Heights church, defendant on 
charges made by women members of 
his congregation. 

Two other specifications, one accus- 
ing Dr. Price of "immorality In con- 
duct In violation of the moral law" 
and the other of "Indulgence of sinful 
tempers and words," were not sus- 
tained. 

It was the Judgment of the select 
committee which reported to the con- 
ference that Dr. Price "should be, and 
hereby is, admonished" as a result ot 
his conviction on the first specifica- 
tion. 

Bishop Luther B. "Wil.son, presiding 
at the conference, directed the conf«ir« 
ence to receive the findings of the com- 
mittee without any expression of. ap- 
proval or disapproval. The commit- 
tee's report accordingly was received 
In silence. 

The court did not find Dr. Price 
guilty of acts sufficiently flagrant to 
demand a change of pastorate, for In 
the list of charges for the ensuing 
vear, as read by Bishop Wilson. Dr. 
Price retains his Washington Heights 
pulpit. 

HEAVY SNOW FALLS 
ON AP PLE B LOSSOMS. 

Ro.«iwell, N. M.. April 8.— With 3.000 
acres of apple orchards In full bloom, 
a heavy snow storm fell here last 
night, doing great damage to the 
crop. The snow storm followed an all- 
day ruin. 

MEATLESS LIGHT 

S OON. H E CLAIMS. 

Cincinnati, Ohio, April 8. — Prof. W. 
I D. Hancroft of Cornell announced the 

di.si.overy of a light known as the 
\ "••lectric firefly," In an address at the 
j convention of thn American Chemical 

association here yesterday. This light 
j r»f»embl»"s the phosphorescent glow of 
! a firefly, but is not yet commercially 
, available. Prof. Hancroft made the 
' announcement of his discovery In a 
i paper in which he declar»?d that light 
i without h«at Is a near possibility. 



WANT ALL WESTERN 

RAT ES REA DJUSTED. 

Denver, Colo., April 8. — At a confer- 
ence here of traffic commissioners of 
eleven Western cities. It was decided 
that a petition should be filed with- | 
In ninety days before the Interstate 
commerce commission for a general re- 
adjustment of transportation rates for 
trans-Mlssourl territory, provided a 
compromise is not reached between the 
carriers and the interested communi- 
ties within that period. 

It was also decided to call a second 
conference In Denver as soon as prac- 
ticable and that communities affected 
be urged to send delegates. A confer- 
ence also Is to be held with repre- 
sentatives of the railroad within the 
ninety-day period, but no definite date 
was set. 

The meeting was held under the di- 
rection of a special rate committee 
of the Denver chamber of commerce, 
and was the result of many months' 
fight for lower rates in the Western 
territories. 



SERIOUS CATARRH 
YIELDS TO HYOMEI 



Be wise in time and 
use the Hyomel inhaler 
at the first symptom of 
catarrh, such as frequent 
head colds, constant snif- 
fling, raising of mucus, 
or droppings in the 
throat. Do not let the 
disease become deep- 
seated and you are in 
danger of a serious if 
not fatal ailment. 

There is no other treat- 
ment for catarrh, head 
colds, husky voice or 
bronohltis, like the Hyo- 
mel method, none Just as 
good, so easy and pleas- 
ant to use, or that gives 
.such quicit, sure and 
lasting relief. You 
breathe it — no stomach 
dosini?. Boyce drug store 
sells ft ^'ith agreement 
to reftjnd your money if 
you afe not benefltea. 

Try ITypmcl at once 
and s^e now quickly it 
clears the head, stops the 
sniililnK, and bani-shes catarrh. Hyomel 
will help you to enjoy good health. All 
druKgists sell it. Asfii for iho coniplcte 
outntr— fl.OQ. filz% 



that the necessary permission might 
be secured for building the structure 
across the Interstate stream. 

The construction of the bridge will 
be begun at the earliest possible mo- 
ment. 

o * * 

Road contracts In the Fifth, Sixth 
and Seventh commissioners' districts 
were let by the board yesterday after- 
noon as follows: 

Fifth district — MattI Hannula, four 
miles of the Hodgson road, $3,020; Emll 
Lund & Co.. 3% miles of the Agnew 
road, $4,064. 

Sixth district— Alex Maki, 2}^ miles 
of the Young road from Vermilion 
road to south quarter corner of sec- 
tion 3, fv6-14, $1,046 per mile; Mattl 
Harris, two wooden bridges over Mud- 
hen river on the Farmers' road. $510. 

Seventh district — Fred Gustafson, 
one mile of the Gustafson road $2.76 
per rod; Matt Perala. one mile of 
Goodwill road on south line of section 
31 61-19, $2.66 per rod; Thomas Bowen, 
one mile Greaney road on east line 
section 16. 62-21, $900. 

♦ • • 

The board made the following ap- 
propriations for improvements of roads 
in the Second district: McQuade road, 
$1,000; Riley road, $500; Bast Du- 
luth and Lester River road, $500; How- 
ard and Gnesen road, $500; North 
Shore road, $1,000; Stiff Line road, 
$1000; West Knife road, $800; Flynn 
road, $400; Rj-an road, $600; Tlscher 
road, $2,600; Normanna road, $500; Ver- 
milion road, f4,4C0; Lismore road, $500; 
Howard and Gnesen road in city lim- 
its, $3,000; Calvary road, $l,0t)O; Rice 
Lake and Vermilion roads, $1,500; 
Norton road, $500. 

♦ » • 

A communication was received by 
the board from the state board of con- 
trol recommending that the Interior of 
the county jail building be painted at 
once. The matter was referred to the 
jail committee of the board. 

* WOMEN 100 YKAPS * 
I OLD VOTED "DRY." % 

^ Syrnmore. III., April 8.— MIrb « 
^ MirKRret S^lnbank. 101 rt^m old, ^ 

* rast her f Irwt vote here ye»ter- ^ 

* day. She voted "dry." m 
A MImm S^vlnbank In bcllrvrd to be ^ 
^ the oldeMt ^voman voter In this %i 

* atate. * 

^ f.ockport. 111., April 8. — Mm. « 
^ I.ydla C. Bamen, 100 ycarM old, * 
^ cant her flrtit vote ymterday. Mr«. * 

* Barnes voted "drj." ^ 

* * 

IS CONTRACT RELATION. 

Members of Polish Church Associa- 
tion Must Abide By Its Laws. 

Milwaukee, Wis.. April 8. — Roman 
Kowalkoskl and Harry Olzewski lost 
their suit to be reinstated as officers 
cf the Central admiulstration of the 



lowness — ^take "California Syrup of 
Figs." For the cause of all this dis- 
tress lies in a torpid liver and slug- 
gish bowels. 

A tablespoonful to-night means all 
constipation, poison, waste matter, 
fermenting food and sour bile gently 
moved out of j^our system by morning \ so watch out. 



without griping. Please don't think 
of "California Syrup of Figs" as a 
physic. Don't think you are drugglngf 
yourself or your children, because 
this delicious fruit laxative can not 
cause injury. Even a delicate child 
can take it as safely as a robust 
man. It is the most harmless, ef- 
fective stomach, liver and bowel reg- 
ulator and tonic ever devised. 

Your only difficulty may be in get- 
ting the genuine; so ask your drug- 
gist for a 50 cent bottle of "California 
Syrup of Figs." Say to your drug- 
gist, "I want only that made by the 
•California Fig Syrup Company.' " This 
city has many counterfeit "fig syrups,'* 



Polish Association of America before 
Judge Grimm, the judge deciding yes- 
terday that the association did right 
In refusing to permit them to serve. 
They had oeen dismissed by the Rev. 
Bolesaus Qoral, spiritual adviser of 
the assoMatlon. 

"If the church exercises autocratic 
power in condemning certain things 
and restraining others without Just 
cause, the answer is that Kowalko- 
waskl and Olzewski voluntarily subor- 
dinated their rights to the obedience of 
such power when they became mem- 
bers," the court said. 

Judge Grimm held that the relation 
between the association and its mem- 
bers was a contract relation and in 
becoming members they contracted to 
abide by its laws. 

Earlier the association had Indorsed 
a pastoral letter written by Archbishop 
S. G. Messmer forbidding the Catholics 
among others, to join the American 
Federation of Polish Catholic laymen. 
Nevertheless the plaintiffs participat- 
ed In a convention of the federation 
,ns delegates, and for this they were 
dismissed from the association. 



Edmonton, with railway officials and 
guests, were at the scene. Moving 
pictures were taken of the track-lay- 
ing race. Chairman Smithers will drive 
the golden spike in August, when the 
line really will be finished. 

The Grand Trunk main line no^r 
stretches from Portland, Maine, to 
Prince Rupert, B. C. A line of steam- 
ers gives Prince Rupert connection 
with Vancouver and Puget Sound. A 
branch south from Fort George, B. C, 
now under construction, will permit 
the operation of trains to Vancouver. 



See the Flower Show 

at the Duluth Floral company. 

WOULD annuTmortgage. 



Trustee Sues in Behalf of Screen 
Company Creditors. 

R. W. Higglns. trustee In bank* 
ruptcy for the Minnesota Screen com- 
pany, on behalf of its creditors, yester- 
day started suit in district court la 
which It Is sought to have annulled a 
mortgage on certain property given by 
August de Noble and other officers and 

nver. B. C. April 8.-The last | JJre'-^tors of the company on April 1, 

n the Grand Trunk Pacific 1>'15- 

It i.^ alleged that at the time the 
mortgage was executed, the officers of 
the company knew of the company's 
Insolvency. The company is a Virginia 
corporation, which was organized on 
Jan. 24, 1910, with a capital stock of 
$60,000. The incornorators are Augu.«t 



DRIVE LAST SPIKE IN 

CANADIAN RAILWAY. 

Vancouv 
spike o 

transcontinental railway was driven 
at noon yesterday near the Nechaco 
river at Fort Frazer, B. C, 220 miles 
east of Prince Rupert. 

Monday night the track-laying gang 
on the east and west ends of con- 
struction left a half-mile gap. and yes- 
terday morning two crews raced for ^ ^, ^ - - 
the middle. President Chamberlain was de Noble, Millard Tdatheson and Ed- 
not present, but five special cars from 1 ward Curtis. 



FAMILY TRADE 



HAVE A CASE OF 



REX OR MOOSE 

BROUGHT TO YOUR HOUSE 
Call Grand 484-117 WEST FIRST 8T.-M«lroae4689 

NIUTH BREWING & MALTINfi COMPANY 



t 

i 

i 



'i 



it) 



Wedn^day, 




THE DULUTU H£RALD 



April 8, 1914. 





Misses\and Women^s 

SuitSy Coats and 
Dresses 

All Wool Serge Suits 

Collars and revers of moire silk and 
other favored trimmings, lined with 
Pcau de Cygne, at — 

%P X. v#« f O wards. 

Spring Coats 

In the new materials, Silk Moire, 
Jacquard, Wool Crepes, Serges and 
fancy checks, in Balmacaai.is and oth- 
er favored stvles, at — 



$14.75 




Spring Dresses 

Made of Chiffon, Taffeta. All-wool 
Crepe and Poplins; beautifully trim- 
med in the verv newest effects, at — 

$8.50 to $24.50 

SPECIAL VALUE— A big assort- 
ment of fine Serge Dresses at $5.95. 

•YOUR CREDIT IS GOOD. 




Ctn. Mii#r« 



MlU/ra— SUPERIOR— YIMINU 




PARIS IS BEING STIRRED 

BY FO UR NEW MOVEMENTS 

Organized Forces to Combat Rats, Immoral Clothes, 
Freak Art and Undeveloped Physique. 



I'arts, April 8. — Paris Is being stirred i ?raph will be iitlllzerl to show the 

by four new movements. Rata. Jm- parlous stages of development of ath- 

, , ^ . , ^ . J i letics by leaders in this branch of 

.moral clothes, freak art and unde- "^ 



\elopea physique are all to be com- 
batted by organized forces. 



sports. The league will give its aid to 
such organizations as wish to become 
allied with it, and will do everything 



Bf. i. 8«cw«rt Co. 

Steel. 4-drawer letter file, f27.50. 

G««4 Fvldny a UoUdmj. 

Only OIK' carrier delivery will be 
made by the postofflce on Good Fri- 
day, which is a legal holiday. The 
stamp and general delivery windows 
will b^ open only one hour during the 
day. from 9:30 to 10:30 o'clock in the 

morning. 

_ ^ 

FIh« Kanter Canto and ricture*. 

Deckers cor. 2nd Ave, \V & First St. 

In Oregon PoIIHcm. 

Elbert Uede, formerly of Duluyj 
and a son of J. Adam Bede, has filed 
as a caudl4ate for the lower houst* 
of the Oregon legislature. Mr. Bede Is 
editor of the Cottage Grove, Or., Sen- 
tinel and was presented with a peti- 
tion signed by sixty of the leading 
citizens asking him to become a can- 
didate, 

# 

Beautifal Iflanter Cardn. 

Engels' Art store. First avenue west. 

ineKlnley Uets 91»6. 

In dlbtrict court before Judge 
Dancer yesterday afternoon a jury 
brought In a verdict for $96 against 
D. H. Clough & Co., contractors, and 
their bondsmen, the National Surety 
company, and in favor of Robert C 
McKlnley. McKinley sued for gravel 
taken from his premises in section 
19, 60-11, which was used by the con- 
tractors In the construction of a city 
reservoir. McKinley sued for $1,200. 

Elaxter Week Servloen. 

Special Easter week services will be 
held at the First Presbyterian church 
tonight and Thursday and Friday eve- 
nings. Dr. Yost, the pastor, will be In 
charge. His subject tonight will be 
"The Things Christ Refused." The 
services will begin at 7:45 o'clock. 

We WIU Bond Von. 

Pulford. How & Co.. 609 Alworth 

building. 

* 

Coniml<i)ilo,ner« VI«ar Lecture. 

The members of the city council and 
several city officials attended a lec- 
ture given this morning in the fuel 
car of the Northern Pacific railroad by 
iJe-jr^a T. Conley, fuel Inspector. The 
car was run to a track opposite the 
re vr of the city hall for the conven- 
ience of the officials. Mr. Conley gave 
an interesting talk upon the elements 
of combustion, demonstrating his 
points with laboratory equipment as 
he proceeded. The car was filled with 
employes of the road and several citi- 
zens Interested In the smoke preven- 
tion attended. 



MuMt Return to Farm. 

William McLaughlin, 39 years old, 
who escaped from the police court sev- 
eral weeks ago after he had been sen- 
tenced to serve sixty days on the work 
farm for being drunk a third time, was 
arrested this morning. He will be 
committed on the original sentence. 



Sholnnd Case Watts. 

City Prosecutor Gurnee returned this 
morning from St. Paul, where he went 
Monday to represent the city of Du- 
luth In the Charles Sholund saloon li- 
cense case. Mr. Gurnee said this 
morning that the return of the writ 
of certiorari, set for yesterday, has 
been continued until April 28. 



Snspeet Is DlHckarged. 

John Fountalne, 19 years eld, who 
was arrested this morning by Capt. 
Fiskett on a charge of attempted lar- 
ceny, was discharged following a trial 
In police court. Fountalne was ac- 
cused by Charles Stubstad of the Mc- 
Kay notel of having attempted to steal 
$5 from his clothes. Fountalne denied 
the charge when arraigned and the 
case was later dismissed by Judge Cut- 
ting. 



-.,.._.. ^1- T # Tj »-i.^»i, T3'..»«„v, possible to put the country In a lead- 

'V\ hile the League of Patriotic French j^^ position in athletics. 

"Women has taken up the gage against Paris has also begun a war of exter- 

Indecent clothes, a reaction has also mlnatlon of rats. It Is estimated that 

com* to the great vogue of cubism, ' no less than 3,000,000 rodents Infest 

post-inipreaslonlsm. futurism and other the city. The central market and th« 

advan.-ed eethetlc art schools. A 1 stockyards are overrun by the pest. 

group of artists who hold ultra- Cotton RaUlng In Morocco. 

a<'ademical principles has been formed, i France might easily declare her In- 

They declare they have felt neglected, i dependence in the cotton growing In- 

♦ nd they have decided at last to makaidustry and ceasa the yearly "tribute" 
themselves heard. A new salon Is to be | of JoO.OOO.OOO for Imported cotton, 
formed, for even the present official i chiefly from the United States, accord- 
aaions show tendencies towards the . Ing to Laurent Bonnevay, who led a 
new heterodox school. recent debate on the Moroccan budget 

Some prominent artists ara behind in the chamber of deputies, 
the movement, which is likely to con- He declared that If France developed 
atltute a strong revolt against revolu- I the cotton lands of Northwest Africa It 
ti'^nary art. The majority of critics. • <ould produce all the cotton needed for 

♦ hilA by no means accepting all the French requirements, and export to 
clal-na of the cubists and futurtsts, j other manufacturing countries, 
freely admit that they have let air and i M. Bonnevay gave the results of an 
light Into the dry places of art, and , '"Qulry made by M. Lamba, an agrl- 
that exhibitions from which they are ! f^ultural expert who studied the cotton 
•xcluded seem dull and tame. In spite j growing possibilities of Tunis. Algeria 
Of their extravagances, they have sue- ; and Morocco. M. L^mba found that 
ceeded In being accepted «• serious ' cotton of an inferior quality was al- 
I.ioneer». The attitude of the general ready grown in some sections of these 
public Is Interrogatory, If not respect- i countries, and he wets convinced that 
Jul; there is little tendency to con- cotton culture could be made as re- 
«^mn off-hand, and that it is a clear muneratlve there as in Egypt, which 

now grows 1,500,000 bales. 

M. Bonnevay said the French constt- 

^_ _ _. lar agent at El-Ksa had imported 

France have come to "the support of an . Egyptian cotton plants and obtained 
■ithletic renaissance. A national league, excellent results. Several French offi- 
to aid la the development of physical : •■'«''s Interested In the agricultural de- 
education, has just been founded with i velopment of Morocco had also experl- 
the patronage of such men as Baron mented with cotton culture at outlying 
fierre de Coubertin, president of the \ French coasts with great success. M. 
International Olympic committee; Heb- Bonnevay had no doubt that cotton 
rard de Vllleneuve, counselor of state' would become the most valuable export 
and president of the Academy of ; ^t Morocco. 
Sports, and Maurice Donnay of the | 
French academy- 

At the head of the committee which 

♦ ill direct the movement Is the mar- 
t^uls de Polignac. 

A propaganda in favor of physical 
education will be carried out In several i Yankton, S. D.. April 8. — The girls' 
Vays. Lectures and practical demon- | dormitory a) Yankton college burned 
•tratlons will be given. The clnemato- ■ this morning. All the girls escaped. 

! The loss is $30.000. 



Will Meet With .School Beard. 

Dr. H. E. Webster, director of public 
health, will meet with the school 
board tomorrow to discuss the hand- 
ling of contagious diseases as they af- 
fect the schools. Dr. Webster wishes 
to have all suspicious cases promptly 
investigated 'n order that the spread 
of ontagious diseases through the 
pupils may be prevented. 

♦ — 

Klephant Tag on Each Orange 
is a guarantee of the highest quality. 

Original Sentence Imposed. 

Because Arthuv Sheehan, 24 years 
old, who was last year placed on pa- 
role following his conviction on a 
charge of larceny, failed to report to 
Probation Officer Hicks, he was yes- 
terday afternoon arrested for violating 
his parole. He pleaded guilty and the 
original fine of $60 and costs or sixty 
days was imposed. Sheehan Is also 
wanted by the Superior authorities on 
a charge of voting Illegally at the last 
primary election. 



tain to the innovators. 

Athletic RcnaliMaaco, 

Some of the most prominent men In 



i Faces LarecnT Charsr^ 

! Leonard Borgen, 24 years old, was 

arrested last night 8^ a suspect of 

; larceny. He Is accused by the police 

{ of having stolen several kodaks from 

I the p6ni;y Arcade store. The police 

I are now Investigating the case and 

Borgen Is being held at headquarters 

in the meantime. 

Drink E;nd> Hla Parole. 

Louis Sandstrom, 43 years old. who 
' was recently placed on parole follow- 
I Ing his conviction on a charge of 
1 drunkenness, was last evening arrest- 
I ed for violating the parole. He was 
I found In a drunken condition by Pa- 
trolman Gamache. This morning Sand- 
I Strom pleaded guilty and he was fined 
$40 and costs or thirty days on the 
work farm. 



YANKTON GIRLS' 

DORMITORY BURNS. 



Sk 



ARE YOU PREPARED 
FOR EASTER? . 

"HI! SUITS, TOP-COATS 

SlIP-ONS AND BALMACAAHS 



The largent ».s«ortin<M»t we have ever 
shown ar<' liere In all the new styles aad 
fabrics — siaes to fit evorylKxly. 

The Home of Alfred Benjamin A Co., 
New York. Clothes; Cbas. Kaufman & Bros. 
Pre-shrunk Clotlie<*, Men's and Younjf 
Men's .Suit.-i, speeially pHeed for Easter at 

$10, $15, $20 

JOHN B. STET.SON HATS 
EMKHY GVARAXTEED SHIRTS 

PACKARD SHOES 

Mothers will do well by buying Ek>y9* 
Clothlnsr here. We can save you luuney. 



Stndyli'g itoctal Center^. 

E. Dudley Parsons, an Instructor In 
one of the Minneapolis high schools. Is 
In Duluth Investigating social center 
ftctlvitles. Miss Marguerite Culkln. 
local social center director, told him of 
what Is being done and he was greatly 
< Interested in what has been acconi- 
plished. Minneapolis has no scclal cen- 
ter, but the administration is contem- 
plating entering that field. 

^ill Repair Incinerator. 

A representative of the Decaire 
Manufacturing company of Minneapo- 
lis, which built the Incinerator, la In 
the city today making a careful exam- 
ination of the plant. The Incinerator 
is in need of extensive repairs, the es- 
timated cost being $600 to $700. Bo- 
fore making that expenditure the of- 
ficials wished to be sure that the best 
results would be secured and at the 
request of Commissioner Hlcken and 
Health Director Webster, the comoany 
sent a man here to look over the plant. 
The Incinerator has been In operation 
for a number of years and Is without 
recent improvements, some of whlci^. 
may be recommended. 
■ • 
McDonald oa Range. 

P.rown McDonald, local Immigration 
Inspector. Is on the range this week. 
He will return within a day or t%vo. 



I 



t 



N^mK9sterRlbbon$ 

in ^1)i^piiful assortment of plain 
and^fanc^- styles at, per yard — 

c, 29c & 35c yd. 



ana ranev j 

4t 




•nummi vALUift MMM supumw^ 

91 aM MM WKtT SUPI»IOR •TlUVr 



Specials 

IX EASTER LIXENS 

95r Table Linens for 75o 

$1.2.-> Table LiueuLS for. fl.QO 

91.50 Table Linens for $1.25 



J A Charming Collection of the 
Newest Eastern Needs 




Easter 
Ready -to-W ear 

Fashionable and Exclusive 

Suits, Coats, Dresses, Skirts, Waists, etc. — select 
now and be pre^jared for the Easter Dress Parade. 
Selected Specials for Thursday and Friday Selling. 

TAILORED SUITS— Made up in the most 
fashionable styles now in use in such materials as 
Gabardine, Serge, Crepes, Poplin and Novelty 
Worsted. Three extraordinary values in an exten- 
sive assortment at $11.50, $15.00 and $17.50. 

NEW SPRING DRESSES— In Serge, Crepes 
and Novelty \\'orsted, in a great range of correct 
new styles. Two great values on sale Thursday at 
$5.50 and $7.95. 

WALKING SKIRTS— In all-wool Serge, made 
up in the leading new styles. A wonderful bargain, 
on sale Thursday for $2>50. 

NEW SPRING COATS— In a wide range of 
new fabrics. An extensive variety of new models 
to select from. Two great specials for Thursday 
and Friday at $7.50 and $10.50. 

WAISTS — Twenty distinct styles, made up in 
lovely jheer fabrics. All sizes. Choice 98^, 



hand- 



collar? 



designs 



50c 



z/ 



Easter Neckwear 

Plain net yokes in white, 
cream, ecru and 
black at 

Colored Bows with 

crocheted lace 

at. 

Lace and embroidery 
in latest 
at 

Plain and fancy Swiss and net 
Ficlius, each worth 

50c at 

Washable Silk Crepe 

ties at 

69c all net chenii.settes in white 
cream, black and ecru CL^g^ 

Fancy chemisettes $2 AO^ 

each to ZrOC 

Fancy washable collars in 
Swiss and lace, worth fZf%£^ 

65c and 75c at ^l/V 

Plain net and Crepe C/>#* 

Fichus at ^VV 

.69c Gladstone collars 

at 

Plauen Lace Colars in white 
and cream, each $1.25, $1.00, 
85c, 75c, 50c, 
at 



« 

I 

* 
* 

« 
« 



50c 



« 
« 

* 

s 

« 
# 

« 

« 

« 
« 

« 
* 

# 





Great Millinery 
Sensation 

Tomorrow We Place on Sale 

200 Beautifully 
' Trimmed Hats 

They are exceptional!}^ good yalues at 
$2.50, $3.75, $5.00 and $7.50. In tliis special 
sale for only $1.98. 

Never before right in the beginning of 
the season were we able to offer you sucli 
wonderful values. 

They are the newest and up-to-the min- 
ute spring styles. 

W^ repeat, hats worth fully double the 
price at S2.50, $3.75, $5.00 and $7.50. On sale 
special at $1.98? 

DON'T MISS THIS RARE OP- 
PORTUNITY FOR BIG SAVINGS. 





COMPLETE SHOWING OF 

Easter G/oves, 
Hosiery, Etc, 

Kayser's Venetian and Lisle Gloves — White 
with black stitches and black with white 
stitching on back, at, per 25c 

pair, 50c and ^*#*# 

Kayser's Long Cliamnisette Gloves — ^^'ash- 
able; a splendid quality, at SOc 

only ***#w 

Kayser's Elbow Length Silk Gloves — the 
regular $1.25 quality; guaran- d^« OO 
teed, at only .^*-l^V 

Plioenbc Silk Hose — Guaranteed; in black 
and all the wanted popular 7Sii 

shades, at . • ^*' 

Wayne Silk. Hose — Full faishioned — the 
most durable silk hose on the ^^ OA 
market at $1.50 and ^*« W^# 

Silk Fiber Ho)<e — Extra heavy — exception- 
al quality; built for service, SOi^ 

at only ^ww 

Women's Union Suits — Globe and Richelieu 
— wide and narrow knee; all styles; Swiss 
and fine ribbed; easily the big- SOf*' 

geat assortment in the city at .^ V** 

Chiltlren's Hose — Black Cat. Pony and 
Iron Clad brands — the hose that gives tai- 
Isf action; none belter made, 
per pair , 



CLOTHI^t. ( o 



405- 4«7 WTST SrPKRlOK ST 
Cook A Glttelson. 



^ 



Civil CaaM G« Orcr. 

No civil cases will be heard In mu- 
nicipal court on Qood Friday. A short 
aeosion of police court will be held 
In the morning. 

• 

Morria In Ttvtai Cltlca. 

Th» calendar In the Minneapolis 
Federal court la so large that Judge 
Pag* Morris, who went there last Fri- 
day, will be compelled to remain In 
the Twin Cities for the remainder of 
the month. He had planned to return 
to Duluth this week, but he writes 
that he will be unable to conduct court 
here for at least two weeks. 

Partner* la Dlapate. 

A dispute over a partnership busi- 
ness is being aired before a Jury In 
Judge Ensign's divielon of the district 
court today where the lawsuit brought 
by Austin J. Meagher apainst Joseph 
G. Fogarty Is on trial. Meagher and 
Fogarty back In 1M9 formed a part- 
nership known as the Floodwood Land 
company. Meagher claims that In 1*1^ 
they dissolved partnership and Fo- 
garty took over the business, agreeing 
to pay him |1,250 for his Interest. U« 



alleges that Fogarty stlU owes him 
$967.83 on this account. 

m 

Jar«r Call^ to Funeral* 

No decision In the personal Injury 
case of Miss Florooce Watson against 
the city of Duluth will be given until 
Monday although all the evldenc« will i 
probably be In this afternoon. A. M. i 
Vnjl, 1111 East Sixth street, Duluth, j 
one of the Jurors, received notice today 
of the death of his father-in-law In 
Superior and he will be given a leave 
of absence until after the funeral. It 
Is not expected that he will return In 
time to help draw up a verdict before 
Monday. 

F«re« Faaeral Fridar< 

The funeral of Edwin Butler Force, 
who died yesterday afternoon at St. 
I^uke's hospital, will be held at 2 
o'clock Friday afternoon from Memo- 
rial hall. It will he in charge of Cul- 
ver post, O. ».A.. of which he was a 
member. Interment will be at Forest 

HUl cemetery. 

- * • 

I.»st Child Faond. 

Wandering away from her home at 
''SI Seventh aventle east shortly after 
noon today. 4-year-old Rose Howard 
was found by a pedestrian near police 
headquarters. He brought the child 
Into the station, where she was later 
claimed by her mother. 
- * 
Will Inspect Uniforms. 

The Duluth Police association will 
hold the spring Inspection of uniforms 
this afternoon at Its regular meeting 
to be held In the assembly room at 
headquarters. All the officers who go 
on duty this evening will be Inspected. 

. — ♦ 

Parents File Petition. 

Louis and Carola Peverlevl of Per- 
gola Italy, parents of Paul Peverlevl, 
aged 24, who was killed In a cave-In 
at the Lincoln mine near Virginia on 
Jan 23 last, today filed with the clerk 
of the probate court a petition asking 
that letters of administration on the 
estate of their son be granted to 
Domenlco Rlpante of Virginia. Peve- 
rievl's estate consists of a cause of 
action for aUeged wrongful deaH 
against the young miner's •mP\|>y«". 
Besides his parents, Peverlevl left tt\e 
sisters. 

Is Serloasly 111. 

Fred Kretschmar, clarionet player In 
the Lyceym theater orchestra, is seri- 
ously 111 of pne umonia. 

AN0THER~siN6ER OF NOTE 

AT NEW ST. LOUIS HOTEL. 




Hev. T. Stanley Oadams of La Crosse 
i.s registered at the St. Louis. 

Matt Hayes of St. Paul Is registered 
at the St. Louis. 

J. P. Deyzer of Virginia Is stopping 
at the St. Louis. 

Charles Morse of Cromwell is at the 
St. Louis. 

J. R. Porter of Milwaukee is stop- 
ping at the Holland. 

Walter Pritchard of Virginia is reg- 
istered at the Holland. 

James Boyle of Eveleth Is In the city 
today. 

George Merril] of Belolt, Wis., Is a 
guest of the Sp'aldlng. 

Henry Bassett of Thief River Falls 
i.s at the Spalding. 

George Levine of Gilbert Is at the 
Lenox. 

Irving M. Halley of Seattle Is stop- 
ping at the McKay- 
George McKay, brother of W. A. Mc- 
Kay of the Hotel McKay, Is in the city 
for a few days' visit. 

H*nry Ketchum of JanesvlUe, Wis., 
at the Lenox. 

William J. North is on a tour of In- 
spection of the Gay & Sturgis offices 
In the Copper country. 

R. T. Goodell has returned after a 
two months' absence In California, bet- 
ter satisfied with the variable climate 
of Duluth than the continued same- 
ness of Pasadena. 

Dr. Hempstead, who went to Vienna, 
Austria, last fall to take a post grad- 
uate course In one of the hospitals 
there, has returned to Duluth and may 
eventually return to Bralnerd, where 
he was located before coming here. 

W. S. Jones, publisher of the Minne- 
apolis Journal, Is In Duluth today. 



Few ^weetcr tenor voices have ever 
been heard In this city than that 
poBsoi^sed bv Frank Nowak, who Is 
now appearing at the New St. Louis 
hotel Miss Hazel CUlso, violinist; Miss 
Clara Wolfre, contralto soloist, and 
Art Buemer, the king of raa time 
pianist,! are three other stars who will 
also ba thors for a few days giving 
concerts every evening in the beautl* 
ful Woodland cafe from 8 to 11, and 
on Raster Sunday a special prepared 
musical program will ho rendered 
from 12 to 2 and « to i during which 
hours dinner \»in be served arranged 
by George W. Lawrence, the celebrated 
steward, who tras tormerly connected 
with the Norttwra Pacific raUroa4« 



Going to Re-Shii^le? 

Neponset Shlnfflcs are practically 
fire-proof, look like slate, and are 
low In cost. 

Call and see them at our office. 

KRIBGKR, JAM VR C(K, 
416 Elaat Superior Street. 



VAN. AND OTHERS 
QUIT WESTERN UNION 



N^ew York. April «. — Pursuant to the 
agreement with the department of Jus- 
tice disintegrating the Western Union 
Telegraph company and the American 
Telephone & Telegraph company, di- 
rectors of the American Telephone & 
Telegraph company, who likewise were 
directors of the Western Union, re- 
signed from the Western Union board 
toaav. Those who resigned are Edward 
B. Jeffery, Charles Lanier, Lewis Cass 
Ledyard. John J. Mitchell, Harry B. 
Thayer, Theodore N. Vail, John L Wa- 
terbury and Robert W^nsor. 

The other directors were re-elected 
and the toUowlug were added to tlt« 



board: William H. Baker, Henry W. 
Deforrest, William Fahnestock, Percy 
A. Rockefeller, Mortimer L, Schiff and 
William H. Truesdale. 

A meeting of the new board has been 
called for April 15, when It Is said 
Newcomb Carlton will be elected pres- 
ident. 

MNNEAPOLiS 6AS 
RATE ROW SETTLED 



Compromise Is Reached 

Between ttie City and 

Company. 

Minneapolis, Minn., April 8.— (Spe- 
cial toJ?he Herald.) — The Minneapolis 
gas rate controversy was compromised 
today by Daniel Fisk, city attorney; J. 
O. P. Wheelwright and W. A. Lan- 
caster, attorneys for the gas company. 

According to this settlement the 
70-cent rate Is allowed to stand from 
last November to April 1. For twenty- 
one months, beginning April 1, the rate 
will be 80 cents. For the next thirty- 
four months 77 cents will be charged. 
Reduction from 18 to 15 -candle power 
is perramed. 

The agieement covers five years, and 
the average price of g«u» for that time 
will be 77.46 cents per 1,000 feet. 

6RAIN MEN WILL 

FIOHT TOfiETHER 



fought the farmers' movement are pre- 
paring a little backfire. 

A call for a meeting of the mem- 
bers of the grain exchanges of Chi- 
cago, Kansas City, Omaha, Minneapo- 
lis and Duluth has been issued by G. 
W. Wells, secretary of the Western 
Grain Dealers' association. The meet- 
ing: is to be held at the Montrose hotel. 
Cedar Rapids, Iowa, Thursday. It Is 
announced that at the meeting the 
question of trading in futures will be 
discussed, along with certain proposed 
changes In rules. Secretary J. G. Mc- 
Hugh of the Minneapolis chamber of 
coBunerce, leader of the flght on the 
farmers' exchange, has issued personal 
notices urging members to attend. 

It Is believed that the meeting Is 
called for the purpose of frustrating 
the plans of the Equity exchange by 
changing rules that have been object- ^ 
ed to by farmers. 



Meeting of Exchange Mem- 
bers Is Called for 
Thursday. 

St. Paul, Minn.. April S.-r-(Speclal to 
The Herald.) — While the farmers of 
the Northwest are holding dally meet- 
ings and telling how they will stand 
by the co-operative marketing move- 
ment, the grain exchanges which have 



MERCURY LOW IN 

T HE SOU THWEST. 

Kansas Ci^y. Mo., April 8. — The low- 
est temperatures ever recorded so late 
In April were t-eglstered over most of 
Missouri, Kansas and Oklahoma, and 
in North Texas today, and the locaJ 
officers of the United States weather 
bureau predicted temperatures several 
degrees lower throughout that terri- 
tory tonight. 

Kansas temperatures reported here 
ranged from 11 deg. above zero at 
Hays in the western part of the state 
to 24 deg. at Topeka and other points 
In the eastern part. The temperature 
here was 2S deg.. which breaks the 
local bureau records of twenty-five 
years' standing. 

wouldTnvestigate 
reser ve ba nk work. 

Washington, April 8 ^The first move 

to Investigate the selection of the 
twelve regional reserve cities of the 
banking system was made in the sen- 
ate today when Senator Hitchcock, 
I Democrat, Introduced a resolution call- 
I Ing upon the organization committee 
{ for all its data and the reasons upon 
' which It based Its conclusions select- 
ing the reserve districts. Under ob- 
jection by Senator Swanson, Democrat, 
1 it went over until tomorrow. 



NOT 




The Boosters' Edition of the Herald Is Now 
Being Compiled, Please Get Photos in As 
Soon As Possible, 




mf 



> 



.•* 



I 




K 



That 

Store-Safe 
Is NOT 

Safe! 



WILL OPEN 



NEXT WEEK 



CUT CANADA 
FREIGHT RATE 



Trout Fishing Season in The Railway Commissioners 



Northern Minnesota Is 
Drawing Near. 



stocked and Promise 
Good Sport. 



It would be mere 
child's play for an ex- 
pert safe breaker to 

purloin the cash re- IgtrCamS in ThiS Disthct Re- 
ceipts you keep in your 
safe. And any sneak 

thief could take every 
penny out of that cash 
register. 

Deposit your cash re- 
ceipts in our burglar 
and fire-proof vaults. 
Open an account here 
todav. Be on the safe 
side! 

We pay 3 per cent in- 



terest on Savings Ac-,ii«^f ,, 

J °^ ,- April 

counts and rent sate 



The fever is in the air. What fever? 
'Tis evident that he who asks that 
question is no disciple of Isaak Wal- 
ton. 

For if he were, he would know that 
April 15 comes next week. He'd be 
fully aware of the fact that it's only a 
week from today. t>rillnarlly a week 
Is but a short f'nie, but when one has 
been waiting weeks and weeks for 
the last week to expire, that last week 
has minutes which deem like eternl- 



trout 



M\.j/v/on. MJ^^.■y.\.J »>^. J ^^Y I ^f more sisnificance than t 

valuable papers, jewel- i juration of a president or tht 

r <t-^ J^i ,^^^ ' t't>n of a king. It is fully a 

rv. etc., tor 5^o per \ ear. ; tant as a birthday, marking 



DULUTH, MIMN, 




Also Establish New 
Rate Zones. 



Special Distributing Tariffs 

Sanctioned — Grain and 

Flour Cut. 



15 is the day on which the 
fishing season opens. To the 

fl*>nn>ait h.->vp<5 fnr voiir' ^'""'^ followers of the si>ort the day is 
aepOSll DOXeS lOr >OUr,of more significance than the Inau- 

le corona- 
as Impor- 
g the in- 
troduction of another season's enjoy- 
ment, greater than which there is 
none for the real fisherman. 
g^*£ Ikl ^.^.^mm.^mM '^'^^ fever is in the air, all right. 
I IfV llJTlIlllIllll -^"^^ ^^^^ "P >'o"f fisherman friend. 
\jK\j ilUUVllUl You've maybe been wondering what 
•' has been ailing him, he's been so 

n^^^l. fidgety and worried looking. But vou 

K2in|4 forgot that he was the same way last 

■'*•*■■* year and that it is the same old 

trouble, the same old fever which 
gets him this time o' year as regularly 
as the season rolls around. 

Weeks ago he got out his pole and 
his lines and his creel and his flies ' 
and his reel, fondly caressing them | 
and living over again In memory 
never-to-be-forgotten days of the past. 
His outfit is spick and span and 
ready for action. He is only waltlnpr 
for the day to come around when h» 
can don the old togs, with the old 
corncob tucked away in a handy pock- 
et, and hie himself away to the banks 
of his favorite stream. 

In Only Remedr. 
It'.^ the only remedy for the fever 
whir'- ha.-5 him in its grip. There is 
no other cure, but the victims are t! 
most willing pntients in the world. 

Xor do they feel that it is a day 
lost if they come back without a full 
day's catch, or n6 catch at all. Th© 
spirit is that of the fl.sherman who re- 
turned to the pool which furnished him 
great sport when be was a kid. He 
had a real outfit on the occasion of 
the visit in question and he got all the 
pleasure possible in making his prep- 
arations. After sitting on the bank 
for a while with his line in the water 
a native chanced to come along. 
"You're wasting your time trying to 
get any fish ouf of this stream; it 
was cleaned out years ago," was the 
cheerful news whioh he vouchsafed. 
What did you want to tell me that 
for." answered the fisherman. "You've 
gone and spoiled a whole day's enjoy- 
ment for me." 

The pros"pect8 for a good season 



WE HOLD OUR 
CUSTOMERS 



with the Strong reins of their 
satisfaction with our service. 
Unless we please you wc do 
not consider the transaction 
satisfactory. 

When you come here for 
Moving. Packing and Storage 

you can do so with the assur- 
ance that we give every pos- 
sible honest value. 



DULUTH 

VAN ft STORAGE 

COMPANY 

18 FOURTH AVE. WEST. 
Both Phones 492. 



were never better. For the last two , , , . - , , »■ 

or three years the state game and fish points came in for reductions, ai 
commission has been restocking the ! also the special ^ratesj^ on ^frints 
streams in this part of the state. Mil- 
lions of fry have been planted and a 
considerable percentage of these have 
now grown past the legal limit of six 
inches. There is fair trout fishing' in 
some of the streams which flow 
througli the city and there are scores 
of others within a short distance. 
These will receive attention from those 
who can spare but a day in pursuit of 
the speckled beauties. The more for- 
tunate who can get several days or a 
week will seek those further away, 
where the fishing Is better because 
fewer people are able to get there. A 
little later the season will open for 
black bass and the wall-eyed pike, and 
then the fisherman's cup of content 
will be filled to overflowing. 



Ottawa, Ont., April 8. — Substantial 
reductions in freight rates are made 
in a decision by the railway commis- 
sion, which at the same time provides 
for new rate zones and standardization 
of tariffs. 

All Canada west of the Great Lakes 

is divided into three zones. The first 
of them extends from the lakes to the 
mountains and is to be known as the 
Prairie section. The Pacific section 
includes British Columbia, while the 
zone to be known as British Columbia 
Lakes section applies to the navigable 
waters in that province. 

For each of these sections a stand- 
ard of maximum rates has been set. 
What Is at present known as the Man- 
itoba standard has been extended to 
fix all rates in Prairie and British ! 
Columbia Lakes sections, abolishing 
the higher rates now charged in Sas- 
katchewan and Alberta. 

While the Pacific section rates will 
be somewhat higher than those of 
Prairie and British Columbia Lakes 
zones, they will nevertheless be lower 
than the maximums now in force in 
Saswkatchewan, Alberta and British 
Columbia, the provinces included iti 
this section. 

Special Dltitrlbatlng Rate*. 
Sanction Is given to special distrib- 
uting freight tariffs and of these Can- 
ada's large commercial and industrial 
centers would be the beneficiaries. 
Under them a reduction of 15 per cent 
of the Prairie standard tariff may be 
made. Through rates from Eastern to 
Western Canada will be based on the 
tariffs which apply to shipments West 
from Port Arthur and Fort William. 

The reduction in freight rates will 
amount to from 5 to 30 per cent on 
nearly s^l classes of goods on all rail- 
ways operating from Winnipeg to the 
Pacific coast, and will go into effect on 
Sept. 1 of this year. 

Local grain and flour rates are sub- 
stantially reduced by two methods, 
first, by a direct reduction ranging 
from 20 to 30 per cent, and secondly, 
by making the terminal Fort William 
rates the maximum that may be 
charged between intermediate stations. 
Floar and (;raln ProdnctM. 
The west bound rates on flour and 
other grain products are similarly re- 
duced. This is an indorsement of the 
complaint of the United Farmers of 
Alberta, and the application of the 
Winnipeg board of trade. 

The United Farmers of Alberta also 
win out in their application for re- 
duced rates on these products to Brit- 
ish Columbia stations. 

Substantial cuts In coal rates from 
the Alberta mines are also made. 

The special mileage rates on butter, 
cheese and eg:gs, pressed meats and 
dressed poultry between all Prairie 

as did 

and 

vegetables from British Columbia. The 

rates on sugar from Vancouver were 

not changed. 

No reduction was made in livestock 
rates, and the present rates of ore'?, 
concentrates, and smelter products were 
retained. The rate on pig- iron from 
Port Arthur and Fort William to Win- 
nipeg, was reduced from 20 cents per 
100 pounds to $3 per gross ton^ 

The board found that the passenger 
business is at present being conducted 
at a loss and felt not justified in direct- 
ing a change until afforded an oppor- 
tunity of seeing what improvement in 
passenger revenues will result from 
improvements In operating facilities 
row under way. 




Until April 17tli 

INITIATION' IS ONLY 

$s.oo 

After April 17th It will be J30.00. 
Call or write to W. R. Hampton, 
national organiser, SIO Alworth 
building. 



U. S. LOSES 
TRUST CASE 

Federal Court Dismisses 

Suit Against D. L & W. 

Railroad. 



TEMPLARS WILL 

OBSERVE EASTER 



93,100 — Pretty 6 -room bungalow. 
Eighteenth avenue east; lot 50x 
100; only |3vO cash; owner leav- 
ing city. 

•75« — Fine building lot, 35x100. 

il.»00 — 50x140 lot on Fourth street 
near Eighteenth avenue; all as- 
sessments paid; best lot bargain 
in East end. 

DULUTH REALTY CO. 

«08 Flr^t National Bank Bids. 



Holds There Is No Statutory 

Bar to Alleged 

Trust. 



Masonic Soldiery Will Hold 
Services Sunday After- 
noon at Temple. 

Duluth commandery, No. 18, Knights 
Templar, will, according to custom, 
celebrate the resurrection of Xl^hrist at 
the Masonic temple next Sunday after- 
noon at 3 o'clock. The services will be 

conducted by Sir Knight Thomas W. 
MacLean, D. D., vicar of Trinity pro- 
cathedral. This service is obligatory 
with all Knights Templar and is re- 
ligiously followed at each Easter. The 
Templars are directed to appear In uni- 
form, but without swords. 

The Knights Templar claim descent 
from the Crusaders and are the recog- 
nized Christian soldiery of Masonry. 

Just prior to the services of the 
Templars the Scottish Rite Masons will 
conduct the ceremony of relighting 
the lights, which will be extinguished 
at the close of the Maundy Thursday 
banquet at the temple on Thursday 
evening. 



Trenton. N. J., April 8. — The United 
States court has filed an opinion here 
dismissing the suit of the United 

] States government against the Dela- 

• ware, Lackawanna & Western Railroad 
company and the Delaware, Lacka- 
wanna & Western Coal company for 
alleged violation of the comtnodity 

I clause and the Sherman anti-trust 

j law. The court holds that there is no 

I United States law or decision prohib- 

I iting the same set of individuals hold- 
ing stock in two distinct corporations, 

' even though they may be engaged in 
kindred business. 

The decision was handed down here 

I by Judges Gray, Buflfington and Mc- 

I Pheraon of the Ttiird judicial circuit. 

j The action was brought in the Federal 

I court here, but through a certificate of 

I expedition filed by Attorney General 

I McReynold.s, was heard by the Judges 
of the court of appeals at Philadel- 
phia in January. 

I Was Aimed at Coal Trawt. 

I The case is considered of the highest 
Importance by the government, as It 
Is one of the steps planned by the de- 
partment of justice In its efforts to 
break up what it alleges to be a mon- 
opoly of the anthracite coal trade. The 
case, which was brought under both 
the Sherman anti-trust law and the 
commodities clause of the Hepburn 
railroad law. in all probability will go 
direct to the supreme court of the 
United States. 

A somewhat similar suit recently 
ESastem Dentists with absolutely no was Instituted against the Lehigh rail- 

raln connected with the operation, and I road and its subsidiaries in the Fed- 
recommend their painless method to real court In New York, and another, , „--., 

%ny one who dreads the dental chair." government action against the Reading ' with a simple preparation which she 



THE PALM ROOM 

AT THE SPALDING 

MOST DELIGHTFUL AND LUX- 
URIOUS RESTAURANT IN 
DULUTH. 



siil. TEETH '5 



00 



COL.D CROWNS S3.00 

Read what Mrs. M. Kruger, 519 
Blghth street, says: 

'l had II teeth extracted at the 



WOULD UNMASK 

S HIPPIN G TRUST. 

Washington, April 8. — "Its purpose 
Is to unmask the shipping trust," said 
Representative Henry, Democrat, of 
Texas, in explaining a resolution he 
Introduced to authorize an investiga- 
tion of steamship transportation of 
freight between the Atlantic and Pa- 
cific ports and in the coastwise trade. 

.Toint ownership, common control, 
holding companies, interlocking stock 
and directors and other officers and 
rates would be investigated. 

Mr. Henry said the Information 
would be valuable In connection with 
the senate's consideration of the Pan- 
ama tolls repeal. 



Actress Tells Secret 



A Well Known Actroa* Tells How Sh© 

Darkened Her Gray Hair and 

Promoted It.s Growtli With a 

Simple Home 3iadc Mixture. 



25 Db;^ Silk Hose, 
Thursday All Day 

12^c 



^i^\^!icna£^ 



Women* s and Misses' Outfitters 

18 West Superior Street, Dulutli 



Special shipment re- 
ceived of Confirmation 
Dresses, samples, $8.00 
values — 

$4.50 



SEARCH THE CITY! 



Go through the stores of Duluth, price the coats and suits of the 
season and then come back and see what we have to show you, and ^ 
you will find that THE NATIONAL can show you all that there is 
to be seen that is wearable and worth while and far under the prices. 
Express companies make daily deliveries. Our values lead because we 
charge for merchandise, not store luxury. 

SPECIALS FOR THiUIBSDAY, 
FmUM km SATURDAY 



PARIS MODEL TAILOR SUITS 

.50 



Made of English 
Serge, Bolero Novelty 
Coat with collar of 
moire taffeta in con- 
trasting shades. New 
model long tunic skirt 




MOIRE SUITS 

Black and Blue 
Moire Suits, for Eas- 
ter special — 







50 COATS 



in all colors, sizes and materials — 
special at 

MORE FINE COATS— 

25 Coats — Markovitz make; finest in 
New York city, choice 




MILLINERY! 

Visitors to The National Millinery Section will find 
a sumptuous showing of the most beautiful, tasteful 
and most carefully chosen lines ever brought to this 
city. Prices from — 



1.50 $0*50 I 



$7-50 $ 



WHAT OTHER CITIES ARE DOING 



mHE city of Birmingham, Ala.. ! 
is contemplating the use of ' 
glass trash cans illuminated i 
at night. This will be an j 
innovation on the downstown i 
street corners of Birming- 
ham. The negotiations up to ' 
date have been in regard to a gal- 
vanized wire can with advertising on 
the sides, to be given to the city free 
and the city to receive a percentage 
of the advertising. The wire glass 
proposition has ken brought up re- 
cently and appeared to appeal rather 
strongly to the commissioners. It was 
stated that the glass can would be il- 
luminated from the inside at night so 
that the advertising on them could 
be read then as well as in daylight. 
This feature will W entirely under the 
control of the city after the proposi- 
tion is accepted. 

George B. Ward, ©resident of the 
city commissioners, has been in com- 
munication with different parts of the 
country trying to secure detailed in- 
formation on modern trash appliances 
and it is his idea to start cleaning up 
the city. In this connection it would 
be well to mention that there is a 
concern making an ornamental waste 
box which is being ' introduced in a 
number of cities. This ornamental 
waste box consists of a pedestal for 



LUMBER AND 
GRAIN LIGHT 

Shipments of All Other 

Products Show an 

Increase. 



President of St. Paul Sys- 
tem Is Optimistic Re- 
garding Business. 



Miss Blanche Rose, a well-known 
actress, who darkened her gray hair 



WE'LL SAVE YOU HALF 

f e Want 

Yosr 

Familj 




to separate it against the Jersey Cen- ' 
tral railroad and other interests, is 
In the United States court in Phila- 
delphia. 



Oovernvrat Will Appeal. I 

■Washington, April 8. — Steps will be ._ 
taken Immediately by the department j To a half pint of" water add 1 oz. of 

bay rum, a small box of Barbo Com- 



mixed at home, In a recent Interview 
at Chicago, III., made the folowing 
statement: "Any lady or gentleman 
can darken their gray hair and make 
it soft and glossy with this simple 
recipe, which they can mix at home. 



<*C«a« In all to whom w« 0'«v« serrtce^ 

Oold Crowns. »»-«0 | Bridgework .f3.00 
ailver rilling. 50« j Gold Fillings fl.00 

Written Uaaraate* f*r 10 Years 
OB AU W«*rk. 



EASTERN DENTISTS 

Opposite Hotel St. LK>al8. 
SK WEST SVPBRIOR STRKST. 

8;t9 a. OL to 7 0. m. 



Dental Work , of justice to appeal to the supreme 
court from the decision of the court of 
appeals in the case against the Dela- 
ware, Lackawanna & Western Rail- 
road company. Attorney General Mc- 
Reynolds said he hoped to be able to 
have the case up for argument during 
the fall term. 



Only One "BROMO QUININE** 

To ge» lh» jeiiulne. ctll tor full URm», I..\X.iTm; 
BHOMO QCIMNK. Look for slr.a'Mre Of E. W 
I UitOV£. Cuist 4 Cold la Oas P«r, 2ira. 



pound, and % oz. of glycerine. These 
ingredients can be bought at any drug 
store at very little cost. Apply to the 
hair twice a week until It becomes the 
required shade. This will make a gray 
haired person look 20 years younger. 
It is also fine to promote the growth 
of hair, relievos itching and scalp hu- 
mors and Is excellent for dandruff 
nad £aUias hair." 



Apart from grain and forest prod- 
ucts, the volume of traffic now being 
handled by the railroads at the Head 
of the Lakes is substantially heavier 
than a year ago. 

According to the report of the man- 
ager, A. E. Piering, the Lake Superior 
demurrage handled a total of 26,367 
cars of all classes of freight in 
March, a decrease of 2,087 cars as 
compared with the corresponding 
month last year. The difference waa 
more than accounted for In the fall- 
ing off In the grain movement In 
which 2,268 cars wore reported, a de- 
crease of 3,172 from March, 1912. 

Handlings of lumber and forest 
products aggregated 3,112 cars, a drop 
of 246 from last year, but Increases in 
traffic were the order in every other 
product through the list. Coal ship- 
ments from the Duluth and Superior 
docks showed an Increase of 136 cars 
In an aggregate of 13,486 cars sent out 
by the roads that are members of the 
demurrage bureau. 

The movement of Iron pipe and ma- 
chinery aggregated l,*76 cars, an in- 
crease of 149 cars. General groceries 
and merchandise handiin^s turned up 
a gain of 421 cars, th« total being r«- 
i^orled at 866 ears. Xbat building 



a flower urn and is about five feet 
in- height and has a base of eighteen 
square inches. Near the middle of the 
stand is an opening in which paper or 
other waste matter is deposited, the 
inside being equipped with a gunny- 
sack which serves as a receptacle. 
When this Is filled it may be removed 
and another substituted. For its re- 
moval there is a door that may be 
opened with a key, which, of course, 
will be in possession of any one in 
charge of the street cleaning opera- 
tions, so that the box may be relieved 
or emptied at stated intervals. This 
door is larger than the opening 
through which the material is de- 
posited. 

At various times In the past the city 
officials have proposed to place such 
cans on the principal streets of the 
city, first in the downtown section and 
then in the suburbs. Other cities 
which have used them report that they 
have been a big help in keeping the 
streets free of wa»te paper and other 
loose material, thereby considerably 
improving the appearance of the city. 
Several offers have been received of- 
fering to place the cans free of charge 
provided the donors could use them 
for advertising purposes, but none of 
them has been accepted. 



trade is becoming active in this city 
is attested in the moving of 606 cars 
of stone and sand, an increase of 285» 
cars, and 468 cars of cement and lime, 
a gain of 77 cars. 

There is also to be credited to the 
aggregate of traffic at these ports ap- 
proximately 7,500 cars of freight 
handled independently by the Great 
Northern railroad, which is not a mom • 
her ot the demurrage bureau. Officials 
of that road advise that with the ex- 
ception of grain, its traffic is making 
a favorable comparison with last year. 
The coal movement was fair with the 
Great Northern last month, amount- 
ing to approximately 3,500 cars. Incon- 
ing and outgoing cars of general mer- 
chandise made a specially gratifying 
showing, going to corroborate the as- 



BINDING 



ourselves to giva the best service 
and workmanship in the city. 
"Rush orders a pleasure." 

MEUin t HECTOR 

PRINTERS AND BINDERS, 
lis West First MU I>«I«th, BUna. 



BEFORE SIGNING A LEASE 

Come to our office and talk over our building plan — it enables 
you to have for YOUR OWN just the kind of a house you 
like best. 

YOUR RENT MONEY WILL PAY FOR IT. 

A very few years will make you independent. 

TALK WITH US NOW. 

LAKESIDE LAND COMPANY, 



CHAS. P. CRAIG & CO., AGENT 



SELLWOOD BUILDING. 



Phones 408. 



FREE TO 

ASTHMA SUFFERERS 

A XevT Home Cure That Anyone Can 

Use Withvnt Discomfort *t 

Loss of Time. 

We have a New Method that cures 
Asthma, and we want you to try it at 
our expense. No matter whether your 
case is of long standing or recent de- 
velopment, whether it is present as oc- 
casional or chronic Asthma, you should 
send for a free trial of our method. No 
matter in what climate you live, no 
matter what your age or occupation, 
if you are troubled with asthma, our 
method should relieve you promptly. 

We especially want to aeiid It to thnse apparently 
hopeless cases, wUere all foruu of Inhalers, douches, 
opium preparattous. fumes, "patent smokes," etc., 
hare failed. Wa want to shnw everyone at our own 
exiwnse, that this new uietliod Is designed te end 
all dlfilcult t>reati)lna. all wheeling, and aU Uto»e | 
teriible parovsnw at once and for all time. { 

This free offer l« too important to neglect a 
single day. Write now and then l)egiu the method 
at once. Send no uouey. Siiuply luall coupos be- 
low. Do It I'odajr. 



sertions that Duluth jobbers are rap- 
idly extending their trade in all lines. 
Forest products accounted for about 
3,5(M} cars or about the same as the 
road's 1913 March tally. 

Agents of the railroads operating 
here aver that the freight movement 
so far this month is running about 
evenly wit'i last year. It is a subject 
of comment that traffic to and from 
the newer districts of this state is 
making the best relative, showing. 

A. J. Earling. president of the .St. 
Paul system, avers that the car load- 
ings of his road for March were 6,000 
in exr:esa ot last year. In the course 
of an Interview Just given out, he 
spoke hopefully regarding the- outlook 
for an Improvement in business later 
on in the season. He is sanguine that 
a greatly increased area will go un- 
der crop In the Northwest as a re- 
sult of the good soil conditions, and 
the acreage plowed last fiill. 

fie spoko enthusiastically regarding 
the electrification of the St. Paul rail- 
road's line across Montana upon which 
actual work will probably be started 
next week. He considers that the 
economy and efficiency of electrical 
operation has been fully demonstrated 
by the Butte, Anaconda & Pacific ro.-td 
which carries ore from the Amalga- 
mated Copp«r company's mines to the 
smelters. 



clal and moral, and are not suscep- 
tible of being made parts of a party 
program. Whenever they have been 
made the subject-matter of party con- 
tests, they have cut the lines of party 
organization and party, action athwart, 
to the utter confusion of politicai ac- 
tion In every other field. They have 
thrown every other question, however 
important, into the background, and 
have made consecutive party action 
Impossible for long years together." 

Secretary Daniels told friends that 
the purpose of his order was in bo 
i way to give a political aspect to the 
I subject of prohibition or to commit 
I the national administration, but only 
: to promote efficiency tn the navy. 

I • 

I Plrkle Dish (or Warship. 

Albany, N. Y.. April 8.— The "dry" 
order issued by Secretary .Josephus M. 
Daniels for the navy recently is .caus- 
ing three state officials to worry over 
what kind of a sil\er service shall be 
purchased for the battleship New 
York. At the last session of the leg- 
islature, a bill appropriating $10,000 
for the purchase of a silver service 
i for the new ship was passed and a few 

days later the govecnor signed it. 
I "We majt" have to eliminate the 
I punch bowl and substitute a pickle 
dish." the governor said. 



WILSON IN FAVOR 
OF LOCAL OPTION 



FRGB ASTHMA COUPON 

FRONTIER ASTHMA CO.. Room 
136J, Niagara and Hudson streets, 
Buffalo. N. Y. 

Send free trial of your method to: 



Views Are Given Following 

Navy Order— Puzzle 

for New York. 

Washington. April 8. — President Wil- 
son is in favor of local option on the 
liquor question, and does not believe 
prohibition should be made a part of 
a party program. Since the order of 
Secretary Daniels was issued prohibit- 
ing the use of liquor by officers in the 
navy, persons In a position to obtain 
the president's views have learned 
that he will stand by his letter writ- 
ten In May, 1911. while governor of 
New Jersey, to Rev. Thomas B. Shan'- 
non of Newark, N. J« in which he 
said: 

"I am in favor of local option. I 
am a thoroagli believer in local self- 
government, and believe that every 
self-governing community which con- 
stitutes a social unit should have the 
right to control the matter of the reg- 
ulation or the withholding of li- 
censes. 

Ket Party Q«esti*n. 

"But Uie auesUous Involved aro so- 




■'te2^?^ "CLEVELAND" 

FroB New York, Jan. 31. 191S 

Visiting famous cities and countrias on m 
palatiar steamsKip which ssrves as your 
kotfll. Ev«iy luxury and comfort assured. 

13S days— $900 and up 

iocbtdiac Skora Trips sad sH b« 



AIm CrwiMS to tbs WssI Udies. Pan. 
•ms CsmI. Slid lUditatraossa 



HAMBURG-AMERICAN 

or local agents 



tIS SaMsS AvMU* assts, 
MlasMSslk, lUsa 



1" 



• III riniiiftiiifiiiirp^"^^ 



I 



12 



Wednesday, 



THE DULUTH HERALD 



April 8, 1914. 



KONKEL IS 
RHIECTEO 

Superior Mayor Returnea 

By Narrow Margin; O'Hare 

Also Victorious. 



line*, the vote was as 



■treet railway 
follows: 

Wards— Ten. 

First b2 

Second 60 

Third, flrat precinct 4* 

Third, second pr»'cii)ct 47 

Fourth, rtrst precinct 89 

Fourth, second precinct.... 46 

Fifth 161 

Sixth, east precinct 72 

1 Sixth, west precinct 176 

[Seventh, first prtclnct 62 

I Seventh, second precinct. . . 101 

Flifihth 85 

, NMnth 116 

Tenth 63 



No. 

228; 

157' 

103 i 

91 
72' 

140 i 

356* 

198 
86 

221 i 

263 ! 

167 I 

181 

104 I 



Citizens Turn Down Plan 

to Purchase the Street 

Railway. 



Citizens of Superior yesterday re- 
elected Joseph S. Konkfl mayor of Supe- 
rior and t;ave his administration their 
approval in one of the closest and most 
hotly contested elections ever held In 
the city. The mayor received a major- 
ity of ?1 votes over James R. Hile out 
of a total of 5,293 vot<-s cast. 

Charles N'. OHare was successful 
over A. D. S. Olllettt; and was re-elect- 
ed by a majority of 375 votes in the 
commlssionership race. The citizens 
turned down the proposition of pur- 
chasing the Superior street railway by 
a majority of 1,232 votes, more than 
two-thirds of the voters having cast 
their ballots on the question. 

Mayor Konkel carried half of the 
wards of the city. While Mr. Hile car- 
ried as many wards as Mayor Konkel, 
his majorities in these wards were not 
Bufficient to overcome the heavy vote 
that the major got In the down Iowa 
districts. 

The niavor carried the First. Third, 
Fourth. Sixth and Tenth wards and re- 
ceixfd in the Fourth ward a majority 
of 340 volt s which the t>ppositlon was 
unable to overcome. The Seventh ward, 
said to be the stronghold of the oppo- 
sition turned In only a small majority 
for Hile. 

According to announcements made 
this morning there will be no contests 
hf!d. The city and county prosecut- 
ing d. partments intend to continue 
actions and Investigations against al- 
leged illegal voting lu some of the pre- 
cincts 

City of.'Iclals take the returns of the 
election es a vindication of the present 
•dministration and its policies. The re- 
call petition for the mayor and the 
subsequent campaign was one of the 
bitterest that has ev*T been held in 
the city, and charges of lorruption. lax 
law enforcement and similar violations 
were made against the administration. 

Throughout the entire day until late 
last night when the final returns of 
the election were In. crowds of people 
thronged the streets. Excitement was 
•t fever heat during the announce- 
ment of the returns which for hours 
were about even. The final result was 
si^-naled by the extinguishing of all 
el^^-tric lights twice. Once would have 
m-ant Hile's election. 

Phil S. Perk'.ns won easily over M. 
C. Brzonkala for county judge, and 
James A. Baker and W. O. Streeter 
were easy winners In the race for the 
office of constable. 

The following Is the result of the 
vote for mayor and commissioner: 



Totals 1.136 2.367 



TREATY TO END OLD 
PANAMA DISPUTE IS 
SIG NED A T BOGOTA 

(Continued from page 1.) 



when the little republic of Panama 
was set up over night with guaran- 
tees of integrity from Washington, or 
that the whole question be submitted 
to The Hague for arbitration. 

The last negotiations were just at 
the clos*' of I'resldent Taffs adminis- 
tration, when Minister Dubois, under 
instructions of Secretary Knox, offered 
a settlement on this basis: 

Ratification by i'olombla of the so- 
called tri-partlte treaty of 1909, also 
known as the Knox-Aro-^emena treaty, 
bv which Panama agreed to apportion 
w-ith Colombia the annual payment of 
1260.000. which she receives from the 
United Stales as rent for the canal 
zone for a sufficient period to liqui- 
date any claim of Colombia's, up to 
$10,000,000. 

Pavment of 110.000,000 cash to Co- 
lombia bv tne United States for an op- 
tion on the Atrato river canal route, 
and coaling sites at St. Andreas and 
t>ld Provldencia. 

An offer of the friendly Influence of 
the United States with Panama for an 
adjustment between Panama and Co- 
lombia over the partition. 

An offer to arbitrate reversionary 
rights In Panama. 

Old FlKB Rejeeted. 

The Colombian foreign office reject- 
ed the plan because It otnitted to rec- 
ognize the claim of sovereignty over 
Panama. 

The Atrato canal option would have 
continued for seventy-five years, dur- 
ing which Colombia would have en- 
joved the sum of $10,000,000 with in- 
terest; she might have recovered from 
her claims on the Panama railroad, 
had an arbitration been In her favor, 
some $16,000,000; other claims were 
estimated at some $33,000,000. In all, 
had Colombia won all her contentions, 
her recovery would ha.ve totaled more 
than $90,000,000. 

Just before going out of office, 
Presid^'nt Taft transmitted a letter to i mission 
congress containing Secretary Knox's : public gaze 
report of the negotiation.-*, saying that 
Colombia, by refusal, had "closed the 
door to any further overtures by th« 
United States." 

Secretary Hay previously declined 
to submit Colombia's claims to arbi- 
tration on the ground that they were 
political and not justifiable, and fur- 
ther, that they might call In the ques- 
tion of the right of Panama to exist 
as a sovereign slate. 

Waa "Inherited** Problent. 

Soon after President Wilson took 
office the negotiations were reopened, 
and have been proceeding steadily to 
the conclusion reached yesterday at 
Bogota, when a treaty was signed. 

It is assumed here that the Colom- 



niclpal officials Incompetent and dis- 
honest, and he declared that their op- 
po.«:ltton to a state commission rested 
on their desire to hold on to these 
sources of corruption. I need not re- 
mind you that a state utility commis- 
sion was not heard of In Minnesota 
until the utility companies found that 
these officials were not only honest, 
but capable of looking after the peo- 
ple's Interests. The people are paying 
the penalty of his vetoes, through 
excess charges and inconvenience. 
Faven Loeal Control. 

After a campaign of several months, 
the governor found public sentiment 
so strongly adverse to his utility bill 
that he abandoned it. 1 am unalterably 
opposed to such a commission for such 
a purpose. I believe that in the mat- 
ter of public utilities the principle of 
home rule and local control should 
gt>vern and if elected I shall exert my 
influence for the creation, development 
and perfection of a system of utility 
supervision and control that will rec- 
ognize as paramount the rights and 
powers of local gove'-nment. 

"In the last analysis, government Is 
simply a matter of carrying on the 
people's business, and It requires the 
same kind of talent, ability and honesty 
of purpose that successful private 
business must have. 

"The need of our state government 
today la an energetic and competent 
business direction. It Is a business 
man's Job. I am a business man and 
if elected I shall consider that the peo- 
ple have employed me to see that their 
business is conducted promptly, effi- 
ciently and economically. 

"All matters of legislation are mat- 
ters of political policy, to be deter- 
mined by the majority of the people 
as their sense of the public welfare 
dictates. 



D. H., 4-^-ri; 



"I believe '«ve slionld hare an 
rffretlve olvll •ervlcr law to 
apply to all appointive olfleen. 
titan pro\ldluK an efficient 
corps of workem to do the 
state's business. Real rlvli 
service reform would be Impos- 
sible If the people did not pre- 
fer political parity. The people 
of this state demand clean pol- 
itics and honcHt ROTcrnmcnt, 
and upon this I desire to 
or fall.*' 



stand 






Head Line: Don a Columbia |3 Hat. 



! 



01 



For Easter ! 




V— . 



Mr. Lee then discussed what he 
termed the antiquated and complicated 
governmental organism and the im- 
perative need for a complete overhaul- 
ing and reorganization of the admin- 
istrative machinery of the state gov- 
ernment, citing the fact that he called 
public attention to such a need dur- 
ing the campaign of two years ago 
Referring to the tardy selection of 
thirty men to form an efficiency com- 
mission, the candidate said the coin- 
In Its reports had held up to 
such a multiplicity of 
boards and bureaus and disconnected 
and disorganized offices as to make the 
state's business organization 
laughing stock of every business 

In Minnesota. „ , , .i ir- t .. 

"This condition," declared Mr. Lee, 
"has grown up while the chief execu- 
tive has been engaged in the -pleasure- 
able pastime of travel, oratory, tango 
dancing and song writing. 

Taxation and Extravagance. 
Coming then to the subject of tax- 
atlon and extravagance, Mr. Lee said 
he had, during the last campaign 
pointed out the enormous Increase in 
fhe expenditures of the state govern- 
ment and that the governor had made 
effort to show that other states 
- • ■■ " regard 



the 
man 



Columbo $ 1 4.50 Suit 



The best answer to the young man's suit question, 



Ready in unequalled selections at 



Duluth, 
Minn. 



Ihe Columbia 



At 
Ave. 



Third 
West. 



Foot-Note: Wear the Columbia $3.50 Shoe. 



-J 



an 



blan foreign office would not approve j were worse off In that 
a treaty which the congress of the ; Minnesota 



the boys and girls raised and educated 
there. As an employer I can state 
the boy whoMs raised on an up-to-date 
farm Is a better boy and gives better 
satisfaction In his work. Is more in- 
than I telllgent and takes a broader view 



the majority. The villages of Edwards 
station and Bartonvllle voted wet. 
Only three local option elections were 
held in Peoria cov;nty. 



ot 
had 





—Mayor— 


— rov.m- 


llroan — 


Ward- 


Hil*. 


Kor.krl. 


Gllletf. 


OlUre. 


First 


!09 


215 


1.^8 


2;.« 


Btcor.d 


1!>2 


:20 


178 


127 


TMrd. (Trst i-r»rioct. .. 


!0.1 


« t 


IM 


70 


Third, »»■■! ;..l vre-'lnct. 


114 


151 


112 


140 


Foiirtli. flr.t preriu'-t.. 


M 


2:« 


»1 


250 




112 


2«2 


10« 


2i8 


Fif-.h 


4.'.< 


2M 


442 


299 


Slxih, caM pr»^Jr.rt. .. 


136 


152 


\r-A 


208 


ifUlh. west prei-lnct. . 


ir.« 


248 


ltt2 


241 


Sern.th. ."jst preciiut. 


244 


241 


217 


2o4 


S^iiTth. ictond prett. 


•3:8 


203 


2r.9 


208 


ElfJ,th 


IM 


109 


148 


121 


Xiiith 


3M 


149 


2«9 


14T 


T«itU 


62 


1S5 


59 


19« 



country would be unlikely to ratify. 

How far the administration here has 
gone toward sounding the senate on 
its proposals is not known, and any 
preliminary steps looking toward rati- 
fication probably will not be taken 
until the terms of the convention have 
been fuily transmitted to Secretary 
Rryan and he has privately advised 
senators of the foreign relations com- 
mittee. 



generally 



"My contentions are now 
agreed to; and the state auditor has 
recently Issued a statement confirming 



dls- 
lay- 
said 

the 
nat- 



Tr.tali 

On 



the 



2.601 

proposition 



2.602 2.365 

to purchase 



HOOPES-KOHAGEN CO. 



1826 T.ondon road, S-room hoase. 

V.May lst» S25.00 

5515 London road, 8-room modern 

house »:J0.00 

1416 Ka^t Fourth street, 6-room 

house •.10.00 

16 West Second street, modern 

A-room flat (May 1) 9.15.00 

4123 <;ilUat street, 7-room house, 

for flS.OO 

STORES 

11.1 East Superior street (May 

l*t> »85.00 

107 Second avenue wrnX 933.00 

aiO Lake Avenue South. 



SNAP! 



outside 
$65 per 
how to 



I have SO acres just 
city limits for sale at 
acre. I can show you 
subdivide this and double your 
money in six months. 

Wm. C. SARGENT 

Providence Building. 



Diseases of Men 
and Women 

They reaJlly succumb to our thor- 
ough and exhaustive methods of treat- 
ment when they are carefully and con- 
sistently followed. Mistakes are at a 
minimum because we have treated suc- 
cessfully many hundreds of cases ex- 
actly like your own and In all prob- 
ability we can do even better In your 
case 'after a etmllar observation with 
the labt. 

It is an error not to seek the advice I 
of a Specialist who gives exclusive at- 
tention to such cases and will un- 1 
doubtedly make a well person out of j 
his patient while others are still ex- 
perimenting with causes and effects. I 

WE TREAT SUCCESSFULLY 

CBRO.MC DISKASES— Catarrh, Throat 
Trouble's, Weak Lungs, Rheumatism, 
Nervous Diseases, Stomach and In- 
testinal Troubles, Kidney, Liver, i 
Bladder and Urinary Diseases, Skin ' 
Diseases, Rupture, Piles, Fistula and 
all R*»ctal Troubles, without knife. 

DISEASES OF WOME\ — Irregularities, 
Painful Periods and all diseases pe- 
culiar to the .oex treated without re- ! 
sort to surgery. i 

DISEASES OF .MKX — Varicocele. Xerv- | 
ous Debility, Blood Poison, Stricture . 
and all Special Diseases. j 

LET rS CURE Yor. 
Oiriee Hours — »-8; Sunday, 10-1. 

Electro Medical Doctors 



NO WOME N LAN D OFFICE 

( C ontinued from page 1.) 

council forty will be Democrats, 
twenty-one Republicans, six Progres- 
sives and three independents. 

Women Helped Beat Subway. 

Votes of women helped defeat a 
proposition for a comprehensive sub- 
way svstem, which had been planned 
at an" estimated cost of $130,000,000. 
The subway proposition was lost by 
a majority of 90.000 votes. 

Another public policy question pro- 
viding for home rule in the regula- 
tion of public utilities was successful 
by a majority of 4,000. 

Five bond issues totaling $8,350,000, 
for city departments and for the com- 
pletion of the Cook county hospital, 
i were defeated by large majorities. One 
i bond issue, providing $350,000 for mu- 
i nlcipal batWng beach Improvements, 

was successful. 
I Propositions to Increase to four 
I years the terms of aldermen, the city 
j clerk and the city treasurer, and for 
; the revision of the municipal court act, 

failed. 
I Proposals to annex the villages of 
i Cicero and Morgan Park, suburbs, 
j were successful. However, Cicero 
\ voted against annexation. Morgan 
Park will vote on the question in two 
weeks. 

May Double Precincts. 
Chicago's 1.300 precincts may be 
doubled In number before the next 
election because of the crowded con- 
•Jitions at the polls yesterday. Wit' 
the addition of women voters, the total 
number of voters was nearly doubled 
in every precinct. The city had been 
divided so as to give each precinct 
about 300 voters. Nearly 600 persons 
voted at each polling place yesterday. 
Klectlon officials said women were 
deliberate in their voting. In most 
cases the new voters read carefully 
each public policy proposal before 
marking their ballots. 
j The Socialist party had an alder- 
I manic candidate in each of the thirty- 
five wards. In most of the wards the 
I Socialist vote was third, and In one 
j ward, the Twenty-seventh, in the 
I northwestern part of the city, their 
I candidate took second place. The 
I vote polled by the Socialist candi 
I dates was 39,900. 



to the 
I favor 
consider 



them. The governor no longer 
putes them, but takes refuge iri 
ing the blame on the legislature, 
the candidate. , 

"I believe," he continued. in 
conservation and development of 
ural resources: by continued Public 
owner.shlp. development and protection 
of all remaining timber and mineral 
lands and water POT^^r: through re- 
forestation, by rt'clamatlon and by 
control and development of the water- 
ways of the state. 

"Good roads are necessary 

development of any country 

! a road policy that takes intc 

I Stion. first and foremost the needs 

■of the farmers and which \m11 make 

I more accessible the ""'"«';$'",« „\°J^i 

centers of the different coinmunlties 

'of the state. Roads are Primarily a 

local utility and I believe should 

1 therefore be under direct local control 

I and supervision as far as as compatible 

! with a broad policy of state Improve- 

"""The people of the state are Inter- 
efted In free and open markets. Any 
fair minded person will agree that no 
unnecessary burden or ^^pense should 
attach to the product of the farm, the 
factory or the shop on its way from 
the producer to the consumer 

"I am in full accord ^vith the world 
movement to better protect the life, 
hlalth and welfare of the people, by 
Siohlbltmg excessive hours of labor 
Snd improving conditions under ^hlch 



and no 



conditions 
labor is performed, with rigid 



Uo"ns on rhe."empToVmentj)f women and 



wage 
laws 



are 
and 
jus- 



every subject than he could If he 
been raised on the 'all work 
profit' farm of former years, 

"I stand for good government, con- 
cluded Mr. Lee. "1 know yo" s^^'ir^i^I 
good government. All good citizens 
do. The people of Minnesota have 
never been found wanting in a crisis. 
From village and city; from farm and 
mine; from shop, mlU and counting 
house, office and store; frotn Pulplt. 
press and pen, from all over this broad 
empire of ours comes the voice of de- 
termination, the pledge to arms, rhe 
machine Is doomed. For the confidence 
reposed In me I am deeply grateful 
Tour aid and co-operation In 
great contest 1 earnestly solicit, 
giving me strength, 1 shall not 
you." 

SIXTEEN COUNTIES 
ADDED TO DRY LIST 
BY ILLINOIS VOTERS 

(Continued from page 1.) 



this 
God 
fail 



which was 
he 
been 

legls- 



have 
hasten 



LEE OPENS BATTLE 

F OR NO MINATION 

(Continued from page 1.) 



tered all over 
Is the 'boss.* 



the state, and then there 



"I.lkc a spider In the center 
of his f«'eb, feeding npon the 
dcKTadadon of mankind, plot- 
ting entlooments and nllure- 
mcnts for innoecnec. and suck- 
ing the life blood of Industry, 
sits the astnte and cunning 
manipalator of our destinies. 
I'nilcr the pscudonjin of an at- 
torncy-at-latv, he collects trib- 
ute, exhales the polsonoon 
breath of Innucnilo. and dic- 
tates appointments and policies. 



t« WEST 



*Incf>rporaied.) 
Sri'ERlOR ST. 

Above Lfciser s. 



(I'pstalrs.) 



"Each of these constituent parts has 
its share to contribute, and each re- 
ceives recognition and compensation 
for the services rendered. The brew- 
ers contribute to the campaign fund 
and violations of the law are winked 
at in return. 

"The office holders are the molders 
of public opinion, the managers of lo- 
cal campaigns, the chore boys who do 
the running about for the boss. They 
are scattered all over Minnesota, and 
if you examine them closely, you will 
find that each one has a string tied 
to him. When the boss pulls the 
string he dances. Oil inspectorships 
have been doled out to certain country 
newspapers as a cheap method of brib- 
ing them to support the administration. 

"If we are to reform that state gov- 
ernment the first thing is to get rid 
of the man at the top. 

"In his veto of the Xolan bill, the 
purpose of which was to permit the 
city of Minneapolis to manage Its own 
local public utilities, the governor as- 
serted the people were not competent 
to manage their own affairs, the mu- 



chliaren. The minimum 
workmen's compensation 
movements In the rlgrht direction 
should be so developed that exact 
tice win be done." 

Old Age Pensions. 

Mr Lee expressed himself as fa^pr- 
Ine the movement to make provision 
fof the declining and non-productive 
v° ars of those employed on salary and 
that he would urge Including those 
who hid faithfully performed public 
Terv ice; school teachers, nurses In the 
ItJte hospitals, and others who might 
become eligible through long serv ce. 

"Mmley elcpended in public schools.' 
Mr Lee declared, "paid the largest 
dividen^ds," and he contended the school 
system of the state should be kept free 
frcm political entanglements and upon 
the highest possible patriotic, moral 
and Intellectual plane. 

"We hear much these days." Mr. Lee 
proceeded, discussing the matter of 
mairity rule, of direct popular gov- 
ernment. "In the coming election the 
neople will have an opportunity to 
vote upon a number of proposed 
total i amendments to the Coiistltutlon, In- 
cUid?ng the initiative and the referen- 
dutn! which should become a part of 
our Constitution. 

"I believe In the primary 
law. WMth the experience 

^b^°ul"d"L*Jile t^o^^/ure'^a^ny defects by 
amending it. Minority rule must 
m^de mposslble. The question of the 
Sectlve franchise for women Is call- 
fng our attention. No one should 
oblect to permitting the people to ex- 
SrisB their will upon this question. The 
feglslature should submit the neces- 
sary constitutional amendment. 

^ For County OpUon. 

"T believe In county option and 
the people of any . governmental 
^hould have the legal machinery 
tided for the expression of their 
uDon the liquor question. 

"I believe in reducing the power 
the brewery In politics and curbing 
ISe slnUter infiuence of the liquor 

^^nlaklng next of the legislature. Mr. 
Lee said: ^ "The right kind of a legis- 
lature and governor working In har- 
mony can regenerate the political con- 
ditions of the state. I urge you to give 
?houghtful consideration to your rep- 
resentatives in the legislature. 

"a" a result of co-operation and di- 
versified farming we have not only a 
creat Improvement In the farms 
fn the financial Condition of the 
mer but there is an Improvement n 
the farm buildings. Improvements in 
hi homes; In the schools andchurchcs, 
and m the public roads, 
better than all. the 
*''.l'A"\VVt"pJoduct8 of the farm are 



ing said they hoped to win in ^O per 
cent of the townships A«er the re- 
turns were announced last nignt i«. 
Scott McBride, superintendent of the 
Anti-Saloon league, declared that he 
was more than satisfied with the re- 
sult. 

"Not a city nor township 
dry has gone over to the enemy 
said, "and our victories 
many. This election will 
latlon curtailing the liquor selling in 
the state. We have Just begun to 
fight, and the campaign wiU continue 
until there is ndt a saloon left m lUi- 
nol" Before another wet and dry 
election we hope to have a county op- 
tion law on the statute books, and 
that will make our battle easier to 

^^°' Sixteen ?«>w Dry Countfcs. 

The sixteen counties added to 
list of thirty already dry are: Boone, 
Brown, Christian, De Kalb, 
Fulton, Henry, Jersey, Knox, 
ston, Macon, McLean, 
son, Warren and 

Of the near-dry counties 
from the election, Jo . ,♦„ 

Whiteside have each one wet city. 
West Galena and Fulton, respectively 
Kane county has t^o wet places: 
rora, where the hottest 
test resulted la ,_javor 
dealers, and St. -i^^a^a 

Rock Island, which landed 
wet column, experienced an 
hour change, Infiuenced, 
largely by promises 
of city saloons 
more stringent 



Colorado Results. 

Denver, Colo., April 8.— Yesterday s 
municipal elections in the smaller 
towns of Colorado were fought out on 
kcal issues. In the six coal mining 
oamps, where union labor was an Issue, 
the labor candidates were successful. 

Returns received early today showed 
that In towns where the wet and dry 
Issue was foremost the wets won In 
six and the drys four. 
— ' — . — » 
New Mexico Republicans I.cnd. 

Albuquerque, N. M., April 8. — Re- 
turns received early today from yes- 
terday's municipal elections in New 
Mexico showed that Republican tickets 
led over Democratic and fusion candi- 
dates. 

♦ ■ 

Jost Re-clcctcd In Kansas City. 

Kansas City, Mo.. April 8.— Henry L. 
Jost, Democrat was re-elected mayor 
of Kansas City over four other candi- 
dates by a majority estimated at over 
9,006 votes. The non-partisan ticket, 
pledged to commission government and 
headed by Clarence A. Burton, was sec- 
ond. All the Democratic candidates for 
the upper house of the council were 
carried "In on the tide which swept 
Mavor Jost back Into office. 

The Democratic candidates for 
comptroller, treasurer and police judge 
also wer« successful. Mayor Jost car- 
ried thirteen out of the sixteen wards 

of the city. 

« — 

Mayor of Joplin. 
Joplln. Mo., April 8.— Mayor Joseph 
Osborne was defeated for re-election 
by Hugh Mclndo, a former state sen- 
ator. In Joplln's first vote on officials 
for service under commission govern- 
ment. 



the 
one, 
De Witt, 
Living- 
Shelby, Stephen- 
Winnebago. 

resulting 
Daviess and 



resource to protect her people In the 
revolution-torn republic was made plain 
when Rear Admiral Mayo, at Tamplco, 
cabled the navy department that the 
commanding officer of the British 
cruiser Hermolne had been instructed 
to care for Spaniards at this besieged 
Federal port. 

Problem Is Grave. 
The gravity of the problem has 
been increased by the unofficial but 
credible information that this policy 
of expulsion of the Spaniards is to be 
of general application; that as rapidly 
as the Constitutionalists by force of 
arms extend their control over such 
cities as Saltlllo and Monterey and 
other places now within the Federal 
line, they intend to drive out the Span- 
iards and seize their property. 



recorded In Mascomni, Barneveldt,. 
Montfort, Miflin, Rewey, Black £Iarth«. 
Blanchardville. Argyle, Stoughton,. 
Washburn, Xorway, Poakln Lake^ 
Turtle Lake, Ricfi Lake, Amery, Che- 
tek, Cameron, New Auburn, Ridgeland, 
Dalls and Barron. 

Madison Mayor Beaten. 

In Madison, Mayor John Helm was. 
defeated by Adolph H. Kayser, a re- 
tired lumber dealer, by BOO majority. 

RacTne reports the election of A- J. 
Eisenhut as city treasurer by a large 
majority. 

Xeenah re-elected C. B. Clark, non- 
partisan, mayor over J. X. Stone, the 
oldest editor in the state. 



of other 
wet col- 



I 



election 

of two years 

the legislature 

by 

be 



Au- 
kind of acon- 
of the liquor 

Charles. 

- - In the 
eleventh 
it is believed, 
that the number 
would be curtailed, 
regulations enforced, 
and all bars closed at U P. m. week- 
days and all day Sundays. 

SDringlleld Women Favor Saloon. 
SorlnKfleld, the state capital voted 
wet after a campaign In which every 
possible argument 
liquor selling 

ed*wlt, *^-'"«*'--y'beTne 4.301 dry and 



for and against 
was presented to the 
A majority of the ^omen vot- 
the figure being 4,301 dry 



that 
unit 
pro- 
will 

of 



and 
far- 



wet 



fifty 
and 
cer- 



by a majority 
Late last night 
city had gone 



Dl\ldf Nebraska Victories. , 

Omaha. Neb., Apnl 8.— In yesterday s 
municipal election.^, the question or 
license and recall created great Inter- 
est, with party politics entering into 
but few contests. Temperance advo- 
cates claim a victory on the license, 
some towns which have long been wet 
going dry. The opposition, however, 
turned the tide in a number 
places, carrying them to the 

""rhe state law gives towns the right 
to pass on the question of Sunday 
baseball games. 

4^ 

Kansas Women Voted. 

Topeka, Kan., April 8.— Women cast 
a heavy vote In the elections he d 
fhroughout Kansas yesterday. Only 

local issues were in^'^y*' w nrsr.\. 
At Hutchinson. Dr. E. W. Cook 
Recently a revival 



elected mayor. 

held in Hutchinson and over 1 000 
verts were made. The churches 
came active In politics and both 
Cook and Lincoln 9. Davis, his 
pcnentf were pledged to clean 
town. 



was 
was 

con- 
be- 
Dr. 
op- 
the 



and what Is 
people are better 
were. 



The 



CASTOR I A 

For In&nts and Cliildieii. 

The Kind You Haw Alwais Bought 



Bears tli9 
Signature of 




"Frerport. which for more than 
vears has been wet territory. 
L*»fiPh was regarded by many as 
t«Vn?o remain so. saw its forty-eighth 
Illoons Xed out of existence by the 
votes of women. 

Jollet was voted 
of approximately 2^,500 

[nfo'the dTco Smn by 1.000 v-otes. The 
cai^paign. particularly In the wards 
lt!^?» the steel workers live, was vig- 
wheie the steei women voted, 

fhPlrbaUots being nearly equally dl- 
iVdld between the wets and the drys 
A majority of the men voters favored 
the saloon interests, 
the saioi^^^^^ ^ Bloomington. 

On the face of the returns. Bloom- 
Inaton was voted dry yesterday by a 
LVender majority, placed by one news- 
S^Vnir Rt elghtv and by another at 
flft^cen on a total vote of 14.000. If 
?hl official canvass by the city coun- 
cil tonight shows a dry victory, the 
wet leaders Intimate that they will 
petition for a recount. 

-The township of Proviso one 
Ci^rXi county townships outside 
clt? of Chicago whloh was reported 
Ifist night to have voted dry, was to- 
dflv shown by the complete returns to 
have be^n voted wet by a majority of 
RP3 There are seventy-seven saloons 
in the township, and a large amuse- 
ment park, as well as a number of 
summer gardens and road houses In 
which liquor Is dlspenped. 

Complete election returns today 
showed Galesblirg. 111., went dry by 
3 002 votes. The men's dry majority 
was 424 and the women's 2,B78. 

Dry After Twenty-one Years. 

For the first' time In twenty-one 
vears the village of Elmwood, near 
Peoria, has gohe •"•dry." The vote of 
the women gained a victory for the 
drys which netted- them 136 votes In 



St Tos'JX' Mo.,'*-ApTl7*8.-Elliott 
Mf^shalr^Republican. defeated David 
E Curtin Democrat, and tvvo oinei 
candidates for mayor of St. Joseph In 
the municip al elect i on. 

americanslMng 
near tampico seek 
refugejn the city 

(Continued fro m page 1.) 



Refugees Reach Juarca. 

Juarez, Mex., April 8. — Six hundred 
and twelve men, women and children 
of the Spanish colony, expelled from 
Torreon by Gen. Villa, arrived here 
before daybreak today. Huddled In the 
passenger cans, they waited for dawn 
and the arrival of George C. Carothers 
special agent of the department of 
state. 

"Mr. Carothers came tip a day ahead 
of us to see what he could do with 
Gen. Carranza," said Joaquin Fernan- 
dez, a prominent member of the colony. 
"We are under protection of the 
American flag, and we decided not to 
leave the cars until Carothers comes." 

Carothers had another interview 
with Gen. Carranza last night, but it 
was learned that the general's atti- 
tude against the Spaniards remained 
unchanged. 

Cardcn Returninjir. 

Southampton, April 8.— Sir Lionel 
Cardcn, British minister to Mexico, 
sailed today on the Olympic for New 
York on his way to Mexico City. Be- 
fore Sir Lionel's departure the for- 
eign office announced that he was re- 
turning to his post in Mexico tera- 
porarilv and that he would proceed 
to another post later in the year. 

The mission for which Sir Lionel 
has been selected is that in Brazil. 
It Is understood that he will leave 
Mexico City for Rio de Janeiro very 
soon. 



Few Changes in 'West. 

La Crosse, V.'is.. April 8. — No Impor- 
tant changes In the wet and drj- col- 
umns In Western Wi.^consin occurred 
in the elections yesterday. Important 
towns voted as follows: 

Viroqua, Blair, Eleva, Holland. Ona- 
laska tovn and Chaseburg, which have- 
been dry. remained dry. 

Galesville, Sparta, De Soto. White- 
hall and Trempealeau, now wet, re- 
main wet. 

The closest fight was at De Soto, an 
oasis for the diT territory in Minne- 
sota on tlie west side of the river. 
The saloons won out by 8 votes. 



See the Flower Show 

at the Duluth Floral company. 



.!li 



Special at 
The Orpheum This Week 

Send vour wearing apparel to us to 
be Dry "cleaned for Easter Sunday. 
Oit>heum Cleaners and Glove Special- 
ists, corner Second avenue east and 
Super'or street. Phones, Grand 976; 
Melrose 1168. 



BOYS APPEAL 

TO THE MAYOR 



Ask 



SEIDEL FAILS 

TO COME BACK 

(Continued from page 1.) 



under 



entitled 
usage. 

That Spain proposes 



international law and 
to exhaust every 



of 
of 



the 
the 



Gardner Bros. 
Wine House 

29 WEST FIRST STREET. 

We Handle a Complete 

Line of Imported and 

Domestic Wines 

and Liquors 



Fnmlly trntltva f;poplalty. Wo 
liver to all parts of tlie city. 

Mull orders receive prompt 
teiiUoii. Our motto. "Service." 
Give Us a Trial. 



de- 



at- 



Phone, Grand 2122. 



ever, he was defeated by another non- 
partisan. , . _ 

Edmund T. Melms, a prominent So- 
cial-Democrat, who during the Seidel 
regime was president of the coun- 
cil, was defeated In yesterdays effort 
to get back. 

The vote does not appear to be as 
heavy as two years ago. The Socialists 
seem to have polled almost equal to 
the last election and the cutting down 
of Badlng's plurality of over 12,000 two 
years ago to almost half that numbei 
is looked upon by them as a victory. 

The registration and yesterday s re- 
turns show that there were many 
thousands of "stay-at-home" voters. 
Bonds For Harbor. 

Milwaukee voted In favor of a bond 
Issue for harbor improvements. 

Circuit Judge "SVilllam J. Turner, 
non-partisan, was re-elected by a de- 
cided majority over the Social-Demo- 
cratic candidate. , ,, „ , ' 

Supreme Court Justice J. C. Kerwin i 
has no opposition throughout the state, i 

The four circuit judges outside of 
Milwaukee whose terms expired were , 
re-elected. ... 

Little In the way of returns has been 
received from counties voting on the i 
proposition for an extra session of the 
legislature. - ! 

Wets and Drys. 

Throughout the state interest In yes- i 
terday's election centered chiefly In 
the license question, the larger cities \ 
voting "wet." Out of 57 places heard ; 
from, 30 went ' "wet" and 27 "dry." 
Madison. Janesville. Belolt, Edgerton, 
and Sparta are among the more Im- i 
portant "wet" victories, while Grants- ' 
burg, Lodl, Lancaster, Barron, Cum- i 
berland and Union Grove registered ■, 
"dry." 

Reports also show the following to ; 
have voted in favor of license: I 

Palmyra, Mauston. Darlington, ' 

BoycevlUe. Downing, Wheeler, Man- 
awa, Shawano. Westcott, Dodgevllle, 
Ridgeway. Cobb. Linden. Hollandale, 
Fort Atkinson (by three to one). 

Victories for the dry element were 



His Help in Securing 
Sites for Baseball 
Diamonds. 

If spring hasn't come it is undoubt- 
edly close at hand. A sign equal iiv 
significance to the arrival of the first 
robin appeared at the office of Mayor^ 
Prince yesterday afternoon. 

The sign was the appearance of two 
delegations of "kids." who want the 
city's assistance in securing baseba'l 
grounds. They asked the executive lo- 
use his influence to the end that dia- 
monds may become available In th»- 
vicinity of the Fairmont school at 
tVest Duluth and between Forty-sixth, 
and Forty-eighth avenues west and' 
Fourth and Sixth streets. 

The embryo Ty Cobbs and Walter 
Johnsons and other illustrious heroes 
of the national game represented that 
the greatest boon which could be con- 
ferred upon them at this time would 
be getting baseball grounds. They 
said that they do not like to play In 
the streets where they would Inter- 
fere with traffic or knock balls- 
through windows. 

Mayor Prince assured them that ha 
has not forgotten that he was a "kid" 
once and knew Just how they felt 
about It. He said that he would take 
the matter up with th« property own- 
ers without delay. He thought there- 
would be little difficulty In securlng^ 
the desired permls^sion. 



STELLAR FLOOR 

VARNISH 




Pir Gailoii 

""^ DAUGHERTY'S 

HARDWARE 

516EastFMrtliSt. 
COUPOH 

THIS COUPON GOOD FOR 50c 

on each mallon of this Varnish 
purchased during month of April 




t 

I. 




r 



V 



m» 



Wednesday, 



THE DULILTH HERALD 



April 8, 1914. 



13 



Tr-T 



Watch The Herald for 
Baseball Neivs 





O 




T 




The Herald Sporting 
Gossip Is Sellable 



LIVE SPORTING GOSSIP 

By BRUCE 




are dead and 



IMMV TF.X EYCK'S senior i feelings of the past 

eight will be opposed by the buried. 

Argonauts of Toronto at the I r *, ^. * t,- j 

National. This fact is certi- ! ^^ 0"« ^^ }}\ Coast Ktnd. 

fied to by the telegraphic 13^9^0111 of the sunshine and sand 
statement to The Herald that the j !■, ?f talitornia comes information 
Argonauts will not send a crew to the reeking ol partiality m close connec- 
Ens^lish Henley tins season, but will 
go after the crack crews of the Do- 



minion and the United States. 



Let us state that the crew finally , ^t pugilism. 



tion with the decision given in the 
case of Clabby versus Murray, which 
was decided in the Daly city courts 



GRAIN MAN 
IS CU[ STAR 

William Henderson Touted 
as Coming Amateur Bil- 
liard Ctiampion. 



PITCHER WHO HAS 

JUMPED TO THE FEDS 



selected by James as the quintessence 
oi local excellence will find competi- 
tion in the turnout of the Argonauts. 
Ever since the men of Canada have 
ligured seriously in the rowing game 
the Argonauts have been among those 
prominently mentioned. 

One never to be forgotten year at 
Syracuse our eight was beaten by the 
light eight of the Argonaut house, and 
upon other illustrious occasions the 
crews of this famous and ancient and 
honorable club have won some of the 
most notable victories registered by 
the Canadian oarsmen. ^^ 

Therefore it the general class of i theyliav^ been' seen ^'iYtle in public, 
the country is lowered to the minor 1,^^ j,^^.g 1^^^^ \i^xs\\y engaged in cer- 
regi>ter and the crews that come to I ^^^^ matters connected with the bat- 
i:.e large and welcoming environs of I ^jng ^f ^ ball against the front and 
Philadelphia are not up to the snufi ] gjjg ^y^n^ ^^ ^ ^.^y^t. 



Jim Griffin, a prodigious lover of 
the home found and grown things, 
we should judge, was the feferee in 
this quarrel and though it is said that 
Tames Clabby landed scores of blows 
to the loosely associated returns of 
his brother at arms, the hands of both 
of the battlers were promptly raised 
aloft at the conclusion of the battle. 

This merely goes to show that you 
have to go like blazes to win from 
one of the native sons on the coast. 

Well, Maybe They Need It. 

HINCE our handball boys have re- 
turned from the city of St. Paul 



of other years, there will be at least 
one eight that will take a lot of beat- 
ing — for these Argonauts are distinct- 
ly and impertinently there. 



Some of the hum boys are mean 
enough to say that it will be good 

for what is the matter of 'em. 

« « • 

What Ever That Is. 
William A. Brady, the theatrical 

SKADINCi in one of the Knglish man, is engaged at the present time 
sporting pages that a genial and j in writing a serial history of his life, 
well informed friend sends us occa- In its midst he calls James J. Cor- 
sionally. that for the first time in | bett an iconoclast. Most of us were 
thirtj' years Ireland has won the Soc- 1 under the impression that he was a 
ccr football championship from dear heavyweight. 



Thy Bleeding Spirit 
iKADINci in one of the English 



old England, our heart goes out in 
this time of severe affliction to that 
of bleeding athletically inclined Eng- 
land. 

The athletic trials and tribulations 



* * • 

Get Out an Injunction. 

Michigan is to have a stadium that 

will seat 34,ooo people. And to think 

that Michigan is out of the confer- 

r 1 1 T- 1 A \.^ I »«„ ^^* .,„i;i.» ence. Can't some of those peevish 
of old England have been not unlike ; , x 

the trials and afflictions that beset | ^__l_\ 

Job. one 

t 'ouble league. 



sors get out an injunction and 

; ., „i 1 ^ 1^.. . r.% ♦!,« I stop the building of this structure? 

ot the real leaders oi the i t^ ^ • ^ -r ..u j- i 

' It begins to appear as if the prodigal 

son has waxed exceedingly prosper- 
ous. 



First some of our aspiring and per- 
spiring pugilists robbed the mother 
country of the prestige she managed 
to save from the series of incidents 
growing more or less directly out of 

the Boston tea party. Following up- j measurements — and long of arm, is 
on these severe and continual defeats the latest of the disease called white 



The Cave Man Type, 
MOHA, broad of bea 
of draught — speaking of physical 



raOB MOHA, broad of beam, short 



came the Olympic games, the polo 
cup defeat, the loss of the Davis cup, 



hope to become virulent. Since his 
defeat of the Battling Levinsky one 



the cup defender incident, and Ihe dis- the boy who has called several of 
mal spectacle of a French boy whip- j the cafes and palm gardens of Mil- 
ping the champion of Great Britain | waukee home, has got the pugilistic 
at the ancient game England proudly J thirst for greater glory. Moha has 



boasted of supremacy in — boxing 

Loss has fallen with heavy hand on 
the broad accent boys, and it is there- 
fore with sorrow and chastened spirit 
that we read of the loss of the soccer 
championship. 

Be of good cheer, old Tom Lipton 
15 again to the rescue and while there 

is life there is *ope. aye, chappie. 

• • • 

Waits Until Yost Sees Him. 

DRAINER FARRELL of Michigan 
rises to the public forum with the 
siateinent that he has developed 
among the youths of the Michigan 
track team an athletic candidate of 
rare and cultured attainments in the 
person of one Constantine D. Trip- 
olitis. a Greek, who is proving an 
adept at the throwing the javelin. 

In addition to distinction at this 
feat, listed as one of the point win- 
ners on the Olympic program, the 
Greek is said to be some boy at other 
stunts requiring muscle and agility. 

This little remark makes us think 
that it will not be long before the 
trained and hawk-like orb of one 
Fzelding Yost will be measuring the 
expanse and capabilities of the Greek- 
youth. 

And — something more — Amos Stagg 



been matched with Gunboat Smith 
and will meet the large and open 
faced one before one of the Milwau- 
kee clubs. In the days of the past, 
lurid and industrious past it was, too, 
Joe VVolcott, short and ebony and 
demoniac, cut them all down, and he 
was only a welterweight. Now comes 
Moha, of heavier poundage, to be 
sure, but yet one of the really won- 
derful little men of his time and 
seething generation. 



Chicago. April 8. — Look out for Will- 
lam Henderson! 

"Who on earth is William Hender- 
son? 

Well, William Henderson Is a dark 
horse in the amateur billiard world. 
He Is a member of the Chicago board 
of trade and has been discovered by 
Charles Frederick Conklln, former na- 
tional and international amateur balk 
line champion. 

When Conklln withdrew from the 
amateur ranks he. In partnership with 
William Burdick, opened a billiard 
room on Jackson boulevard, directly 
across the street from the board of 
trade. At least Conklln and Burdick 
acquired the room which had formerly- 
been conducted by Charles H. Weegrh- 
man. president of the Chicago Federal 
league baseball club. And it wa* 
here that Conklln fjjst got his lamps 
on William Henderson, "the coming 
national amateur balk line champion." 

So impressed was Conklln with the 
natural, fine swinging stroke of Hen- 
derson that he displayed a keen inter- 
est In the grain broker from the start. 
Taking him on for a game. Conklln 
found the dark horse a worthy oppo- 
nent, and the old champion had to step 
right along to beat him. Conklln 
averaged 9, while Henderson's clip was 
a trifle under 8. 

Henderson Becomes Pupil. 

From that moment Henderson be- 
came a pupil of Conklln. and an apt 
one at that. His style needed correct-^ 
Ing and he was a bit shy on his draws* 
and masses, but in general his work 
was good and he possessed all the ear- 
marks of a champion. 

Now Conklln has sometimes to 
travel at a 20 average to beat the new- 
comer in the amateur field, and only 
last week Henderson took Charles 
Fredericks' measure In a 400-polnt 
game at 18.2 balk line. In that con- 
test Henderson averaged 18. and had 
the high run of the game, a well ac- 
complished compilation of 124. 

Henderson, though a man of 40 
years or better, has shown such marked 
Improvement under the earnest tu- 
telage of the former amateur cham- 
pion that Conklln has persuaded him 
to enter the national tournament next 
year, feeling that he will have an ex- 
cellent chance to carry off the cham- 
pionship. And Conklin is willing to 
wager a good hat right now that his 
protege will not finish worse than 
third In the big event of 1915. 

KANSAHITY 
STARS SHINE 




RUSSELL FORD. 

Fargo. Watklns pitched for the Vir- 
ginia club a part of last season. 

Big Peters, who is! some catcher, 
both In ability and weight, will try 
out with the Grand Forks team. Pe- 
ters win probably make good. He 
had a favorable record with the Daven- 
port team of the Three-I league last 
season and was sold to Grand Forks. 

Joe Sporn. an inflelder, will try out 
with the Winnipeg team. 

RED BLUHM GOES 
TO NEW ORLEANS 



Northern League to Be 

Plentifully Supplied With 

Missouri Players. 



Kansas City, Mo., April 8. — Every 

team In the Northern league will have 

one or more Kansas City players in its 

lineup this spring, except the Superior 

I club. Twelve local pastimers will be 

I given tryouts In the Northern league, 

I some of which were on the payroll of 

1 the league last year. 

! Winona, Virginia. Fort William, 

Fargo and Duluth will each have two 

i Kansas City faces in their lineup and 

; Winnipeg and Grand Forks will each 

, give one player a chance to land a 

regular job. 

Roy Baxter, an outfielder, and Leo 
I Murphy, a catcher, who played with 
I the champion Winona team last year, 
I are being given a tryout with the Kan- 
sas City team of the American Asso- 
New York, April 8. — The English elation at present, but from all Indl- 
players for the International polo | cations they will -probably be back in 
matches against America which will j a Winona uniform when the Northern 
be held at Meadowbrook this spring, i league season starts, as Lefty Davis 



MEMBERS OF ENGUSH 
POLO 11AM CHOSEN 

Will Play in England Before Sail- 
ing for America to Take Part in 
International Polo Matches at 
Meadow brook. 



have been selected as follows: 

No. 1, Capt. H. Tompklnson; No. 2. 
MaJ. F. W. Barrett; No. 3. Capt. Vivian 
Lockett; back, Maj. C. Hunter; sub- 
stitutes, MaJ. Mathew Lennowe, Capt. 
E. Palmer and Capt. H. Ralston. 

The English team will leave Madrid I on to the Duluth payroll. 

Clyde Bramble, an outfielder. 



has several of last year's players, who 
are holdouts, while the Blues have a 
surplus of national pastimers. 

Joe HarvlUe, a pitcher, who heaves 
from the "wrong" side, and Billy 
Brammell, a catcher, will try to hook 



has a Chinaman in his squad who has 1 on April 16, for England, where a 

attained to classical distinction in the ««,•:'«« °' AYJI^® matches will be played 
T-k ij-ji- u with the Old Cantabs, mado up of Capt. 
gymnasium. Doc V\ illiams has never Haseltlne. F. M. Freake, G. M. Buck- 
developed any athlete of Chinese master and A. L. Halgh 



The players will probably remain 
two weeks In England before sailing 



origin who threatened a minor sort of 
yellow athletic peril among the col- 
leges of the conference. 

* « • 

The Kink May Come Over. 
[ITTLE drops of news from across 

the sea tell us of the contempla- ' 

tuc coming of King Alfonso of Spain 1 
with a Polo team that is to compete j 
for the large amount of glory that 
will travel hand in hand with the win- London. April 8.— English newspa- 
ning of the tournament that will be I pers are devoting much space to Fran- 
plaved at the San Francisco fair. I^is t>uimet. the American golfer, who 
*^ -f. I .. ,• u TT •» J c* i-, - ' already has won many friends by his 

The last time the United States was i unassuming manner, modesty and 
more or less intimately associated sportsmanship. 

v.ith the horseback riders of the Don ! Ouimet made his first appearance on 
country, was at the matter of San 



and 

Man Brokaw, an outfielder, will try to 
land a regular Job with the Virginia 
club. 

Rube Johnson, a pitcher, who is re- 
ported to have the speed of his name- 
sake, Walter, and Frank Butchart, an 



Duluth baseball fan«'-wlll no doubt 
be interested in the announcement that 
Red Bluhm, former first baseman of 
the Duluth White Sox, has been sold by 
the Cleveland club of the American 
association to the New Oi'l^eans club of 
the Southern league. 

While the red-headed one, even from 
the first day he cavorted around the 
first bag at our ball park here, pos- 
sessed the nifty knack of knocking 'em 
down with his eyebrows, his rise to 
higher company brought on troubles in 

the hitting line. 

From Duluth to New Orleans maJces 
the run of climatic changes one that 
should harden the heart of Ihe red- 
head and foster his philosophy. 

Bluhm is but a youngster In years, 
and the coming season will be but his 
third in professional baseball company. 
Mayiiap it will transpire- that the agile 
fielder and nifty guardian of the sta- 
tion numbei- one will Improve in his 
hitting and will again be back in faster 
baseball company. 

Red is a clean, hard-working ball 
player, and as such deserves success of 
golden-tipped variety. 

RAID ON BOO KIES. 

Fourteen Arrested at Virginia Race 
Track on Governor's Orders. 

Norfolk, Va., April 8. — Fourteen re- 
puted bookmakers were arrested at 
the track of the Jamestown Jockey club 

yesterday, charged with gambling. The 
arrests were made on orders from Gov- 
ernor Stuart, who announced at Rich- 
mond that every effort would be made 
to prevent gambling at Virginia race 
courses. Those arrested were held In 
$2,000 bonds each for. their appearance 
In court today. 

Ten special policemen, a.worn in on 
orders from the governor, raided the 
betting ring during the third race, and 
are said to have taken -charge of $5,000 
found In the possession of alleged 
bookmakers and reputed to have been 
placed on entries in the race. 

Attorney General Pollard directed 
operations against the reported gam- 
bling. He was Instructed by the gov- 
ernor to make further arrests today If 
gambling Is attempted. 

Robert Levy, manager of the James- 
town track, announced last night that 
racing would continue, but that In- 
stead of the race track management 
offering purses, the horse owners would 
divide the gate receipts every day. 

McCOY TAKES KLAUS' 
GOAT AWAY FROM CHIP. 

New York, April 8, — Al McCoy of 
Brooklyn knocked out George Chip of 
Newcastle, Pa., a leading claimant for 



for the United States. The English j outfleMer, are scheduled to tjry to land ] the middleweight title, in the first 

'*"' " " ""•• round of their ten-round match last 
night. The knockout came after one 
minute and forty seconds of fighting. 

The result was a great surprise, as 
McCoy had been considered only a 
fairly good middleweight. 

In the first round. Chip assumed the 



ponlps, thirty In number, will leave I their meal tickets with the Fort Will- 
London on May 17 for America. lam club. 

• ! Horace Flagg, an Infielder, and 

Frank Watklns. a pitcher, will in all 
probability land regular jobs with the 
Fargo nine. Flagg is being given a 
tryout with the Minneapolis team of 



OlIMET IMPRESSES 
ENGLAND FAVORABLY 



the A. A. at St. Joseph. Mo., and, ac- i offensive and was forcing McCoy 
cording to late reports, he will be around the ring, when the latter land- 
turned over to the Cantlllon farm at 1 ed his first blow — the knockout one. 



Juan hill. We won that contest in 
somewhat hollow fashion and since 




an English golf course at Deal yester 
day, and there was much speculation 
as to how he would shape up after his 
long rest from practice. That he 

«v^t n^^^o -^- i«.o- «,-^ V.1- ^ --• ' need.s vetry little practice to get Into 

that more or less memorable occa.sion f^^m w«s shown when he went around 
the Spanish people have cared little the course In 81 strokes, a remarkable 
for our game. I performance In the face of a stiff wind. 

Now that King Al is thinking of |||M|%|i|M| PAB BIA 
coming over on one of the regular ; BIDDIIIG rOR BIG 

liners and trying his hand at the game 
of polo, let us all go in with three 
raha and a ti^er and hope and sin- 
cerely trust that the little emphatic 



NEWS FROM THE STARS IN 

SPRING PRACTICE FIELDS 



TENNIS TOURNEY 



.^Miiir: 




WILLilMSOl 4 MEMEIIilLL. OllatI 




New York, April 8. — A spirited con- 
te-^t has developed for the honor of 
staging the International tennis games 
for the Davis cup. to be played Aug. 
13 to 15. 

The principal bidders for the event 
are the Longwood Cricket club of Bos- 
ton, the Crescent club of Brooklyn, the 
Allegheny club of Pittsburg, the Merlon 
Cricket club of Philadelphia and the 
West Side club of this city. 

As the West Side club offered so 
many Inducements In the way of erec- 
tion of stands and provisions for the 
comfort of the spectators and players, 
it T^as taken for grunted that the games 
would be awarded to New York. Boston 
tennis players, however, hav9 not given 
up hope, and have presented arguments 



New Orleans, La., April 18. — Fred 
Merkle's home run drive over the left 
field fence netted the New York Na- 
tionals their fourth consecutive vic- 
tory yesterday over the New Orleans 
Southern association team. The score 
was 1 to 0. Merkle later hit for three 

bases and also hit a single. Score: 

R. H. E. 

New York 1 8 

New Orleans 3 

Batteries — Fromme and Meyers; 
Bagby. Glavenlch, Gudger and Adams. 



Reulbach and Miller. Umpires 
and EmsUe. 



-O'Brien 



Belleville, Kan., April 8.— Lathrop 
pitched a one-hit game for the Chi- 
cago American second team yesterday, 
shutting out Belleville, 6 to 0. Score: 

R. H. E. 

Sox 6 9 

Belleville 1 4 

Batteries — Lathrop and Sulllva^i; 
Scott and Page. 



Lynchburg. Va., April 8. — In a game 
here yesterday between Baltimore and 
Pittsburg of the Federal league. Pitts- 
burg hit Qulnn In the Initial Inning, Nationals 1 D 0— 1 8 

securing a six-run lead, but Baltimore i Americans OOOOOOOll — 2 4 

finally overcame this and won, 9 to 8. I Batteries — Alexander. Jacobs and 
Score: R. H. E. ' KllUfer and Burns; Shawkey, Pennock 



Philadelphia, April r,— The Philadel- 
phia Nationals had the local Americana 
shut out until the eighth inning yes- 
terday, when the Athletics tied the 
score and won out in th6 ninth, 2 to 1. 
Score: R. H. E. 

Nationals 1 D — 1 8 



Pittsburg ' 8 13 

Baltimore 9 13 1 

Batteries — Barger, Leolalre and Ber- 
ry; Qulnn, Smith and Jaclltsch. 




Brooklyn, N. Y., April 8. — The Brook- 
lyn Nationals evened up the spring 
sertoi with the New Tork Americans i American association teams. The De 



and Lapp. 
Byron. 



Umplresr—Cohnolly and 



Louisville. Ky., April 8.-r-Raln pre- 
vented the exhibition game scheduled 
for yesterday afternoon b»etween the 
Detroit Americans and the Louisville 



third undecided but leans toward Long- Brooklyn lOlOlllO x— 6 8 8 

i *<'"*• Battttries— McH»l« and Sweeney; 



trolt team left for Cincinnati. 



New Orleans, La., April 8. — The New 
York Giants have started north. Sev- 
eral games will be played <en route to 
ri\Hndelphla, where the team will open 
the licason April 14, 



SPIKE KELLY IS FOULED 
IN C ONTEST W ITH FERNS 

Superior Fighter Sinks to Floor From Low Blow 

in First Round— Young Burke Also Claims 

Foul in His Bout With Jack Doyle. 



BY BRUCE. 

Misfortune, riding under whip and 
spur, trampled all over last evening's 
boxing show of the Twin Ports Ath- 
letic club. Two accidents occurred, 
stopping the seml-windup in the 
fourth round and the main bout of the 
evening before the expiration of the 
first round. 

"Wild Cat" Ferns, during the short 
Interval of fighting that the spectators 
were privileged to witness, lived up 
to the ferocity suggested in the ring 
name under which he sails. 

At the call of time the Ferns one 
assumed the aggressive. After feel- 
ing around for half a minute Ferns 
rushed and sent Kelly into the ropes. 
Again he rushed and in the clinch at- 
tempted to work both hands to the 
Kelly kitchen. His royal spikelets 
protested to the referee against this 
free work in the embraces and Mr. 
Ferns humbly begged the pardon of 
his adversary. 

Again Ferns rushed and this time 
Kelly neatly sidestepped. Just before 
the conclusion of the round, when the 
spectators had settled down to the 
gleeful anticipation of a corking scrap. 
Ferns rushed again and forced Kelly 
to the ropes. Ferns hit out quickly, 
his right coming up from the waist, 
and with a groan, turning half around, 
a look of agony convulsing his fea- 
tures, Kelly slowly sank to the resin. 

Over the prostrate form of the fallen 
pugilist stood Referee Tug McDon- 
ough, urging Kelly to his feet. 

"I can't. Tug," groaned Kelly, I 
can't move." 

Like a lot of amateurs some han- 
dlers hauled the suffering Kelly to his 
corner and later he was taken from 
the ring, groaning with the poignant 
pain of the blow that landed in the 
groin. 

Ending Is Unfortunate. 

As in any athletic contest where the 
public is given a short run for its 
monev, the ending was exceedingly un- 
fortunate. The promoters must be ab- 
solved from blame — it was simply un- 
fortunate, and that says it all. 

The scrap would have been a corker. 
If the two minutes and a fraction or 
work can be taken as a criterion from 
which to judge. Ferns was obviously 
out to make a fight of It from the 
first gong, and with his rushing and 
aggressive tactics it looked like the 
bout would have been filled with ac- 
tion. 

Jack Doyle of New York, the latest 
of the Abrams stable, made his debut 
to the fans present. 

The Doyle one was pitted against 
Young Burke of England, a wee cock- 
ney, who took the match on two hours' 



the handsome countenance of Kid Pat»J. 

But Wagner showed the signs of a 
belligerent temperament many times 
and landed that left with resounding 
effect. The kid was there with wicked 
rights and kept coming all the time, 
and had the shade. 

It was a great victory for that sec- 
tion of our city lying between Third 
and Second avenues east on Superior 
street. A chop suey supper celebrated 
the event, we are told. 

P. S. — The Kid says he is now ready 
for any one In the world of his weight. 

Dr. Ned McNuIty of Duluth acted aa 
master of ceremonies and Introduced 
the warriors. 






AMERICA Bf FVGHTnnS 

INVADiO AM'IPOOES. 






notice. Defoe, or Johnny Sokol, one 
does not know which, as the an- 
nouncements were different, was to 
have met the New Yorker. Burke was • 
the last minute substitution and there- I 
fore had no time whatever in which , 
to train. | 

Doyle refused to shake hands and ; 
got in Dutch with the crowd from the 
start off. Little Burke, clever, fast and 
possessing some real knowledge of the ' 
boxing game, made a fine showing , 
against the better-conditioned and 
longer-armed Doyle. I 

While Doyle had the shade, Burke 
was making excellent progress until : 
the fourth round, when he sank to the j 
floor, spasmodically holding his gloves 
to his groin. | 

There Is a dispute as to whether the 
little Briton was fouled. One doctor, it 
was stated after the bout, said he was, 
and another claimed he could find no 
evidence of a low blow. There you 
are. 

Kid Bluings WlM. 

Kid Billings, the red-headed member 
from Billings Park, won all the way of 
the eight rounds from Joe Koskl ol 
dear old battered Chi. 

Joe failed to wake up until the final 
round. Joe is a placid and phlegmatic 
youth, it would seem, for he went 
through seven of the eight rounds with 
his countenance stuck out a broad tar- 
get for the lefts and rights of the sub- 
urbanite. 

Occasionally Joseph would essay a 
return, or more seldom yet, a lead; but 
this was seldom, and with monotonous 
regularity he kept receiving a straight, 
slightly overhand left, occasionally 
varied with a left hook and a right 
cross. 

Blood streamed from the Koski nose, 
but at that he was not hurt. Joe's 
chief claim to undying gladiatorial 
fame must rest in an unruffled spirit 
and a philosophical outlook upon life. 

Kid Paul had the shade on Young 
Wagner. Kid Paul is from Duluth, 
and, if census reports are not wrong. 
Young Wagner hails also from the 
western portion of our metropolis. 

The rejuvenation of Aunt Mary has 
nothing whatever upon the comeback 
of that ferocious miller. Kid Paul. 

Last evening the kid was at his best, 
and this mix was filled with animated 
action from gong to gong. It was for 
four rounds, and it was biff-bang most 
of the way. 

Wagner kept a left in reserve. like 
our naval militia, and occasionally for- 
got himself so far as to use It. The 
Wagner one lacks experience, but did 
very w^ell for a novice. 

Every once in a while Young Wag- 
ner would start a blow and would then 
become skeptical about using it and 
would gently let his glove sink against 



t 



San FraneUeo, CaL. Aprtl 8. — ^ 
tk Jlmmjr Clabby of HaniMond, \nA., 4l 
4k tbf middleweight puirlliNt, left Ik 
4k MnddeMly yeaterday ^ith hln man.- # 
4k a^er for Aawtralla via the liner 4k 
4k Ventura. He Maid he had agreed 4k 
4k to fight three boutn for "Snowy" 4k 
4k Baker, the AuMtraliau promoter. 4k 
4k With Clabby went Steve Ketohell 4k 
4(i and Joe Wallintf, CliiraKo light- 4k 
4k weights, and .lohnny Shift, a Loa 4k 
4k Angeles featherweight. 4k 

4k 4k 

4k Los AngeleK, Cal.. April 8. — 4k 
Clabby'a trip to Auxtralla will not 4k 
affect his wtatUH a» a probationer 4k 
4k of the Loa Augelea police roart, 4k 
4k: under anapended aentenoe of three 4^ 
4k yeara aa a reitult of a atreet 4k 
4k brawl In wlilrh a policeman waa 4k 
4k severely beaten. Poller Judge 4k 
4k White aald he had given CUbby 4k 
4k permlaalon Xo go to Auatralla it 
4k when the pugilist repreaented 4k 
4k that he waa golnic for legitimate 4k 
4k engragementa and would return 4k 
« aooB. « 

4k m 

WALTTR NASGODA TO 
MEET BILLY HARVEY. 

Under the auspices of the Woodmen 
of the World, Walter Nasgoda and 
Billy Harvey, two of the best of the 
welterweight wrestlers of Duluth, will 
meet this evening at the old M«,8onic 
temple. 

As both of the boys are evenly 
matched and both are about the best 
that have been produced here, the bout 
should be a corker. 

The bout will be to a finish and 
should result In a fine contest. 



DUBS TO FIGHT FOR 

BRITAIN'S TITLE. 



t 
I 



* 

41 

4k New York, April 8. — Arrange- 4k 
4k ments have been rompleted for a 4k 
4k Xisht between Jim Coffey, the 4lk 
4k "Dublin Giant," and Bombardier 4k 
^ WeUa for the heavyweight chum- 4k 
4k plonahlp of Great Britain, aeeord- 4k 
4k Ing to private cable advlrea re- 4k 
4k eelved here. June 2* haa been 4k 
^ act aa the date. 4k 

4k The contest will be held In I.on- 4k 
4k don under the auspices of the 4k 
» National Sporting dub. 4k 

> 

Cole Out for Senator. 

Columbus, Ohio, April 8. — Former 
Congressman Ralph D. Cole of Find- 
lay made formal announcement hero 
last night of his candidacy for the 
Republican nomination for United 
States senator at the August primaries. 



For Manly Mm 

We have purposely made 

up a tobacco to appeal to the 

strong, vigorous man who wants 

ftdl flavor and fragrance com- 

^^ bined with natural sweet- 

ness in his smoke or 

chew. This tobacco is 

PEERLESS, It was put 

on the market fifty years 

ago especially to satisfy 

the tobacco hungry man. It 

has filled the bilL 

m^ Firemen, policemen, out-of-doors 

.^I^. _ men, two-fisted men in general, all say 

'*"' PEERLESS satis£es. Once they start 

using: PEERLESS they cannot get the same 

J satisfeiction out of any other brand. 

PEERLESS 

Long Cut Tobaoeo 

has character to it That's why it appeals to 
and pleases these men of sturdy character. 

PEERLESS is made from pure Southern 
Kentucky lea^ aged for three to live years, 
so as to bring out slowly and naturally all 
the juicy mellowness and richness of the 
tobacco. That's why its quality never varies 
—and that's why hurried-up, hashed-up 
tobaccos can't compare with PEERLESS. 

In the strenuous hours of work or in the 
pleasant hours of relaxation, be sure to have 
some of this wonderful tobacco with you. 

Just try PEERLESS for a w^eeA — 
"Smoke it or chew it— but go straight to it" 
Sold everywhere in 5c pacl^ges. 

Other eizM, 10c. 20c and 40c Packages, and 4Sc Tin PaUa. 








THE AMERICAN TOBACCO COMPANY 




PEERUSS 



•••it 




3 •- »d ■ " * . *^- r 




1 



I 



*-7- 



3SCSE 





14 



Wednesday, 



THE DULUTH HERALD 



April 8, 1914. 



!l 



f 



^- 



ON THE IRON RANGES 




;\> 



OFFICIAL i^^l^ OF THE WEATHER 



ROAD MAHERS 

ARE CONSIDERED 

Lake County Board Dis- 
poses of Various High- 
way Subjects. 

Two Harbors, Minn.. April 8. — (Spe- 
olal to The Herald.)— The county com- 
missioners yesterday received a com- 
munication from the town board of Two 
Harbors and Matt Spellum. one of the 
«ui>frvisors appeared before the board 
k«king the county to construct the 
road laid out between section 8. This 
road starts at Waldo and runs to 
Dnimmond and would be a big aid to 
farmers in that vicinity. Th« county 
board adopted a resolution to build 
the road and will be reimbursed by 
the town of Two Harbors to the extent 
of $1 500. 

Mtssrs. Hillman. Oman, Holbeck. 
.Tuhn Peterson and Robert Peterson ap- 
peared before the board and asked the 
county to raise the Stewart river 
bridge and to cut down the hills so as i 
to m-^dify the grade. After consider- \ 
ing the matter they decided to refer , 
It to Mr. Hans»on, superintendent of 
road .onstruction and advised him to 
take I ho matter up with the town of 
Silver Creek. , 

To Uelmfcorae Coanty. 

Count^ Audit. T Paulson reported that 
he had "appeared before the tax com- 
mission and also met the state highway 
eommission and made arrangements so i 
that the county will be reimbursed for 
any enclneering work done on roads 
on which state aid will be received. 

The state highway commir'slon re- 
ported that Lake county ha.s been ap- 
portioned tiie sum of $14,000 to be ex- 
pended in accordance with the provi- 
sions of the state highway commission. 

Mr. Dwan appeared In behalf of the 
Lake (^'ownty Development association 
asking the county for aid in defraying 
expenses In advertising the agricul- 
tural resources of Lake county and 
pavment of annual dues to the 



VILLAGE PRESIDENT 
ALSO TOASTMASTER 




PATRICK HAGEN. 

Mountain Iron, Minn.. April 8.— (Spe- 
cial to The Herald.)— Patrick Hagen. 
the new postmaster here, Is serving his 
third terra as mayor of Mountain Iron 
and Is one of the village's most popular 
citizens. Born in Rockland, Mich., m 
1866, at the age of 17 he went to Iron- 
wood Mich., where he was employed 
as a grocery clerk for fifteen years 
"v and I and coming here ten , years ago em- 
vr,rth barked in the mercantile business with 
North- I ^«', ,. . __^ T> J Matchefts In the 



ditor was instructed to call for bids for 
n ro.ad prader 



payment of annual dues to tne .>orin- r,- ", /^routt and P 

em Minnesota Pevelopnient association. «• u' {ain Iron store.' Mountain Iron 
The county appropriated MOO. Theau- ffa7'^'%%uYat?on of about 2,000 and a 

taxable valuation of nearly $11,000,000. 
Under Mr. Hagen's administration 
Mountain Iron has taken a new lease 
of life, and many permanent Improve- 
ments have been accomplished. Durine 
1914 several of the village streets will 
be opened, a free public library, and a 
cltv hall will be built and some parks 
placed In different parts of the village. 



ERRORS FOUND 

IN CITY BOOKS 



Kvfleth. Minn.. April 8— (Special to 
The Herald.) — Irregularities, errors 
and discrepancies Involving compara- 
tively small amounts were disclosed In 
an auditor's report on city books of 
wiii>h a synopsis was read at the coun- 
cil meeting last night. The report 
1 overed the findings from an audit 
of th city books for the years 1912 
and 1913. 

Incidents were cited where bills had 
be»-n paid allowed In larger amounts 
than originally authorized by the 
• oun.il; where parts of certain bills 
w-re duplicated; where Illegal expen- 
ditures had been made for band mu- 
sl«- for a Fourth of July celebration 
and for a banquet for the council; 



self up. "Imprisonment will be bet- 
ter than the feeling that there is a 
reY"''<* ""* '°'' '"y capture. I will re- 
gain my citizenship and come out a 
free man." 

Loveless enlt»led two years ago In 
the Twehty-slxth company. Coast Ar- 
tillery corps, according to his story, 
and deserted Aug. 8, 1913. Since de- 
serting he has traveled about the 
country a great deal. 

BRAZICH CASE 

QIVEN TO JURY 



CJrand Rapids, Minn.. April 8.— <Spe- 
cial to The Herald.)— The evidence was 
concluded In district court late yester- 
day In the case against Bozo Brazlch 
Indicted for killing Officer Kokko at 
.\ashwauk Feb. 10 last. This m«rnlng 
the lawyers summed up, the Judge 
charged the Jury and the twelve re- 
tired at 11:30 to deliberate. 

Many witnesses were heard, all hav- 
ing more or less bearing on the case 
but the two important witnesses were 
Ell Karakus who 1» one of the men In- 
dicted with Brazlch and Mary Bonclch. 

Karakus testified to having seen 
Brazlch with a gun shooting at Kokko, 
the policeman who was killed. 
Aecui»ed Had Only <jiun. 

Brazich, it was shown, had the only 
gun around the place and the only gun 
found by the officers. Mary Bonclch 
testified that she was in bed the time 
of the shooting and that she was awak- 
ened by the noise, that Brazich ran Into 
the room next to hers and throw him- 
self on the bed and began to cry say- 
ing that the policeman had killed hie 
brother and that he had killed the po- 
liceman. Immediately following the 
trial of Brazlch Judge Wright ad- 
journed court until April 21. This ad- 
journment leaves the court with prob- 
ably the cleanest calander of any ad- 
journment ever had. At this term 
there were only three cases continued 
and of these two will probably be set- 
tled out of court. 

• There are only seven Jury cases left 
on the calendar and seven or eight 
court cases making not over fifteen 
cases In all left on the calendar. The 
cases in the murder trial of the assall- 
ments of Kokko will be taken up at the 
time of reconvening of court on April 
21. 




FORECAST Tll-Ii 7 P. M. 
THURSDAY 

For Duluih. Supeilur and vicinity. 
Including the Mesaba and VeiTullinn 
Iron ranges: Partly cloudy weather 
tonight and Tluirsday; lowest tem- 
perature tonight 10 deg. to 15 deif. 
at Duluth-Superior and 5 deg. Ui \0 
deg. ou tiM Iron ranges; wanner 
Thursday aftemocu; gentle to mud- 
erste nonberly breezes, becumiug 
variable. 



EXPLANATORY NOTES. 



OUtrvalt'-M U\« af 8 •,«., t«»»ty wtn ni«noi*n iio r j; y . ■„ , <»a^ .oil tftO" r» clear- a partlr cloudy; A c oudv: R rua 



WIND SC.AL.E. 

Miles 
Per Hour. 

Calm Ot« ' 

LiBht 5 °15 

Moderate 15 . ,- 

Brlek *5 to 3j 

Sigh :: 35 to 50 

oi?e ..:: 50 to 65 

Hurrtcurie 65 *"l"if 

H. W. RICHARDSON. 
Local Korecaater 

of equal au prwiuie. T»on»»ll8 (dotted linet) 
; S anew; M report «ui«iBg. Aitowi tj with 



HAVE YOU HAD THE 6RIP? 

There are certain disorders, such an 
the grip, that especially debilitate and 
make the body an easy prey for more 
dangerous diseases. Ask those who 
have had the grip regarding the pres- 
ent condition of their health and 
most of them will answ^^r: "f^nce I 
had the grip I have never been well. 
They still have profuse perspiration, 
the persistent weakness of the limbs, 
the disordered digestion, shortness or 
breath and palpitation of the heart 
caused by the thjn-blooded condition 
in which the grip almost always 
leaves its victim after the fever and 
Influenza have subsided. They are 
furthermore, at the mercy of relapses 
and of complications, often very seri- 
ous. In an attack of the grip there 
is a rapid thinning of the blood and 
not until the blood is built up agaiu 
Is complete health restored 

Dr Williams' Pink Pills quickly 
make the blood rich and red, drive out 
the lingering germs from the sy.stem 
and transform despondent grip vic- 
tims into cheerful, healthy men and 

women . .« „# ^, 

Try the pills for any form of de- 
bility caused by thin blood. 

All druggists sell Dr. Wihams Pink 
Pills. Get a box today and begin at 
once to regain your health. \NYlte 
for free booklet, "Building X p the 
Blood," to the Dr. Williams Medicine 
Co., Schenectady, N. Y. 



CLOUDY 



of March. Four cases of scarlet fever 
were reported during the month. 

A street light was ordered between 
Fayal road and Jones street, on Fayal 
avenue. 

michaeTboylan 
now in charse 



Virginia, Minn., April 8.— (Special to 

The Herald.)— Mayor M. A. Murphy 

last evening turned over the gavel to 

and for a oanquei lor me coum-n, '»°'- " iL«i„K»^i Wf^vinn who as- 

where bills had been overpaid through Mayor-elect Michael Boylan. wno as 

« ^1 1 .. ^ .. .a «^v.f.>.A Aii.,./\,.a ho/l I J ^1 —»:»«. A# r^Wiric^ nnrl nmid tn( 



where bills haa oeen overpaia inrouBu aaayui-ci^*... — .-^ — -- ■ 

clerical errors and where errors had ] gumed the reins of office, and amia tne 
been made in figuring the amounts of I - fe^'ling the Incoming and the 

bills and contracts; where no returns ^esi ^administration fraternized, 

had been made to the city for fees o««Kouig au ^^^^ ^^ ^^^ 

collected by the clerk for flhng chat- I.V.ti. tn'^the oc 



tel mortgages, by the health commis- 
.<loner for recording births and deaths 
and bv the chief of police for serving 
papers, where there was evidence of 
public officials having been Interested 
directly or indirectly In small transac- 
tions with the city. 

Lt^dor l.le«-nses Tmnsferr^^il. 

Five liquor license renewals and ft 
trnnsf'.r wire granted. 

An ordinoncf- was passed extending 
the fire limits. , 

The report of the health commis- j 
sloner showed twenty-five births and 
six deaths In the '" "*" 



mui^ic to the occasion, while many nne 
floral tributes graced the council 
chamber, and a large number of spec- 
tators cheered the outgoing and the in- 
coming administrations. 

In laving down the cares of office. 
Mayor Murphy referred modestly to 
some of the things his administration 
had accomplished, the most notable of 
which was taking over the light and 
water plant, and added that he wished 
his successor every success. 

B*vlan Elght-Honr Man. 
niy-nve oirins ana i Mayor Boylan thanking Mr Miirphy , 
city for the month for his good wishes, said that he hope^d 1 

to acquit himself creditably in the oner- ; 
ous position he had assumed. He said | 
he wanted to see an eight-hour d?«y ; 
for city employes, music in parks, a 
public gymnasium and a municipally | 
owned gas plant. ! 

After these felicitations connected 
with the change in mayors, the council 
got down to real business — the division 
of the offices. The forecast in yester- 
day's Herald was carried out. the fol- 
lowing being elected: Fred J. Moilan. 
president of the council; C. W. Lund- 
strom. vice president; Albert E. BlcK- 
ford. city clerk: R. J. Montague, city 
attorney; A. E. Anderson, city engi- 
neer; Peter King, poundraaster; Carl 
Anderson, scavenger; M. Halvorson, 
plumbing inspector. 

There was a deadlock over the po- 
sitions of assessor and street com- 
missioner and no appointments were 

made. _ , _. _. 

The appointment of a health officer 



MANDAMUS CASE 
IS BEFORE JUDGE 



Chisholm, Minn.. April 8. — (Special 
to The Herald.) — Attorney C. R. 
Woods for Recorder Culver and At- 
torney Edward Freeman on behalf of 
Former Deputy Village Recorder 

Frank Austin argued the mandamus 
proceedings last evening In Hlbbing 
before Judge Hughes. Mr. Freeman 
claimed the mandamus proceedings 
were not proper In that they were not 
served on Former Village Recorder 
Mlnty Tramontln. After listening to 
numerous citations Judge Martin 
Hughes took the matter under advise- 
ment and will either decide to quash 
the proceedings or render his decision 
on the facts as submitted. It is be- 
lieved that the matter will be dis- 
posed of within a week and that rec- 
ords belonging to the Incoming re- 
corder will be turned over to him in 
a reasonable time. The village coun- 
cil win meet this evening, at which 
j time the matter of turning the records 
1 over to Mr. Culver may be done by 
[ agreement. 




Again cloudy 
weather is pre- 
dicted. Ain't It aw- 
ful? Along comes ! 
one fair day and 
then the weather , 

man grows stingy 
again and hands us ; 
the clouds. Of 
course it's only 
''partly cloudy," 
but it will be 
fenough to obscure 
the sun at times' 
anyway, and sun baths will be inter- 
rupted. Oh. Weill 

The weather was gray and cold a 
year ago today. The sun rose this 
morning at 6:33 and will set this eve- 
ning at 6:46, giving thirteen hours and 
thirteen minutes of sunshine, three 
minutes more than yesterday. Wonder 
if the double "IS" will prove un- 
1 1.1 c k V 

Mr. Richardson makes the foll(5wlng 
comment on weather conditions; 

"Colder weather prevails in the lake 
region, the Central valleys and South- 
western states, with freezing tempera- 
tures southward to Southwestern New 
Mexl(<o and Central Texas. During the 
last twenty-four hours rain or snow 
fell over the lake region, Ohio and 
Lower Mississippi valleys, the extreme 
Southwest, Rocky mountains and 



day; rising temperature tonight and in 
ea&t portion Thursday. 

Lower Michigan— Partly cloudy and 
continued cold tonight; Thursday fair. 

Upper Michigan — Generally fair, 
continued cold tonight; Thursday fair; 
slightly warmer. 

. • ■ 

Temperature*!. 

Following were the highest temper- 
atures for the last twenty-four hours 
and the lowest for the last twelve, en 1- 

ing at 7 a. m.: 

High Low I 

Abilene <8 •»2 

Alpena 38 '» 

AmariUo 20 




22 
14 
38 
30 
30 
32 
24 
'20 
62 
20 



plateau region." 



Rupture Cured 

At Home 

eid Sea Captain Cared Himself By 

Simple Means Within Reaeh 

of .411 Sufferers. 



HIm Remedy and Big, IntereMtinis Book 
i^ent Free to All Sofferm. 

If Captain CoUings could cure him- 
self of a double rupture that kept him 
bed-ridden for years, by a simple 
means of his own Invention, why can 
not you achieve the same blessed re- 
sult by doing as he did? You can't be j V'^^^tl^*';"""";::" "" "<, Teft over to 
mu.h if any, worse off than this old , and milk '"^P.^'^^o'' ,^,?.^ !,t,,n. ii n^xt 
^afarer was, for no truss could hold ' the next meeting of the council noxt 
bis rupture. Doctors told him he must , Tuesday, 
be operated upon or die. Yet he cured 
himself absolutely and_ his big, free 
book tells how. 




VILLAGE HALL CHANGES, 

Chisholm Water and Light Board to 
Rearrange Offices. 

Chisholm, Minn., April 8.— (Special 
to The Herald.) — The water and light 
board yesterday afternoon issued in- 
structions to have the village hall so 
arranged that offices will be provided 
separately for the village recorder and 
the clerk of the water and light board. 
The work will be started at once and 
the new offices arranged soon to ac- 
commodate the newly created offices 
made by the council. Several new 
bureaus have been created which re- 
quire department heads and those 
rooms are included in the new ar- 
rangement. 

The jail office will be enlarged and 
in the women's cell the old steel inner 
cage will be dispensed with and the 
padded cell rearranged. 

Aside from ordering furniture for 
the new office of the superintendent 
of the water department and the pas- 
sage of the monthly bill and payroll 
the meeting was without special fea- 
ture. 

SULUV ANWIN SCUP. 

Chisholm Man Finally Carries Off the 
Bowling Trophy. 

Chisholm. Minn., April 8.— (Special to 
_ -fc-^— — Bfc— ■»*% i The Herald.)— The Tramontln Bros.' 
RHASE SPEcDEnS ' silver bowimg trophy cup has finally 
WlinWB* VI fcfc«»»iaw , ^^^^ awarded to C. J. Sullivan, who 
— i won the final contest with John Bul- 

lot after all other competitors had been 
eliminated. The windup of the con- 
test between Bullot and Sullivan was 
close and exciting. Bullot got a no- 
ticeable lead in the first two games, 
but the pins then began breaking bad 
for him and better for Sullivan until 
at th.> finish. Sullivan won by 46 pins. 
His score was 1.636 and Bullofs 1.590. 
In one game Sullivan bowled 234 and 
Bullot In the same game 232. Sulli- 
van's average for the nine games was 
182 and Bullofs 177. Both of these 
men bowled in the recent Duluth 
tournament, but did not make as good 
scores as some of the other Chisholm 
bowlers at that time. 



Geaeral ForeeastB. 

Chicago, April 8. — Forecasts for 
the twentv-four hours ending at i p. 
m. Thursday: ^ ^^ 

■Wisconsin^Fair tonight and Thurs- 
day; somewhat higher temperature 

Thursday. . , ^ ^ m». 

Minnesota — Fair tonight and Thurs- 
day: slowly rising temperature Thurs- 
day and in the west portion tonight. 

Iowa — Fair tonight and Thursday; 
slowly rising temperature Thursday 
and in northwest portion tonight. 

North Dakota and South Dakota — 
Fair tonight and probably Thursday; 
rising temperature. 

Montana — Fair tonight and Thurs- 



Baitleford 3* 

nUmarck 28 

Boise 62 

Boston *2 

BufTalo 42 

Cairo 

Calgary ** 

Charles City ••••" 

CharieBton "" 

Chicago 40 

f>)ncordl» ■ • • • ^^ 

Davenport •• fO 

Denver i" \^ 

Des Moines 38 '/« 

De\lls Lake 28 

Dodge *« 

Dubuque *'' 

OULUTH 24 

Edmonton ■*<> 

EBcanaba 30 



Fort Smith 36 

Galveston 72 j2 

Grand Haven ..-40 20 

Green Baj 34 14 

HavTe 42 18 

Helena 42 20 

Houghton 1? 

Huron 8« JO 

Indianapolis 24 

Jacksonville 04 

Kamloops 60 38 

Kansas City 44 26 

Keokuk 20 

KnoxvlUe 72 44 

La Crosse 16 

Lander 24 

Louisville 62 32 

AUdlson 36 14 

Marauette 22 14 

Medicine Hat ...44 28 

Memphis 72 40 

Miles City 34 18 

iUlivaukee 42 16 



High I/ow 

Minnedosa 26 4 

Modena 66 32 

Montgomery 80 56 

Montreal 30 

Mcorhcad 28 16 

NaaliTllle 30 

New Orleana ....84 64 

New York «0 50 

Nortli Platte ....34 12 

Oklahoma 40 28 

Omaha S6 21 

Parrj- Sound ...44 26 

Phoenii 80 5A 

Pierre 28 18 

Pltfsbuig 62 34 

Port Arthur 22 

Portland, Or . . .68 52 

Prince Albert 34 14 

Qu'App^lo 26 12 

Kalelgh 70 .54 

Rapid City 26 12 

Iloseburg 70 50 

Roswell 32 

St. Louis 44 30 

St. Paul 32 20 

Salt Lake City. 68 42 

San Diego 66 54 

Kan Francisco. . .64 54 

Sault Ste. Marie. 28 12 

Seattle 64 48 

Slieridan »4 12 

Slireveport 70 44 

Sioux City 32 18 

Spokane 62 .S8 



Springfield. Ill 28 

Springfield. Mo 

Swift Current 26 

Tampa 80 

Toledo 38 

Valentine 

Washington 72 

Wichita 

Wllliston 28 

Wiunemucca .... 58 

Winnipeg 24 

Yellowstone 30 



Ulected, plans made '"^ the season^ 
I shoots and an interesting talk give" 
I by Fred Myers of Biwablk a me|"b|r 
I of the state game and fish commis 

I ®*The officers for the coming year are: 
PrIJident. D. F. W. Bullen; vice presi- 
dent, L.. J. Micka; secretary and treas 
Srer J. L. Lewis ; assistant sec re tar > 
W. H. Day; field captain, John Adams, 
it was decided to co-operate with 
the cot-nty fair ofticials in the erec- 
tion of o. new judges stand, the lowei 
part of which would b:- used by the 
ciiib cUuing the ir shoots. 

hibbing"councOotes. 

Liquor License Hearing Is Postponed 
to Next Week. 

Hlbbing, Minn., April 8.— (Special to 
The Herald.) — The report of the clerk 
of the municipal court was submitted 
to the council yesterday afternoon for 
the week ending March 30, showed that 
from village and state cases the court 
received $59.66, fiom *^»vil cases J2.>, 
while the expenses amounted to fli.iy. 
The balance ?71.56 was turned over to 
the village treasurer. ^ . . . „^ 

Bids for the laying of curb apd gut- 
ter on First and Hlbbing avenues in 
Alice will be received by the council at 
a meeting in the near future, the vil- 
lage engineer having been instructed 
to prepare plans and specifications. 
With this work completed the side- 
walks in that section of the village 
.can be laid this season. 

Postpone IJcense Hearing. 

Because Robert Stratton, attorney 
for Mario Sognalia claimed that the 
notice had not been given in time for 
a proper preparation of a defense, tne 
hearing as to why the license held by 
Sognalia should not be revoked, was 
postponed until next week. The coun- 
cil had its evidence ready to show that 
the saloonkeeper had sold to minors 
and was prepared to take action. 



of the paving work bought 14.000 sack* 
of cement. It is alleged that Dougher- 
ty sold the sacks for 10 cents each, 
netting $1,400, and that the money was 
never returned to the city. 

bangormIners 

are still out. 

Virginia, Minn., April 8. — (Special to 
The Herald.) — From all that can be 
learned at this distance from the scene 
of the Bangor mine trouble the miners 
who quit because of the adoption of thf 
contract wage system are still out. N''-> 
reports have b'^en received here ot dis- 
turbances at the mine. 

clubUds 
its election 



Public Affairs Committee 

Will Also Hold Annual 

Meeting. 



Name May Be Changed to 
Duluth Association of 
Commerce. i 



hibbing^oTto 



William T. Bray, a Duluth architect, 
is working on the plans for the bund- 
ing which is to be among the finest 
in Eveleth. Work will be started as 
goon as possible.^ 

ELY FOR UGENSE 

BY 125 MAJORITY 

Ely, Minn., April 8.— (Special to The 
Herald.)— By a majority of 125 votes 
the people of Ely who expressed them- 
selves at the polls yesterday on the 
license question favored continuing the 
city in the "wet" column. It was the 
most exciting election probably ever 
held here right up to the minute the 
last vote was coivnted. The vote was 
the largest polled In years. 

John A. Harri and John Schaefer were 
elected by large majorities as mayor 
and municipal court judge, respec- 

^'^Arihur Toms was elected city treas- 
urer and Anton Kotchevar was elected 
assessor. The alderman elected were 
Mike Somero, James White, Fred 
James, Olaf Knutson. John Preshiren 
and Axel Hegfors. 

A SPARTAN OUTRAGE. 



"BlANt my topllghtnl I can dan«« 
the hornpipe aa well a* If I'd never 
keen ruptured.'* 

Why should you continue to go 
through life with the awful handicap 
of a rupture? Why be annoyed and 
embarrassed by awkward, uncomfort- 
able and ineffective trusses that are 
only makeshifts at the best? Why be 
denied so many of the pleasures and 
joys of life because the slightest vio- 
lent exertion may cause the truss to 
slip and the rupture to displace? 

Do not put up with these things. Get 
Captain CoUings' ab.sorblngly Interest- 
ing book and his free remedy that is 
so generously offered to those who suf- 
fer as he did for so long. Costs you 
not a penny — places you under no ob- 
ligation whatever. Just clip and mall 
the coupon below and receive book 
and remedy free of all charge and pre- 
paid. 

Do not put off sending it. Every day 
you delay is a day of increased com- 
fort and happiness lust. Send coupon 
today. 



Hlbbing, Minn., April 8.— (Special to 
The Herald.) — The council last evening 
ordered additional pieces of motor- 
driven machinery. A two-cylinder 
motorcycle with speedometer was 
bought from the Range Cornice & 
Roofing company for $325. to be used 
by the police department in the pur- ^ 
suit and timing of speeders. The Kelley ; 
Hardware company of Duluth had a 
bid In on an Excelsior machine with j 
electric starter. ,,, , * * I 

A 60-horse power Kissel street ! 
.•sprinkler and flusher was purchased , 
from John Makl. the cost being $4,660. 
There was but the one bid in. 

whiteIvaTposts 
bouoht by ribbing 

Hlbbing, Minn.. April 8.— (Special to 
The Herald.) — The contract for 461 
white-way posts to be used In the ex- 
1 tensions planned for the coming sea- 
I son was awarded at the water and 
I light board meeting to Elmer P. Mor- 
( rls of New York at a price of $30.65 
' per post, or $14,129.66 for the lot 

The posts are specially cast for the 
village and are of a design that will 
match with the present system. The 
base and post has a heavier appear- 
ance, weighs more and y^-t costs less 
than the ones purchased last year. A 
sample was cast and set up for the 
board. Shipment will be made as soon 
as possible. 

The board decided to call for bids 
at once for the laying of the i-ement 
foundations for the posts and the fill- 
ing In of the conduit trenches. 

DESERTEfTSURRENDERS. 



EVELETH BANK TO 

ERECT NEW BUILDING. 

Eveleth. Minn., April 8.— (Special to 
The Herald.) — The Miners' National 
hy.ir of this city has purchased the 
Tower hotel property at the corner 
of Jones street and Grant avenue, 
owned by Nels Anderson. 

The two-story frame hotel building 
will be razed to give place to a two- 
story brick bank and office building. 



KKKK RlPTrRE BOOK A:\D 
RKMKDY COL' POX. 

Capt W. A. CoUings (Inc.), 
liox 321. Watertown, N*. T. 
Pl«as»» send me your FREE Rup- 
ture Remedy and Book without any 
obligation on my part whatever. 

Mame 

Address 



Richard Loveless, Who Quit Army, 
Gives Self Up at Eveleth. 

Eveleth. Minn.. April 8.— (Special to 
The Herald.) — Richard H. Loveless, a 
deserter from a United States army 
post at Fort Bayless. Wash., surren- 
dered himself to an officer here. Thp 
police communicated with the army 
officers and have been Instructed to 
hold the deserter for delivery to the 
officials at Fort Snelllng. St. Paul. 

"I want to square myself. Loveless 
explains aa hla reaBou for givloff iiim- 



POSLAM SOAP 
IMPROVES THE 
COMPLEXION 

NEW SIZE^IS CENTS 

The problems of a perfect complex- 
ion, beautiful hands and a clear, 
healthy skin are solved by Polsam 

Scap. , , . 

This is the ."^oap. not only rich, pure 
and wholesome, but possessing the 
nicst beneficial hygienic properties be- 
cavse medicated with Poslam, the 
great skin remedy. 

F:v€ry ordinary cleansing operation 
becomes a doublB source of healthful- 
ness if I'oslam Soap Is used daily for 
toilet and bath. 

Sold by all druggists everywhere. 

(TO DRITGGISTS — All Jobbers now 
sipply Poslam Soap at N. A. R. D. 
prices.) 



House Wired Up and Match Applied, 
But Inmates Escape. 

Gilbert. Minn.. April 8.— (Special to 
The Herald.) — There is intense indig- 
nation here and at Sparta over the 
despicable attempt made eariy yester- 
i div to burn the boarding house of Paui 
! Kovaceovich in the Sparta location and 
perhaps cremate five men. a woman 
land child Bleeping in the place. -The 
fower door was wired and the match 
appHed but before the "re attained 
I ereat headway the inmates of the 
I house were aroused and escape, some 
berni cut in getting out. 'There ap- 
pear! to be no clue to the villains who 
tried the murder stunt. ^ 

GILBERT GIRL To WED. 

Will Become Bride of Ironwood, 
Mich., Young Man Next Week. 

Gilbert. Minn.. April 8.— Announce- 
ments have been issued of the forth- 
coming marriage of Miss Martha Wig- 
Kins of Gilbert to George Abeel. Jr., 
of Iron wood Mich. The wedding will 
?Ike pl^ce at the. home of the bride's 
mother Mrs. Carmichael. here next 
w/dnesday the 15th. Miss Wiggins 
was born and raised In Negaunee and 
Ts a graduate of the Negaunee high 
school -The family moved to the Me- 
laba range three years ago. Bert(:ar- 
michaei: a brother, holds a responsible 
SJsmon with the Oliver Iron Mining 
company h ere. ^ 

RAILROAD^S OFFER. 

Tells Hibblog Council What It Will 
Do About Alice Viaduct. 

Hibblng, Minn.. April 8.— (Special to 
TViA Herald ) — If the Great Northern 
Slroad'agrces to construct a viaduct 
over Its crossings at Alice, the vll- 
ule council wlfl not demand a via- 
duct over the ntw yards to be con- 
structed near tlic Winston-Dear prop- 

Representatives of the company ap- 
neared before the council yesterday 
afternoon iC-ith a map of the pro- 
posed mprovem^-hts. So that the peo- 
p?c going lA that direct on need not 
Sass over four Of five railroad tracks, 
fhfroad ask* permission to change the 
Brooklyn road, making it about 300 
feet longer.' The change would ne- 
cessitate croitolnit only one trac^ 

Earl Hunner ot the Great North- 



em ore properties appeared with the 
reuresentatlves of the road to show- 
that within a few years work on the 
property known as the Longyear No. 2 
would be started and the present road 
would have to be abolished. 

There is some talk of. cementing the 
road through Brooklyn and abandon- 
ing the highway that must be changed. 

BAYli SS BAN QUET, 

Plans Perfected for Giving Chisholm 
Social Affair. 

Chisholm. Minn.. April 8. — (Special to 
The Herald.) — The committees in 
charge have prepared the following 
program for the farewell banquet to 
be tendered Mining Superintendent 
Bayllss, who has moved to Eveleth, 
at the O'Neill hotel Saturday evening, 
April 25: 

Violin solo, Edward Hagen; vocal 
solo, Miss Wlnnifred Hayes; vocal solo, 
Douglas Smith; vocal solo. Miss Wln- 
nifred Andrews; vocal solo, George 
Biasing; piano solo. Miss Luclle Bran- 
denburg; vocal solo, Harry Angst; cor- 
net solo, Oscar Simstrem; reading, Mrs. 
Harry Angst; selection. High School 
Glee club. Outside speakers will in- 
clude Warren E. Greene and Judge 
Martin Hughes. 

HIBBING GUN CLUB 

EL ECTS O FFICERS. 

Hibbing, Minn.. April 8. — (Special to 
The Herald.) — An enthusiastic meet- 
ing of the members of the Gun club 
was held last evening. Officers were 



MEAT INJURIOUS 
TO THEKIDNEYS 

Take a tablespoonful of Salts 

if Baci< hurts or Bladder 

bothers. 



BIWABIK HONORS 

L ATE J. E. RILEY. 

Blwabik, Minn., April 8.— (Special to 
The Herald.) — The people of this vil- 
lage paid a fine tribute this morning 
to the late village clerk, John Emmet 
Riley, by closing all business house.'? 
during the time of the funeral, from 
10 to 11. High mass was celebrated 
at St. John's Catholic church by Rev. 
Father Levdon the church being crowd- 
ed, all village officials, past and pres- 
ent, being present. Interment was in 
Lakeside cemetery. The pall bearer3 
were: Ed Kenney, Pete O'Donnell, J. 
D. Sullivan. J. P. Beatty, O. E. Everett. 
F. A. Hawerdon. 

The New Conndl Meets. 

The old village council held its last 
meeting last night and wound up some 
routine business. The new council 
then met but out of respect to the late 
village clerk. John E. Riley, adjourned 
until April 15 without doing anything. 
At the next meeting the various offices 
will be fi lled. 

FAMILY AFFAIRS 

AIR ED AT VIRGINIA. 

Virginia. Minn.. April 8. — (Special to 
The Herald.) — The trial of the case of 
August Walberg versus his son-in-law. 
Leroy Edwards, to recover $1,000 for 
the keep of Edwards' wife and son. 
began in district court this afternoon 
before Judge Hughes and promises to 
be quite an airing of family troubles. 

The grand jury is still in session 
working it is reported on the Balkan 
election in which colonization is al- 
leged. It is reported that the Jury will 
find it difficult to return a true bill in 
this case. The jury Is expected to re- 
port some time tomorrow. 

GRAND^A RDS CONTEST. 

Grand Rapids. Minn., April 8. — (Spe- 
cial to The Herald.) — There will be an 
Interclass cup contest In orations and 
declamations between high school stu- 
dents at the high school tonight In 
which the following will participate: 

Seniors: Wayne Gilbert, Ethel 
Kremer, Will Whaling. 

Juniors: Evelyn Lane. George Moo- 
ers. Gladys Slsler. 

Sophomores: Edith Brackln. Frank 
McCormlck, Kenneth Sutherland. 

Freshmen: David Brandon, Elmore 
Roecker, Joseph Kennedy. 



The annual election of the DulutH 
Commercial club is taking place today, 
the polls being open practically all 
day for the receiving of the vote on 
the candidates for the board of di- 
rectors, g 

This evening the annual meeting 
will take place, and coupled with it, 
for the first time, will be the regular 
monthly meeting of the public affairs 
committee. The combined meeting' 
promises to be an unusually interest- 
ing one and every effort is being mail«* 
to have every member of the club at- 
tend. The meeting will be preceded 
by a dinner, served at 6:15 and It is 
expected that the dining: room of the 
club will be taxed to its full ca- 
pacity. 

At the meeting the annual reports 
will be read and a complete history 
of what the club has accomplished 
In the last twelve months will bo 
giv«n. That the club has achieved 
seme big things since the last annual 
meeting is well known, but they will 
be heard of again tonight in pleasant 
reminiscence; and plans will be made 
for a campaign of progress for the en- 
suing year. 

One question of '.mportance which will 
ccme up will be that of changing thf» 
name of the club from "Duluth Com- 
mercial club" to "Duluth Associatioa 
of Commerce." It Is likely that some 
decision will be reached in this mat- 
ter this evening. 

LEASE MANYACRES 

IN MORTON COUNTY. 

Mandan, N. D., April 8. — (Special to 
The Herald.) — Over 175.000 acres of 
state school lands in Morton county- 
will be leased April 25, un- 
der the direction of Commission- 
er Frank Henry of the land depart- 
ment. 

The Morton county lands are largely- 
grazing lands, and constitute the 
greatest area under state ownership 
in any county in the state. 

Commissioner Henry has a series of 
leasings in all parts of the state dur- 
ing the present month. 

« ^_ 

CleanlBK Vp Mlnot. 

Minot, N. D., April 8. — (Special to 
The Herald.) — The newly appointed 
police chief of Minot inaugurated a 
civic cleanup campaign by arresting^ 
three alleged blind-piggers In raids. 
Mrs. Louise Rush was arrested in her 
place, and a considerable quantity of 
bter was confiscated. L. J. Turner and 
John Sampson are the other accused 
men. 






W 



> 



T« Use Mimot Xomal. 

Minot. N. D.. April 8.— (Special to Tho 
Herald.) — School sessions are beinij 
held In the Mlnot normal school build- 
ing this week, the main structure hav- 
ing reached such stage of completion 
that its occupancy is now possible. " 




We are a nation of meat eaters and 
our blood Is filled with uric acid, says 
a well-known authority, who warns us 
to be constantly on guard against 
kidney trouble. 

The kidneys do their utmost to free 
the blood of this irritating acid, but 
become weak from the overwork; they 
get sluggish; the ellmlnatlve tissues 
clog and thus the waste is retained 
in the blood to poison the entire sys- 

When your kidneys ache and feel like 
-U<mps of lead, and you have stinging 
pains in the back or the urine is 
cloudy, full of sediment, or the blad- 
der is Irritable, obliging you to seek 
relief during the night; when you have 
severe headaches, nervous and dizzy 
spells, sleeplessness, acid stomach or 
rheumatism In bad weather, get from 
your pharmacist about four ounces of 
Jad Salts; take a tablespoonful in a 
glass of water before breakfast each 
morning and in a few days your kid- 
neys win act fine. This famous salts 
is made from the acid of grapes and 
lemon juice, combined with llthla, and 
has been used for generations to flush 
and stimulate clogged kidneys, to 
neutralize the acids In "rine. so It is 
no longer a source of irritation, thus 
ending urinary and bladder disorders. 
Jad Salts is Inexpensive and cannot 
in lure; makes a delightful effervescent 
lii'hla water drink, and nobody can 
make a mistake by taking a little oc- 
opslonally to keep the k dneys clean 
and active. Agent. Wlrth's Red Croso 
JTrus Store. 13 West Superior street. 



CONSIDER ITASCA 

ROAD QUESTIONS 

Grand Rapids, Minn., April 8. — (Special 
to The Herald.) — The Itasca county 
board Is considering the bids for the 
big state road contracts which were 
presented at the last meeting. The 
contracts for all of state road No. 2, 
except the Cohasset-Deer River por- 
tio nof this road will be let, and the 
contract for the north and south road 
from Deer River to the county line on 
the north will be let at this meeting. 
Aside from this a number of minor 
road maters will be taken up and dis- 
posed of. 

BUHL officials" 

REPLY TO CHARGES. 



Buhl, Minn., April 8. — (Special to The 
Herald.) — That the charges are the re- 
sult of peevishness on the part of dis- 
appointed office-seekers and are not 
supported by the truth is the claim of 
local officials in connection with the 
charges brought against John F. 
Dougherty, who was employed last year 
as a construction foreman for the vil- 
lage in an extensive municipal cam- 
paign. , i 
Dougherty, it Is alleged, was hired 
on a percentage basla to supisiinteiMff 
1 vUlag« iDipvo-T«meuts, and In tb« coursVl 



■niiifi — 



mmmfKjK 





Wednesday, 



THE DULUTIi HERALD 



April 8. 1914. 



15 




PLAN OR&ANiZATiON 
OF COUNTY SCHOOLS 

State Board of Education 

Has Meeting at 

St. Paul. 

St. Paul, Mtnn., April 8. — (Special to 
The H'^rald.) — Details of the organiza- 
tion of county school districti^ were 

di.-''"U''sed today at a conftronce of tho \ 
n«*rnbers of the state educational com- j 

The commission proposes to do away i 
Viih niral districts as such, and vmn- . 
bino all schools in each county outside 
of independent districts under one ' 
board of live members elected by the ! 
pe >ule. i 

There are now 7.500 rtiral distrii^ts 
In Minnesota, earh govt-rned by a, 
board if three inisteos, making: a 



• total of :.'•.'. 50l» school offic'alj=. TVre 
' new plan is to have a sinplc board 
' for each county, eighty-six in all. with 
a member.shlp of but 430. 

The problem before the romniisslon 
is how to define the school boundaries 
I within a county. It is likely ilmt the 
territory to be served by each school 
will be' left to the discretion of the 
county board. The question of future 
or,^ajiization of independent districts 
was also diseussed. 



) 



f.)r the families tiiat have suffered 
through the sealing: disaster. 

PHYSICIAN KILLS 
ARIZONA RANCHMAN 



NO NEWS OF LOST 

SEALING VESSEL 

St. John's Xfld.. April 8.— There was 
no news today of the Southern Cross | 
and her crew of ITS n»en. Wreckage is 
occasionally sighted, but it cannot be 
connected with the missing sealer. 

AnUh ff*r Rellrf. 

Xew York. April 8.— William J. El- 
lis, mayor of St. John's. Ntld.. now In 
thjs city, has issued a call for a meet- 
ing of Newfoundlanders in New York 
tomorrow evening to organize relief 



Phoenix. Ariz.. April 8.— T. E. P. 
Booth, foreman of a ranch near here, 
was shot and killed today by Dr, ^• 
E. Wiggins, a physician of hheiDy 
county. Texas. Dr. Wiggins surrend- 
ered himself to the sheriff. 

The physician charged that Bootn 
had wrecked his home. 



Tour 
Or.llt 



202 AND 204 EAST SUPERIOR STREET. 



202-201 

Fast SiiiHTior 

Street. 



A Few Basement Bargains 

at our Removal sale. Onlv a few days left— will be in our new 
showrooms 122 and 124 \\ est Superior St., by April 20th. 

SPECIAL-Brass and Glass 
Wash Boards- OOp 

Strictly first-class Wash Boards— ^^M W 

Removal sale price 

Willow Clothes Baskets 




farSScandSSciSflOg 



Removeal Sale Price 





I 



High Grade Kitciien & Scythe Stone 

U$nal Price IQC tO 15C O A 

Removal Sale Price Only ^V 

^^Jfe^^Elcctric Domes */^ Price 

^^M^^^Our Xo. l:!4() Domes, |KA ^ gk 

fgia;^^-.. $19.00 $9.50 

\^-S^Z-*^^ Removal sale price.. ■ 

Our Xo. 722 Domes d^lQ TA fl^A TfC 

— reo-ular price ^pl^-ilV T|M f ^ 

Removal sale price w VB I W 

5:i:,ra/?i?e"^!: $19.60 CO gQ 

Removal sale price %|r W m\0\^ 

Our Xo. 1982 Domes MO CA d^ 1 ^1 OC 
—regular price ^P^O.ilV l| I lA X^ 

Removal sale price ^Jr tm I ■■■%# 

We have thousanri^ of pieces loft at great bis: discounts. 



CARPENTERS' UNION 

No. 361 

Von «r«> rcnucHted to attend tlie 
ruiM-rai of Mrs. Anna Hay. wife of 
Brother A. H. Hay. from *he reM- 
Ueaoe. 51 » Ea«t lourth street, to- 
niorro^v i iprll J»th» at '£ o'clo«-k p. m. 
til AS. MeKINM'X, IVvh. 



HANDLING GRAIN AT 
BUFFALO ELEVATORS 

Boats May Be Ready 

to Start West 

April 15. 

Buffalo. N. Y.. April 8— Handling of 
grain was resumed at the elevators 
here todav. The housemen returned 
to work pursuant to a settlement 
whereby the men receive an increase 
of 10 per cent in wage.o. The work 
on transferring the 7.500.000 bushels 
of grain afloat here will be rushed 
and some of the grain boats may sta t 

rns^ln^th'/^piVl^l^ ^o^. 

DRYS GAINING¥" 

CHIPPEWA COUNTY. 

Chippewa Falls. Wis.. April 8— Jhe 
villages of New Auburn. Holcomb and 
Cornell yesterday voted <lry- four- 
teen out of nineteen country distr cts 
in Chippewa county voted dr>. Chip- 
pewa Falls voted in favor of enforcing 
the Sunday closing law. ^„.,.„,. 

John T. Twohy was elected ma>oi, 
the vote being the lightest in twenty- 
five years. 

-• 

Speelal SeMsions Retunm Slow. 

Madison. Wis.. April 8— Only meager 
information has reached the capital re- 
garding the vote in various towns or 
the state on the question of a special 
."session of the legislature. The town of 
Merrimac. Sauk county, voted unani- 
mously against it. Fox Lake, La 
V'alle. Mazomanie and Borneveld voted 
unanimously for it. 

RESERVOIR BREAKS; 
! OHIO TOWN FLOODED. 

Gallon, Ohio. April 8— The retaining 
wall of the west reeerroir of the Big 
■ Four railroad broke early today, flood- 
ing the lowlands in this city. Prop- 
erty damage. It is said, will be con- 
.«iderable. There was no loss of life. 

■ • ■ 

WInbnrn Headn (Jeergla Road. 
' Savannah, (la.. April 8. — William A. 
Winburn of Savennah, vice pr<^sident 
of the Central of Georgia railway, was 
! elected president at the meeting of dl- 
I rectors of the road today. He succeeds 
! C. H. Markham of Chicago. 



NAT eOODWIN 

NOW AH AUTHOR 

Much-Married Actor Writes His 

Biography and Calls It 

*M Wonder." 



Kansas City Star: Nat Goodwin has 
written his biography, which is about 
lo be published. As the man in the 
street remarked, "it ought to be a 
hum-dinger"— and it is fair to assume 
that means about everything that is 
superlative. And by the way, Mr. 
(Joodwln e^cplains that his real name 
is Nathaniel Carl Goodwin, Jr.— just 
like that. "I've been Nat so long, he 
remarks, "that when I try to use my 



^V; 



■<«; 



V^l 



r\ 



rA 



Correct Easter 
Haberdashery and Hats 

The pleasure of choosin,^ from such an at- 
tractive stock of Hats, Shirts, Cravats and 
Gloves is not confined to the gentlemen only. 
Ladies also find the task interesting and agree- 
able. You may always depend on receiving 
quality and satisfactory value for the money 
expended. ^"""^ 



\/f 



■ill! 



A 



r 



z 



Dunlap, Stetson, Roelofs, 
Imported English and 
Italian 

Hats 

Derbies $3 upward 

Soft Hats.. $2.50 upwards 

Silk Hats $8.00 

Opera Hats... $7 and $10 

Crushers $1.50 up 

Caps 75c up 



Fowne's London Gloves 
$1.50 up. 

Cravats de Luxe 

The most attractive collection we have ever had the pleasure of show- 
ing. Novelties from London and Zurich, Switzerland. Pure Silk Cravats, 
50c upwards. 

Shirts— Silk and Others 

Have you seen the beautiful styles and patterns? The new soft cuff, 
tucked and plaited bosom shirts in madras, merceri/.ed, oxford, silk mix- 
tures and Sotsette fabrics will appeal to you instantly — $1.50 upwards, 

A most attractive line of real Balmacaan, Tweed and Homespun Rain- 
proof Coats, $22.50 up. Rubberized and Gabardine Slip-ons, $6.00 up. 



whole name I'm lliSTTttie man the dog 
bit because he came home sober." 

Mr. Goodwin h»«*«*n writing iils 
book "goln' on to" ifl»B years, and, hav- 
ing brought it up lo (mto, he finds that 
it totals ninety chulMUK has 300 illus- 
trations and coveiTjn&eriod of fony 
years. He calls it-*5-JWonder;" it isn't 
clear just why. f 

FrtendN Judsred MlH MannRPrlpt. 
Most of the work"o$ 'JI Wonder" waA 
performed at the if^^or's ranch in 
Southern CalifornIai>«fta at his home at 
Santa Monica. Friends and acquaint- 
ances of the stage apd well-disposed 
real estate agents-xttowHatter, it seems, 
comprise the bulk of ^uthern Califor- 
nia's population — woulfl^slt around and 
pass judgment on the admissibility of 
the evidence as Mr. tJodwin read his 
manuscript aloud to them. This "1 
Wonder" waxed great In anecdotes. 

I.,lke many famous actors, young Nat 
.showed no inclination for the stage in 
the days of his graduation from "the 
Little lilue Academy" down in Maine, 
though he points with pride to the fact 
that his valedictory address before his 
.schoolmates called forth great praise 
from the local newspapers. While in 
his 'teens he was persuaded to take a 
small part in a little play which was 
ptased in Providence. This was his 
first appearance and lasted not quite 
five minutes. In grease paint and 
grotesque costume he tied back home to 
Hoston and mother, declaring, "Send 
me to a shoemaker's and let me learn 
the trade: I can never be an actor!" 

Goodwin, howevet, changed his mind 
about being a shoemaker and began 
to spend all his evenings at the old 
Boston Museum. There he frequently 
"suped." (Jne of his first real parts 
was in the title role of "Nathan Hale." 
Of the first appearance he relates the 
following anecdote: 

Charles Hot had assured me of his 
intention of being present with his 
wife. But she refused to accompany 
him, and Charley, having purchased 
two ticliets, sought someone to go with 
him. He soon found a friend and in- 
vited him to go along. Much to his 
astonishment, the friend quietly and 
firmly refused the invitation. 
"Why not?" asked Hoyt. 
"I don't like Goodwin," his friend 
replied. 

"Well," said Charley, "you like him 
as an artist, don't you?" 

"No," replied the other, "I don't like 
him on or off the stage." 

"Come along," said Charley, "you are 
sure to enjoy this_performance. They 
hang Nat in the last act." 

C«lian World'M CireaieMt f.enlUM. 
Concerning his conteB%>oraries in the 
profession Mr. Goodwtt pays special 
tribute to E. H. Sott^rn and George 
Cohan — and the greafe>?of these is ap- 
parently George. ' : 

"If ever a man .deserved the posi- 
tion he attained," Ivrite* Mr. Goodwin, 
"it is Edward H. Sothern — if only for 
his energy and tenacity of purpo.se. 
Even in this country, surrounded as he 
is by productions of b<&astly immorality 
on every hand, to Ve able to make 
Shakespeare a pacing investment is 
an achievement to be proud of." lie 
continues: "Any mail who has the 
courage to announce his intention of 
plaving 'Macbeth' tot one week on 
IJroftdwav — and does It — deserves ii 
place in the Hall of Fame. Hats off 
to Edward H. Sothern!" 

As for George M. Cohan, Mr. Good- 
win calls him. quitefilmply, "the great- 
est genius the stag* of any country 
has ever brought forth." Also, (Jeorge 
is "one of the dearest of my friends. 
For years, in spite of a feeling of fam- 
lliaritv on my part that bordered on 
affection, Georgle always addressed n e 
as 'Mister' Goodwin. Finally I remon- 
strated with him. 'Call me Nat, I 
urged. 

" 'I'd like to,* replied George, 'but I 
can't. You're too big a man to call by 
his f lr3.t name.' " 

Xat Did the Dlvorcinjaf.;^ - 
- Somebody, , somewhere, onre wrote 
that Nat Goo'dwln was mor^, ' ^'^l^V'^^^'i 
against" than "fllvorcing." "That is a 
verv pretty paraphrase," observes rsat 
"but like most thihgs printed about 
me— untrue. 0( three divorces in 
which I have figured I obtained .wo— 
and had to work very hard and spend 
an enormous sum of money to ei^a'Jle 
Edna Goodrich to obtain .the othor. 
Here Is the way Mr. Goodwin discus.ses 
his adventures: 

"I suppose I have no right to refer 
to the sanctity of marriage trivially— 
•a union of two souls' cemented by a 
paid preacher should at least be treated 
with respect. Granted! From the point 
of view of some persons this is all true, 
hut for my part I have no reverence 
for anv sanctified ceremony or obliga- 
tion that can be annulled by a ?5,000- 
a-year judge. 

"I have the same respect for the 
marriage ceremony, as far as the 
church part of it is concerned, as I 
have for the warden of a prison who 
opens the gate for a murderer and al- 
lows him to go free. 

"My second marriage with a young 
society lady of Buffalo, a married 
woman whose name was Mrs. Nellie 
Baker Pease — who came to take tea 
with my mother and stayed three 
months — was absolutely and solely the 
result of her overwhelming desire to 
get out of 'society' and into 'Bohemia. 
"As has been the ca.se too often with 
me and as is usually the case with all 
young men who marry — I had nothing 
to say about It at aH. Mrs. Pease told 
me there was much 'talk' about us, 
and the only proper thing for me to 
do was 'prove to the world' a great 
many things, including my devotion to 
her — and do them all by marrying 
her. 

"Poor lady! How little she knew her 
own mind — or at least to gain in that 
i way an entree into the mysterious land 
1 she called Bohemia. As it was she 
found no happiness .with me — and 
! eventually it became ntcessary to di- 
I vorce her." , , 

Mr. Goodwin's discussion of his mar- 
riages somehow suggests to his mind 
I the affiliated subject o^ divorce. How- 
ever that may be, Hfe reverts to the 
I case of Maxine Elliott. Says he: 
I "It was far more expensive for me to 
divorce Maxine Elliott than It cost to 
wed her — I mean as far as the actual 
' cost of the ceremony went. The par- 
' son never got a peek at my bank roll. 
I The divorce counsel did — ^but they 
I earned their fee. 

"Talk about Reno being the Mecca 
i for vacillating souls! If the poor, de- 
' luded ladies only knew New York — 
the real New York in its relation to 
divorces — they would know that by 
comparison the Empire state makes 
Reno look like a Mormon mausoleum." 
The story of the wreck of the sloop 
on the California coast and the acci- 
dent which nearly cost Mr. Goodwin 
his life in the summer of 1912 is told 
in great detail by the actor. He gives 
j to Miss Margaret Moreland, who is 
j now his wife — or was when last heard 
from — entire credit for his rescue both 
I fiom the waves and from the doctors. 
1 Of the latter he writes: 
i "I suppose I should not complain be- 
i cause they wanted to cut me open to 
1 find out if they were correct in their 
' ccmjecture as to what had happened to 

"But Miss Moreland objected! 
I "And bv objecting she saved my life. 
i One of the physicians has admitted it 
! to me — since. Their argument was 
simple. If they were correct in their 
I conjecture — all right — if not, they 
I could sew me up again and put me 

under the ground." 
1 During his long convalesence Mr. 
I Goodwin says he discovered the mean- 
I ing of the»term "fair weather friend- 
I ship" and had occasion to revise his 
list of friends. He »a»80 had the privi- 
lege of reading his own obituary and 
discovered what an Important person 
he really was. "When I am denied the 
opportunity of reading mv next obitu- 
ary," he observes. "I ht)pe those who 
write it will deal kindly, with the poor 
player whose only mission on earth 
was earnestly to endeavor to live to 



REPUBLICAN WILL 
SUCCEED BREMNER 

DemQcrat Is Elected to 

Congress From Twelfth 

Massachusetts. 

Paterson, N. J., April 8.— The Re- 
publicans gained and the Democrat* 
lost a seat in the house of representa- 
tives as the result of the special elec- 
tion in the Seventh New Jersey dis- 
trict. Dow H. Drukker, a contractor 
of Passaic, was elected congressman 
to succeed the late Robert L. Brem- 
ner by more than 5,000 plurality over 
James J. O'Byrne. personally indorsed 
by President Wilson and aided by 
some of the foremost campaign speak- 
ers at the call of the administration. 

With two out of 112 election dis- 
tricts missing, Drukker got 10.469 



votes and O'Byrne 5.113. Deniare.st, 
Socialist, got 5.118 and Whitehead, 
Progressive, 600 (e.stimated). 
No Slap at WIImoii. 

Leading Democrats refused to ac- 
cept the result of the election as a 
repudiation of New Jersey's tii6l citi- 
zen Thev declared that the reap- 
portionment of 1912, which divorced 
Pas.saic county from Sussex and Ber- 
gen counties and placed it in a con- 
gressional district by itself, left a nor- 
mal Republican plurality. Although 
Congressman Bremner, a Democrat, 
was elected by this new district, the 
Democrats as.sert this his success was 
a personal one. 

The Seventh district is one of the 
centers of the silk and woolen spin- 
ning Industry in America. Drukker 
made his campaign appeal chiefly on 
the tariff ls.sue, declaring that the 
manufacturers and the workmen in 
the district hud suffered from the re- 
ductions brought about by the Dem- 
ocratic administration . 



StHtrnicnt By Doremnn. 

Washington, April 8.— When news of 
the Republican victory in the Seventh 



New Jersev district came. Represent*^ 
tlve Doremus of Michigan, chairman 
of the Democratic congressional coni- 
mitte** after a conference with Sec- 
retary Tumulty dt the White Hou»»e, 
issued this statement: , , *, „ 

"Two special congressional election- 
were held Tuesday — one In the Sev- 
enth New Jersey and the other in the 
Twelfth Massachusetts. These two 
elections the Democrats broke even. 
The Seventh New Jersey district a.- 
recently jerrymandered, is ^trongii 
Republican and always has been. The 
late Mr. Bremner, because of his tre- 
mendous personal popularity, wais 
probably the only Democrat who could 
carry the district. If the Democrat* 
had succeeded there yesterday,^^ It 
would have been almost a miracle. 

Demorrat Surreeda Cerley. 

i Boston, Mass., April g.— Jame» A. 
Gall Ivan, Democrat, was elected to 
congress from the Twelfth district to 
fill the unexpired term of Mayor 
James M. Curley. resigned. He re- 
ceived a majority in a triangular con- 
test. The -vote was: Gallivan. 8.<08. 
Frank L. Brier. Republican, 3,9 < 5, 
James B. Connolly. Progressive, 3,59^. 




Little Tots' 
•Togs for 
Easter at. 
Baby Shop 



THE STORE FOR SER.VICE. 
11S-115-H7-11© WEST SUPERIOR STREET. DULUTH. MIXBI. 



Easter Greet- 
ing Cards 
at Gray*s, 
new ideas, 
5c to 50c 






«« .t***** 




• • • •, I 






Your Easter Hat Will Be Becoming If 

You Choose Here ! 

TRY ON S0:ME TOMORROW! Come in the morning if possible; then you 
need not wait, for we are very busy in the afternoon. 

MilHnery is an art. A simple and moderately priced hat— properly chosen— is 
more to be desired than a costly hat, loaded with rich trimmings, regardess of good 
taste. 

You know that and you instantly appreciate the advantage of choosing from 

such a refined collection of truly beautiful hats as you see here. 

Moreover, milliners of taste wall take pleasure in showing you the hats that are 
most suited to your needs. ' 






Beads and Necklaces 

of Wonderful Variety Are in Highest Favor 

And 'tis surely fortunate for you discriminating 
dressers that you have so large an opportunity for 
choice. Manv imported novelties in plain and combina- 
tion colorings, also fancy links, combined with \&r\- 
colored beads. These are the 27-inch n^cklaces^^ich 
you know are in demand. Prices range 50c to f4.75. 

Lovely Rose Beads 

That Are Fragrant and 
Fashionable 

Rose, violet, green or black beads, 
made from rose petals, condensing the 
fragrance of the flower. These are 
18-inch, 27-inch and 54-inch strands, 
at 92.25, 93.50 and 95.75. 

Italian Jet Beads 

Beautiful and black, 91.25 to 92.9S 



J2.25 each. ^ ,., .,^ ^, ^■ 

Colored wood beads, 25c to 9<{.'5 the 

strand. 

The Small Hat Pin is Needed 
for the New Hats 

There are jet, silver and gold plated 
hat pins in many styles. Some of tbem 
set with handsome colored stones. 
Prices, 25c, 50c and ©8c the pair. 




Novelties in Neckwear 

This is a wonderful season for neckwear of varying 
styles. They vary from Quaker demureness to Pa- 
risian daring. Styles resembling the Easter Lily seem 
quite prominent. 

Here you will see guimpes. low collars, Gladstone 
collars, coll.ars and ficViues in net. organdie, and shad- 
ow laces; also plain and hand-embroidered styles. 

Prices range from 35c to 912 each, with many prices 
in between. 

Special — 15c for choice of our wom- 
en's 60c, 69c and 65c neckwear. 

Krom no^v until Katitcr '«vc offer y4Mi 
choice of <he dalntlent 50c, 59c and 65c 
acci&'v\'car at only 45c. 

The offering is one that good dress- 
ers will not think of missing. 

Novelty bows and Windsor ties. All 
wanted shades in crepe de chine. 

Prices, 59c and 65c each. 

Vanity and Envelope Purses 

0for Easter Gifts. 
The finest assortment of high-class 
leather goods it has been our pleasure 
to show you. The range at 93*8 to 
$18 includes unique effects in Pin Seal, 
Mat and Crepe Seal and Moire Silk. 
rhey are variously fitted with vanity 
and coin purses. They are certainly 
purses of which you and we may be 
proud. 

?Vcw and fa^iitonablc Vetln for the 
Easter hat. The correct Mtylcn at the 
correct prices. 

The millinery modes are such as 
give pi*ominence to veils. 




ft^ 



HATTERS AND HAHERDASHERS 

304 WEST SUPERIOR STREET. 



make the world laugh at sorrow and 
smile away the tear. 

RURAL FOR ^URE. 

lilpplncott's Magazine: A party of 
Nashville motorists turned a sharp 
curve In the Cumberland mountains 
and paused for a look at the scenery. 
Just below them, on a.iutting rock, a 
mountain boy of about l9 was looking 
dejectedly up and dawn the road, evi- 
dently in search ot something. 

"Say, lady," he askftd one pf the 
partv as the car started, "is you seen 
anvthing of a cow. .d»wn the road 
named Crump?" i 



Won't You Try and Come Tomorrow 

For Your New Easter Wearables ! 

Is it a Coat— a Suit— a Skirt— a Blouse— or a gown you want? It isn't too late to have it for 
Easter— our assortments are so complete that your desires may very likely be oratilied in a gar- 
ment which will require no alterations. We alone in this city carry the nationally famous line of 
Wooltex Suits, the choice of so many well dressed women everywhere. Plan to come early to- 
morrow—in the morning, if possible, so that you may be perfectly satisfied with your selection 
of a model most fitted to you. 








• I 
s I 



I 



10 



Wednesday, 



THE DULUUTH HERALD 



QmfVO THE CUB 
OVUUI: REPORTER 



Meet Mister Sioop, Mister Scoop 





/X WANT VOU TO :^HOW HiM, 
( 5C0OP-^H,F\^ST-^m<3^^ 
\ ^00 HAD TO L^ARM 
A \NH^^ NOU CAHe To 






^e F\^ST ^yK6- 1 HAD 
TO LEAUN WAS HOW TO 

TAKE- A (tOO\> 




(^t<^lif-iN-ru-^"/f»P •■P<*>v-'^-<^p - 



NEIVS OF THE NORTHWEST 



I Dakota Briefs 



SCHOOL UNION 
VERY^PULAR 

Consolidated Schools in 

Forty-Three of Fifty North 

Dakota Counties. 



RED RIVER VALLEY MULES 

FETCH VERY GOOD PRICES 



1 Paul banks and from time to time 

drew out $5,000 lots and put them In 

his box. 

Meta Tozer Mitchell, widow, is dying 
, at St. Joseph's hospital of a mental Minot, N. D. — That the Reporter and 

disease and knows nothing of the rich the Optic may be consolidated Is a 

find. peridtent rumor here. It is asserted 

1 A bitter struggle over the Mitchell | th>it following the consolidation a 
'affairs doubtless will take place in the telegraph service will be added. This 

Ramsey countv courts. Mitchell mar- ] is in line with the rumored consoli- 
I ried Mrs. Metft Tozer. a rich widow. : dations at Fargo and Jamestown and 
I and all of his inoncy came through her. i the one made effective some xnonths 



Towner County, in North 

Central Section, Is in 

Lead With Fifteen. 



Farsro. X. D.. April 8.— (Special to 
The H*-rald.) — The first consolidated 
school map ever prepared in any state 
showing the distinction between the 
town and the open country consolidat- 
ed schools, has just been issued by N. 
C. Matdonald, state inspector of con- 
solidated, graded and rural schools. 

Thi.» map shows the exact location of 
each school in each county, square 
blocks showing the country and round 
dots indicating the town consolidated. 
There are 190 consolidated schools in 
North Dakota of which 115 are located 
in towns and seventy-five In rural dis- 
tricts. The gain during the year of 
1S»13 was forty _ 
to siity are anticipated during 1914. 




In addition to the fortune in cur- 
rency, Mitchell had many valuable se-. 
curitles and diamonds in the box. 

The Xorthwestcrn Trust company 
and W. M. BurnS have been appointed 
guardians for Mrs. Mitchell. The prop- 
erty of Mitchell and his widow amounts 
to about f700,090. In his will Mitchell 
left the widow only one-fourth of the 
estate. 

TO RE DUCE T AXES. 

Convention at Milwaukee in June to 
Name Complete Ticket. 

Milwaukee. Wis., April 8.— E. L. 
rhilipp of Milwaukee is heading a 
movement to call a Republican state 
convention of citizens. Interested in re- 
ducina: the taxes, to be held in Mil- 
waukee some time in June. A full 
slate of candidates for state "offices 
will be brought out at this meeting. 

In a statement he issued Mr. Philipp 

said it would be a "Wisconsin conven- 

i tion for Wisconsin people and pol- 

I icies. All voters will be welcome who 

I believe in the national Republican 

party, a protective tariff, retrenchment 

in expenditures at Madison, and who 

I believe in a clean-up of the state gov- 

! ernment for the public good. 



RAP CITY ABATTOIR. 

Grand Forks Women Claim New En- 
terprise Is Poorly Managed. 



ago at Grand Forks. 

Hazelton, N. D. — The street lighting 
system hece is to be extended. The 
electric light plant was established a 
short time ago and the business sec- 
tion of the city lighted. The plan is 
proving so popular it will be extended 
into the chief residential sections. 

Harvey, N. D. — Falling from the roof 
of a building on which he was hand- 
ling the nozzle of a hose, fighting a 
fire in a business block. Anton Bakken, 
I aged 27, suffered injuries which may 
I cause his death. Bakken is com- 
I pletely paralyzed from the hips 
down. 

Mlnot, N. D. — With an offer of a free 
site already before the board of the 
state lodge. Mlnot Is making an ef- 
fort to secure the location of the state 
home for dependant members of the 
lodge of Odd Fellows. 

Grand Forks. N. D. — Funeral services 
for William Whalen. who died in 
Minneapolis last Friday, were held 
April 6 at St. Michael's Catholic 
church. Interment was in Cilvary 
cemetery. 

Fargo, N. D. — Clarence Nordsaard 

died April 4 at the home of his mother 

In this city. He was 23 years of age. 

j The funeral was held Monday af ter- 

noon at 2 o'clock. Rev. Mr. Anderson 

i of the United Lutheran church of- 

j flciated. Interment was made in 

I Riverside cemetery. 

Devils Lake. N. D. — Rev. Albert Tor- 
et, pastor of the Presbytcian church, 
left Monday for Rolette to preside as 
moderator over a meeting of the Min- 
newaukan presbytery. 



gens and daughter. Mr. and Mrs. 
Thomas Nlcholls and son. Mr. and Mrs. 
Harry Pollard, and Mr. and Mrs. Matt 
Doney arrived home Saturday evening 
from Ironwood. where they have been ' 
located for several months. They ■willj 
resume their residence here. 

Houghton — The examination of W. i 
A. Melville, who was brought- back j 
from Chicago on a charge of perjury 
In connection with an alleged state- 
ment relative to the Daily-Jane mur- 
ders at Palnesdale, will be held ne>Y 
Thursday morning. In . Justice Elch- ■ 
kern's court in Hancock. j 

Hancock — Joseph Laird, aged about 
50 years, died April 6. In St. Joseph's 
horpital, after a lengthy Illness with a 
complication of diseases. He has rela- 
tives at Baker City, Or., and until 
tley are heard from no arrangements 
will be made for the funeral. 

Lake Linden — Mrs. Elizabeth Kas- 
par, a resident of Lake Linden slnct 
1882, Is dead, following an illness of 
long duration. The deceased was born 
1)1 Germany seventy years ago. 

Houghton — E. F. Niemeyer for the 
past year manager of the Houghton 
branch of the Cudahy Packing com- 
pany, has been notified to report to 
the Chicago headquarters of the firm 
to receive an appointment to a higher 
position. Mr. Niemeyer will be suc- 
ceeded here by John Blair, former 
manager of the Minneapolis branch. 



\ Minnesota Briefs 



Grand Forks, N. D.. April 8. — (Spe- 



LONG EARS THAT BROUGHT $700 PER SPAN. 

Crookston. Minn.. April 8.— (Special to The Herald.)— As an illustration 

of the steady trend in the Minnesota Red River valley toward better stock, i clal to The Herald.) — Charges that the 

Gerrett Smith, a prominent farmer, this week sold two span of tiiules to the j Grand Forks municipal abattoir, re- 

eitrht and at lea^^t fifty ' Perley Holding company for $1,400; $700 per span. Mr Smith has been getting erected has 'failed of Its pur- 

eight and at lea.t_rirt> ^^^^ ^Igh grade stock for many years, having splendld_BU,les. ^and H/ref^«/J» , ^^ose ^In the AiXatTon o^^ 



In \«-arly all Conn ties. 

There are consolidated schools in 
fortv-three of the fifty counties of the 
state. The greatest center Is in the 
northern central section. Towner 
county leads with fifteen. Cavalier on 
one side is second and Rolette on the 
other is third. Ramsey county is 
fourth and Cass fifth. The seven coun- 
ties in the state without consolidated 
schools are Burke. Sargent. Dunn, 
Wells. Mcintosh. Griggs and Pembina, 
the latter being the oldest county in 
the state. - 

The counties with only one consoll- 
dat^•d school are Dickey. Sheridan. Mer- 
cer and Morton, the latter being the 
largest county of the state. 

During the present year it is hoped 
to establish consolidated schools in 
each county of North Dakota and the 
bulk of new ones will be in the coun- 
ties now having a limited number. 

North Dakota educators are some- 
what elated over the -fact there are 
more consolidated schools in this than 
In Minnesota and that the increase dur- 
ing 1913 was more rapid in the land of 
the Fli<^kertail3. 



Smith has been getting 
and Hereford , 
and Shorthorn cattle, and at a recent sale disposed of over 400 head of stock, i P°^ 
all high grade stuff. The two span of mules referred to won first and second 
prizes, and general sweepstakes, at cvery fair in Northwestern Minne.sota and , 
North Dakota at which they were shown. The price received Illustrates the 
profit in raising high grade rather than scrub stock. 



contract of 10 cents a ton royalty ! wounded Edwards In the hand 



on iron ore and prior to the com- 
mencement of this suit substantially 
$26,000. Kruse asks that the partner- 
ship be dissolved and that an ac- 
counting be taken, that a receiver be 
appointed, that the Crow Wing Land 
company be restrained from paying to 
Tripp the percentage of royalties, that 
Kruse be decreed to be the owner of 
i an undivided one-half interest in and 
I to the agreement between Tripp and 
the Pine Tree Lumber company, that 
j the Interest of Kruse be declared a 
Hen on and in said ore In the ground. 
I and that the court further decree that 
I the full one-half of said 10-cent roy- 
alty be hereafter paid by the Crow 
! Wing Land company to the plaintiff. 
Frj'berger, Fulton & Spear, of Dululh 
are attorneys for Kruse. 



few 



He 
days 



escaped and was captured a 
ago. 

White, who, when arrested, gave his 
name as R. W. Edwards. Is the son of 
Robert S. White, a contractor of this 
city, and lives within a block of the 
hotel on which the robbery was at- 
tempted. His Identity was not discov- 
ered until after the prison sentence 
had been pronounced. He Is 27 years 
old. 



CUYUNA LAND SUIT 
IN DISTRICT COURT 



UNION ORGANIZER 

HELD NOT GUILTY. 



Minneapolis. Minn.. April 8. — Dennis 
F. Gorman of Detroit, national or- 

rers' union, was 
shooting Joseph 
Bayerele. a factory foreman, by a jury 
in district court here late yesterday. 
Gorman had been on trial for several 
days. Bayerele, employed at a factory 
where a strike was in progress, was 
shot and dangerously wounded on the 
morning of Feb. 14. He accused Gor- 
man, who was directing the strike, of 
having fired the shot. The jury dellb- 



"WEr' VOTER 
LESS IN OSTBURC 



erated but a short time. 



TO INVESTIGATE 

LAWYER^S ADDRESS. 



I X" . yjrui mail ^jl ±^^%.ivji 

Partnership Affairs Involv-ii-uer^of^the^^^^^^^^^^^ 
ing Iron Lands Will 
Be Aired. 

Brainerd. Minn.. April 8. — (Special to 
Tho Herald.) — P.-irtnership affairs al- 
leged to exist between H. J. Kruse. 
formerly superintendent of the Rogers, 
Brown Ore company, on the Cuyuna 
range and Chester D. Tripp, president 
of the company, are to be aired in a 
suit for an accounting instituted by 
Mr. Kru«e. the title of the case being 
H. J. Kruse vs. Chester D. Tripp and 
the Crow Wing Land com.pany. The 
■ult revolves about the surface rights 
of land situated in the south half of 
the northwest one-fourth of section 11. 
township 46. range 29. in which the 
Pine Tree Lumber company owned the 
merchantable iron ore under the sur- 
face, of which there are millions of | may have rendered 
^0Qg, to prosecution for 

What la Alleged. 

Tho complaint recites the sale of a 
right-of-way through the land to the 
Soo line, for which $6,400 was received, 
the securing by contract of 10 cents a 
ton royalty on the ore. Kruse charges 
and alleges 
companay an 

company had paid to Tripp, after mak- 
ing a deed from Tripp to the Pine Tree 
Lumber company, and after making 



So Wisconsin Town Votes 

License By Decreased 

Majority of One, 

Ostburg, Wis., April 8. — This town 
yesterday voted in favor of license ijy 
a majority of two votes. The result 
two years ago was a majority of three 
votes for the "wets." The loss of one 
"wet" vote Is accounted for by the 
death In an Interurban street car ac- 
cident six weeks ago of a known "wet- 
sympathizer. 



Houghton, Mich.. April 
Judge Streeter and Attorneys 
and Legrls were appointed by Judge 
O'Brien yesterday to Investigate 
speeches made by A. E. Petermann, an 
attorney for the Calumet & Hecla 
Mining company, which he believes 

Petermann liable 
contempt. The 
speeches were made in Citizens' Alli- 
ance meetings Dec. 7 and 10. Judge 
O'Brien asked the committee if it is 
decided to bring proceedings, to begin 
the action before another Judge. 



Ashland Could >ot Vot^. 

A.^hland. Wis.. April 8— Ashland vot- 
ers had no opportunity to cast their 
ballots yesterday. The city authorities 
decided, as there was only one candi- 
date. Justice Merwin. of the municipal 
court, to succeed himself, it would be 
a waste of money to open the election 
I booths. Ashland Is a city of 11,000 
8. — Former population. 
Burritt 



.i^dM.^e^So"^'^;^^fn^"Srn^5 SEVERAL CHILDREN 

IN NORTH DAKOTA. 



Constipation 
Vanishes Forevcf 

I Prompt Relief-- Pennacent Ciir« 

CARTER'3 U7TLE 
LIVER PILLS ccTcf , 

iai). Purely veget- 
able—act tureiy 
but geally oa 
die liver. 

Step after^ 
taaa 
distrest — -f 
cure mdu^ 

r'oo — biprove tlta comj^edan — bn^tea 
eyes. SmH PiU, Smil D*M, SmU Pri<« 

Genolne nnntb^a: Signature 




Rochester. Minn.. April 8. — Mrs. Ann 
Dooley, widow of John Dooley and a 
pjoneer resident of Olmsted, Aitkin 
county, died at Cascade April 5. aged 
60. aiid Is survived by seven children 
as follows: Dan and Jerry of Leeds, 
N. D.; Mrs. Walter Morrison of Cas- 
cade; Thomas of Antler. M. D.: Mrs. 
Fr( d Johnson of N'oonan, N'. D.; Ed of 
San Francisco, and Leo of Max. X. D. ; 
also two stepchildren. John M. Dooley 
of Brinsmade, N. D.. and Mrs. Mary 
Maroney of Seattle. A brother resides 
In Washington. 



Reaalt at Brnle. 

Brule, Wis., April 8. — The following 
officials were elected here yesterday: 
P. W. Jay. chairman; John Byorni. su- 
pervisor; A. J. Webster, town clerk; O. 
W. Carlson, treasurer; Oscar Maki. as- 
sessor; John Ulvlla. justice of the 
peace; James Heuchenn, constable. 



^'aHhbnrn Finally ♦'Dry." 

Washburn, Wis.. April 8. — Washburn, 
which has been "wet" for the last thir- 
ty vears, voted out the saloons yester- 
day bv a majority of twenty-five after 
one of the hottest political battles In 
vears. The "drys" also carried seven 
of the twelve aldermen. Ed Bryan, 
the "wet" candidate, was elected mayor. 



some conditions usually Incident to 
cattle slaughterirtg:, are made by the 
Grand Forks Women's Civic league, 
which yesterday filed formal complaint 
with Mayor M. F. Murphy and the city 
council. 

The women charge tjiat faulty con- 
struction' has reiulted 4n Insanitary 
conditions, while the lack of adequate 
equipment has created waste which. If 
properly handled, would return profits 
to the city. 

Thorough Investigation of the abat- 
toir, methods of construction, and Im- 
mediate remedying of the defects, are 
asked by the complainants. 

FARGO COLLEGE ~ 

N OT TO DEBATE. 

Grand Forks, N. D., April 8. — (Spe- 
cial to The Herald.) — The triangular 
debating contract. Including the Unl- 
, verslty of North Dakota, University of 
i Manitoba and Fargo college, will not 
1 be carried 6ut iiext year, arrange- 
i ments having been made whereby 
Fargo collega -f^ni be dropped. 
' Xo.'-th Dakota will debate the Uni- 
versity of Manitoba and probably the 
University of South Dakota. 

NOAPPLJCATJONS 

At La Crosse for Food Shipped By 
Parcel Post Test. 

La Crosse, Wis., April 8. — In La 
Crosse, one of the ten cities In the 
United States la which the producer- 
to-the-table experiment is being tried 
by the postoffice department, not one 
consumer has thus far applied at the 
postoffice for the lists painstakingly 
• compiled of the farmers willing to ship 
dircctlv to the consumer. A long list 
I of farmers has been obtained, but In 
■ the eight days the plan has been In 
operation not one person has offered to 
i take advantage of their proposals. In- 
directly, however, the action of the 
government has had some effect, for 
prices have con^ down. Eggs today 
! retailed at 18 cents a dozen, or 2 cents 
I below the best offer made by the 
I farmers shipping via parcel post. 

• 

Editor Wedded Fifty YearM. 
Rochester, Minn.. April 8. — The gold- 
en wedding anniversary of A. W. 
Blakely, editor of the Rochester Post 
and Record and one of the veteran 
editors of Minnesota, and Mrs. A. W. 
Blakely has just been celebrated quiet- 
ly. Mr. Blakely came to Rochester In 
1860, working first in the postoffice, 
and later started his apprenticeship 
In the newspaper business with his 
brother. David Blakely, on the Roches- 



} Wisconsin Briefs ] 

Chippewa Falls — Oscar Olson of Mel- 
rose, Wis., was found guilty in Judge 
Coleman's court and paid a fine of $12. 
including costs for maliciously cutting 
a bicycle tire with his jackknife. 

Eau Claire— Work on St. Patrick's 
new parochial residence is progressin;? 
rapidly. The foundation is already in 

and the framework is going up. The, _ . „ 

old residence has been moved to a ! closed down his logging camp in Rose 



Stillwater — Christian Junker died at 
the city hospital, where he was taken 
from his residence on the Lily Lake 
farm, aged 48 years. He came to 
America from Germany about eight 
years ago, and remained in Chicago 
a Rhort time, later coming to Still- 
water, where he has since resided. A 
widow and two chlldi-en survive. 

Little Falls — Supt. F. W. Dobbyn hcs 
engaged C. A. Smith, who has been in 
charge of the manual training work 
at Pipestone, as instructor in that de- 
partment of the high school, to suc- 
ceed Edward Skibness, resigned. 

Mankato — The annual meeting of the 
Southern Minnesota Dental society will 
be held here Monday, Tuesday and 
Wednesday. Dr. H. B. Clark of St. 
Paul, an expert in tooth extraction; Dr. 
W. G. Crandall of Spencer, " 
specialist in amalgam work. 



a lot of ties from Maple Hill. 

Red Wing — According to the report 
of the board of audit. Goodhue count/ 
had on March 1, $156,158.88 in th« 
county treasurer's office and In county 
banks or depositaries. The tax levy 
for the year 1913 reached a total of 
$466,987.06 of which amount |130,f 
990.26 were collected. The abatement 
of taxes totaled $57.83. The uncollecle4 
tfixes In the county amount to $335,* 
938.97. 

Crookston — A. G. Sandberg has filed 
as a candidate for the nomination at 
sheriff of Polk county. Mr. Sandberg 
was a candidate for the nomtnatloa 
two years ago. and received the secon<J 
highest vote in a field of eight candi- 
dates. 

Rochester— Mrs. H. H. Wltherstine ot 
this city has been honored by th«i 
election as president of the Rochester 
board of education, a distinction that 
has come to few women in the stat 
! and In some circles It is believed tha 
; Mrs. Witherstlne is the first woman 
In the state to be elected to such aa 
office. 

Brainerd — Lena Perlinger, who wag 
granted a divorce from Steven Per- 
linger. whom she had married in Cro\^ 
Wing county, and was also awarded 
the custody of the two children and 
alimony In the sum of $700, which was 
{ made a lien on the eighty acres owned 
I by the defendant and situated in th 
j north half of the northeast quarter o 

section 6, township 43. range 31. and 
' reputed to have a value of about 
I $2,100. 

Moorhead — .Tohn Erickson. an old 
! and esteemed citizen, is suffering from 
i an attack of pneumonia. 

St. Cloud — Officials of St. Cloud have 

• been notified that the board of control 

I has authorized Supt. C. S. Reed of the 

state reformatory to employ inmates 

of that institution in the work of re- 

I pairing and improving the road be- 

tveen the reformatory and the Tenill 

street bridge. 

Winona — Frank D. Brown, formerly- 
prominent here, vcas stricken with 
heart failure while in bed at his home 
at Seattle and was found dead Satur* 
dav morning. The body, accompanied 
by" the widow, her sister. Mrs. W. A. 
M. Smith, and Mr. and Mrs. W. D. 
Heid^ will arrive here Wednesday 
mbrn'ing for burial. 

Faribault — Thomas H. Loyhed, .Tr- 
dled at his home here April 6 aftef 
Hint 



i 



point at the rear of the church and 
between that structure and the Sisters 
house. 

Madison— S. W. Sells & Co. were 
granted on Monday a refund from the 
Omaha and Northwestern roads of 
$5 78 for overcharges on a car of ex- 
celsior from Rice Lake to Fort Atkin- 
son. 

Sheboygan — Assemolyman Carl Zil- 
lier was knocked down and seriously 
Injured while entering the postoffice 
here Monday afternoon. Two boys 
moved the revolving doors so rapidly 
as Mr. Zlllier was entering, that he 
was knocked down and rendered un- 
conscious with injuries to his head 
and hip. 

Fond du I>ac — The will of C. A. Gal- 
loway, president of the Fond du Lac 
National bank, who died Thursday, 
was filed Monday. The estate is esti- 
mated at $160,000, of which $125,000 Is 
personal property. The will directs 
the payment of $5,(00 to the widow, 
Jtfrs. Flora .Jewell Galloway, and there- 
after an annuity of $4,000 for the sup- 
port of her two children. 

Kenosha — Alderman Herbert Thomey 
of Kenosha gave a pint of his blood 
on Sunday In order that his 3 yeai--old 
son might have life and have It more 
abundantly. 

Milwaukee — A cap found upon tho 
government pier, near where a man 
fell into the lake Sunday and drowned, 
was identified by Mrs. Mary Eilers, as 
belonging to her husband, Fred, aged 
43 who has been melancholy because 
of' failure to get work 

Madison — Governor McGovern has 
reappointed Ralph Smith of Merrill to 
he a member of and chairman of the 
state board of control for a term end- 
ing the first Monday In April, 1919. 



Iowa, a i several months' Illness. He was 27 
and Dr. I years old. Until his illness he had 
H A Mazes of Minneapolis, a crown : been farming in Northern Wisoonsln, 
arid bridge man, will give demonstra- i and had been with a railroad company 
tjons. I In Mexico and British Columbia. Mr. 

Grand Marais — George Mayhew has j liOyhed was the son of Mr. and Mrs, 
v.osed down his logging camp In Rose- ' K. H; Loyhed and was n former stu- 
bush and is now engaged In hauling 1 dent of the University of Minnesota. 



About Your Own Vigor 

Sent Free To Men 



ter Post. 



<«)S^ 




mm 



w 



SENT TO ST. CLOUD. 

Mill City Young Man, Who Figured in 
Hotel Robbery, Admits Guilt. 

Minneapolis, Minn., April 8.— Still 

' bearing the scar of a bullet wound re- 

I ceived In a battle with the clerk of a 

i local hotel, whom he tried to hold up. 

I Russell White late yesterday pleaded 

guilty to attempted robbery and was 

sentenced to the state reformatory at 

St. Cloud. The maximum time which 

he may serve is seven and one-half 

years. White entered the hotel early 

on the morning of Sept. 29, last, and 

ordered the clerk to hand over the 

hotel cash. The clerk snatched a re 

volver from *'shlnd the desk, fired a 



Kenosha Result. 

Kenosha, Wis., April 8.— After the 
most bitter campaign ever known here. 
Mathlas J. Scholey, former mayor and 
' former member of the state assembly. 
j was elected mayor yesterday, defeat- 
I Ing Dr. William M. Farr by 492 vote& 
i Scholey received the votes of most 
of the working men in the city. George 
W. Harrington was re-elected city 
clerk and Martin Stinmetz city treas- 
urer, and John W. Stevens, assessor. 

Big bond Issues for schools, bridges 
and a filtration plant all were defeated 
by big votes. 

FORTUNE jy'pDEN AWAY. 

Frank J. Mitchell, Lumberman. Had 
$58,000 in Safety Deposit Box. 

St. Paul, Minn.. April 8. — When the 
safe deposit box held by the late Frank 
J. Mitchell, lumberman, was opened 
Monday a fortune was Tevealed. 
Wrapped in brown paper were eleven 
packages 



Stearns' Electric 
RatOiRoach Paste 

The National RafKiUer 



ndl 



of currency amounting to 
$68,600. 

Mr. Mitchell began placing the money 
In the box in February, 1913. He cashed 
a check on the First National bank of 
Stillwater for $76,000. It Is believed 
that he divided this money up in St. 




Peninsula Briefs 



KtHst>ff ratt, mice, 

cockroaches, waterbugs and 

odler vermin. 

It ?9 reai^fcr xub. •conomlcal, rellabfo 
ard sold under an absolute guarantee of 
money baeiU it fails. 

Directioin fai M langrtiacea hi paekac*. 

Two sixes: 26c and $1.00. 

8«i4^aHail«n vtmrwhw. 



Gwlnn — Martin Peterson has re- 
turned from New Orleans. La., where 
he took a course of lectures in the 
economics of railroad firing. He has 
had the best record of any of the fire- 
men on the Munislng, Marquette & 
Southeastern railroad for the past two 
years and was sent to the meeting by 
the company. 

Negaunee — With but one exception, 
the city election Monday was a land- 
slide for the Taxpayers' party. Mayor 
William S. Heggaton won over Theo- 
dore Hagwall, the Socialist candidate, 
by a majority of 843 votes. In no ward 
did the latter poll a strong vote. The j 
largest vote he received was in the 
Second, where forty-five ballots were | 
cast In his favor, as against 148 for 
Heggaton. 

Newberry — RolUn Payne, a repre- 
sentative of the state tax commis- 
sion, recently Inspected the tax rolls 
of McMillan township. Mr. Payne In- 
formed Supervisor Park that It was his 
judgment that the property in the 
township was assessed at nearer the 
true cash value than In any other 
township In the peninsula. 

lehpeming — The Republicans car- 
ried the city election here Monday, 
electing these officers: Mayor, Dr. G. 
G. Bamett; recorder. Richard H. Olds; 
treasurer, John V. Anderson; school In- 
spector. Jacob P. Nleml. 

Marquette — G. W. (Sehrand. who has 
been superintendent of schools in Mar- 
quette for the past six years, during 
which time he has done efficient work, 
has resigned. Mr. Gehrand Is planning 
to do more university work in the line 
of vocational and educational train- 
ing. 

Negaunee — Edward Morse, a Negau- 
nee boy. who has signed up with the 
Green Bay team, will leave for Green 
Bay on the IBth and go with the team 
to Chicago where they will hold their 
spring training. 

Ishpeming — C. T. Kruse of the Pitts- 
burg & Lake Angeline company left 
for Virginia, Minn., Sunday night to 
be gone for a few days on business. 

Calumet— Mr. and Mr». Georse Frlg- 



MR. READER: 

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MANHOOD I Tte auallty which rules th* 
world today. Uy rrisnd. Uitre ncvMr wu s Mm* 
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sturdy manhood, manly \1for and manly couras* 
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mlnuts. No rnaltsr what your ysars. wh*ther 
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sbly the tsUow who provss up strontnt In this 




MANiiOOU WI.NS IN XLL WALKS OF LIFE. 

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or manly stien^h. no matter what his past 
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RiiALLT MAKf: THK EFFORT: Slid provided, 
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ase or is not Incurably diseased. To my mlod. 
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fectly triain. bill it is a road that miy m*n 
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ance, wclch'.rtf but a few oui'cee. wliich you wear 
•t night. This Vitallxer i««erstes and Mods 
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To Get Free Book Please Use Coupon. 

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Dear Sin— Please forward me your t>ook, as ad\enised. free, sealed. 




^ 



-r* 



4 



^^ 



J 



i-f 



•»• 



'qy make in 

attic of ^out" 
vest pocket- 



When you e«n buy one »1 fiCM 
smart mppearini C^csterMId 
WatchM at sucn a moderate 

You will adniira the thla 
graceful deiign of tho Chester- 
field Wateh— 

And after you have carried 
one for • white you will reavcct 
its reltaMe aecunicy. 

In the Chesterfleld Watch you 
have a tiaiopieee that you can 
rely upon at all timaa, winter or 
summer, at work or play over 
ro-jgh roads or smooth, year ia 
and year out — 

Its a wateh you will always 
ko proud to carry 

Why not drop In and look 
them over fiis rvening— we will 
d:li(hted to show them to y»ti. 

HENRICKSEN 
JEWELRY CO. 

Xii West So»erior St. 



E, B. FORCE 



FOR SALE 

Computing Scale, Counters, Show 
Cases and Shelving, large size Cof- 
fee Grinder and 6 Fire Extinguish- 
ers, also large stock of Shoes and 
Men's Furnishings Goods al bank- 
rupt sale prices. 

C. p. LARSON, 

113 FAST SI PKRIOR ST. 

I. S. Guiiin, Manager. 



Trunks, Bags, 
Suit Cases 

Of All Descriptions. 
IF IT'S LEATHER. WE HAVE IT. 

DULUTH TRUNK CO., 

Manufacturers Mlace 1888. 

220 West Superior Street. 



COOPER DAMAGE 

CASE POSTPONED 



Inability to Get Service on 
Alleged Slayer- 
Assigned. 

Grand Forks, N. D.. April 8.— (Spe- 
cial to The Herald.)— The suit of Mrs. 
Mary Ross against Harry J. Cooper of 
HlUaboro, and his son, McLain Cooper 
of Hood River, Or., to recover damages 
for husband's death will not be tried 
at the term of the district court which 
opened at Fargo yesterday, the case 
having been continued over the term. 

Mrs. Ross seeks remuneration for 
the slaying of her husband by Mc- 
Lain Cooper. 

The recent attempt to extradite Mc- 
Lain Cooper from Oregon to North Da- 
kota, to face charges of alleged bribery, 
it Is alleged, was designed to bring him 
within the jurisdiction of the local 
courts that he might be served, as the 
plaintiff has been unable to obtain 
service on him. 



Police and Civil War Vet- 
eran Dies at St. Luke's 
Hospital. 



Was First Duluth Officer 
to Be Retired on 
Pension. * 



ARE m MORE 

Congressman Miller Says 

Continuous Sessions 

Are Necessary. 



Edwin Butler Force, 70 years old, 
veteran of the Civil war, member of 
the Duluth police force for twenty-two 
years and the first officer ever retired 
on a pension in this city, died early 
yesterday afternoon at St. Luke's hos- 
pital following an illness of more than 
two years. 

Mr. Force had been ailing for the 
last twio years and for more than a 
year had been a constant visitor at 
St. Luke's hospital. Several weeks ago 
his condition became worse and ho 
died about 2 o'clock yesterday after- 
noon. 

He was a prominent member of Cul- 
ver post, G. A. R., and was well known 
among the Civil war veterans through- 
out the state. For four terms Mr. 
Force was adjutant of the local post 
and one year he held the position of 
commander. For several yeai^ he was 
aide-de-camp on the staff of the de- 
partment commander and when Form- 
er Governor Van Sant was commander- 
in-chief, Mr. Force was on his staff at 
the national encampment that year. 




Nation's Business Demands 

It — Consistently Against 

Free Tolls. 



EDWIN BUTLER FORCE. 



Mr. Force also represented the local 
post at the encampments held at San 
Francisco and Boston. 

Mr, Force was bom In Marshall, 
Mich., and he lived In the Michigan 
city until the war broke out, when 
he enlisted In the Twenty-fifth regi- 
ment, Michigan infantry. His father 
was very much opposed to his serving 
In the army and succeeded In forcing 
his son to withdraw from service. 
Later, however, Mr. Force re-enllsted 
and served until the close of the war. 
About thirty-two years ago Mr. 
Force came to Duluth and on Oct. 3, 
1884, he was appointed patrolman on 
the Duluth police force. He took part 
In the labor strike of 1889 and was 
later given a gold medal by the city 
of Duluth for his bravery. On May 1, 
1906, he retired on a pension, the first 
police officer ever given that privi- 
lege by the department. He had served 
twenty-two years. 

Mr. Force is survived by one brother, 

George Force, who lives in Michigan. 

Local Civil war veterans, who have 

I taken charge of the body, yesterday 

I wired the latter and arrangements for 

1 the funeral will not be made until he 

Is heard from. The body has been 

taken to the Stewart undertaking 

rooms. 



Special at 
The Orpheum This Week 

Send your wearing apparel to us to 
be Dry Cleaned for Easter Sunday. 
Orpheum Cleaners and Glove Special- 
ists, corner Second avenue east and 
Superior street. Phones, Grand 976; 
Melrose 1168. 



See the Flower Show 

at the Duluth Floral company. 

AIDS DEF OR'mE DCHILD. 

County Will Pay for Treatment for 
Anna Dillon. 

Anna Dillon, aged 7, will become an 
Inmate of the state hospital for crip- 
pled and deformed children at St. Paul 
In the hope that surgeons may be able 
to affect a cure of her case. One of 
her arms and one of her legs have been 
deformed since birth. Yesterday after- 
noon, Rudolph Shogran, assistant clerk 
of the poor commission, left with the 
little girl for St. Paul. The county 
will pay for her treatment at the state 
hospital. 



WINTER FUREBACK 
DUE FOR THE EAST 



By Any Other Name 

VOSE 

PIANO 

Would Be Just as 
Great a Favorite. 

It was the piano that inade the 
VOSE name famous! Hence, the 
word VOSE stands for all that is 
right and all that you can demand 
of a piano. 

SOLD OX TIME PAYMENTS. 



VOSE representatives, 

Howardf 
Farwell & Co. 

Oldest Reliable Plaao Mereluinta. 

18 and 20 SECOND AVE. WEST. 

Rex Theater Bldg. 

Chas E. Havens, Manager. 



Weather Bureau Issues 

Special Bulletin on 

Conditions. 

Washington. April 8. — An old fash- 
ioned flareback of winter is about to 
sweep the East. At the weather bu- 
reau today this special bulletin was Is- 
sued: 

"Abnormally high pressure and low 
temperatures prevail over the great 
Interior basin of the country, the line 
of freezing temperature extending to 
the Oklahoma-Texas line. 

"These conditions will move east- 
ward and southeastward over the Gulf 
and Atlantic states during the next 
twenty-four to forty-eight hours, and 
frosts may be expected Wednesday 
night to the Gulf coast, with tempera- 
tures near or below freezing In tho 
Interior and frosts on Thursday night 
over Northern Florida. 

"In Georgia and the Carolinas freez- 
ing temperatures are likely on Thur."- 
day night, while to the northward they 
will be from ten to twenty degrees 
lower. Over the great central valleys 
and the west low temperatures will 
continue for another day or two." 

VOTE TO CENSURE 

M R. McD ERMOTT. 

Washington. April 8. — Congresslonji 
censure for Representative McDermott 
of Illinois as a result of the dis- 
closures of the lobby investigation 
was agreed upon by the judiciary com- 
mittee. The determination was reached 
at a long session which did not deter- 
mine whether the censure should ex- 
tend to the National Association of 
Manufacturers and Its officers. Com- 
mitteemen who had been holding out 
for a resolution of expulsion for Mc« 
Dermott finally yielded to o*ne for cen- 
sure only. 

• 

A4nl«s Beatlitff: Parentn. 

Minot, N. D.. April 8. — (Special to 
The Herald.) — f'harged with drunken- 
noes, during which sne admitted beat- 
ing her father and mother, Ida Hack- 
meHter of this city was fined $5. Her 
fathe.- paid the fine. 



Congressman C. B. Miller, who 1« 
home for this week, resting up from 
his labors In Washington, is of the 
opinion that the time has gone by 
when the legislation of the nation can 
be handled in short or limited sessions 
of congress. 

"The business of the nation," said he 
to The Herald today, "has grown to 
such an extent that we may as well 
make up our minds that congress will 
have to be in almost continuous ses- 
sion to handle public uflfairs. That 
does not necessarily mean continuous 
making of ntw laws any more than 
the dally meetings of the board of di- 
rectors of any large concern mean a 
continually changing policy. But con- 
grt'ss must pass on public matters and 
they are coming up too rapidly to per- 
mit of the old-time short sessions and 
getting home. This may not appeal to 
some congressional aspirants, for the 
old supposition was that being a mem- 
ber of congress was a snap. The 'snap' 
part of it disappeared long ago, and 
being a member of congress now means 
real work." 

Mr. Miller feels somewhat amused 
over the furore caused In some quar- 
ters because he voted against free 
canal tolls. Said he In regard to it: 

"There was nothing remarkable 
about that. I was merelj- consistent. 
I voted the same way when the bill 
was first up. I accompanied the com- 
mittee that went to Panama three 
years ago to investigate conditions 
with a view to furnishing whatever 
legislation was believed necessary. We 
were thoroughly convinced at that 
time that free tolls would be a mis- 
take. I sur-portcd President Wilson 
this time because I had not changed 
my mind about the matter. The presi- 
dent was right — absolutely right — as 
he usually Is. 

Economleally and Morally Right. 

"We all know that the American 
ships that would benefit would be the 
coastwise traders. That is a monopoly. 
Any ship In the coastwise trade must 
be of certain build and fly the Ameri- 
can flag, all foreign ships being shut 
out. Should, we give them free tolls 
we would simply be conferring a ship 
subsidy, to which we are opposed. That 
Is the economic side of it. The moral 
side demanded that we charge tolls, 
for there Is no mistaking the language 
of the treaty. 

"Another view of it — economic, too — 
that seems to have been overlooked by 
those who have found objection to the 
vote against free tolls, Is that for the 
first few years, at least, the canal will 
be operated at a loss. . Why should we 
exempt American ships when their 
tolls will go a long way towards 
meeting the expense of operation'.' 
Would It be better to tax the Ameri- 
can people as a whole to make up the 
deficit? If those who want to see free 
tolls feel that way they are welcome 
to their opinion; but I feel otherwise." 

Mr. Miller said that he believes that 
the senate will pass the antl-fvee toll 
bill, but not before about a month 
from now. 

"At first, there was a good deal of 
objection In the senate," said Mr. Mil- 
ler, "but undoubtedly the sentiment 
has changed. There Is no question in 
my mind but that the senate will fol- 
low the lead of the house, but it wlU 
sp^^nd a good deal of time in talking 
about It first." 

IS victiSToF 

NERVOUS GOLUPSE 



L A. Simonson Is Detained 

at Request of 

Friends. 

Louis A. Simonson, one of the most 
prominent workers of the Minnesota 
Anti-Saloon league and the Prohibi- 
tion forces of the state, president of 
the West End Commercial club and a 
candidate for the state legislature in 
1912, is the victim of a complete nerv- 
ous breakdown. He is being held at 
police headquarters pending a hearing 
before Judge of Probate Gilpin. 

Mr. Simonson, It Is believed, has 
overworked and his condition today Is 
declared by many business associates 
and acquaintances to be the result. 
For the last two years he has won 
first prize among all the agents of the 
life Insurance company, for which he 
is the local agent. 

During his residence In Duluth of 
about ten years Mr. Simonson has 
been one of the strongest workers in 
the fight against liquor. He is a mem- 
ber of all the local temperance or- 
ganizations. He ran for the state leg- 
islature at the last election on the 
Prohibition ticket. 

His friends have been making every 
effort of late to aid him, but his con- 
dition became worse and this morning 
Patrolmen Mahlen and Monahan were 
called and they took him to headquar- 
ters. 

Rev. Mr. Oftsle of the West end 
filed a complaint against Mr. Simonson 
with the probate court and a hearing 
will be ordered by Judge GUpln with- 
in the next day or two. It Is hoped 
that treatment In a sanitarium will 
restore him. Mr. Simonson lives with 
his family at 2102 West Superior 
street. He Is 45 years old. 



MAUNDY THURSDAY 

AT B APTIST CHURCH. 

Maundy Thursday will be observed 
by the members of the congregation 
of the First Baptist church Thursday 
evening at 8 o'clock. This service will 
be held In the main auditorium of the 
church, and there will be special music 
by the church choir. The communion 
8f rvlco will be observed and new mem- 
bers welcomed. This Thursday night 
corresponds tty the night on which 
Jesus Instituted the Lord's supper. 

Easter Sunday, the minister, R. Ed- 
ward Sayles, will preach at both serv- 
ices The sermon theme for the morn- 
ing will be; "Why I Stlall Believe In 
Immortality." 

Mrs. Valborg Gunderson-Flnkleson 
win render violin solos both morning 
and evening. There will be special 
music by a chorus choir. 



GOES CRAZY OVER 

CAILLAUX FAVORS. 

ParlR. April 8. — Mme. Vllz, a pris- 
oner in Saint Lazare Jail, today was 
sent to an Insane asylum, having be- 
come demented In consequence of her 
campaign against the granting of 
favors by the prison authorities to 
Mme. Caillaux, who killed Gaston Cal- 
mette. The woman occupied a cell 
near that of Mme. Caillaux. For sev- 
eral days she had shrieked continually 
agiiinst her fellow prisoner. 




Easter Time! 

The joyful period of the year 
when men, like the trees, are 
anxious to bud in new dress and 
to receive with open arms and 
open windows the gentle, all-re- 
viving gladsome spring. Worn- 
out winter clothes hang heavily 
upon the young and spreading shoulders. *'OfF 
with them" is the cry of the lively boys and 

"On to Ihe Columbia" 

is the answer echoing forth from all who know 
this great and good clothing store of Duluth. 

Oh the Columbia's second floor is a Boys' Specialty Store as big as 
most other stores' entire space. It's the choicest spot in the house where 
a flood of bright daylight breaks through eleven large plate glass win- 
dows. The boys will need a suit now — a blue serge suit for first com- 
munipn or for confirmation or a fancy suit for Easter Sunday. Whatever 
price parents may be willing or able to spend, here is the suit for their sons. 

Blue Serge Suits at $4. 90 ('The Little Columbo") at $6, at $7.50, 
$8.50, $10, $12.50 and $15. Fancy Colored Suits at $1.95, $2.50, $3, 
$3.50, $4.90 ("The Little Columbo") and also up to $15, 



Sampeck Clothes^ 
Woolwear Suits, 
Kaynee Waists, 
Kaynee Shirts, 
Rali-Rati Hats, 
Heid Caps, 
C. & H. Neckties, 
Barker Collars, 
Evenvear Hose, 
Mu rising Union Suits, 
Cogan Shoes. 



Duluth,, 
Minn. H 



The Columbia 



At Third 
Ave. West 






.4 



I 



STRIKERS WIN 
FIRST ROUND 



Six Master Painters Agree 

to Terms of Union 

M^n. 



Men Deny Being Influenced 

By I. W. M^. Agitators 

in Strike. 



That the painters, paperhangers and 
decorators' strike ik partially settled 
and prospects good for a complete set- 
tlement within few days Is the report 
made by officials of the painters' 
union today. Six of theimaster painters 
have already accepted the terms of the 
union. It Is said, and agreed to take 
back the striking men at once. 

The report that 1. W. W. agitators 
are at work in Duluth and are back of 
the strike was emphatically denied by 
the officers of the painters' union. 

"The I. W. W. union and the paint- 
ers' union are dual organizations," said 
J. B. Jensen, recording secretary of the 
latter union today. "The Ideals and 
alms of the two organizations are con- 
flicting, and the painters' union re- 
fuses to admit to membership any 
member of that organization. For that 



reason the report that we have been 
influenced by these men is without 
truth or foundation." 

The strikers held another big meet- 
ing this forenoon, and great optimism 
was expressed by the officials when 
the gathering adjourned. Expectation."? 
for an early and satisfactory settle- 
ment of all differences was expressed. 

"Things are rapidly coming to a 
proper solution," said Mr. Jensen. "Sev- 
eral of the master painters have al- 
ready met our demands, and a large 
number of our men will go back to 
work. The employers who have agreed 
to a union shop and a Saturday half 
holiday will take back all their men. 
We expect several other master paint- 
ers to come in as soon as they have 
been notified of the action of the oth- 
ers who have. All of them have not 
yet been notified. 

"A point that has helped us is that 
several of the non-union men who 
have been working during the strike 
have now come over to us and will join 
our union. This action was taken yes- 
terday afternoon and this morning. 
Furthermore non-union men from out- 
side are not coming in to take the 
places of the strikers." 

A point that htis worked much in 
favor of the strikers Is that a strike 
w^ould not necessarily mean a complete 
lay-off for the union men. It Is point- 
ed out that work is abundant at this 
season of the year, and the strikers 
are not under obligation to refuse work 
If offered by persons other than their 
former employers. The public Is In 
need of labor and plenty of work Is 
said to be waiting the strikers. 

ohioan"dies"at 

ag e of 1 07 years. 

Toungstown, Ohio, Apiil 8. — Edward 
M. Jones, 107 years of age, died at his 
heme in Niles on Monday afternoon. 
Mr. Jones was bom In Wales and In 
his younger days followed a searfarlnff 
life. He had been a resident of Niles 
for half a century. 




would then resume and a busy seasoa 
w^ould likely result. 



BETTER CHANCE 

FOR EARLY START 



Elevator Strike at Buffalo 

Settled— Affected Grain 

Shipping Here. 

Word was received In Duluth last 
evening that the elevator strike at 
Buffalo, N. T.. has been settled. The 
terms of settlement were not given but 
that is of minor importance at this end 
of the Great Lakes. 

With the elevators tied up while the 
men were out and with every indica- 
tion of the strike being prolonged it 
seemed here that there was not much 
chance of early shipping of grain from 
Duluth. Boats that have been lying In 
the Buffalo harbor all winter with 
grain In store, have not yet been un- 
loaded because of the strike, and no 
grain would be sent forward from here 
until they were, because of the inevit- 
able congestion. 

The settlement of the strike will 
cause an earlier opening of navigation 
than was planned. No vessel owners 
were anxious for their ships to start 
out before May 1 and not even then If 
the strike conditions continued. 

Were the coal strike to be settled 
now, so that the stockpiles at lower 
lake ports could be built up, thus en- 
suring cargoes for up-bound boats, 
normal conditions on the Great Lakes 



Kill THEMSELVES TO 
AID GRANDCHIUIREN 



I 



Aged New York Couple 

Commit Suicide By 

Hanging. 

New York, April 8. — Despondent be- 
cause they believed they were a bui- 
den to the grandchildren, Jacob Thels, 
79 years old, Jind his wife, 78, com- 
mitted suicide today by hanging them- 
selves in the home of their grandson, 
George, on First avenue. 

The old couple made careful prepar- 
ations for their death. The husband 
helped his wife adjust the noose 
around her neck. Then he assisted 
her to the window sill upon which 
the rope was fastened. When she had 
stepped off to her death, he hanged 
himself beside her. 



WILSONS GOING 

TO WEST VIRGINIA. 

Washington. April 8. — Plans for 
President Wilson's Easter trip wer« 
changed today. The party will go to 
White Sulphur Springs, W. Va., In- 
stead of Hot Springs, Va., as previ- 
ously announced at the White House. 
The purpose is to afford Mrs. Wilson 
rest and an opportunity to recuperate 
from her recent illness. The president 
win leave Thursday night, spending 
Friday, Saturday and Sunday at White 
Sulphur Springs, and being back at 
his desk Monday morning. 



Make Your Plans Now— Attend This Sale! 

T he Only Real Removal Sal e 

Now going on in Duluth— Don't let this opportunity pass— Now that you are about to 

, move, to houseclean or to start housekeeping is a good time for you to talk it over. Do 

it this evening, then bring the family to this, the greatest sale for things for the home. 

Office Furniture, Living Room Pieces, Library Pieces, Bed Room Furniture, Dining Room Furniture, 

Gas amt Coal Stoves, Rugs and Draperies, Linoleum, Sliades, Baby Cabs, Dishes, Vnware, 

Pictures, Cut Glass, Lamps, Silverware, Bed Outfits, Porcli Furniture. 

Not^hg Reserved— Everything at Real Removal Sale Prices ! 



K 



I M 



You CanrSee the Savings 
at a Glance— Compare 
Our Prices With 
VCfthers. 






COiniTC mSEFUINlSISK 




A& 



DULUTH, MINNESOTA 




We can make It easy for 

you to pay; If you ivlsh 

live can make the pay- 

ihents small. 



J 




iw^ 



qpMMB* 




18 



Wednesday, 



THE DULUJH HERALD 



Aprils. 1914. 



In 




n 



r 



\ 



'ou'lldobeiterLitKelly' 

Read This 

List of 

Unusual 

Curtain 

Values 

95c Special 

TO CLOSE OUT— Six 

patterns of Ruffled Net 
Curtains, 2^- and 3 yards 
k«ug. have sold at from 
$2.:>0 to $7.(.H> per pair. A 
BIG SNAP for rooming 
house keeper or hotels; 
about 50 pairs going at a 
saoriiicc regardless of value. Come in early Ck^g* 

as those will not last long at, per pair %7t-f 1^ 

$2,50 Value for $1,69 

Plain Arabian Net Curtains, 40 inches Avide and 
2-2 yards long, with pretty edgings and fancy 
braid trimmings. A good values at $2.50 per pair. 
This week's special at, per 
pair 



^ AMERICAN AUTOMOBILES IN WAR-RIDDEN MEXICO | E. L FIRMINE 



Loyal Protective iHnaranee „^»"»,»*""»i 



l-ltiK-ls K. 




$1.69 



$1.79— Special— $1.79 



Four patterns of extra fine quality Scotch Madras 
Curtains in cream color only, hemstitched with 
plain band borders, for a cool, airy chamber cur- 
tain it surpasses any others ever shown. Something 
entirely new. Don't miss this opportunity : only 
lour pairs to a customer. Special 
per pair 



I lUlllL > , KIlllJ 

$1.79 



Our Big 4 Specials 

Your choice of several sekct patterns in Mar- 
quisette and Scrim Curtains in white, cream, biege 
and ecru. Some have pretty edgings and inser- 
tions: others plain and hemstitched borders, whicli 
we offer during this sale at — 

Regular $2.50 values, special ^ f 70 

per pair %P JL • 9 ZF 

Regular $2.25 values, special ^ "% tf Q 

per pair <p -*■ •<9^ 

Regular $1.75 values, special ^ "f /)Q 

per pair •? -■- • V^^ 

Regular $1.50 values, special - /^Qc 

per pair \J%^^^ 



GENERAL INSURANCE 
and SURETY BUNDS 



606 and 608 Providence Bidg. 



ipai 

lau'J.) ». Aiiguatua AUen. prwUlHit; 

P«rk», M»ret«jy. Attorney to «ccept bcrv-ce in Mju 

iieMit»: CumiiilssiOiiw of UmurHrM*. 

CASU CAPJIAL, 4100.000.00. 
INCOME IN IS13. 



Premiums received (Met) — 
▲ccideut and beaiUi ' 

T<H«I net premium Income • 

PolU-y fees 

Kiom liiicrest mtd i«Hts 

tfjm liU olUcr i.'.urv;«b 



S35.62«.2« 

535.626.:« 

07,480.0« 

14,471.03 

8S.4} 



ToUI ln<-ome • 

UUkt:! a«bele l>cc. i\ nl pre«iiiiu ycM. 

Sum ♦ 

DISBURSEMENTS IN Itl3. 
Claims p*id (Xnj — 
Acjideui luiU health t 



««;,662.T« 
38!>,39t.34 

997,0«1.3« 



300.426.11 



New JSitKland Casualty Company. 

Prijidpal (ifflee: Bo^ion. .\l»«s. i«>rgaul2<->i In 
1910.) Corwln McDowell, presldriit; AXUui Korl**, 
eet-rettry. Attorney to at(.-ei.l service lu Mluiie«»oi«: 
CoiumlMiiuuer of iusuraiice. 

CASH CAPITA!., $1,000,000.00. 
INCOME IN I9I3. 

Premium!! received (Net) — 

Anldent I 68,405.05 

Health M.84'.o3 

Liability €y»,«i6.4r 

Workmen'* compensation 3!'J,l'.i:i.4C 

Fidelity 5:..'>46.04 

Surely 2H1,3«.%.(»8 

PUie glass 40,248. .2 

Burglary and theft Ji8.:U3.J« 

Aulo, eic, l*r(ip. damHge t!7.352.lil 

Workmeub Coll 10,182.80 

Total net premium Income t 1,771,011.83 

Pi Uey fees 7.836.00 

From interest aand rents 68.726.02 

Picfit on sale or maturity of leduer ae- 

stu 4,183.31 

rnm all other sourcei , 138.22 



Net paid pcIlcyholUera t 

IiiieBtigatJcn and ad^uztmeiit of claims. 

I'ollcy fe«s ; 

Commiiislons 

ijalarles of offlcers, a£eu!s, employee, es- 

amliirrs' aJiJ hiKpectio » fees 

Dividends to block boldiiK 

Lobs on sale or maUurUy of ledger aa- 

acta 

All other disbuisemeiits 



30fi,4S«.ll 

3,889.63 

£6.651. Ot 

10,745.57 

84,7t2.1« 

i9,oo<>.oa 

295.0« 
51,952.0* 



Total dUbursemente $ 564,751.55 

Balance 432,M«.7S 

LEDGER ASSETS DEC. 31. 1913. 



Total Income $ 

Ledgei aaasets Dec. 31 of previous year 



l,851.Ctl5.08 
].8({tl,702.58 



Book Talue of bonds and stocks % 

(;a»U In office, uum. conipaulea and 
banks 

Total ledger a.iset« (a* pei balance) . .$ 
NON-LED0ER ASSETS. 
luterest wid rents due and aiciued 



:!27.47I.M 

104,831.73 

432,309.75 

3,865.43 



Gro>* ashet* j..:.-.!.,..^*^*'^'^'* 

DEDUCT AS&ETS NOT ADMITTED. 
Book value of ledger atseit over market 
value • 11.628.03 



Upper Left — Passing United States Custom House at Gate No. 2, Tia Juana. Upper Right— United States- 
Mexico Boundary Monument, Tia .Juana, Mexico. Lower Left— The Desert Valley Where the Battle of 
Tia Juana Was Fought. Lower Right — "The City" of Tia Juana, One of the Keys to Lower California and 
Westernmost Stronghold of the Mexican Federals. * 



Sum 

DISBURSEMENTS IN 

Claims paid (XetJ — 

Accident 

Heailli 

Lliibiiity 

Workmen's cumpentatlon 

Fidelity 

.Surety 

Plate glass 

Buiglary and theft 

Auto. etc.. Proi). damage 

Workmen's Coll 



. ..» 3,721, 5S8.56 
1913. 



28,8!»3.36 
21,U3.o7 I 
143,049.92 
75. 301.. -8 I 

3.678.43 
5»<,223.11 

t<,044.12 
.^4,074.24 
i4.1t)0.42 

1.972.21 



HOW MANY B ANANAS P iD YOU EAT? 

The ''Slip'' in the Peels of the Bananas Imported By the 
United States Would Launch the Ships of the World— 
Where They Come From and How They Grow. 



Your 

Credit 

Is Good 




"^^^g^^^^mmM 



Your 

Credit 

Is Good 



Everybody that eats at all eats i plants grow to a height of from fifteeii 
bananas — that is almost everybody. \ to thirty-five feet, spreading In .ill 
From the rare luxury and tropical i directlon.s, until the soil is overbiir- 
ciirlosity of forty years ago the banana dened with a mass of stallt and leaf 
has become almost as common and growth and stunted fruit is produced, 
well known as the apple and, taken | The plant M-ill grow with wonderful 
the year round, considerably less ex- | rapidity under favorable circumstances, 
pensive. From the crowded markets of j Within a period of six or seven weeks 
New York to the cross-roads country 1 the two or three-foot plant will more 
store of Arkansas the yellow bunch i than double in size, and a month or 
Ib as familiar as is the homely barrel ' so later the leaves cease to unfold 
of potatoes, and the enormous quant- ' and a spike appears out of the center 
ity of this nourishing fruit consumed ; of the crown. This Is the future stalk 
by the people of the United States Is I of the bunch and carries a huge red 
astounding. i blossom at the end. It develops rapid- 

"If you did not eat forty bananas ; ly, bending more and more until it has 
last year, you did not have yoar completely turned upon itself, so that 
share," writes Franklin Adams, editor I the bananas grow end up, or in a po- 
of the Monthly Bulletin of the Pan- sitlon the reverse of that in which ,... 

American Union. "Over 46.000.000 ' they are seen when hung up for sale, clubs were united in the Housewives 
bunches, or more than 3,600,000,000 i From seven to twelve month* after . league, and the city was asked to pro- 
bananas, were imported by the United ■ the blossom appears the fruit is ready vide a place for a market under its ex- 
States In 1913. The immensity of these | for the gatherer. elusive direction. The city administra- 
shipments can be more readily grasped In cultivation four suckers, or shoots, ! tjon was sympathetic and was glad ^o 
by the statement that they would ; are usually allowed to grow in one " ' "' " 
cover an area over twenty feet wide ; hill, and their graduation Is so ar- 
reaching from New York to Sau Fran- ranged that while the oldest is bear- 
olsco, or, placed end to end, would ex- | ing fruit the next is in blossom, the 



I of dedication in which Brand Whitlock, 
j mayor, and the officers of the women's 
I clubs took part, ever>' one of the stalls 
; being occupied. 

j For the first year the success of the 

' n:arket house seemed complete. Thou- 

1 citnds of women visited the market 

' every morning and the prices of vege- 

tables and other food supplies dropped, 

while the quality improved. So great 

was the success of the new plan that 

scores of other market gardeners, who 

hod been unable to rent stalls, backed 

Ihelr wagons up along the curb for 

.several blocks adjacent to the market 

I house and did business in the open 

air. 

Middlemen Made a Fight. 
Retail dealers and produce commis- 
sion men presently found their own 
business seriously damaged and deter- 
mined on retaliatory measures. The 
commission men especially made a 
hard fight on the city market: 

Their most successful method was to 
send out buyers, who met the wagons 
driving Into the market house and 
bought the entire load. Then, instead 
of going to occupy his stall and sell his 
produce to the housewife, the market 
gardener would drive to a waiting 
freight car and unload for shipment to 
some other city. 

Meanwhile the organized women of 
the city were also busy. The various 



Net paid poilcj holders $ 3f'l, 140.76 

IinesUgallon and adjustment vt claims. 44.8S3.84 

Policy fees 7,836.00 

Commisslona -. 432,289.21 

Salaries of offlcers, agents, employee, 

examiners' and lnsp«*-iion fees 190,666.59 

Loss on sale or maturity of ledger u- 

eets 454.64 

All other disbuisements 87.838.51 

Total dl8bur^ements t 1.155,079.55 

Balance 2,566,51"J.01 

LEDGER ASSETS DEC. 31. 1913. 

nrok ralue of real estate $ lO.MO.OO 

Mortgage loans 3P.112.7.'. 

Bo<k value of bonds and ftcfks 1,862,954.78 

Cash lu office, trust companies and 

banks " 159.477.06 

Premiums in course of c-ollectlon 4D4.739.70 

All other ledger assets 38,834.72 



Total admitted aase'.s ♦ 

LIABILITIES. 

Claims — 
III pn>c<»!j! of a<ljn&tment and reported.! 

Incurred but not reported 

Knitted 

.Set unpaid ilahns 

Expenses of luveMigatloo and adjuat- 

mcnt 

Vneanied premiums 

Esce-s cf «>eclal dej- sli ov«r UabllUies 

Uifreon 

All other liabiliUes 

CapitaJ slock paid up .' 



424,^4:. 13 



69 256.00 

J3.000.0* 

744.0* 

83.000.9O 

407.33 

09.641.67 

2,3f;8.5T 

M.S02.3i 

U'O.tOO.tt* 



Total lUWUtles, indudir^g capital...* .TOO.MS.SZ 

Surplus ovt-r all Mabililles 8 124,307.21 

BUSINESS IN MINNESOTA IN 1913. 

Prtmiums Receired. Looses PaM. 
Accident and health tl0,4»4.ltt $5.07:;.i« 



Total ledger fvittn <n i>er balance).} 2,566.519.01 
NON-LEDGER ASSETS. 
Interest accrued $ 15.138.19 



StJite of >Unne60ta. Depanment of In«uT«nce. 

I Htreto Certify, That Uie annual staiemenl of the 
Lo'.al Protective Insurance company for il>e year end- 
ing December 31, 1913, of which the above Is an ab- 
stract, has been received and filed In this departmeul 
and duly approved by me. J. A. O. PKIX'S, 

rommlssloner of InsuraooS. 



The Medical rrotrctlve Companr* 

rrinclTil ornte; Fort W^yne, lud. (OrgKi.Ued in 
1909.) i»ulfi Fox. president; Byron H. Somere, aec- 
rttary. Ationjey to accept aendc* In Mlnueacu: 
Commi^b<ouer cf insuranc*. 

CA.SH CAPITAL. $100,000.00. 
INCOME IN 1913. 
Pi-emUims received (Net/ — 
Medical ITW • 91.599.57 



Total net premium Income % 

From Interest and reuis 



91,599.57 
8,»j<.3a 



Tttal Incfime $ 100,45 j.8» 

Ledger asseta Dec. 31 of previous year. 173,505.82 



turn over to /.le women the old hay and 
corn market on Superior street. 

The old buildings and stalls were 
cleaned and painted, and the House- 



tend more than thirteen times around j third is half grown, and the last is just ^-ives' league made strict rules cover 



the earth at the equator. The "slip" | coming up from the ground. The plan 
in the peels would launch the ships i tation yields a continuous harvest for 
of the world. The wholesale value of ! years without replanting. In planting 
the 1913 importation, at point of ox- ! for the market about 200 hills are al- 
port, was over |16,3f»3,000, while in all lowed to the acre. Sometimes the num- 
probabllity the consuming public of : ber Is increased to 226, having 900 
the United States expended over $40,- j stalks, yielding about 300 marketable 
000.000 for this delectable fruit." | bunches a year. It Is said that the cost 

With the increased cost of living ' of production of bunches that sell for 
owing to the proportionately decreas- jo cents is about from 10 to 15 cents. 



CAR E OF B ABY. 

Dallas News: Babies soon learri the 
tegular hours for feeding, and with a 
little patience on the part of the moth- 
er, the babvs life can be made to run 
as evenly as a little machine. Then the 
mother can count on the hours she will 
have for other work. A baby will even 
learn to waken at its regular feeding 
time, if properly trained to regular 
hours. 1 know of an infant that 
wakened regularly for his last bottle 
for many month?, and at the last did 
not open his eyes, because his nurse 
bad the bottle ready for the slightest 
movement when the time came near 
for this last feeding. It was a great 
comfort to the mother to feel sure 
th'^re would be no crying spell, and 
that the child really wanted to get to 
sleep again as quickly as possible after 
the milk was tanen. It is worth trying 
for, and only needs constant attention 
to detail until the habit is established, 
and then equally constant adherence to 
the regular hours for feeding. It is 
better for both child and mother to 
follow some such plan. 

Babies need fresh air day and night. 
Many kind? of illnejis are cured by fresh 



air. Warmly covered, and away from i 
draft, a baby may sleep in a room with 
the window open — even in cool weath- 
er. In winter, new born babies ordinar- 
ily are not taken out until they are four 
weeks old. In the summer they go out 
at two weeks. 

Keep baby warm when out, and pro- 
tected from winds and glaring sunlight. 
1 I have seen sleeping babies in the open 
air turning and squirming In their 
' coaches in an effort to get away from 
t a blinding, glaring sunlight. It seema 
, Incredible that anyone should expose 
an infant in this way, but it is the 
I truth that many ignorant young moth- 
t ers allow their child to be thus treated 
j and later wonder at failing eyesight. 
I Babies living in the country may take 
their naps on the veranda. In mild 
I weather, and thus get plenty of fresh 
; air. 

I Fresh air will help to cure sick 
I babies and will help well babies to 
' digest their food. Fresh air may be 
I kept in a room by putting a board, the 
I width of the window and two or three 
1 inches thick, under the lower sash. 
: The fresh air coming In at the opening 
■ between the upper and lower sash does 
1 not make a draft, and will keep the air 
in the room pure. 



Ing food supply, the banana comes for 
ward as an important factor In .he 
world's economy. While Its use as a 
food is limited In this country almost 
entirely to its consumption In a raw 
state, in localities where It grows It 
is frequently fried or baked and is 
also used for making flour, dellcioaa 
confections, etc. Placed in a closed 
barrel and allowed to ferment, bananas 
produce an excellent vinegar, while 
from the ripe fruit a delightful cordial 
is obtained. Dried ripe bananas are 



the average profit per acre being about 
$50 annually. 

In 1899 banana trading was organ- 
ized on modern commercial lines. Over 
160 vessels have since been built for 
this trade and are plying between 
American ports and the tropical fruit 
belt. Wireless telegraph stations along 
the Central American coast keep In 
touch with the banana fleet that Is 
moving In a steady procession up and 
down the Caribbean. When a steamer 
starts from a United States port to 



said to be superior to figs, weigh only j secure Its cargo a cable Is sent notify 
about one-ninth as much as the bunches jj,„ ^j^g growers to prepare for the 
and occupy correspondingly less space cutting of the crop. About thirty-six 
in shipment. In other words, the j^^^j.^ before the expected arrival of 
banana has many kinds of food values ^y^^ vessel orders are sent to the plan- 
as yet but little known in the country ta^jons, notifying then* to cut friilt 
which consumes the most. j ^q^ delivery on the specified date. TBe 

Banana culture is really one of tne ^j^ before the steamer is uue trains 
oldest of industries. It seems to have ; ^^.^ made up at the fruit ports and 
been known almost since the origin or j ^^^^ ^^^ ^^ ^j^j^ ^p ^^e fruit, these 
the human race. Long before the a»^'" i trains being so timed that steamers 
of history in the Old W orld, perhaps . jjj ^^^ ^^ delayed waiting for cargo, 
before the Old W orld rose f rom_ the , ^ ^^ morning of the cutting the 



waters, man lived on the fruit of the 
musas. The banana was generally 
considered a native of .Southern Asia, 
and to have been carried into America 
by Europeans, until Humboldt threw 



first out on the plantations are the 
"cutters," who go up and down the 
long avenues of banana plants armed 
with long palm poles liavlng broad 
steel blades at the ends, with which 



doubt upon its purely AsUtlc origin. ; -j^--pj-,g j^,, g^ ^^ ^bout eight 

quoting early authors^ who asserted ^^It^^^^^^ the ground. The weight of 



!that the banana was t^^Jil^iv-ated in the - -- - ^^^^ ^, ^j^^ j^^^ 

Americas long before the coiiquest It ; ^^^„"^i^^iy, .^hen the bunch is cu 

is claimed that, bananas formed pn^ of aown siowy^ machete. Follow 



ing their use. No one who did not 
actually raise the produce offered for 
sale was allowed to occupy space; com- 
mission men and hucksters were 
rigidly barred under palu of arrest, 
and police were stationed about the 
square to see that these rules were 
enforced. 

Prodncera Got Stalin Free. 

No charge whatever was made "for 
the use of the stalls by farmers and 
other actual producers, and a commit- 
tee of women was constantly on hand 
to keep things running smoothly. 

From the start the new enterprise 
of the Toledo women was successful. 
The prices of all sorts of produce, eggs, 
butter and poultry dropped, and It was 
always easy to fill the market basket 
with "freshly gathered vegetables and 
other food products of the highest 
quality. 

Three days In each week during the 
season more than 100 truck gardeners 
and farmers brlngi their own stuff In to 
the women's market and sell It direct 
to the consumer. So far there has been 
no successful Interference «n the part 
of retail market men or commission 
merchants. 

Encouraged by its success, the House- 
wives' leagtie is now planning the erec- 
tion of four new municipal market 
houses, one in each of the four quarters 
of the city. 



Groes assets > 2.681.657.20 

DEDUCT ASSETS NOT ADMITTED. 

Premiums in course of collection (past 
due) $ 176,415.01 

Book value of ledger aiGets over market 
value 60.110.55 

All other aasseta not admitted 17,862.83 

Total aasets not admitted $ 2.'54.3S8.41 i 

Total admitted asset? 2,327,268.79 

LIABILITIES. 
Claims— 

.\djusted t • 8.118.r8 

In process of adjustment and repcrt«d.. 113.882.63 

Incurred but not reported 8,307.58 

Resisted 10.68.i.OO 



Sum 272,961.71 

DISBURSEMENTS IN 1913. 

Investigation and adjtistment of claims. t 21,410.04 

Commls-loiis 20,985. 5> 

Salaries of offl<ers, agents, employtt. 

examiiiers' and inspection fees 10,594.43 

All other dlsburaemeuta 11,746.03 



Total t 13.1.994.19 

Deduct reinsurance 1,766.00 

Net unpaid claims except liability 

claims I.";. 228.19 

Special reserve for intpaid Itabll'ly lo«5«>6 22T,5l'9.38 
Expenses of inTcstigaslon and adjust- 
ment 680.97 

Unearned premiums 718.701.60 

Commissions and brokerage 66,319.27 

Ah other llablUties 28.947.37 

Capital stock paid up l.OOe.OOO.OO 



Tutal ItabUltles. inehMMng capital. .. .8 2,170.386.78 

Surplus orer all UablUtle? 150.882.01 

BUSINESS IN MINNESOTA IN I8I3. 

Premiums iteceived. Losses Paid. 

Accident f 319.50 

Liability 688.12 3152.00 

Fidelity : 326.88 

Surety 2.372.03 

Plate glass 437.77 64.89 

Burglary and theft 768.26 

AutcmobUe property damafi 183.41 66.58 



TV)tals 14,895.97 



$283.17 




Only Four Days 

More Before 

Easter 

We wish to again suggest the necessity of bringing <• 
out your Spring Clothing and having them French 
Dry Cleaned, Pressed and Repaired ready for Easter. 

We have secured additional help this week and can 
assure you that there is still plenty of time to have 
your suits, coats and gowns perfectly cleaned and fin- 
ished by Sunday. Phone 2442. 

OUR m^^^^mgi^i^ <)VR 

GUARANTEE Mflili^ SERVICE 



who~llvVd m the warm and temperate 1 !"» the cutters come the. picking-up 



regions of the Montana. It seems that 
almost all tropical countries claim the 
fruit as Indigenous. 

On the American continents bananas 
are successfully grown through 60 
deg. of latitude, from Tamplco, Mexico, 



gangs, who deliver the fruit at the re 
celvlng platforms along the railroad 
tracks. An Inspector counts and grades 
the bunches, rejecting those that show 
signs of ripening or are undersized or 
bruised. As soon. as the train Is loaded 
it is rushed to the port where steam 



TOO LATE 
TO CLASSIFY 

One Cent a Word Eaeh Insertion. 
No Advertisement Less Than 15 Ccnta. 

EVERY ONE W^HO WANTS THE BEST 
goes to Miss Horrigan's for hair 
work. 



For Rent — 6 rooms, light, water, gas. 
1112 W^ 3rd St., $12.60 mo. Mel. 2703. 



26 de«- south. Cultivation or t^ ^^^^^j ^^ ^^^^ ^^^^^ ^^ ^j^^ 

?,Tn*tt^ wuiV^ there a^^e^sThan 100 i destination the fruit Is constantly 
• ''"Lf- of tnniml rlli^fall closely Inspected, wind sails and ven- 

•"^rlfe^ ^^^"n'k^'ia^^'r'prodigal method | Jjjf '{l^S^femSl^rStu^e^'' '° "'^'"^"'" 
of propagation, for before the Parent , the proper temperature. 

, rpf,;;g^"uV^"Ther^!?r^"ifhortr ?ra! ica^nruii'^h^r^fhr^'o^^ %^^?""- 

^row from the root of the original ing the cargo to the ventilated cars 
DlaiTt res^^bling the sprouts from thd commences. Every bunch Is recounted 
"eyes" of T potlto, and each in turn regraded. and relnspected. Fruit that 
becomes a parent stalk with Its fruit, shows signs of Hnening Is sent to near- 
It foUows that unless most of the by markets Fully rpe fruit Is sold 
constantly appearing new plants are to dealers and peddlers in the city, 
cut out (which Is the practice) the ! In a few hours the shipment has been 
flrst stalk In a few years will become i discharged and cleaned up. and the vea- 
the center of a small Jungle. The i sel Is ready for the return trip. 



FORCE H. G. OF L. T O RETREAT 

Toledo Women Got Public Markets and Reduced the 
Prices— Middlemen Fight Hard But the House- 
wives' League Is Successful. 



FOR SALE— BY OWNER. FIVE-ROOM 
cottage on large lot, fenced. In West 
end; easy terms. Address L 446, 
Herald. 



WANTED— COATMAKER, 30 
First street. Grand 1277-D. 



WEST 



Farm lands at wholesale prices. L. A. 
Larsen Co., 214 Providence building. 



MARRIAGE LICENSES. 

George Eugene Ellis and Essie Vic- 
toria Larsen. 

Charles V. lottl and Minnie L. Leslie. 

Charles Spenard and Mildred St Ger- 
main. 

Charles Nunan and Annie Koskela. 

Emil Nurnela and Minnie Kuos- 
manen. 

Percy G. Payne and Elizabeth W. 
Bain, « 

Fred Llnde and Mrs. Annette Laren. 

SOLID GOLD WEDDING AND EN- 
GAGEMENT RINGS made and mount- 
ed to order at Henricksen's. 



state of Minnesota. I>«»>artinent of Icaiiranc*. 

I Hereby Certify, That the annual statement of 
the New Kngland Casualty ccmp.nny for the ye*r en* 
ins December 31, 1913, of wliicli ihe abore Is an ab- 
strart. has b««) reeetred and filed In this dciMrt- 
ment and duly appi-OTed by me. 

J. A. O. PREUS. 
Commissioner of Insurance. 



Total dlsbursemenU I 64.7Se.09 

Balance 2««.2:5.6a 

LEDGER ASSETS DEC. 31. I9r3. 

Jlortgace loans $ .1*' 

Itock \sl\i« of bonds and stcctis 

Cash In office, trust companies aad 

banks 46.491. T9 

Premiiuns in course of coUet-tion 1'!, 761. 83 

All oilier ledger •s'ets 275.0* 



.:.»7*» 
IM.OO 



Total leUeer a«*ets (as per lulancel.J 208,SS5.«> 
NON-LEDGER ASSETS. 

iMtrest and rent-^ due and accrued 1 2,246.«7 

UiUer oun- ledger assets 4,150.20 

Gross afseta I :il4,622.H 

DEDUCT ASSETS NOT ADMITTED. 

Premiums In course of collection (pact 

duel » 2.:P4-00 

All Other assets not aOmiUed I 4.3<»«.44> 



Total assets not admitted t 

Total admitted as«ts 

UABIUTIE& 
Claim*— 

Rf^lstcd for polii-yV.olders .| 

Vueamed premiums 

CoDimi«<>ions aiwl brokeiage — ......... 

AU other liabilities 

Capiial stock paid up 



6.SM.40 

l-(<t.ll8.«9 



ie.3TS.0O 

13.036.91 

S.0JT.00 

2.S00.09 

IM.OM.OO 



Total liabilities. Including cipIUI...! 1C5.23«.?1 

Surplus over all liabiliilen 42,8rS.lS 

BUSINESS IN MINNESOTA IN ISfS. 

Premiums Received. Losses Paid. 
Medical ProtertlTe $6,C30.W 



State of Minnesota, I>epart«ient of Insiirtnce. 

I Hereby Certify. That the annual siatement of 
the Medical Protft-dve company for the year enUlnff 
December 31, 1013, cf «hich the abcve U an ab- 
stract. h& been received and filed in ihla d«>art- 
ment and duly approved by me. 

J. A. O PREUS, . 
Cbmmksloner of Inauraoc*. 



WHITNEY WALL CO., Agents 

REAL ESTATE, UMNS AND INSURANCE 

301-2 TORREY BLDG. 



Dubuque Fire A Marine InsnraBce 
Company. 

Principal office: I>ubuque, Iowa. (Organized in 
1883.) John EUwanger. president; N.^J. s^chnip. sec- 
retary. Attorney to accept senlce In Jllnuesota: 
Commibslojier of Insurance. 

CASH CAPITAL, $2OO,0OO.0«. 
INCOME IN 1913. 

Premiums ether than peipetuaJs t 

Rents aiid interests 

GroKS profit on sale, maturity or adjust- 

meut of ledger a^ets 



Total Income > 

I.iedger assets Dec. 31 of previous year. 

DISBURSEMENTS IN 1913. 

Net amount paid for losses ♦ 

H^spenses of adjustment of losses 

Commissions and brokerage 

Salaries, fees and allowances of of- 

ficeis, agents and empluyee 

Taxes, few. rents, real estate expense. 

fire patrol, etc 

Dividends and Interest 

All other disbursements 



7P1. 270.95 
:ti,«9«.12 

1.437.50 

8«9,398.57 
1,447,0«4.73 

S75.«09.«J 

n,832.«l 

216.8S2.13 

60,2S0.19 

31.857.79 
40. 000.04 
25,802.89 



UTorthem Insurance Company. 

Principal office: New York, N. Y. (Organized la 
18'J7.) William Mason, president: Jame$ Marshall, 
secretarr. Attorney to accept service in Minnetoia: 
Commlsjlonrr of liisurance. 

CSSH CAPIT.Ai. 8350.000.0*. 
INCOME IN 1913. 

Premiums other than peipetuals $ 711.923.49 

Uentj. and interests &<,908.7* 

Groes profit on sale, maturity or adlttst- 

ment of ledger assets 9,997. M 



Total income f 

I.«dger assets Dec. 31 of previoits year.. 



778.819.ST 
I.314.1«2.«« 



Send a garment 
today and if you 
are not well pleased 
with your venture 
don't pay us a cent. 



I 




DRY 

CLEANING 
DEPARTMENT 



W© can return 
your garment In one 
day If you wish It. 
Xo shop odor or 
gasoline smell after 
after our sanitary 
process. 



Henry M. Hyde In Chicago Tribune: 
I.,ed by the organized women of the 
cltv, Toledo, Ohio, has been making a 
determined effort to reduce the cost of 
living to Its citizens. 

Toledo is one of those Ohio cities 

which in recent years have made such 

great progress in the direction of real 

democracy and municipal home rule. 

<:< nsequently when the women's .clubs 

i demanded the erection of great mu- 

' nlcipal markets where consumer and 

I producer could be brought together 

! and the profit of the middle man ellm- 

! Inated the city council was ready to 

i listen. , .L ^ . 

I At a referendum a bond issue of 
1200,000 for market purposes w^as voted 
by a big majority, though a hard fight 
against it was made by retail grocers 
and market men. Even before that 



but It was In an undesirable neighbor- 
hood and had gradually come to be 
used almost entirely as a hay and corn 
market. 

New Mnrhet id <k Conrcnlent Place. 

For the new market the city bought 
four and one-half acres of land at a 
cost of $70,000. The site is conven- 
iently and Quickly reached from all 
parts of the city by street car.s. 

Nearly three acres of this land were 
at once covered with a market build- 
ing, a concrete structure, one-story 
high and rather pleasing from an 
architectural standpoint. It contains 
276 stalls, arranged on either side 
of six wide and optn aisles. The stalls 
vary In size and the city charges a 
rental of from $2» to f50 a year for 
them. 

In Jime, 1911.;th* new market hou.'^e 



BIRTHS. 



HISE — A daughter was born April 4 
to Mr. and Mrs. George L. Hlse, 626 
South Sevanty-flrst avenue west. 

HKNDRICKSON— A son was born 
April 1 to Mr. and Mrs. William 
Hendrickson, 6009 Wadena street. 



MONUMENTS. 



LARGEST STOCK OF HIGH-GRADE 
monuments in the Northwest; call 
and Inspect before buying elsewhere. 
P. N. Peterson Granite Co., 320 E. Sup. 



Monuments to order direct from fac- 
tories; yon save 20 per cent. Chas. 
Benson. Office 2301 W. 2nd Lin. S34. 

FUNERAL FLOWERS A SPECIALTY. 
Duluth Floral Co.. 121 W. Superior .St. 



there had been a small city market, was opened wl^ elaborate ceremonies 



BUILDING PERMITS. 



To J. Mundt, frame dwelling, 
GllUat street, between For- 
ty-fourth and Forty-fifth 
avenues $ 

To Thomas Olafson, addition, 
Huntington street, between 
Fifty-seventh and Fifty- 
ninth avenues west 



300 



600 



Total dlsbursemcnU • 70.2.265.19 

Balance 1,554.698.11 

LEDGER ASSETS DEC. 31. 1913. 

Book value of real estate t 2.823.64 

Mortgage loans '•*'^2-!I?i' 

Collateral loaJM „„l*?Ti!?; 

Book value »f bonds and stocks 299.9U.oO 

Cash in office, trust companlw and 

banks 84,409.39 

Agents' balances, unpaid prenjlum-s and 

bills receivable, taken for premiums.. 120.197.58 

Total ledger assets (as er balance)..) 1,554.698.11 
NON-LEDGER ASSETS. 

Interest and rents due and accrued 1 21.184.S6 

Market v,ilue of real estate, bonds and 

stocks over book value 3,337.60 



Gross assets » 1,.^73,221.97 

DEDUCT ASSETS NOT ADMITTED. 

Agents' balances and bills receivable...! .'j.491.43 



Total a»set8 not admitted I 5,491.43 

Total admitted assets 1,573,730.54 

LIABILITIES DEC. 31, 1913. 

Unpaid losses and cUlfj t 

I"ncanie«1 premiums 

Salaries, expenses, taxes, dividends and 
Interest due 

AU ether llablllflea r... 

Capital stock paid up 



:6,U4.ei 

»es.3:3.4i 

25.000.00 



Sum t 2.093.002.55 

DISBURSEMENTS IN 1913. 

Net amount paid for losses $ 

Expenses of adjustment of losses 

ComniissiOBs and brnkerace 

^Salaries, fees and allouances ot ofAcen. 
agents and employes 

Taxes, fees, rents, real estate eipenMi 
fire patrol, etc 

Dividends and Interest 

Gross loss on sale, maiurltjr or adjust- 
ment of ledger as.'eta 25,512. 5# 

All other dlsbuniemeuta 6.212.99 



3!l2,n«l 4S 

8,618 59 

261.759.74 

1.4iC.0« 

:O.057.3« 
21.O00.9* 



Total disbursemmts | T07.r>62 61 

Balance 1.38^,439.94 

LEDGER ASSETS DEC. SI, 1913. 

Mortgage loana $ 128.000. 0* 

Book value of bonds and stocks 1.090.755.oe 

Cash in office, trust companies and 

»>*nks 68.S10.89 

Ageuts' balani-es, unpaid premiums and 

bills receivable, taken fur premluina.. 97,874.0t 



Total ledger amets (as per balance).. $ 1,385 439 94 
NON-LEDGER ASSETS. 

Interest and rents due and accrued | 6,182 87 

AU other non-ledger asseta '40o!oO 



Gross assets $ I..-i»2,02S.ai 

DEDUCT ASSETS NOT ADMITTED. 

Agents' balances ai d bilLs receivalile.8 fft jg 

Book value of ledger asseta over narkct 

value j; 8M.M 

Si>eclal depoalts. leas (3.399.64 UabOity *' 

">«^n 6.960.M 



Total aaeeta not admitted....... | 

Total admitted aasei* 

LIABILITIES DEC. SI, Itl3. 

fnpald losses and claims | 

I'ncanted premiums 

10 OM M ! ^'l'^*^- expenses, taxes. dlvUlcnds «nd 

200"oOo"oo I l"te'«t due 

-tll»,000.00 ^^^ ^„^ p^j yp -^ 



Total llnbintiea. Including capital 1 1,169,487.42 

Net auiplus 404.243.12 

RISKS AND PREMIUMS. 1913 BUSINESS. 
(a) KIre risks nrltten during Uie .vear. .$ M, 474. 008. 00 

Premiums received thereon i,o:o,393.52 

Net amount in (orre at end ot the year 

O'lre and Marine) 150,746.24800 

a— Including bualnees other than marine and in- 
land. 

BUSINESS IN MINNESOTA IN 1913. 

(Including rpinsurauce i-eireived and de<iucttr.g re- 
insurance placed.) Fire lUsks. 

lUsks written $2,148,227.00 

rremlums received 

Net losses paid 

Net losses Incurred 

Amount at risk 



60,625.61 
1.331.S97.M 

44.S61.M 

667.951.93 

15,000.90 
350,000.09 



Ty>tal Ilabllttlet, Including ctDttal. ..S l.or«.3].^.J3 

Net surplus SJ3, 084.01 

RISKS AND PREMIUMS. 1913 BUStNCSS. 
(a) lire risks written during the year. Jit". 056.758*9 

rremtums recei\td thereon 1,006.375. 8e 

Net aiuotint In force at end of tb* 

year 133.410. 7S9.99 

a. — Including business other than maiiue and in- 
land. >'li« Higka. 
BUSINESS IN MINNESOTA IN 1913. 
(Including reinsurance received and de<lucttnt r«> 
insurance placed.) Fire RIski. 

Risks wrlUen ♦ 2.482.903.0* 

26.431.88 I Premiums received 3«.53S.oe 

14,166.22 Net losses paid 18,882.00 

14.926. ;!2 Net loesos Incurred 17.757.00 

3.131.829.00 Amount at risk S.S«3,42a.90 



State of Minnesota. I>ep.inment rf Insurance. 

I Hefeby Certify. That Uie annual statement cf the 
Dubuque Fire & Marine Insurant company for the 
year ending December 31. 11(13. of which the above 
Is an abstruct. has been received and filed In this 
det>aitmcut and duly approved by me. 

J. A. O. PRErs, 
t>m>wil^loner i>f Jitsurance. 



State of Minnesota, Department of InsuratKe. 

1 TlerebT Certify. That the annual statement of th« 
Nortliern Insurance company for the j-ear eiullnc 
December 31, li'lS. of nhlch the abore la an ab- 
stract, has been received and filed in this dcpattaient 
and duly approred by met. 

J. A. O. PRGU8. 
Commlaidoner of Inauraace 



For Quick Results Use HeraMnVanls' 



^* 




-• • 



■»■ 



WHEAT TAKES 
SHAJ^JUMP 

Market Advances on Short 

Covering and Bulge in 

Coarse Grains. 



AMERICAN WHEAT MARKETS, APRIL 8, 1914. 



May — Open. 

Duluth 89b 

Minnt-apolia 

Chicago 90 H 

\Vlnntp«g^ 90 V« 

July— 

Duluth 90 lib 

Minneapolis ... .99% 

Chicago , .86 '1-86 

W'innlp«V 91^ 



.88 ^ab 

.90 Ti 

.9m 

.90% 
.86^4 
.9:iiib 



Low. 
.17b 

.87V4 
.90 % 

.90 Vi 

.89H 

.86 

.9174 



Close. 
.8»\b 

.88>,«b 
.90%a 
.9vHb 



April 
.88 



'a -89a 
.87%-^a 



.96T«-91a 
.8'>%b 
.86 4a 
.934 



.90«.4-'4 
.88T»-89b 



.91 \- Tib 



fr ago. 

.88% 

.92^-H 
.90 ?» 

.89»l-»^ 
.90 "^-^ 
.91 T» 



DULUTH DURUM MARKET. 



Open. 

May 87V»b 

July 89 



Hiish. 



Low. 



Cloae. 
.STSa 
.89n 



April 7. 
.87».Hb 
.88*/in 



Y'r ago. 

.96 ^k 



Flaxseed Trading Is Erratic 

But It Closes With 

Small Gains. 



May 

t July 

September 
October . . 



DULUTH LINSEED 

Open. High. Low. 

1.87 •*, 1.57 'i 1.56 H 

1.69a 1.69^b l.RS^a 

1.59a 1.59\ 1.59a 



MARKET. 

Close. April 7. 

l.ST^hia 1.67Sa 

1.59\a 1.59 'na 

1.69%a 1.69\,a 

1.68% 1.53 4.a 



Y'r ago, 

1.27»4 
1.29 Ti 
1.31 Vi 
1.51^ 



Duluth close: Wheat— On track: No. 1 hard. 90»ic: Xo. 1 northern. f9'4f': 
So. 2 northern. 87Sic: No. 1 northern to arrive, 89?4c: Montana No. 2 hard, 88%o: 
Montana No. 2 on track, 88^c: May. 89^40 bid; July. 90'«®91o aaked: September, 
88 '4C bid. Durum— On track: No. 1, SS^ac; No. 2. 84%c; to arrive. No. 1, 8638i- 



DalMth Board of Trade. Aprtl 8. — 
The market wa« Mtrong np to the eloae. 
May v«heat doaed '^e upi July ^^e up 
•Bd September I'.sr ■» at 88^4'. May 
darani rioved ^■^c up and JuIt 'ne up. 

Oatn cloaed ^^e up at 3«>.He. Rye 
closed nnrkaaged at 54V^9M^ae for 
tke hfHt grade*. There vraa bo mar- 
ket In harlry. 

At Winnipeg. Mar oats closed at 36« 
and .luiy :n\^^Sl'iC bid. 

Put* ou MlBueapolls Maf wheat 
rioted at 87'>4e asked aad calls at 
88c bid. 



No. 2, 84T,c: May, 87^c asked; July, 89o nominal 
arrive. $1.56=^; May. $1.57% asked; July. }l.59% 
tober. JlSSi^i asked. Oats— On track, SSVsc; to 
64'-(j»56Hc; to arrive, 64M:(ff56«.ic. 

Elevator receipts of domestic grain — Wheat 



Llnaeed — On track. $1.56 "^i; to 
asked; September, |1.69%; Oc- 
arrlvo. 36 ^sc. Rye— On track, 

24,6S1 bu: last year, 1.042 bu: 
year, none; flax, 3,498 bu; last 



-Wheat. 916 bu; last year. 2,250 bu; last year, 



oats. 1,410 bu; last year, none; rye. 2,671 bu; last 
year. 1.104 bu. 

Sbipmentjj of domestic grain 

'■"^^Etevator receipts of bonded grain— Wheat. 25.876 bu; last y^*'. /';560 bu: 
oats 1 603 bu-K year, 11.928 bu; barley. 1.896 bu; last year. 8.166 bu; ryo, 

''•'l^.iVi^.en7s o'fXnl^d'Vrain-Wheat. 603 bu; last year. 389 bu. 



^^^^^^^^^ «« ^^^^^^"^ 



The Impression that the government 
crop report had been fully discounted 
l«d to heavy short covering and buy- 
ing of wheat at the opening this 
morning, and prices advanced *»c dur- 
ing thp first ftw minutes' trading on 
excited bidding. After resting there 
for a time, further bulges materialized 
as a rosuli of the strength In the corn 
situation, and fears that the present 
cold wave might work down Into the 
winter wheat territory. There was 
also s"me talk of export business hav- 
ing been worked at Winnipeg, and 
some uneasiness was expressed on the 
score of the delay in seeding opera- 
tions through the Northwest. Opera- 
tors furthermore pointed out that 
many things may happen through the 
Southwest and Middle states to impair 
the pr-.'»ent high condition of the win- 
ter v; heat plant, and might easily 
knock from 50.00rt.O0 to 100.000.000 bu 
off the governments estimate of 662.- 
000.000. which la based on the main- 
tenance of the present extraordinarily 
high condition up to the time of har- 
vesting, nearly three months hence. 

The bulls were disappointed at the 
action of the Liverpool market, which 
only In a measure reflected yesterday's 
decline here. Expectations over there 
•are for light Argentine and world's 
shipments this week. That led to good 
sijnport and bidding for cargoes. 

Duluth operators were pleased to re- 
ceive intimation this morning to the 
effect that the grain handlers' strike 
at Buffalo had been settled. Tho 
prompt unloading of stocks afloat 
there is now assured, and that, it Is 
taken, will materially hasten the open- 
ing of navigation and the sending of 
cargoes from here down the lakes. 

Receipts were liberal today, pri- 
maries amounting to 813.000 bu against 
300,000 bu last year. Inspections at 
Duluth came to 19 cars against 20 
last vear. and there were 60 cars of 
all grains on the tracks for the day. 
A feature at present Is the renewed 
movemt.-nt of bonded grain this way. 
31 car.'* coming to hand today. 

Mav wheat opened M»c up at 89c. 
and it gained \ac more up to the clos- 
ing hour. July opened '«c up at 90 'iC 
and gained He more. May durum 
opened ^c up at 87 '•40 and advanced 
3»c more. The July option opened VsC 
up at S3c and held at around that 
flgure. 

Flaxseed Turns Strenp(. 

There was good trading in flaxseed 
throughout the session, but it was 
mostlv in small lots. Fair cru.'ihers 
support was in evidence on the weak 
spots. , ,, 

The market opened weak, and sold 
off 'uc at the start on the execution 
of considerable selling orders. Quo- 
tlons were then advanced as rapidly 
•aa they had receded until they were 
well abo-. e yesterd.-iy's close. Final 
quotations showed advances of Vic 
with the market steady. 

Foreign markets were strong. 
Buenos Aires closing '4C up; London 
ijc up at Antwerp unchanged- 
May flax opened unchanged at 
$1.57=^ and closed ^*c up at $l.57»^ 
asked. July opened Ut: off at :51.59 and 
closed Vjc *up at 8l.59ai asked, and 
the September option opened Sc off 
at 11.59 and closed V^c up at $1.59=ig 
ask^d. 

At Winnip*»g. May flax closed at 
$1.38^1 bid and July at $1.41»4. 



No. 

No. 

No. 

X«». 

No. 

No. 

No. 

Osts, 

No. 

No. 

No. 

Xo. 



Cash Sales Wcdmcs4«7- 

1 hard wheal. 1 car T , 

2 nrtrtl>erii wheat, 1 car 

9 norther!! wheat. 1 ear 

1 diirum. 1 car 

1 (lurim. 9 can 

J (luniiii. 2 cars 

1 mix?.! durum. 2 cars 



1 



1 na.x. 1 car 

I rial. 2 can 

1 nax. 1.200 bu. to arrlTO 

1 nax. I car 



.90% 

.r«fc 

.84% 

i..vm 

1 . 56 'a 
1.5BH 



MARKET GOSSIP. 



A. D. Thomson returned today from 
a month's vacation, spent In Florida 
points. He commented on the large 
exodus of Duluthlans down that way 
during the winter. 

« « * 

The Minneapolis cash market was 
Arm. with the demand very good. Most 
of the milla were in the market with 
the exception of CargiU's. Interior 
stocks in the line companies' houses 
are pretty well all in. One northern 
blue stem sold at from l*^^3c over 
May. a'»d velvet ch.aff at IVic over. 
Flour demand was better, and sales 
the last week have been quite good. 
Cash one northern wheat sold there 
at from 89«4^91'/ir. and No. 2 north- 
ern at from 87ii'a88^*c. 
• • • 

An official German report for March 
places the conditions in that country 
as follows: Winter wheat April 1. 8(J 
per cent against 78 per cent on May 
1. 1913, the condlton was winter rye 
83 per cent. Dryne.««s and warmth is 
urgently wanted by farmers. 
« • « 

Bi'oomhall cabled from Liverpool: 
"The wheat market was under influ- 
ence of moderate realizing, and open- 
ing values were »id lower, being in- 
fluenced by the weakness In New York 



A GCX5D FIRM TO SHIP 
YOUR GRAIN TO 

ATWOOD-LARSON 
COMPANY, Inc. 

Special attention given to cash 
grains. We give all shipraeots our 
personal attention. 

Dri.VTH. HIlflVKAPOiaS. 



and also Buenos Aires yesterday and 
the highly favorable government re- 
port. Following th'> opening the mar- 
ket was dull but steady There was a 
noticeable quiet demand for cargoes, 
and offering.-* of American winters 
over night were larger, but still sup- 
port was In evidence. The forcast is 
for Ugh: Argentine shipments this 
week and expectations of light world'.-? 
shipments other than from America. 
At 1:30 p. ra. prices were ^A@'Sd low- 
er. 

"Corn opened 'id higher and latet- 
July gained 'ad on better spot demand, 
fewer Plat offers aid rains in Ar- 
gentina." 

Argentine — Tonnage loading is 154.- 
000 tons, against 216.000 tons last year 
for all grains. 

The weather is favorable for field 
work In Uoumania, which Is progress- 
ing favorably. 

In Hungary the winter damage Is 
slight and the crop Is assuming a rich 
green color. 

Argentina — Estimate wheat, 1.000.- 
000; corn. 2.125.000. 

Our agtnt cables today general 
heavy rain for corn. 

Broomhall's India agent cabled that 
heavy rain Is falling in the Punjaub, 
and wheat is being damaged. 
« * • 

Baker had the following from his 
Chicago correspondent: "The trade la 
staggered at the stupendous Hgures 
on the growing winter wheat which 
indicates almost two crops In one. 
Cables come only H ® *»d lower on 
this. Freealng weather over the belt 
Is shoMn this morning which may dull 
the edge of the bears' onslaught. It 
will not be profitable to become too 
enthusiastically bearish, and it may be 
that on any decline export business 
of a large character will padS." 
« « « 

Price Current says: "Based upon 
Information secured from correspond- 
ents April 1. 3 and 4. the soil condi- 
tion is extremely favorable to the win- 
ter wheat plant, and for spring plow- 
ing and seeding. The percentage of 
seeding which has been done in spring 
wheat Is as follows: Illinois. 18 per 
cent, Wisconsin. 18; Iowa. 41; Ne- 
braska. 39. and Kansas. 100. 

".Seeding of oats In Ohio and In- 
diana Is 15 per cent; Illinois. 11; Wis- 
consin. 10: Missouri. 5; Iowa. TO; Min- 
nesota, 10; Nebraska, 13; Kansas, 88, 
and Oklahoma. 1'9. Basing the crop 
of last spring at 100. the percentage 
comparison of crop this spring Is as 
fellows: Ohio. 96; Indiana, 98; Illin- 
ois. 96; Wisconsin, 11; Missouri, 92; 
Iowa. 89; Minnesota. 98; South Dakota, 
94; Nebraska. 84; Kansas. 71 ;Oklahoma. 
94. 

"Hog slaughterings in the West for 
week ending April 4 were 335.000. com- 
pared with 4S7.000 In the preceding 
week and 471.000 in the same period 
last year," 

« * • 

Parker Paine received the following 
comment from Chicago today: "Fig- 
ure it any way possible and the of- 
ficial report of yesterday on winter 
wheat Is most bearish. Allowing for 
the natural decline In condition and a 
little loss In acreage from April to 
harvest, the total Indicated on the 
face of the report 662,000,000 bu may 
be brought down to about 620,000,000 
bu. It is claimed In some quarters 
this morning that the bureau at Wash- 
ington interprets the figures to Indi- 
cate a crop of about 610,000,000 bu 
As soil conditions are perfect the 
promise Is surely the greatest ever 
known at this date. Would caution 
against over-selling In a bear flurry, 
but on any hard spots would suggest 
quick sales." 

• * ♦ 

Primary markets report the follow- 
ing receipts and shipments today: 

\Vhfat— Receipts, 813.000 bu. last 
vear 300.000 bu; shipments. 720,000 bu, 
last vear 386.000 bu. 

Torn— Receipts. 751,000 bu, last year 
51S.000 bu- ?hlpmints. 1.235.000 bu. last 
vear 499.f'0f> bu. 

Oats — Receipts, 751,000 bu. last year 
607,000 bu: shipments, 1,589,000 bu, last 

year 568,000 bu. 

« * * 
Oulith bonded erain receipts: Wheat 
14 cars; oats. 5 cars; barley, 1 car; 
flax. 11 cars: total, 31 cars. 

• • • 

Carh of wheat received — Year 

Tuesday, ago. 

Duluth 19 20 

Minneapolis 178 1*0 

Winnipeg 182 144 

Chicago 46 132 

Kansas City, bu 32,000 14,000 

St Louis, bu 31,000 82^,000 

• • « 

Cars of linseed received — Tear 

Tuesday, ago. 

Duluth 14 5 

Minneapolis 14 24 

Winnipeg 8 26 

• • • 

Foreign closing cables: Liverpool — 
Wheat, unchanged to >*d lower; corrv 
unchanged to 'id higher. Paris — 
Wheat, i4(fJ*4c lower; flour. '.;@?ic 
lower. Berlin — Wheat, Vnc lower. Bu- 
dapest — AVheat. 3'ic higher. Antwerp 
— Wheat, %c lower. 

« * • 

Duluth car inspection: Wheat — No 1 
northern. 7; No. 2 northern, 6: durum, 
4; winter, 1; mixed, 1; total wheat, 19. 
last vear 20: flax. 14. last year 5; oats. 
6 last year 3; rye 1. last year I: total 
of all grains, 40, last year 33; on 
track. 60. 

• • • 

Duluth grain stocks, giving changes 
In three days: ,_ ^^^ 

Wheat — Western and winter. 636.000 
bu; soring. 10.114.000 bu. Increase 23.- 
OOO bu: durum. 2.151,000 bu, increase 
18,000 bu: bonded, 1,256,000 ba. in- 
crease 38,000 bu: total wheat, 14,160.- 
000 bu, net Increase 79,000 bu. 

<'oarse grains — Corn, 388,000 bu; 
oats, 3,947,000 bu. Increase 2.000 bu; 
rye. 323.000 bu. Increase 5.000 bu; bar- 



ilev 622.000 bu. Increase 2,000 bu; flax. 

fdo'mestic. l.t 24.000 bu; bonded. 3i»1.000 
bu: total flax. 1.876.000 bu. net Increase 
29,000 bu; total all grains. 21,315,000 
bu not increase 117,000 bu. 

1 ' • ♦ • 

I Clearances reported — Wheat. 288,000 
bu; flour. 27,000 bbl; together they 
equal 405,000 bu; corn. 17,000 bu; oats. 
31,000 bu. 



Corn and Wheat Bulletin. 

For tl-.e twenty-four hours eutiing at it a. m. Wadnes- 
da>, .April 8: 



vtAnotm. 



tUTV 



MiniieaiioUi . . . 

Cainpbi<ll 

Cr^okston 

l>«ir«Jt 

Mont«Tl<iao 

New I'lm 

Ph rk. K.iplds . . . 

Kiicheater 

Winnebago .... 
W.rtWiiitott .., 

.Aberdeen 

Mllbaiik 

.MllclieU 

PoUot-k 

Keiltteld 

Mtuux t'alU ... 

Watertonn 

Yaiikiim 

.\uictiia 

BtUbteau 

BovTl)ell.* 

Uickinson 

i'vhMndao .... 

Grat:on 

Jan.estowa 

Laiigdon 

I.arlmor« 

Lisbon 

Mir.ot 

NatoieoD 

Pvniblna 

WaliiMiun 

ItiUiiiSs 

JDiilutli 

{Mi'orhead .... 

1st. Paul 

llA C'rosss 

IHuma 

SPierre 

{Ilaptd rity 

3Hi.tniarck , 

lUevlls I.ak9 .. 
fGtJiKl Fork* . 

IWllliiloji 

IHiWre 

I.Milea t Ity 

j;MInncd08a ... 

liWinnipeg 

StPattlefird ... 
j+trinca Albert 
ilQu'.Vppelle ... 
JlSwift t'urreot 
i':l:;diuontOQ ... 



I8tat« cf 
Iweatbw. 



Pi. riolkly 

Clear 

Clrar 

Clear 

Clew 

.Pi. flovdj- 

nearl 

.Pt. Cloud.vj 

Cloati 

.Pi. Cloudy I 

Clearl 

Cleari 

Clear: 

.Pi. (loudyl 

Clearl 

Clewi 

Cloudy I 

near! 

Cleart 

Clearl 

Clear 

Clear 



Raln- 
falL 



Clear 

Clear! 

Clear 

Clear! 

Clearl 

Wtearl 

Clear 

Clear 

Clear 

Cleat 

Clear 

nearj 

Clearl 

Clearl 

.Pt. Cloudy I 

Clear! 

Cleari 

Clear! 

Clear] 

Clear' 

Clearj 

Clearj 

Clear! 

.......Clearj 

Ciearl 

.Pt. Cloudy! 

Clearl 

Cleari 

Clear' 

Clearj 

, Clear! 



30 
•H) 
26 
23 
34 
34 
2S 
32 
2« 
20 
36 
»i) 
30 
30 
36 
28 
30 
30 
30 

iS 
a 

30 
28 
38 
24 
-28 
28 
SO 
28 
28 
24 
40 
24 
28 
91 

30 
28 
26 
28 
28 
23 
28 
42 
34 
26 
24 
34 
84 
S« 
34 
40 



20 
16 
14 
12 
16 
18 
12 
16 
14 
14 
12 
14 
14 
12 
14 
14 
12 
13 
16 

8 

6 

8 
10 
14 
10 

4 

12 
19 
10 

8 
10 
14 
20 

8 
14 
20 
16 
18 
18 
18 
14 
12 
14 
14 
16 
18 

4 
14 
22 
14 
12 
18 
26 














• 
u 


























.01 







• 












KOl.VRK.S— Rain or snow fell over the Ohio and 
lower MlialMippi ralleys. Much colder weather pre- 
vails lu most of tile winter nheac state*. 

H. Vi. HICH.VRDSnX. 
lA)cal Forecaster. 



• — Incbes and biindredtlia. 
t— Hirheat yeatetday. lo-.vest lajt night. 
Not imluded In the arerages. 



i 



NOTf>-The arerage highest and loivest temper- 
aturea are made up at each center from tlM actual 
number of reports receired and th« average preripl- 
tatious fruic tba liumlMr of atatioti* reporting O.IO or 
mora. 



Liverpool Grals. 

Liverpool, April 8. ;5r- Wheat — Spot 
easy; No. 2 red western winter, 7s 3Vid; 
No. 1 Manitoba, 7s 3^d; No. 2, 78 2V4d; 
No. 3. 7s l^d. Futures steady; May, 
78 l*4d; July, 7s l%d; October. 78 ^id. 
Corn — Spot quiet; American mixed, 68 
7d; La Plata futures steady; July, 48 
6'id; September. 4s 7V»d. 



CHICAGO MARKET. 



Prices Rally After Response to Bear- 
ish Cntp Report. 

Chicago. April 8— Although the 
wheat market responded promptly to- 
«?*' ^? ^^^ bearish crop figures from 
Washington, prices soon rallied to a 
considerable extent. Freezing weather, 
especially In the Southwest, tended to 
Induce a good deal of buvlng. Many 
traders also were disposed to regard 
the government report as having been 
pretty well discounted in advance. Quo- 
tations after opening 14 to «ic lower, 
rallied to nearly Monday night's level 

Uneasiness over delay is seeding In 
Northwest helped to sustain the mar- 
ket. Closing prices were firm at the 
same as Monday night to ^4c off. 

Com rose on account of the absence 
of selling pressure. The few specula- 
tors who expected weakness In sym- 
pathy with wheat were qulcklv forced 
to cover. Prices opened a shade off to 
><>c up and then made a material ad- 
vance all around. 

Later the purchase of 240,000 bu of 
Argentine corn to come to Chicago In 
May had a temporary bearish effect 
The close was nervous at M'^Mc to 
%c net advance. 

Unfavorable seeding conditions put 
firmness into oats. Besides the mar- 
ket was inclined to follow the bulge In 
corn. 

Provisions went higher with hogs. 
First sales were 2i^@5c to 7>4c up 
and there was no sign of any import- 
! ant reaction. 

Wheat— No. 2 red. 92^*9 93 Vic; No 
3 red, 91».2 (ff92«^c; No. 2 hard, 90^4*® 
91c; No. 3 hard, 90»>2 1^ 90=s»c; No 2 
northern. 93(@91c; No. 3 northern, 92® 
93c; No. 2 spring, 9318 94c; No. 8 spring 
9293c. 

Corn — No. 2, 69i/i(a70c; No. 2 white 
70 Vic; No. 2 yellow, 70c; No. 3, 68 @ 70c' 
No. 3 white. 68M:@69>ic; No. 3 yellow' 
68 @ 70c. 

Oats — No. 2 white. 41fr4mc; No. 8. 
39 ^c; No. 3 white. 39*4(&40Vic; stand- 
ard. 40aic 



@t»V&c; No. 8 
Flax, 91.53% ei-6fi 

Heavy Hour sal^L were reported by 
local millers todayT^ftin was In strong 
demand. Flour — {Mwces unchanged. 
Shipments. 59,278 bbl. Barley, 43® 62c. 
Rye. 65@>56Vic. P W »i; unchanged. 



New Yovk Grain. 

Naw York, April 8 Wheat — May, 

99 ^c; July. 9 5?»(Si96^c. 

BOSTON COPPER STOCKS. 

Furnished by Gay & Sturgis, 326 
West Superior 8tre«t: 



Ldsted Stocks — 



Bid. I Asked. 



.«•.«< 



Mass. 

do 
Mass. 



{'V 



.^,v 



Adventure 
Agr. Chem 

do pfd , 

Alaska , 

A.nm66ic •••■••••■•(■ai 

Algomah 

Allouez , 

Amalgamated 

American Zinc ........ 

Arcadian , 

Arizona Commercial . , 

Boston Elevated 

Boston & Marine .... 
Butte & Ballaklava . , 
Butte & Superior . . . . , 
Calumet & Arizona,.., 

Calumet & Hecla 

Chtno Copper 

V.IIXI ••• ■■•••■••*•■••■ 

Centennial 

Copper Range 

Daly West 

East Butte 

Franklin 

Grunby Cons 

Greene-Cananeib 

Hancock Cons 

Hedley Gold Mining Co 

Helvetia 

Indiana 

Inspiration Cons 

Island Creek Coal .... 

l>'.le Royale 

Kerr Lake 

Keweenaw 

Lake Copper 

La Salle 

Mass Copper 

Electric Co 

pici ••••■•••■•••I 

Ma.son Valley 

Mayflower »...> 

Miami 

Michigan 

Mohawk Mining Co. . . , 

Nevada Cons T. . . . , 

New Haven 
Nlpissing . . 
North Butte 

Nortli Lake 

Ojibway 

Old Colony Mining Co^ 
OM Dominion ...Vt^J..» 

Osceola 

Pond Creek CoalX^V.. 
Quincy Mining Co.*!.. 
Ray Consolidated 

Santa Fe i. 

St. Marys M. Land 

Shannon <-in > 

Shattuck 

Shoe Machinery ..... 
Shoe Machinery pfd • • 
Superior & Boston.'. . 
Superior Copper . .^^. . 

Swift A Co Vi'" 

Tamarack '3. 

Trinity V^': 

Tuolumne /. t 

U. S. Smelting, coihmdn 
U. S. Smelting pfd 
United Fruit ....'. 

Utah Apex 

Utah Consolidated 
Utah Copper .... 

Victoria 

Wlnooa 

Wolverine , 

Wyandot 

Unlisted 
Arizona & 
Bay State 

Begole 

Bohemia .«. 

Boston Ely'., 

Butte Central 

Butte & London ...... 

Cactus 

Calaveras ....*....... 

Chief Consolidated . . . 

Cotus. Copper MineaCo 

Corbln Copper - ..^i ,?.>. 

Cortes 

Crown 

Davis 

Dobie 

Dome Extension 

Ely Consolidated 

First National ...'.... 
Goldfleld Consolidated; 

HoUinger 

Houghton 

La Rose 

Mines Co. 

Montana 

New Baltic . . . 
North Star — 
Ohio Copper . . . 

Oneco 

Pearl Lake . . 
Porcupine Gold 

Preston 

Raven 

Smokey Dev. . 
South Lake . . 
Southwestern 
Temtskamlng 

Tonopah ,. ., 

Tonopah Belmont , . • < 
Tonopah ExtensloA •• 
United Verde Exti.t.^, 

West End w . , 

WWettlauf er .... tj. . , 
TiiKon •••••• ••■•».«a«4 

v>. oBr^ ^ • •* • •••• * * K**-*^ 



f 



stock* 

Michigan. 
Gas 



•■; 



Reserve 
Daly . . 



of America. 



MiMnl 



1^ 
66 >^ 
»4V4 
24VS 
286 
1V4 
41 
76% 

VA 
81 

1^ 

34^4 

68 »^ 
420 

41% 

1 
UV» 
37Vb 

2 '4 
11 V» 

88Vi 

37 

18 

30 

30c 
4 

17% 

49 

19 
3^ 
3% 
7% 
4% 
3% 

11 

61 

90 Vi 
3 

23^ 

75c 

43% 

15V4 

68% 

6Vi 

27 »i 

■ 1% 

1^4 

4Va 
50 
79 

18% 
61 
22% 

1% 
36 V^ 

6% 

25^ 
55^ 

2 

29% 

106^ 

35 V^ 

3hk 
60c 
39 
47% 
1621^ 

1% 
11 
56^ 

1 

3% 
46 
SOc 



9c 
1, 

37c 

Ic 
45c 

Ic 

1 
90c 

2)^ 
90c 
25c 
11-16 
66 

6c 

5c 

3c 
2 1-16 

1% 
15% 

3 

1% 

2 
80c 

1% 
53c 
34c 

6c 
10c 

2c 
15c 
25c 

4 

1% 
14c 

6% 

7% 

2 
76c 
84c 

3c 

28 



1% 
57% 
95 
24% 
295 

1% 
42 

76% 
17 

82 
43 
3 
35 v; 

68% 
421 
42% 

2% 
16% 
38 

2% 
11% 

6% 
88% 
37% 
18% 

■45c' 

4% 
18 

49% 
19% 

*% 
t 11-16 

8 

4% 

4 
11% 
61% 
90% 

3% 

6% 
24 

1 
44 

15% 
69 
6 6-16 
27% 

1% 

1% 

4% 
51 
SO 
18% 
62 
22 7i 

2 
37 

6 

26 
66 
28% 

2% 
30 
106% 
36 

4 

70c 

39% 

47% 

163 

1T4 
11 V4 
67 
1 1-16 

3% 
45% 
65c 

15c 
lie 

1% 

1% 
42c 

5c 
47o 

3c 

1% 
95c 

2% 

1% 
30c 

1% 
66 
26c 
12c 
10c 

2% 

1% 
16% 

3% 
1 9-16 

3 

1 

1% 
57c 
38c 

1% 
10c 
16c 

60 
18c 
75c 

5 

2 
17c 

6% 

8 

2% 
77c 
86c 
10c 

2% 
29 



INJTOCKS 

Break in Canadian Pacific 

Is Feature of Morning 

Session. 



Prices Have Recovery But 

Fall Off Again Before 

the Close. 



New York, April 8. — The wld« break 
in Canadian Paciflc which carried It 
below 200 for the first time in several 
years was the chief development of the 
morning session, although it affected 
the rest of the market to only a slight 
degree. 

Later there was a recovery when 

the coalers began to show the stimulat- 
ing effect of Lackawanna's victory in 
the anti-trust suit. Reading and Le- 
high w^ere run up about a point on 
this movement, causing an increase of 
covering in other stocks. Trading was 
on a considerably larger scale, the 
forenoon total being nearly four times 
yesterday's amount in the correspond- 
ing period. 

Bonds were steady. 

Canadian Paciflc slumped violent- 
ly at the opening today on the re- 
duction of freight rates by the Cana- 
dian railway commission. It opened 
with a block of 3,000 shares at 202 to 
201%. a maximum decline of 5%. Min- 
neapolis. St. Paul & Sault Ste. Marie, 
a controlled road, lost 6 points. The 
general list was heavy, with an in- 
creased volume of business. 

Opening losses were partially re- 
trieved, Canadian Pacific rallving a 
point. Heavy foreign selling of Cana- 
dian Pacific drove it down again to 
199%, which was an incentive for re- 
newed active selling of the general 
list agaiti. 

The market began to drag again after 
its forenoon rally. No response was 
made to copper producers' figures, 
which showed a reduction in supplies 
of 13,762.000 pounds. 

Weakness of individual stocks 
caused the market to sag further. 
Texas company continued its decline, 
falling three points. 

The market closed heavy. Lacka- 
wanna Steel's large shrinkage in earn- 
iiags for the last quarter, the expect- 
ed decrease in United States Steel 
tonnage figures and dismal comment 
by steel trade Journals intensified the 
general heaviness. Union Paciflc, New 
Haven and Amalgamated lost a point 
and the coalers relinquished their 
gains. 



NEW YORK STOCK QUOTATIONS. 

By private wire to Gay & Sturgis, 
826 West Superior street. Members 
of New York Stock Ex c hatige. 

8TOCKS— 



High. I Low. I dose. 



• • • a < 



Ilfiilway Hora^ Market. 

Minnesota Trojufer. St. Paul. Minn., April 8.— 

Barrett & Zimmerman ttixHl: Better liinulrr for 

general piirp.^8e horses aiHt' draft pairs, a mimber of j 

sales being made to t^rrafx* fri)in Wisconsin. Min- 
I nesota and Upper Miolitgan. .^ay's recelpta included 
i se\«ral loads of good qu^iy bones. 

Drafters, extra -'^ - •.., 

' Draftees, choice 

Drafters, common to Boorf. . . .'. 

Farm marea and liorsen. et'fni.* 

Farm mares and liortes. Miolc* 

Farm horses, common to gijodv 

Delivery horsea •:J,>».>. 

Drtvers and saddleis. :j 

Mules, according to sixe 



. .<^^.. ..«•' 



.$15»@2]3 

. nO@I43 

. 75@110 

. 125@163 

. 95@12.5 

. 60® 05 

. 60(ifl65 

. 83(0 160 

. 73^195 



Chicago Tilvestoek. 

Chicago, .\prU 8. — Hogs— RecelpLs, 18.^00: stmng 
to 5c abo»e yesterday's average; bulk. $8.80@S.83; 
light. $8.70^8.90: mixed. |8.<N(<>8.90; beavy, |8.4U(^ 
8.87'i: rough. $8.40i88.S.">; pigs, $7.65@8.70. 

Cattle— Receipts, 11.000; ateady »o lOc hjglier: 
beeyes. $6.95@9.5.t; Texas steers. $7.23®8.30; west- 
em steers, $7.00(?8.15; stocker* and feeders, $'i.60(» 
8.10; cows and helfeis, |3.70<*8.«0; c»lTe», $7.00(8' 
10.00. 

Sheeo— Receipts. aO.OOO: strong to 10c higher; na- 
tive. $.'...'i5«s6.85; westefii. »3.Mw6.95; yearlings, 
$,5.80@T.4j. Lambs, native, J6.30«^i.l0; western. 
$6.50(aS.20. 



Alaska 

Amal. Copper 
Am. Can .... 
Am. Smelting. 

Am. Snuff 

Am. Tel. & Tel 

Anaconda Copper . . . 

Atchison 

B. F. Goodrich 

B. R. T 

Canadian Paciflc ..... 
Cai. Petroleum . , . . , 
Central Leather . . . . 
Ches. & Ohio 

C, M. & St. P 

Chino Copper ...... 

I>en. & Rio G 

j-i*n" •■•• •«••••«•■■ 
Gen. Motors 

do pfd 

Granby Con 

•Gt. North, pfd 

Gt. N'th. Ore ctfs... 

Harve.iter . 

Inter.-Met. pfd 

Kan. City Southern. 

Lehigh Valley 

Lorilard 

Mexican Petrol 

Miami Copper 

M., St. P. & S. S. M., 

Missouri Paciflc 

Mont Power 

Nevada Con 

New Haven Ry 

N. Y. Central 

Northern Paciflc . . . . 

Pacific Mail 

Pennsylvania 

People's Gas 

Pac. Tel. & Tel 

Pressed Steel Car. . . 

Pullman 

Reading 

Rep. Iron & Steel . . . 
Ray Consolidated . . 

Rock Island 

Rock Island pfd 

Studebaker 

Southern Pacific . . . . 
Southern Railway . . . 

Tenn. Copper 

The Texas So 

Union Paciflc 

U. S. Rubber 

do 1st pfd 

U. S. Steel 

Utah Copper 

Va-Car Chem 

Wabash 

do pfd 

Western Union 



25 

77% 

29Vij 

691/4 
162 
122% 

35% 

97 

27 

92% 
202 

26% 

35 

63% 

iai% 

42% 

18% 

29% 

76% 

92 

89 

1125% 

I 34 

1105% 

i 61% 



24% 
76% 
29% 
69 

162 

122 
36% 
97 

26% 
92% 

199% 

• 25% 
34% 
53% 

101 
42 
18% 
29% 
76% 
92 
89 

126 
S3% 

105 % 

I 61% 
25 



146%!144% 



♦Ex-dividend. 
1% per cent. 



25 

76% 
29% 
69% 

162 

122% 
35% 
97 

26% 
92% 

200 
25% 
34% 
53% 

101 
42 
18% 
29% 
76% 
92 
89 

125% 
33% 

105 ^i 
61% 
2« 

144% 

180 
67% 
23% 

123 
25% 
49% 
16% 
69 
»0% 

114% 
25 

110% 

123 
21 
43% 

155% 

165% 
23% 
23% 
3% 
6% 
31% 
?4% 
25% 
34% 

142 

15i» 
60% 

104 
62% 
56% 
31 

1% 

4% 

62% 

Great Northern pfd. 



180 
67% 
23% 

123 
25% 
49% 
15% 
89% 
90% 

114% 

26 

.110% 

123 
21 
4»% 

166%! 

166%tl 
23% 
23% 
3% 
5% 
32% 
94% 
25% 
34% 

l-»4% 

159% 
60% 

104% 
63% 
67 Vi 
31 

1% 
4% 

62% 



180 
66% 
23% 

121 
25% 
49% 
15% 
69 
89% 

114% 
25 

110% 

123 
21 
43% 

155% 
65% 
23% 
23% 
3% 
5% 
31% 
94% 
25% 
34% 

142 

159 
60% 

104 
62% 
66% 
31 

1% 

4% 

62% 



}i^«^>^«^k^aA^k^^^«^>^k^M^^>^M^^rf^p^»^>^^^f^»^«M^ 



— SHIP TO — 



H POEHLER CO. 

(Rstabltshed 1856.) 

GRAIN COMMISSION 

afI?(^RAPOLI9. DULUTH. 



South St. Paal L.lvestocfc. 

South St. Paul. Minn.. April 8. — Cat- 
tle — Receipts, 1,800; killer.s, steady to 
strong; steers, $5.75®8.25; cows and 
heifers. $4.75 (^'7.00. Calves steady to 
weak, $6.50619.50; stockers and feeders. 
$4.75(3)7.26. Hog.«— Receipts. 4,500; 

steady to weak; range, $8.50<&'8.60; 
bulk. $8.55. .Sheep— Receipts. 1,200; 
steady; lambs, $5.75® 7.50; wethers. 
$5.00^6.25; ewes, $4.00@5.75. 



New 

11 a 
Noon 

1 p. m. 

2 p. m. 
Total . 



York 
m. . 



Sales- 



Today. 
. . 93,331 
..141.513 
..163.813 
..176.503 
..220.300 



Tuesday. 
25,416 
41,196 
73,.705 
81.100 
111,000 



Range of prlt^es; 
Wl»e«t— Open. 



M*jr 

July . . . 

Corn — 
May . . . 
July . . . 

Oats— 
Afar ... 
July . . . 



.9oVi-% 
.SOVsM 

.«8«i Ti 
.68%-% 



High. 
.»0% 
.9ii\ 

.69>4 



.30%-% .40 



^Jnw. 

.8C 

.68V 
.08% 

.S8% 
.19^ 



none. 
.»0»»» 

.8«Ht 

.fifiV4-^4a 
.M\-%b 

.39 Via 

.35t\b 



MINNEAPOLIS MARKET. 




ANDALl, pEE & 
ELIABLE USAIN 




Wheat Is Strengthened By Improved 
Cash Demand. 

Minneapolis, Minn., April 8. — A bet- 
ter cash demand strengthened the 
wheat market at the opening here to- 
day. The market remained active dur- 
ing the early part of the day. 

Wheat — May opened 87 %c to 
high, 88=»<c; low, 87%c; closed 



MINNEAPOUS 



- DULUTH 



WINNIPEG 



bid. July opened 89»,c; high, 
low, 89 %c; closed 89 %c bid. 
No. 1 hard, 91% (g*92%c; No. 1 
ern, 89% W 9l't,c; to arrive. 
91 %c; choice to arrive. 90%c 



87 %c; 

88 %o 

90%c; 

Cash : 

north- 

89 %@ 

No. 2 



London Stocks. 

London. April 8.^«~JtKf)erlcan securities 
opened steady, but quickly turned 
downward in sympathy with Canadian 
Paciflc. A heavy tone prevailed dur- 
ing the rest of the session, and prices 
continued to sag. The closing was 
uncertain. 

■\ew York llIon»r. 

New York. April 8. — Call money 
steady, 1%#2 per cent; ruling rate, 
1% per cent; closing. 1%#2 per cent. 
Time loans weaker: 60 days, 2%@2% 
per cent; 90 days, 2% per cent; six 
months. 3@3% per cent. Mercantile 
paper, 3Vj(S)4 per c«nt; sterling ex- 
change steady, 60 days, $4.84.90; de- 
mand. $4. {6. 55. v^ommerclal bllN, 
$4.84%. Bar sliver, ,^8V^c: Mexican dol- 
lam. 45 %c. Government bonds steady; 
rallro.ad bonds, irre|piil^r. 



cofto«;' 

New York, April vS.—^^otton: Futures 
closed very steady. Mhy, 12.8tc; .luly. 
12.61c; August, 12.ifr1 October. 11.77c; 
December, 11.79c. &irot, quiet; mid- 
dling, 13.40c; gulf. 13.Ǥc. 



TTSnrr 



northern. 86%<g88%c; to arrive, 88% 



ReacfTIie 
Herald Wants 



THE PRODUCE MARKETS. 

Dalutli. 

lIISCEI.I.ANEOrS UtUlTis— 

Malaga Grass, keg 17 iu» 

Pineapples (2<;. crate " i'»« 

STIl.^WBfaiRlKS— ••" 

Florida, quart . 

Loufclatia Dints, box "•' ,••? 

CR-VNBKRRIE.**— •'•• ''• 

Fancy Jersey late red, crate . ,_ 

Eraporated. (3» pkgs), carton j" 

ORAXGl-?- ftO 96 112 IM-Sii" 250-288 

Extra fam-y S«TeU...$n. on $3.25 13.25 gqXi 

Fancy Xavels 3.00 .•!.25 3.25 a m 

Ex. Chnlce .Na^ta... 2.75 3.00 3 (w, S"?" 

OHAPB KRUn— 3U iSg 54, g. '" 

Gondola brand $1.00 (4.00 $+.00 " '"" 

Florence brand 400 4.00 4.00 

Swaallka brwid 4.00 4.50 4.75 ;:: 

LEMONS— 300s Z'gZ 

T.emon». fancy California, box |,-,.oo .1 ^ 

Lemons, extra cholc* California, box.. 4.50 ^ Lt 
Limes, fancy, box ,„. 

BANANAS— •"" 

Bftiianaa. fancy IJmon, lb /^ 

UAKREL APPLt:S- •• •"* 

Jonathan*, fancy barrel - ,. 

Ben Davis, fancy, barrel j- J 

Ben Parte, extra fancy, barrel .'^ 

Circle F litand. "" 

BOX APPLES— Ejt. Fancy. Stand. Choice. Slnale 
Stajman Wlnesap*... .$2.50 »S.40 .... *^°- 

WlnesapH 2.75 2.75 j.50 

Roman Beauties 2.40 8.40 2.M 

Spltrenletgs 2.75 2.50 2.50 

Ben I>avU 2.15 2.00 1.9a *."" 

pelaware Red* j'jg 

WHlow Twig* 2Jf0 

Black Twigs i.ra 

GREEN VEOKTABLES— 

Aauaragua, large bunches, Imz 4.25 

A.sparagua. crate j.q^ 

Asparagus, dozen 1.19 

Beans, wax. hamper §.35 

Uceta. dozei. go 

Cauliflower, crate 4.40 

Carrota, barrel stock, dozea m 

Carrots, lumper i.jo 

Celery. Califurnla. caae 6.76 

Celery. California trimmed Jumbo, doaen I.IO 

Celery. Florida, crate s.50 

Cucumber*, fancy, doaen 1.50 

Chlres. box ]{0 

]->idtve. barrel 6.00 

KndlTe. F-. by lb, pound M 

Egg plant, crate 9.S5 

Head lettuce, haiuper S.90 

Head lettuce, crate j.m 

Lettuce, l«.ir. 3 dozen, box 1.S5 



Mint, dozen 50 

Mualirouoia. pound <>0 

Oyster plant, dozeu SS 

Pepiieu. basket M 

Peppers, crate 3.35 

Pariiley. hi/thouse, dozeu 40 

Pai-sley, fancy Houtbem, doMo T5 

Pie plant, box 8.75 

Mb plant, pound 00 

RadUbas. doaeu ..,. U 

Shallots, dozen 75 

Spluavb. basket 1.73 

Sprouts, box 28 

Tomatoes. Florida. 6-lMa)i«t. %k; baaket 70 

TurulM. d()7Au .00 

VEGETABLES— 

Bagas, cwt 1.25 

Beets, cwt * 8.S5 

I'urnlpa, tub 2.S5 

Carrots, per cwt.. $2.25; washed, per tub 1.7S 

Parsnips, per c»t., |2.25; washed, per tub 1.75 

Spanish oulcus, large crates, crate 6.S5 

Fancy yellow onions, 190 lbs, sack 8.75 

Oniona. white, crate 8.89 

Fancy red onloHS, 100 Itis. sack 3.79 

New cabtage, ewt 3.25 

Brown beana, bushel 1.40 

NsTy beans, bu»hel 2.40 

Squash, pound 05 

Horaeradlsh, bbl., |7; per lb 11 

ONION SETS— 

Red sets, bushel 3.15 

White sets, busliei 3.ii 

Yellow seta, bushel 3.30 

POTATOES— 

Minnesota stock, extra fancy, per bu 05 

Sweet putatoea. genuine Jerseys, hamper l.M> 

Florida new stock, hamper 3.50 

CHEESE— 

Block Swiss, lb 17'.4 

Brick, quarter cas«, lb 18V^ 

Twins, New York state, lb 18 

Twins, Wisconsin, new 19 ',4 

Twins, WUconsiu, lo IH'ra 

Young America, lb 18>4 

Limburgcr, lb 16 

Swiss, Imported, lb 85 

Roquefort, lo SI 

Camemt«rt. dozen 3.00 

Roman.' lb 31 

Edam. Par., docen 10. .^9 

EGGS— 

Fresh, dozen 18@ .19 

Checks 10(* .io ' 

BUTTER— 

PriBts, lb 2T 

Tub, lb 26 

Flret creamery 21@ .22 

Imitation creamery 21® .'.i 

Dairy, lb not 29 

MEATS— 

Beef, native steers, lb 139 .13^ 

Beef, heifers u«r .12 

Mutton, per M) 00@ .10 

Pork loins, per lo 14(9 .15 

Veal, per lb 12@ .13 

Lamb, per lb 129 .is 

Lard, per lb nu 

FRESH DRESSED POULTRY— 

Boasters, lb 29 

Fowls, lb 20 

Cocks, lb 14 

LIVE POULTRY— 

Hens, heavy, lb IB 

Cocks 14 

Springs 19 

FROZEN POULTRY— 

Broilers 20@ 22 

Roasters 19 

Fryers I9@ .20 

Live fowls 15 

Heavy fowls 19 

Old cocks 14 

Ducks ?9 

Geese 16 

Turkeys. No. 1 22^ 21 

Turkeys. No. 2 179 .19 

HAY— 

No. 1 Umothy, per ton 813.00ffn.50 

No. 2 Umothy, per ton U.OOCa' \J.(iO 

No. 1 mixed timothy, per ton 10.00@!2.00 

No. 2 mixed thnothy. per ton 9.00® 10. .'iO 

Choice tlmotliy, per ton 11.00 

No. 1 prairie, per ton.... 11.00@12.00 

No. 2 prairie, per ton 8.00@10.00 

No 3 prairie, per ton 6.00@ 7.00 

No. 1 Midland, per ton 7.00® 8.00 

No. 2 Midland, per ton 6.00ig' 7.f* 

Rye straw, per ton 5 . 50^ 8 . 00 

Oat straw, per ton 5.00@ 5.50 

The above Quotations Indicates those being paid ly 
the retailers to the wholesaler. 

-« 

New York. 

New York. April 8.— Butter-Steady : recelptj. 8.419 
tubs; creamery extras, 25^@20c; firsts. 2l(?2r>c: held 
extras, 22%@23c; firsts, 21S22c; process extras, 20® 
20^c; ladles, current make, firsts. 18c; seconds, lit* 
VV'C; packing stock, current make. No. 2, 15(sl5Vsc. 

Cheese— Unsettled ; receipt*, 857 boxes; state, whole 
milk, held, white specials. 19c; colored, 19(& l9V»c; 
wldte average fancy. 154fel5?tc; fresh specials, 14® 
l.)c; white. 14%@15c; average fancv. iSfel.THc; Wls- 
consiti whole milk daisies, 18V4@19c; twins and flats, 
18H^19c; sklnis, XV4@15c. 

FSes— Easy: receipts, 41.902 cases; fresh gathered 
extras 2P,i@22c; lliats. storage packed, ZOM^^lc; 
flrsu. 'l8^*@20^c; seconds, 19S19He; slate, Penuwl- 
vania and nearby hennon' whites. 20c; gatliered 
whites. 25'/4^26c; beiineo' browns, 22c; mixed colors, 

20s 21c. 

» 

Chicago. 

Chicago. April 8.— Butter— Steady; receipts. 7,412 
tubs; creamery extras. 23c; extra firsts. 24e; flrsla, 
21^22c; seconds. 19C*20c. 

Kggs — Receipts. 31.007 cases; unchanged. 

piieeae — (Xewi tfpu; daisies, 174(sl7?i*i twins, 
16<i^l6V»o; America*. I6^^169ic; loug tkMUi. le'** 

Potatoes— Receipts, 24 eais; unchanged. 
PiMiltry— Alive, uochanged. 

HIDES AlilD FURS. 



solidated's 1913 operations is. the sat- 
isfactory results attained at a load 
producer. 

The fillip given to the property tn 
its recession as a copper producer by 
the increasing lead output is shown 
In the earnings of $2.12 per share in 
1913, the largest In five years. In this 
period copper production declined from 
10.000,000 pounds to 7,700,000 pounds, 
while lead output Jumped from prac- 
tically nothing to 19,200,000 pounds. 

• <! • 

Hancock Consolidated Mining com- 
pany for the year ended Dec. 31. 
showed total receipts of S212.192; total 
disbursements of |20S,414, and aa ex- 
cess of receipts of $6,778. 

* * « 

According to a wire received by 
Gay Sturgis today the report of Ari- 
zoiia Commercial Mining company for 
the year ended Dec. 81, 1913, shows 
cash, accounts receivable, supplies, and 
securities on hand, amounting to $188,- 
000, with accounts payable of $8,71S, 
leaving a working capital of approxi- 
mately $130,000. 



STOCKS— 



Bid. Asked. 



5.00 $ 8.12 


.20 


.SO 


.29 


.to 


• • > • 


.19 


.26 


.28 


2.2fi 


Z.Tf 


.92 


.95 


.45 


.!• 


7.75 


• ■ • • 


.10 


.16 


1.6/ 


1.75 


• • • • 


9.00 


• • • • 


.55 


• • • • 


2.00 


• ■ • • 


1.60 


.60 


.70 


s.oo 


8 60 


.75 


.90 



Green Salted Hldaa- 

Steers, orer 60 lbs $0.14% .18^ 

Branded steers, over 60 lbs 13 .18 

Cows, 23 lbs and up, and light steers, 

under 60 lbs U% .13H 

Cows, 25 lbs and up. and light steers. 

under 60 lbs, branded 12H 11^ 

Bulls 18 .ll?i 

Veal calf 17H .16 

Long-haired klcs. 8 to 25 Iba 14% .19 

Veal kips 15 to 25 lbs 15 .ISVi 

Gieen hoise hides 1.50 4.06 

Green hides, l>/492c lesa. 

Dry Hides- 
Territory butchers, over 15-Iba 80 .S 

Murrain and fallen, over 13 lbs 15 .17 

Minnesota, Dakota. Wisconsin. Iowa, 

under 15 lbs 15 .I* 

Calf, under 6 lbs tO .25 

Kips. 4 to 12 lbs tt .23 

Salted, all weights 13 .15 

Horse and mule Uldst 75 1.50 

Raw FuBi — Large. Medium. Small. 

Bear $18.00 $14.00 $1000 

Bear cub 8.00 6.00 5.00 

Badger 8.50 l.M 1.00 

Civet eat 65 .... .*0 

Fisher 25.00 20.00 15.00 

Fox. stiver 500.00 350.00 200.00 

Fox, cross 30.00 20.00 10.00 

Fox. gray 2.25 1.50 1.00 

Fox. red 7.50 5.00 3.50 

Lynx „ 12.50 9.00 6.00 

Mink, dark O.DO 4.00 S.OO 

Mink, brown 5.50 3.50 2.50 

Mink, pale 4.50 3.00 2.00 

Otter, dark 20.00 16.00 12.00 

Otter, brown 16.06 13.00 10.00 

Otter, pale 13.00 11.00 9.90 

Racoon 3.50 2.00 1.25 

Skunk, black 4.60 .... »-«0 

Skunk, ahort atrlped 3.25 2.25 

Skunk, atzlped 2.50 l.SO 

SMALLliCLiNK IN 
mNIMS STOCKS 



Market Off on Light Busi- 
ness Despite Large Cop- 
per Reduction. 

The market In mining stocks at Bos- 
ton was dull and inclined to weakness 
today even In thre face of 13,762.633 
pounds decrease shown in metal stocks 
during March by the copper producers' 
report. 

Changes in quotations were only 
fractional, birt they were mainly in 
the way of declines. 

Alaska Gold closed 26c off at $24.68; 
Butte & Superior S8c \ip at $35.12; Cal- 
umet & Arizona 26c off at $68.60; 
Franklin 60c off at $6.25; Greene- 
Cananea 26c up at $37.26; Granby 60c 
up at $89; North Butte 25c up at $27.50, 
and Amalgamated Copper 87c off at 
$76.38. 

In the Duluth curb list. Calumet A 
Corbin was Arm, selling at 29@>30c. 

• 4> * 

The interesting feature of Utah Con- 



Butte-Alex Scott $ 

Calumet & Mont. Cons. 

Calumet & Corbin..... 

I Calumet & Sonora 

i Carman 

iCuyuna-Mllle Lacs.... 
• Chief Consolidated 

Cliff Mining 

Denn -Arizona 

Florence , 

Keating 

Rainbow Dev 

Red Warrior 

San Antonio 

Savanna 

01 Crig. •••••••••••••••• 

Warren 

Warrior Dev 



M-\KIXG A NEW CHIEF IX AFRICA. 

Letters describing the installation of 
a new chief in Angola. West Africa, 
have Just reached the American board. 
The new leader succeeds Kanjundu of 
Chlyuka, an able and distinguished 
native Christian. 

When Kanjundu died, even the 
heathen "old men" around said. "Only 
a good man can be chief after Kan- 
jundu." His eldest son, to whom the 
honor would naturally have gone, had 
been ruled out by the dead chief hlm- 
j self as not nt for the office. Kan- 
1 jundu's brother declined the headship, 
saying; "1 am old. I cannot go to the 
fort when they call. 1 cannot read, 
and Chiyuka Is a village of books. 
Moreover, I am not one of 'The 
Dords' (Christians), and no one but a 
Christian can be a successor of Kan- 
jundu. We look over tlie possible 
I ones and we choose Chikosi." 

So Chikosi. a nephew of Kanjundu, 
was unanimously chosen to reign in 
his stead. The members of the royal 
family sent for him and told him of 
the decision, and all the people raised 
their hands and cried "It is Chikosi 
that we want as our chief." 

The lad who had been Kanjundu's 
attendant then came forward and 
said, "The chief said, 'When I am gone 
and my successor is chosen, he is to 
receive my hymn book. Psalms, and 
Proverbs, and the Sixteenth chapter of 
Proverbs is to be read.' " So the 
chapter was read and prayer offered, 
and the books given to Chikosi. 

Then the tribes-people prepared for 
the installation ceremonies. The 
streets and villages were cleaned, the 
oxen were killed for the feast, and the 
women pounded all night so that there 
might be meal enough to feed all who 
came. The young men went to the 
new chief's house to bring him in 
triumph to his Ombala. or council 
house. The bush car which had been 
Kanjundu's was used. CtlikofJ, wear- 
ing a new gray tweed suit, russet 
shoes, and a gray felt hat, was seated 
in it. A crowd of people shouting, 
, singing and playing on musical Instru- 
ments surrounded it- Children bearing 
I bunches of wild flowers stood on each 

fside the trail, and relays of youths ran 
In front of the car to clear the way 
for the chief. 

From the ombala and the chiefs 
house the procession went on to the 
church, where a religious service was 
aeld — the first Christian installation of 
a chief ever known in Angola. 

Chief Chikosi Is said to be a fine 
looking man, about 40 years old. a 
good, speaker and evangelist, and has 
been a deacon in the mission church 
for a number of years. 

CAUSE FOR ANGER. 

Ladies' Home Journal: Mr. Wil- 
kins was near the exploding point 
when his neighbor met him on the 
street. 

"That man Tompkins." he burst out. 
"has more nerve than anyone I erer 
met!" 

"Whyr' asked his neighbor, curi- 
ously. 

"He came over to my house last eve- 
ning ^nd borrowed my gun to kill a 
dog that kept him awake nights." 

"Well, what of that?" 

"Why," shouted Mr. Wilklns. "it was 
jny dog he killed:" 

OPERATE THURSDAY 
ON S WEDIS H RULER. 

Stockholm. April 8. — King Gustaf 
of Sweden and the surgeons In attend- 
ance have fixed tomorrow as the day 
on which the operation is to be per- 
formed on his majesty, who Is suffer- 
ing from an ulcer in the stomach. 

NORTH BUTTE MINING COMPANY 
Notice Is hereby given, that the an- 
nual meeting of the stockholders of 
North Butte Mining Company will be 
held at the office of the Company at 
room 1400 In the Alworth Building, In 
Duluth. Minnesota, on Monday, 'tb« 
20th day of April, A. D. 1914, at 12 
o'clock noon, for the election of three 
Directors to hold office for three years 
and the transaction of such other bus- 
iness as may properly como before said 
meeting. 

The stock transfer books will be 
closed from April 4th. 1914. to Anril 
20th. 1914. both inclusive. 

Dated Duluth. Minnesota. March 23rd 
1914. • 

FREDERIC R. KENNEDY. 

Secretary. 
D. H.. March 26. April 1. 8. 16 , 1914. 

OFFICE OF SUPERIOR ft piTrs 

BURG COPPER COBtPANY— 
To the Shareholders: 

You are hereby notified that the An- 
ntial Meeting of the stockholders of 
Superior and Pittsburg Copper com- 
pany will be held at the office of th« 
company. Caluinet. Mich Monday. 
April 13, 1914. at 12 o'clock, noon, for 
the purpose of electing directors for 
the ensuing year and for such other 
business as may come before the meet- 

The transfer books of the company 
will he closed March 6. 1914. and will 
reopen March 16. 1914. 

By order of the Board of Directors. 
GORDON R CAMPBELL, 
_ . Secretary, 

Dated at C*lumet. Mich.. March I. 
1914. 



W. M. PRINDLE & CO., (Im.) 

INVESTMENT BONDS 

LONSDALK U.OQ., DULUTH, MINN. 



Bankers GAY & SXLJRGIS Brokers 

BvMielk Office I SM West Sapcrlor Street. 

MCMBFRS OF THE! NBW YORK AND BOSTON STOCK B.XCH.lXnES. 

Direct Private Wlrs to B«at«ii, New York, Detroit, Pittsburg, ChlcagSk, 

HovvhtoH aad Caluaet. 

Listed 8»c«Tltle« Bovtsht and Sold oa Both Exehaascs. 

SPECIAL ATTEN-nON TO LOCAL SECURITIES. 

Both PkoBcs S210. 

R. •!>. €M>ODBI'I'. IUald«Bt Maaaccr. W. J. NORTH. Aas*t. Res. Maaacer. 




« 
\ 




-gwigpi ■ju i '* 



mfmmfm^mmm't 



aj 



Wednesday, 



mmm 



THE DULUTH HERALD 




April 8, 1914. 



Tke HaHford Strana Bollrr Infipretloa 
A IitHur«M«e Compaay. 

Fritu-lral iffce: Hartfunl. roiiii. lOrsantzed In 
!»««>. I K- man B. Kraj'ierd. pr«»iil(nt: Charln !*. 
Make. s«<Trtaj>'. Atlornry to ;!>-'-ept irtricc In MiB- 
UMvtk: Cummlaaloner of iusuiaLcr. 

CASH CAPITAr,. »I OOO OOO.CO. 
INCOME IN I»I3. 
IVem'tiiiM r«fei\«<l tNet) — 

Steam l.oiter $ l.MH.i'.l.TT 

tis whw-l S1.4S2.t3 



Ttit«] net pr«mlum Inrom* | 1.J7S.7M.42 

rolJoy fets. Ins*''!""* 41,4.'0.M 

rrvm intvrwt and rrt)t» 238.919.6S 

Prtfli on sale or Diatiirlt]' of Icdfcr m- 

aets T*;.»» 



Total Inrome t 

ledger ai-:-eis I>tr. 31 uf prcTtous jear. 

8uffl $ 

OISBURSEMENTS IN 1913. 

natnu paid iN«) — 

KtCdm b<>ller f 

rir wheel 

Net paid pollryholders t 

InTe.«tlgiiiliiii and ailiustineot of rUlaw. 

t'omiiii">ions 

Saiartes cf offlcen. agents. enpIoTW. 

eiamii'.eni' and In.-spei'tkui fees 

Plv Wends to itockholders 

Iii«s on Ml* or maiurltr of ledger aa- 

»et» 

All other dtabur»emeiit» 



1 8SS.921.M 
5.3:2.422.22 

7.225.344.11 



184.:ilT25 ! 
23. MO. 37 ; 
2«8.16:i«2 
769.93 
223.S01.79 

9.10.21:..:.: I 
i:o.ito.oo , 

•lt.2« 
134.5M.9S 



Total disburaemei.fs f l.«i::6.-..^ 13 

Biiiai:oe 5.60:.691.u« . 

LEDGER ASSETS DEC. 31. 1913. i 

B'"k vaUie of real c«>tale S 90..'?«hi.0« 

M.rtsiKe li'ans 1 l!>9.34.":.0O 

B.uk value of U.nd« and slociu 3.664, JSS.M [ 

1'a.sh in office, trust cutupaniea t'id | 

bank* . 218. '.CO 43 ' 

Prenmini* hi coiiri^ of i-vUertion.* 412.XI2.66 

Cash iu i-ourae of transndaslon 22. 78?. 91 I 



TbttI le<i«er assets 'as per bal- 

itL^t) $ 5.607.691. M 

NON-LEDGER ASSETS. 
Irtere't aud rent* due and acrrued $ 77,404.77 



CrCM assets I K 683.«95.83 

DEDUCT ASSETS NOT ADMITTED. 

]*reiiuuiB» in course uf ci'llwllou (padt 

due) t 124.473.02 

Book Value of ledger aiMeta over markM 

lalue 148. 127. 20 

Spei-ial deposit. >«s $46..'^49.7S liability 

Uiemn 19.3:.0 27 



Tea! as«et« rot admitted $ 291.950.55 

Total admitted aasWs 5.393.145.21 

LIABILITIES. 

ruiirsr- 

In proi-eag of adjustment and reported.! 41.9P0.2* 

Vneanird pnniiums :.:93.028.64 

CCmmiswions a-ul brokerage S7..'>37.92 

Special lontiiigfi.t teaerre 22.429.31 

All ..ther liabilities 2.1.000.00 

I'apital stcoh paid tip l.OW.000.00 



Total liabilities. Inchidtr.g capital. S 3.419.996.15 

Surplus .^<T all liabiiitlfs l.J'i.'i.lSS.ia 

BUSINESS IN MINNESOTA IN 1913. 

Preniiuuis Rei-elved. Ix►^*es Priid. 

Steam Niler |29 29:99 I866.17 

n.v wheel »59.«8 



TTrpensfs rf adjustment of Iossm 12 1.10.00 

Couuiilsiiloivt uiid brokerage 128.683.87 

SaUil«si. fee." aiid aliowauces of offloerii, 

agcnt.s and employes 38..MS4. 71 

TaxPH. few. rents, real estate expense. 

fire patrol, etc .17.453.03 

Relumed to home offlre 910.007.49 

(lr\«a Ui-s on talr, uiatiiritT ur adjust- 
ment of ledger a.<aets 24.fi3<r00 

All other dlsburaciD«iits :o.36r>.39 

Total dlsbiiisfmwta f 1.920.573.02 

Balance 1.044.264.89 

LEDGER ASSETS DEC. 31, 1913. 

Book fitlue of boiids ai:d ."turks $ 64:.. 990.00 

I'aah in ofSce. trust ronipaides and 

bauka 303.184.10 

.^grnt..i' balances, unpaid v^'ciulnni.s and 

bills rrrcitable. taken (or premiums.. 414.938.92 

Toul ledger a^seU S 1.364.113.02 

Deduct ledger llaUlltie?. due for retn- 

s>iran<-« 319.848.13 

Net ledger aasets 1.044. ::64. 89 

NON-LEDGER ASSETS. 

Interest and rent, due and a<'(-r\ied . . . $ 8.02103 

.411 other m>n letlgrr aastxs. due on re- 
iiiaurt^l lo.-!>« 66.7:14.86 

t:ro»s waets $ 1.119.040.78 

DEDUCT ASSETS NOT ADMITTED. 

AgeiiLs' balauce« and bilK reoelvable. . $ 50*'.. 11 

IttH.k value .'f letlger a.<Mieii. o\er market 

TaUio 4.S.T1.00 

Spec'al dtpunlts. l«%s i:o liability tliers- 

on 8,700.00 

Total assets nnt admitted 9 14.037.11 

Total adujiitfd a.-<set» l.Ul.'V.OOU.67 

LIABILITIES DEC. 31. 1913. | 

rnpald looses ar.d oiainis $ 138.37."5.07 I 

I'leaiiud prepilum^ 204.745.04 I 

Salaries, e\i>enati. tales, dividends and 

lu-.ereet due 34.o0r..68 

Crntinitetil couuoissiona 3.974.10' 

l>eposll capital 200.00U.00 

Total liabilities, iiicliiding depuflt 

capital $ 381.397 89 

Net surplus 523.605.78 

RISKS AND PREMIUMS. 1913 BUSINESS. 
Marine ati.l Inlai.d risks written during i 

the vtar $?89.96.'',887,00 ■ 

I"remlum» rweived thereon 2.;00.J9.'.39 . 

Net amount in force at end of the year 

(Slaiinei 30.fi87,92:..09 ' 

BUSINESS IN MINNESOTA IN 1913. i 

{Including lelnsurant* re<«lved and deducting re- ! 
insurance placed, i Marine and Irdand. ', 

Risks written $13,836,981.00 

PremiiiniM ret-elved 24.328.00' 

Net losses paid 2.212.00; 

Net losses Incurred 6 8:7.00 

Amount at Ii^k 4.665.00 '■ 

8tate of Minnesota. D€i>artment rf Insurance.. I 

I Hereby Certify. That the annual stateraeut of the | 
Standard Marine Ii\suranc» CVmpany, Limited, for 
the .vear ending December 31. 1913. of which tbe 
above is an ahstrart. has been receiveil and filed In 
this department and duly appioved by me. 

J A O. PKKl'S, 
Commissioner of Lisuravce. 



Totals 



.830,237.07 



$866. 17 



State rf Minnesota. Pepartment of Insurance. 

I Hereby fenify. That the annual statement of the 
Hartford Steam Boiler Ii.^^peptlrn h Insurajice com- 
p«ny for the year ending Dei'eniber 31. 1913. of 
• hlo"; t!»e a^^)Te is an abstract. ti»s been received 
and rtied in tliis dcpa:tinent and duly appro\e<l 
ty s.«. J. A. O. PRKIS. 

Commisslouer of Iii'juraia-e. 

T. W. HUGO, 

RESIDENT AGENT, 
Duluth, Minn. 



floodoira Arrld^nt A»MO«ia<ioa. 

Hi-nie -fr.e-e: Liii.oin. Neb. A. U. i'aulteier, 
littfU'.tfUl : C H. Spaiiit.er. sie>.re:ary. Ir.cori.orated 
July 8. IS'Ji). C.'mraeiuvd businnc Aug. il, 1890. 
Att' rne;.' to accept sen ice In Minnesota; Commis- 
aSo! er < i Insurance. 

Bt^Aoce fR-iu pr«vlcu« year $ 221.723.14 

INCOME IN 1913. 

Membership fee* a.ti.aliy itvened $ 14.26T.5S 

fremlutui or aascssmeias 262,921.20 



Total received from members | s::, 188.75 

Deduct pavmer.ts retume-i 858.55 

Net •mout.t received from memben 2:6,33l».iO 

>'ioin all utber sourcck 10,350.85 



Total income | 286.681.05 

DISBURSEMENTS DURING 1913. 

Peafh claims laid 8 ll.;j0!i.80 

Di<aHii<y iieneUts and ttlier payments 

to members 1".3.004.87 



Total paid to members $ 164,314.67 

Coiuniiasion*, salaries to managers and 

agents 11,784.55 

Compeusstton and expenses of ofllcera 

and employes 38,11:5.13 

Ah otter dlsbuisements 49.155.83 



Tcul disbursements 8 263,:i68.17 

Excess cf income ever disbursements.... 23,312.88 

Ba:aoc« Dec. 21, 1913 245,(»38.u2 

ASSErSw 

Mntsage losns $ 161.40«.OO 

Ca»h in ofBi-e and !u baiUu 83,638.02 

Interest and rents due and accrued 6,887.28 



Total px>M assets 
Lets ipe\ iai (iei;i'..sii3. 



251.923.30 
2.0C9.00 



TusI admttt«d assets 

LIABILITIES. 

Total death claims 

T< lal 5id( aiid accident claims.... 

Salaiies. e.\peuse^. etc 

AUvauce tremiuiEs or ^sM^ments. . 



249,925.^0 

0.000.00 
2*.17.i.0O i 

3.840.16 i 
44.457.65 j 



Trtal UablUtiea | 78.470.81 ; 

Balatice 171,454.49 

fteservo fu::d 1(0,000.00; 

Kuri'lus i u;;as--i«ned fund<.> 71.454.49 ! 

EXHIBIT OF CERTIFICATES OR POLICIES, 

BUSINESS OF I9l3. \ 

—Total Business — j 

No. Amouiii. 

In for-e De.v 31. 1512 33.465 $20.4:i.05«.'K> ' 

Written during the ytar 13. ',•22 8.:i5.100.0« ! 



Tbtal 

Ceased during ttie yew 

It fotcs Dec. 31. 1913 



In force Dec. ni. 1912 

Wilttcn during the year... 

Total , 

Cea6ed during the year 



829,i:6.130.C0 
6,.541,l'50.00 



.35,6.57 $22,634,200.00 | 

-Business in Minnesota — j 

No. Amount. I 

.1.265 ( 833.300.00 
, . 390 393,850.00 



1.226. 150.00 
268.250.00 



l3 fcrcs Dec. .■?!, I<.i3 1.348 'J,-,7,900.0« 

EXHIBIT OF DEATH CLAIMS. I 

- -Total Busir.ess — I 



No. 

Claims uiipaid Pec. 31. 1912,. 3 

ClaUus incurred duric^g the year 17 



Total 19 

Claims <.etl!ed during the year 14 

Viipaid Dec. 31, 1913 3 

— Busineai 
No. 
Claims incurred during the rear 2 



Amount. 

4.0OO.0O 

16,000.00 



I 20.000.09 

11.309.80 

6.000.00 

In Minnesota — 

Amount. 

$ 2.000.00 



Tbtal 3 $ :.0««.9« 

Claims setTle<l durinir the year. 1 1 000.00 

ri.iai.i r>>- . ;-i. ivi,'; 1 I.i'OO.co 

EXHIBIT OF SICK AND ACCIDENT CLAIMS. 

— Mai Business- 
No. Amoimt. 
Claims unpaid Pec. ri. !0i2.. 790 $ 23,.-,69.0O 
t la ims Incurred during the year 5.. *)34 753,608.87 



Total 9.384 $ 177.177.87 

Claims setrie<l during th*yemr. 3.571 153,004.87 

Unpaid Dec. 31, 1913 7.W 24. 173.00 

— Business in Miruiceota- - I 

No. Amount. I 

Claims nnpaid Per. 31. 1913.. 28 $ 820.00! 

Claims incurred during th« year 216 :.4:3.53 



Tbtal 244 8 

Claims sefTle<l during ttie year. 915 

Ibpald Dec. 31. 1913 29 

Kect>ived fn'O members tn Mituieaota 

during tiie year t 



8.29.T5S 

7.378.55 

915.00 

10,238.44 



State <t Minnesota. Pe<)Artment of Irsurance. 

I Hereby Certify. That the aniiuai statement of the 
W'.odmen Accident association for the year ending 
iHrctmber 31, 1913. of which the above is an ab- 
strari. has been received and filed in this depart- 
Bttii and duly appr. ved by me. 

J. A. O. PREI'S. 
Commissioner of Insurai;ce. 

Standard .Marine Insurance Company, 
J.lmlted. 

Principal efflfe in the fnited States: New Tork. 
N. Y. .Commenced buhiness In tlie V. S. 1&09. ) 
W. J. Rol)ert8. general manager in the I'tjlted .States, 
.^ttonicy to accept lervlce in ilinneiota: Coicmis- 
sloner of Insurance. 

DH"OSIT CAPITAI,. $2(i0.00o 00. 
INCOME IN 1913. 

Ptemium.s other liian peri«etuals $ 841.700.03 

Kenta and Intere*;* — 19.740.81 I 

Beceived f.-<^m home office.. 617!865.39 



Total income } 1,488.398.20 

Ledger as^eis Dec. 31 of previous year . 1.476,441.71 

«««■ $ 2.9«4.83r91 

OISBURSEMENTS IN 1913. 

Net smotuit |.a:d fur :i sse-i $ :48.fi50.61 



Let the OTHER 

advertiserTAKE 
ALL the chances 
— put your ad in 
The HERALD 



I'Ditrd StmtfK Health A: .4eci<lent In- 
Kuranrr Company. 

Priicipai rfflce: Saginaw. .Mich. lOrgaiiized In 
liKtO. I J. r.. Iltt iier. i>rr>ideiit : J. M. Pitcher, >e».- 
rrtao. Attorney to accept tervlce iu Miniicsul*: 
Commis>,ioner of ir.suraiicei. 

CASH CAl'ITAL. $400,000.00. 
INCOME IN 1913. 
Premiums received iN'et) — 

Acci'lcnl $ :28,:f6.07 

Health 096.5211.14 

Total net rteralum Income 8 1.125.226.21 

Policy fee* 128.37S.00 

l>oni Ir.iere-l and rtnl.« 42,131.75 

Profit en sale or maturity it ledger as- 
sets 2,797.86 

From all other sources 313.40 

Total liicome $ 1,298, 807, 22 

I>edger aiisets l>ec. 31 of pitvious year.. 1.104.440.69 

Sum $ 2,403,i;0:.»l 

DISBURSEMENTS IN 1913. 

Claims paid uNeti — 

Accident I 326.146.21 

Healih 189.819.01 

Net paid pollcylioldeni f 615,9«5.88 

hive^tlgaiicu and adjustment of claims. 4.342.33 

Pnll.y fees 128.378.00 

Cciumissiins 281,079.U2 

•Salaries of officers, agents, employes. 

examiners' and inspection fees 179.205.'4O 

D!vidend.s to stckholdere. Inc. $100,- 

OftO.OO stiKk diildends 147.946.00 

\jcisi on sale • r maturity of ledger assets 73.10 

\n other disbureemei;ts OO.ses.:;-.' 

Total dUburse<E(«t9 | 1,343.558.19 

Balance 1.059,749.72 

LEDGER ASSETS DEC. 31. 1913. 

Collateral loans $ 5.000.00 

Book value of bonds and stocks 861,990.i>9 

Cash in office, trust companies and 

ba.iks 141.623.52 

Premiums In course of coliecttoBs 48.135.21 

Total ledger a<set£ ''as per balance).. $ 1,059,749.72 
NON-LEDGER ASSETS. 
Intere«t ind lents due and accrued.... $ 17,429.26 

Gross a-ssets | J. 077, 178.98 

DEDUCT ASSETS NOT ADMITTED. 
Book vaiue of ledger assets over market 

value $ 19,215.9« 

.Special dernsit. less $1,503.65 lUbilitjr 

thereon 13.716.35 

AH other atsets uot adiuitttd 1,500.00 

Total a.sse(s not admitted $ 34,432.23 

Total admitted a.ssets $ 1,042.746.73 

LIABILITIES, 
nalma— 

Adju-ted I 11..'48.00 

In proctMi of a<Uustment and reported. 57.697.00 

Incurred but not reported 23.292.42 

ItesUted 6.9t.0.00 

Total 9 99.4.'<:.42 

l>etliict reinsurance 1.68:. 42 

.Net unpaid claims except listBlity 

claims 9:.:30.00 

r.Tpeikse^ of invest igat ion and adjust- 
ment 1250.00 

I'nearned premiums :6.19T.70 

'■oramissiotii. at;d brokerage 24.537. .",5 

Advan.e premiums (100 per cent) 27.122.49 

All otlier liaMlittcs 29.603.34 

Cspital stock paid up .• 400. COO. Oo 

Total llabUlties. Includirg capital $ 656.463 rs 

Surplus over all liaMlltle'S .?86. 283.65 

BUSINESS IN MINNESOTA IN 1913. 

rremiums KeceiTcd. Looses Paid. 
Accident and health $24,517.30 $9,116.88 

TotaU $24,517.30 19.116.88 

State of Minnesota. Pepartment of Instirance. 

I Hereby Certify. Tliat the annual sta'.ement of 
tlie I'nlted Stales Health & Accident Insurance com- 
psny for the year ending December 31, 1813. of 
which the atrave Is an aivtrait, has been received 
and filed in this depsrtment and duly approved 
by me. .1. A. O. PREUS. 

Coraml'sloner of Insurance. 

As««raaee CoaspaNy of Aaaerlca. 

Priii.-ira! office: New York, .\. Y. (Urganlzed In 
1897./ K. Bleecker Rathbone, president; Charles S. 
Corklin. secretarv-. .Attorney to accept service in 
MiunciiOta: I'ommis^loner cf insurance. 

- CASH r.XPITAI.. $200,000.00. . 
INCOME IN 1913. 

Preroiums other tiun pe:i>etua!s f 209,119.40 

Iteuts and interests 17,791.49 

Total lii'-ome 9 228,910.88 

Ledger a&sets Dec. 31 of previous year. 343.467. 79 

Sum 9 770,378.64 

DISBURSEMENTS IN 1913. 

Net amount paid for i.*i*es $ 81.408.51 

Expenses cf adjustment of looses 997. Oy 

romiiilasicns and brokersire 49.482.47 

Sslarles. fee«> and allowances of officers, 

agents and empio.''e8 7,734.49 

Taxes, fees, rents, real estate expcos*. 

fire pstrol. etc 3.611 16 

Dividend.! and interest 10,000.00 

Gross loys on sale, maturity or adjust- 
ment of ledger a-'^sets 12.002.34 

All other disbursements 3,533.73 

Total disbursements 9 170,789 71 

Balance 399.588.93 

LEDGER ASSETS DEC. 31, 1913. 

Book value of t!on<kl and stock* $ 495.687.29 

Casli in iffli'e. trusk ce>mpafiies and 

bsnks 87.634.41 

Agents balances 19,267.83 

Total ledger assets fas per balance'.. $ 309.388 93 
NON-LEDGER ASSETS. 
Interest and rents due and accrued 9 4.743.06 

Gross asrcU $ 604,331.99 

DEDUCT ASSETS NOT ADMITTED. 
Book value cf lc::ger assets ever market 
value 9 31,312.29 

Total admitted .i-ssct^ .'r . .9 552.819.70 

LIABILITIES DEC. 31, 1913. 

I'npsiil l'S<cs and claims 9 24.7L'0 00 

Ineamed pre-Dluros r.'«.:2:.13 

Taxes due , 6.000.00 

ContUijreiit lommLsflons 1.468.27 

t apilal stock paid up 200,000.00 

Total liabilttlen. Including capital 9 359.913.(9 

Net surplus 192.904. ::o 

RISltS AND PREMIUMS. 1913 BUSINESS. 
'a> Eire ri»ks written during U»e year..$ 3.1,416.837.00 

Pienilums received therton 241,862.89 

.Maiine and inland risks written during 

the year 3, 990. 0.1.'.. 00 

Premiums recrtveil thercoir 103.112.32 

Nci amoiuit iu force at eitd of th« year 

iFire and ilarlric) J6.020.SIIOO 

a.— Iiulud'iig busli'.e>i» ither than marine and In- 
land. 

BUSINESS IN MINNESOTA IN 1913. 

(IiH'uttir.R reinsurance rerelvcd and dedtictlng re- 
lnsura:;ce placed.) >1 re Risks. 

Rl«k» written 9 393.445.00 

Prrmlum's re.^ived 2.781 no 

Net k'lses p.ii.l , 2.400.00 

Net losses incurred 2,496.00 

AlEount at risk 545.443.00 

State of MinnesoJg. Pei>»rtment of Insurance. 

I Hereby f'ervtfy. TImt the annual <<tateroent of the 
.\»8'irar.<e Company • f America for the year nidi;ig 
r>ec. 31, 1913. of wliich the above U an abstract, has 
been received and filed in this depaitmcnt and duly 
aivrovcd by ma. J. A. <). PRECS. 

Cctr.mliiBlonsg o( Instuaaoa. 



I.KGAL KOT1CE9. 

AMENDMENT OFTStlCLES OF 

INCORPORATION 

— OF— 

TEHAN IRON COMPANY. 

state of Minnesota, County of St. Louis 

— BB. 

AVe, the underslgrned. respectively 
Pre.sident and Secretary of TEHAN 
IRON COMPA.N'Y. do hereby certify 
that at a special meeting of the etock- 
hoMera of said company called for that 
expressly stated purpose, held on the 
6th day of April, 1914, at the office of 
the Secretary of said company in the 
cit>- of Duluth, the followlnK resolu- 
tion was adopted by the majority vote 
of nil of the shares of said corporaiioii, 
and by majority vote of all of it's 
members, namely: 

•'URSOLVIOD. That Article V of the 
Articles of Incorporation of ."aid com- 
pany be and the same Is hereby amend- 
ed so as to read as follows: 
ARTICLE V. 

The amovint of the capital stock 
of this corporatloji ."hall be One 
Hundred and Twenty-five Thousand 
Dollars ($126,000.00), and the same 
shall be divided into one thousand 
two hundred and fifty (1.250) shares 
of One Hundred Dollars ($100.00) 
each, and the t^ame shall be sold 
either for cath «>r property or 
things of value deemed by the board 
of directors equivalent thereto, 
such determination by the board of 
directors to be final and binding 
upon the parties In interest. 

The stock of this corporation 
."hall be paid for as called for by 
the board of directors, and no 
stock which has not been sub- 
scribed for, and upon which pay- 
ments called for have not been 
made as required by the board of 
directors, sliall be entitled to vote 
or representation tn any of the 
proceedings of this corporation.. 
"RESOLVED F*L'RTHER. That the 
F'resident and Secretary of this cor- 
poration cause this resolution to be 
embraced In a certificate duly executed 
by them, under the corporate seal of 
this corporation, and approved, filed, 
recorded and published as prescribed 
by law to make said amendment effec- 
tual." 

IN WITNESS WHEREOF, We have 
hereunto set our hands and the seal of 
said corporation, this 6ih day of April, 
li>14. 

J. B. ADAMS, 

President. 
W. D. BAILEY. 

Secretary. 
(Corporate Seal, Tehan Iron Company.) 
Signed. Sealed and Delivered 
in Presence of. 
J. A. SI.NCLAIR. 
C. M. VAN NORMA.V. 



ADDITIONAL 

FROlVf RAGES 21 ancl 22 



WAlSJTiS 



LL AND 



_BUSIINESS^ANCK._ 

* 

* 

* A cres. 

a- N otes and mortgages. 

^ C Ity property. 

•.¥ H ouses and lots. 

■^ O re properties, 

•;¥ R Bnches. 



WE BUM JfcLL , 

e?o«hInge 



if- 



C all on us. 
O ur motto; 



* 

"Strict attention to ■;¥ 



^ R ents and insurance. 

H- E states managed. 

^ A bstracts furnished. 

# L oans furnished without delay. 

% X o^'"site propositions. 

if- T ou will need us. 



REAIJSTATELOANS. 

W. M. PRINDLE & CO.. 
3 LONSDALE BLDO. 



MKL. 2400— PHONES— GRAND 239. 

WE ALWAYS HAVE 

MONEY ON HAND TO 

LOAN AT 5Vi AND 6 PER CENT. 

ON REAL ESTATE SECURITY. 



W. M. PRINDLE & CO. 



MORTfJAGE LOANS. 
We are in a position to place your 
loans on most advantageous terms, at 
lowest cost. 

RICHARDSON, DAY &. CHEADLE, 
Exchange Building. 



FARM AND FRUIT LANDS. 



FARM AND FRUIT LANDS. 

(Continued.) 



I IMPROVED FARMS LOCATED | |*-.^***********>Wt*«******** 
"" "" ' "^-orn Ao. ^ FARM LANDS FOR SALE. # 

t ■ I 

% 

480 acres in Lake county, Mlnn.» Ur 



* T(:> SUIT THE MOST PAR 

* TICULAR FARMER. . ^- 
;^ * 

* 80-acre about 13 miles from the # 



LAKE COUNTY. 



# center of the city; 20 acres un- ^ , v^ 

# der cultivation; about 10 acres ^ | ;^ 

# more partly cleared; some nice * Ms 

# timber; nice stream crosses the *i^ 

# land; In good settled comn 

# good 7-room house; good u-... «' i i ur-rt^- nnr nrlcp «2 60 t»«-p acrp 

•j^ with hay fork; 4 head of cattle: •* j * acre, our price $^.60 per acre 



]^ i'i«T*"iU ''2^lA*''-l1f^^A ^«^^"unltv'^ *l* close to railroad; good soil; an ex- * 
t. l^'ll- i".A''.2^v.!f.f5L^** i°'?i""ba% *i* cellent Investment. Worth $6 per » 



^ all Implements. Price, $3,900. 

■Sf- For rent, two partly Improved # 



* 



business." 

Telephone, Melrose 58^0. 



A.VCHOR REALTY COMPANY, 

:il6-J17 Torrey Bldg., 

Duluih. Minn. 






State of Minnesota, County of St. Louis 

— ss. 

On this 6th day of April, 1914, before 
me. a Notary Public within and for said 
county, personally appeared J. B. Adams 
and W. D. Bailey, to me personally j 
known, who, being by me dul.v sworn, j 
did say that they are, respectively, the I 
president and secretary of Tehan Iron 
Company, a Minnesota corporation; that 
the seal affixed to the foregoing cer- 
tificate is the corporate seal of said 
corporation, and that the said instru- 
ment was executed in behalf of said 
corporation by authority of a majority 
vote of its members, and of Its stock 
and stockholders, and that the state- 
ments contained in said certificate are 
true, and the said J. B. Adams and W. 
D. Bailey acknowledged the said in- 
strument to be the free act and deed 
of said corporation. 

JOHN A. SINCLAIR. 
Notary Public. St. Louis County, Minn. 

My commission expires Aug. 14. I'JIS. 
(.Notarial Seal. St. Louis Co., Minn.) 



* FOR SALE. 
?^ 

* Restaurant and fixtures in down- ^ 
•* town district; owner has 3-year -* 
^ ie.i.se: good payinig business; $1,000 -,;i 

* ca.sh will handle this proposltioi>. -;^ 

* balance monthly payments. An -Jg- 

* excellent opportunity for someone. ^ 

«p jt, 

^ MONEY MAKERS FOR YOU. * 

* "^ 

* For sale— 48-rfcom hotel, cen- h 

* trally located; afways filled; in- ;if 
21 ^ooc® °^'^^ *"^ above expen3e.«i. H 
•^ $-^5; rent. Including heat, $200 yi- 

* per month. frfc6, $3,500. ?2.-'J0 ;¥ 

* ca.vh, balance Hio)>thly. 7^ 

* anchor"^^lty CO., t 

'5 216-217 Torrey Bldg. # 

^ Duluth. Minn. -;¥ 

BUSINESS CH.\NCES— IF YOU AVA.XT 
to buy a buslneae. call on us, we 
may have something listed which 
^■o"'a s"it you; we take care of all 
the details. If you want to sell j-our 
business, come to us. we have cus- 
tomers waiting for something good 
to be offered; we can sell for you. 
Central Business Exchange. 214 Tor- 
rey building. 



MORTGAGE AND REAL ESTATE 
loans; money on hand to loan at 6 
per cent In amount of $1,000 and up- 
wards, no delay. N. J. Upham Co.. 
714 Providence building. 

CASH ON HA.ND TO LOAN ON CITY j 
and farm property, any amount, low- j 
est rates, no delay. Northern Title ; 
Co.. 613 First National Ba nk Bldg. | 

CITY AND VILLAGE LOANS IN MIN- : 
nesota. Repay loan monthly; easy 
terms. Knippenberg. Commercial 1 
building. Phone 697. I 

MONEY TO LOAN— ON FIRST MORT- j 
gage; immediate answer given. See 
us. J. D. Howard & Co., Providence 
bi)lldlng. 

MONEY TO LOAN ON REAL ESTATE; 
any amount: no delay; cheap rates. 
William C. Sargent, main floor Prov- 1 
idence building. I 

$50,000 TO LOAN — LARGE AND! 
small amounts. Low rates on mort- I 
gages. Cooley &. Underbill Co., Ex- ' 
change building. 

Money at lowest rates. 
Any amount, no delay. j 

Little & Nolte Co.. Exchange Bldg. | 

MONEY TO LOAN— LOANS MADE ON 
timber and farm lands. John Q. A. 
Crosby, 305 Palladio building. 

—FOR CHEAP .MONEY QUICK— 
— See L. A. Lafsen company — 
— 214 Providence building — 

MONEY TO LOAN ON FIRST MORT- 
gages. any amount, no delay. C. L. 
Rakowsky & Co.. 201 Exch ange Bldg. 

Money to loan; any amount; low rates. 
Coole y & Underbill. 209 Exchange. 



■58- * 

-it ST. LOUIS COUNTY. * 

if, 280 acres near Burnett. St. Louis ;^ 

# fafm's within the'^ city llm'its on * ;^ county, Minn ; excellent soil, good * 
^ the Rice Lake road; will give * * roads; schoolhouse close in ^^ e ^ 

* good terms. H- 1 X- have exclusive sale. Price $8 per * 
^ "^l* acre; one-fourth down, balance 6 * 

# 80 acres in 66-18; good high * # per cent. * 

* land. Price, $8 per acre. * * _ * 

^ . #1^ AITKIN COUNTY. f 

# 160 acres near Brookston; some :^ j ^ **■ 

* cleared. Price, $12 per acre. ^ ■}(. We have 160 acres, 80 acres and ■» 
iC- *!* 40-acre tracts 3 miles from Bain, H- 



* 240 acres east of Brlmson; some it- 

* timber. Price, $3.60 per acre. * 

* 880 acres south of Aurora in * ^ 



* on the Soo railroad. Price $12 to * 
it $18 per acre; $4 per acre down, * 

# balance In five equal payments. * 



^ one tract. Price, $6 per acre; part *1^ 
mineral; terms. *!'i^ 



AITKIN COUNTY. 



it\ 



CARLTON COUNTY. 
Improved farms In Carlton coun- 






# 80 acres on road In 49-24; part * 
^ mineral In Iron belt; cheap. * 

t280 acres in 60-26. $16 per acre; 7^ 

one and one-half miles from Pall- •j^ 

j^ sade. "^ 

h 40 acres 3 miles from Aitkin. ^ 

il^ Price, $15 per acre; no mineral. * 1 j* 

# 10,000 acres in one solid body; "ff-lS 

# roads and drained, ready for set- * ; T? 
7& tiers; best colonization deal In 'Sf ' s 



^ ty, Minn., near 
•^ cheap; good soil. 
ii' to show you. 

* 

# ITASCA COUNTY. 

it- Wild land in large tracts or * 



Cromwell, very ^•> 
We would like # 



it small tracts from $8 and up; close # 
a- to railroad. il* 



# Aitkin county. 
it- 2,000 acres in 61-25; part mln- 

# eral; .suitable for colonization. 



State of Minnesota. Department of 

State. 

I hereby certify that the within In- 
strument was filed for record in this 
office on the 7th day of April. A. D. 
1914, at 9 o'clock A. M., and was duly 
recorded in Book Y-3 of Incorporations, 

on page . 

JULIUS A. SCHMAHL, E. 
Secretary of State. 



PLSINESS CHANCES — SNAP. $300. I 
furniture of six-room flat, centrally 
located on We;9t First street; mod- I 
ern; rent $35 per month; four rooms i 
rented which more than pavs rent. I 
Anchor Realty company. 216-17 Tor- 
rey building. 

FOR SALE — GOOD MILLINERY 
business In county seat, town of 2,500 
in Central Minnesota; fine territory, 
good reason for selling: cheap if \ 
taken at once. Address V 499, Her 
aid. 



* 



WHEN YOU WANT 

TO BORROW $10 OR MORE 

ON FURNITURE, PIANOS, ETC., 



MONEY ON HAND FOR 
GOOD FARM LOANS. 



* 
it 

it 

We make a specialty of all kinds it- 
of lands and positively can * 
save you money. it 



HEADQUARTERS FOR LANDS 
OF EVERY KIND. 



EBERT-WALKER CO., 
The Land Men. 
315-16 Toriey Bldg.. 
Duluth. Minn. 



it 



BUSINESS CHANCE — PARTNER 

wanted quick; one-third interest 
$250, wit.i services, party who se- 
cures this will get in monev-maklng 
legitimate business. V 396, Herald. 

BUSINESS CHANCES — FOR SALE— 
Rooming house; very desirable and 
centrally located; see us before do- 
liig anything. . Address M 443, Her- 
ald. 



has been, 
in objec- 
purport- I 



OFFICE OF REGISTER OF DEEDS. 
State of Minnesota, County of St. Louis 
— ss. 

I hereby certify that the within in- 
strument was filed in this office for 
record April 8. 1914, at 8:30 A. M., and 
was duly recorded in Book 16 of Misc., 
page 381. 

CHAS. CALLK^AN. 

Register of Deeds. 
By C. L. LCJFGRE.N, 

Deputy. 
D. H., April 8. 9. 1914. 

ORDER FOR ADJOURNMENT AND OF 
HEARING ON PETITION FOR PRO- 
BATE OF WILL — 

State of Minnesota, 

County of St. Louis — ss. 
In Probate Court. In the Matter of the 
Estate of Joseph Sellwood, Deceased. 
In the matter above entitled, the 
petition of Richard M. Sellwood for the 
allowance and admission to probate of 
an instrument bearing date January 
2l8t, 1914. purporting to be the last 
will and testament of Joseph Sellwood. 
deceased, duly came on to be heard 
before this court* at the appointed time, 
to-wlt. April 6th, 1»14, at ten o'clock 
A. M., pursuant to notice theretofore 
given, and It appearing to the court 
that before the time so appointed for 
the hearing as aforesaid there has been 
duly filed in this court certai 
tions to the allowance of said 
ed will, by one of the heirs of said 
deceased, to-wlt, Ophelia S. Leithhead, 
one of his daughters, upon the alleged 
grounds briefiy summarized as follows: 
That said purported will and testament 
was not executed by the said Joseph 
Sellwood In the manner required oy 
law to make said will valid, and that 
at the time of said alleged execution 
the said Joseph Sellwood was not of 
sound mind or disposing memory, and 
that said purported will was procured 
by undue and Illegal Influence of the 
residuary devisees therein named, a.nd 
Is not in fact the will of said deceased; 
and the satd Ophelia S. Leithhead hav- 
ing also then and there filed her peti- 
tion for the probate of a lost or de- 
stroyed will of said Joseph Sellwood. 
alleged to have been executed by the 
deceased as his last will and testa- 
ment, at some time between December 
26th. 1911. and the month of April, 1»13, 
and devising and disposing of his es- 
tate, as alleged in said petition, in sub- 
stance, as follows: That his ante- 
nuptial agreement with Martha E. 
Trlggs of date April 4th, 1910, should 
be carried out; that his debts and 
funeral expenses should be paid; that 
his grandchildren, Richard M. Sell- 
wood. Jr., Joseph G. Sellwood and 
Francis Sellwood, should have Five 
Thousand Dollars ($5,000) each, and 
that his grandchildren. Leslie .S. Leith- 
head and Jim Leithhead, should have 
PMfty Thousand Dollars ($50,000) each; 
that his nephew, Joseph Sellwood, Jr., 
should have Twenty Thousand Dollars 
($20,000), to be paid him on reaching 
forty years of age, and In the mean- 
time the income therefrom, amounting 
to One Hundred Dollars ($100) per 
month; that his niece, Lucy Sellwood, 
should have One Thousand Dollars; 
($1,000), and the residue of his estate' 
he gave, bequeathed and devised 
equally between his son, Richard M. i 
Sellwood. his daughter. La Rue 9. Mer- ' 
shon, and the petitioner, his daughter, | 
Ophelia S. Leithhead, and alleging that' 
said lost or destroyed will was the 
last will and testament of said de- > 
ceased; 

NOW, THEREFORE, by rea.ion of 
the facts aforesaid, it is ordered, that I 
the hearing set for this day upon the 
petition of said Richard M. .Sellwood | 
be and the same hereby is adjourned ; 
to May 4th, 1914. at two o'clock in the 
afternoon, and that the hearing upon 
the objections of said Ophelia S. Lelth- ' 
head to the allowance of said purported i 
will, and upon her petition for the 
allowance of said alleged lost or de- 
stroyed will, be heard before this court 
at the Probate Court Rooms In the 
Court House, In Duluth, In said County, 
on Monday, the 4th day of May, inn^ 



BUSINESS CHANCES— WANTED A 
loan of $600; will take Interested 
party in doing business with me. For 
particulars addr ess V 457. Herald. 

BUSINESS CHANCE.S— PARTY LEAV- 
ing town will sell part furniture! 
of thirteen-room rooming house ■ 
cheap for cash; very central and good 
location for anyone wishing to keep 
boarders. Address Y 410, Herald 



BUSINESS CHANCES— WE HAVE A 
client who wants a business partner- 
must be willing to do his share- ex- 
perience unnecessary: $600 required 
Central Bnsine.ss Exchange. 214 Tor- 
rey building. 

NOTICE— DON'T FAIL TO SEE US IF 
you want to buy or sell a place of 
business. Duluth Business Exchange. 
609 Torrey building. 



Bi:SINE.SS CHANCE 
loan of $500; will 
party in dairy busin 
part iculars address 

FOR SALE CHEAP 
light grocery on m 
rent; doing good 
HeraH. 

BUSI.NESS CHANCE— FOR RENT— 
Saloon in hotel, 631 West Superior 
street. Call 623 West Michigan 
street. 



S— WANTED A 
take Interested 
ess with me. For 
V 457, Herald. 

— FRUIT AND 

aln street: cheap 

business. X C, 



SHIRTS TO ORDER. 

.Shirts made to fit; 1,600 sample.x 212 

Providence building. Melrose 268 



UMBREU^RE^OVERING 

IT PAYS TO HAVE YOUR UMBRElT 
la repaired. Glngold, 126 E. Sup. St. 



BOARD & ROOM OFFERED 



BOARD. $3.76 PER 
West First streett. 



WEEK. 613 



^ you naturally want it quickly, con- 
it fidentially and at the most reason- 

* able cost. Y'ou want to feel that it 
■^ you are dealing with a company it 
it who will consider your interests, it 
it give you every advantage and ex- it 
^ tend the utmost courtesy and con- * 
■^ sideration at ail times. it 
■H- i^ 
it DULUTH LOAN .COMPANY, it 
it 307 Columbia Bldg., 303 W. Sup. St. * 
it Open all day and Wednesday and it 
it Saturday evenings. * 

* * 
i(^ii^ i^i^itit iti:-ititiiit ^i<i6iiii-i6ii^^i^ i^ii-:titT;i 

SAL.\RY— LOANS — CHATTEL. 

Take your own time to pay us — 1 
month, 3 months, '6 niontha or 1 year. 
Cheap rates anu reasonable terms. 
L-iJOK. OVER THt:yr. HATES. . 

Borrov. $10; j ou pay DacK $11.00. 

Borrow $20, you pay back $21.76. 

Borrow 4,10; you pay back $32.60. 

Borrow J40; you pay back $43.26. 

Borrow *50, you pay back $54.00. 

Rebate allowed If paid before due. 

Write, call or telephone us. 

DULUTH FINANCE CO., 

301 Palladio Bldg. Both phones. 
Open Wednesday and Satur day even'gs. 

DULUTH REMEDIAL LOA^^I ASSOCIA- 
TIUN. 
401 First National Bank Bldg. 
Organized by business men of this city 
for the purpose of loaning money In 
amounts of $10 or more on chattel se- 
curity. The only Chattel Loan Associa- 
tion in Duluth licensed by the city, 
and whose rates strictly comply with 
the charges allowed by Minnesota 
laws. 



it 
it 
* 
* 

* 



it 
it 
it 

it 
it 
* 
it 
itititit^^^iii^'i^itii-i^iiiMiitititit-^X^ii-^i^it 

itHi^i^&itiiitii^itititit-^tit^it^ititititititit 

it ^ 

k .. FOR SALE. it 

i^ it 

it TWO CHOICE 80-ACRE TR.\CTS it 
it PARTLY IMPROVED, AT MEA- * 
it DOWLANDS. SEVERAL AT- it 

it TRACTIVE PROPOSITIONS FOR it 
it DAIRYMEN. CREAMERY PRAC- * 
it TIC.VLLY ASSURED. « 

JLJ i 

* L. B. ARNOLD. * 
it LAND COMMISSIO.NER. it 
it 110 WOLVIN BUILDING, ^ 

* DULUTH. MINN. it 
it a 
ititit-^^}tit^?^ii^il^^i^ii-i^i^^^i^iii^>ii^iiit 

FOR SALE — FACTS ABOUT THE 
Southeast: Farm lands average less 
than fl7 per acre; beef. pork, dairy- 
ing and poultry make big profits; 
large returns from alfalfa, cotton, 
corn, truck, fruits and nuts; good 
local and nearby markets; ample 
rain, mild winters, enjoyable sum- 
mers; industrial openings every- 
where. The "Southern Field" maga- 



ANCHOR REALTY CO.. 

216-217 Torrey Building, Duluth. 

Both phones. 



4 * 
11* 



* 

it 

it * 

ititititii-}tit^itit'^itit7t7tititititif^i^it^>i^itit 

iti6itf^-itif:i^itititititititii^iit^ititit;i^itit 

« FOR sale:. 
* 

* A FEW CHOICE 40 AND 80- it 
it ACRE TRACTS AT MEADOW- * 
it LANDS. NEAR STATION AND it 
it SCHOOL AND ON A GOOD ROAM. # 
it EASY TERMS. # 

* 



3 



it 
itit-: 



L. B. ARNOLD. 

LAND COMMISSIONER. 

110 WOLVI.N BUILDING. 

DULUTH, MINN. 



« 



WHITNEY WALL COMPANY. 



Fine three-acre tract. Hermantown 
road. All cultivated. Good six- 
room house, barn and chicken coop. 
Price $1,100. (Tl) 



Very fine tract on Hermantown 
road, crossed by nice creek. Ninety- 
four acres; good soil and lies well. 
Make excellent five or ten-acre tracts. 
Price $2,100. (X8) 



WHITNEY WALL COMPANY, 
Torrey Building. 

FOR SALE OR RENT — 160-ACRB 
farm, with new big house, barn, etc.. 
26 miles from Duluth. 10 minutea 
from station. R. R. Forward. DuJutta. 

FOR SALE — FINE FORTY -ACRE 
tract at Meadowlands. cheap and on 
easy terms. Write S 466, Herald. 

Lands at Meadowlands on easy terms. 
Uno Ltndstrom, owner. 31 E. Mich. St. 



PRIVATE HOSPITALS 



zine and state booklets free. Charles rwiTVATP" Tini*Tr viirT^njijr ax-ttT'tvi'^ 
S. Chase. Western agent. Southern P«lVATE_HOME BEFORE AND DLR 



We make 

—FARM AND CITY LOANS— 
— Collateral and other loans — 
— UNION LOAN COMPANV— 
— 206 Palladio Building — 
— 227 Both phones. — 

WE LOAN ON ALL KINDS OF PER- 
sonal security at lowest rates. Call 
on us. 430 Manhattan Bldg., and get 
rates. Duluth Mortgage Loan Co.. W. 
Horkan. New 1698-D: Melrose 3733. 



Ing confinement, best of care by pro- 
fessional nurse; babies also cared 
for. Margaret Finkle. Call Melrose 
2464, 16 West Fifth street . 

PRIVATE HOME FOR LADIES BE- 
fore and during confinement; expert 
care; infants cared for. Ida Pearson, 
M. D., 284 Harrison avenue , St. Paul. 

MRS. B. ESCH. DOCTOR. PRIVATE 
home for women before and during 
confinement; prices reasonable. 135 
South Western av e.. St. Paul. Minn. 

Mrs. H. Olson, graduate midwife; prl- 
vate hospital and home; 329 N. 68th 
ave. W. Phones: Cole 173; Cal. 270. 



MONEY TO LOAN— HUNTERS — WE 
loan money on rlfies. shotguns, re- 
volvers; will hold »ntil next season 
before sold. Keystone Loan Co., 22 
West Superior street. 



MONEY TO LOAN — SAFE AND 
profitable investment for $500, $1,000 
or more. Your money will double. 
Ask for particulars. Address T 202, 
Herald. 



MONEY TO LOAN — LOANS MADE ON 
diamond!*, furs, watches, all goods of 
value; $1 to $1,000; lowest rates In 

. city. Keystone Loan Co.. 22 W. Sup. St. 



FLORIST 



Duluth Floral Co.. wholesale, retail cut 
flowers, funeral designs. 121 W. Sup. 



at two o'clock P. M.. at whfch time and 
place proofs shall be taken upon both 
of said purported wills and objections, 
and all persons Interested In said hear- 
ing and in said matter are hereby cited 
and required at said time and place to 
appear and be heard. 

ORDERED further; That this 
order be served by publication In The 
Duluth Herald, according to law, and 
that a copy of this Order be served on 
the County Treasurer of St. Louis 
County, not less than ten days prior to 
said day of hearing, and by mailing a 
copy of said notice to each heir, de- 
visee, legatee or Interested party at 
least fourteen days before said day of 
hearing. 

Dated at Duluth, Minn., April 7lh, 
1914. • 

By the Court, 

P. W. GILPIN, Judge of Probate. 
Attest: A. R. MORTON. 

Clerk of Probate. 
Seal. Probate Court. St. Louis Co., Minn. 
D. H., April 8. 16, 22. 1914. 



NOTICE. 
To Richard Henry Christ and Eugene 

Miles Redfield; 

You are hereby notified that a de- 
fault has occurred in that certain con- 
tract No. 192 made and entered into op 
the 23rd day of May. 1910, between 
yourselvea and the. Duluth & Iron 
Range Rail Road .Compa.ny for the sale 
to y:>u by the said the Duluth & Iron 
Range Rail Road Company of the fol- 
lowing described property to-wlt: 

All that portion of the southeast 
quarter of the northeast quarter (SU% 
of NE>4) of Section Ten (10) In Town- 
ship Fifty-three (53) North, Range 
Eighteen (18) West of the Fourth 
Principal Meridian lying west of the 
westerly right-of-way line of the Du- 
luth, Mlesabe & Northern Railway 
Company as described in a certain deed 
from the Duluth & Iron Range Rail 
Road Company to the Duluth, Mi<isaLe 
& Northern Railway Company, dated 
January 20th, 1906, and recorded In 
the office of the Register of Deeds of 
St. Louis County, Minnesota, in book 
276, of Deeds, page "*7, and containing 
32.81 acres, more ot less, according to 
the United States government survey 
thereoL ,, , \ . 

Sucb d«fauU conaists In your fallur* 



to pay as the sime became due under 
the terms of si-. id contract that certain 
installment or amount of monev, to- 
wlt: Twenty and 07-100 Dollars 
($20.07) interest due from and payable 
by you on the first day of April, 1913; 
and your further failure to pay at the 
office of the Treasurer of St. Louis 
County the sum of Eight and 88-100 
Dollars ($8.88) taxes for the year 1912. 

You are further notified that said 
contract will terminate thirty (JO) 
days after the service of this notice 
upon you, unless prior thereto, you 
make compliance with the conditions 
of tie contract and pay the costs of 
service of this notice. 

Dated at Duluth this 3rd day of 
March, A. D., 1914. 
THE DULUTH & IRON RANGE RAIL 

ROAD COMPANY. 

By L. B. ARNOLD. 
Land Commissioner. 

ORDER LIMITING TIME TO FILE 
CLAIMS AND FOR HEARING 
THEREON. — 

State of Minnesota, 

County of St. Louis. — ss. 
In Probate Court. In the Matter of the 
Estate of Olivine Lemire. Decedent. 
Letters of administration this day 
having been granted to George Har- 
ris. 

It is ordered. That the tlnu: within 
which all creditors of the above named 
decedent may present claims' aga'nst 
her estate in this court, be. and the 
same hereby'ls. limited to three months 
from and after the date hereof; and 
that Tuesday, the 7th day of July, 
1914. at ten o'clock A. M.. In the Pro- 
bate Court Rooms at the Court House 
at Duluth in said County, be. and the 
same hereby Is. fixed and appointed as 
the time and place for hearing upon 
the examination, adjustment and al- 
lowance of such claims as shall be 
presented within the time aforesaid. 
Let notice hereof be given by the pub- 
lication of this order In The Du'uth 
Herald, as provided by law. 

Dated, Duluth, Minn,, March Slst. 
1914. 

S. W. GILPIN, 

Judge of Probate. 
Seal Probate Court, St. Louis Co., Minn. 
BENJ. M. OOLDBBRO, 
Attorney for Admlnlstrfttoiv 



railway, Z 1735. Chemical building, 
St. Louis. Mo. . 

FOR SALE— 160 ACRES OF HEAVY 
clay land, 60 acres under cultivation; 
part of this Is In clover now: good 
eight- room frame house; good barn 
and well; fine apple orchard; also a 
large maple bush; 2^ miles from a 
good town with creamery; we wish j 
to get a good man on this farm at 
once and it will sell it for $5,200; 
terms will be made suitable for pur- 
chaser; this is a very fine dairy farm; 
it will pay you to come and look it 
over or write the Farmers' State 
bank, Mlnong, Wis. 

FOR SALE— IF YOU ARE LOOKING 
for a cheap farm or cheap lands for 
Investment we have several thou- 
aini. acres in large tracts In St. 
Louis. Lake. Aitkin. Itasca and Pine 
counties, that we can offer you 
fro.m $3.50 per acre and up. See us 
before you buy. Bartlett-Pearson 
company, 504 First National Bank 
building. Duluth. Minn. it?t-^ii-i^itititititi6if^itit-:^it-:tititit:<i^i.';~i» 

FOR SALE OR TRADE— 160-ACRE i t Ti-AN:Ti.-r> xo wp-v-t ^ 

farm; good soil. 20 acres under cultl- I * \\A>,TED TO RENT. « 

vatlon; river cuts across on corner; IS t* i. •. .... * 

log house and barn; five miles f rom ' * " you have a house or flat to rent. ^ 
good town; mortgage of $800 on it i * '^. ^^^^ °^ ^'^<^ *o "»^ ** in our it 
at 5 per cent for quick sale; will seL' I * **FJ55^ *^ ^'^ *'"*_ unable to «c- it 



MRS. HANSON. GRADUATE MID- 
wife; female complaints. 413 Sev- 
enth avenue east. Zenith 1226. 



LYDIA LEHTOXE.V, MIDWIFE, 2406 W 
Second stret. Phone. Lincoln 475-A. 



WANTED TO RENT 



equity for $800 or trade for good, 
light car. Write Cashier. Farmers' 
State bank, Mlnong. Wis. 

FOR SALE — CHOICE DAIRY LANDS 
near Alborn and Payne, on the main 
line of the Duluth, Missabe & North- 
ern railway; special prices and terms 
for the next tlxty days. Dairymen 
investigate. L. B. Arnold, land com- 
misLloner. 100 Wolvin building, Du- 
luth. Minn. 



FOR SALE — FORTY ACRES OF GOOD 
farm land close to Five Corners, ten 
miles from Duluth; $20 per acre; $200 
cash; also forty acres one mile from 
Munger. Minn.; close to school and 
road; $600; one-half cash. E. E. Hel- 
land, 103 Thirty-ninth avenue west. 
Duluth. 



FOR SALE— EIGHTY-ACRE FARM IN 
Carlton county, four and one-half 
miles from market; all cleared ex- 
cept ten acres of good timber; rich 
black soil, twenty acres fenced in; 
no better land in Minnesota. Address 
J 476, Herald. 



FOR SALE— WISCONSIN. THE BEST 
dairy and general crop state in the 
Union; s,ettler8 wanted; will sacrifice 
land prices to get them: ask for 
booklet about Wisconsin Central 
lanl grant Address Land Dept., Soo 
Line, Minneapolis. Minn. 



FOR sale;— 200.000 acres good Doug- 
las Co. lands. 16 to 80 miles from 
Duluth: $7 to $16 per acre, terms, ten 
years' time; prices advancing. United 
States Land Co.. Hammond Blk.. Su- 
perior, Wis. Phone Broad 292. 



ACRE TRACTS WITHIN CITY LIM- 
its. near Woodland; level land, good 
soil, good roads; take an auto ride 
with us and look them over; only 
$10 cash. $10 monthly. Fay-Schan 
Co.. 106-7-8 Providence Bldg. Both 
phones 24. 



Five farms, large and small; prices 
right and terms easy; all more or 
less improved. For information see 
W. L. Seaton, Res. 9 Mesaba place 
6th Ave. and Mesaba; phone Grand 
791; or 208 Manhattan Bulldine- 
cither phone 1998. "wuiug. 



FOR SALE— STEAM PLOW AND 
threshing outfit; also eight horses a'nd 
set of farming machinerv; and will 
locate the "buyer on homestead Ad- 
dress M. E. Greenwood. Gaylord. 
N. -D. 



FOR SALE — 160 ACRES IN SECTION 
2. 49-6 Bayfield county. Wis.; house, 
barn, fruit trees, some timber, twen- 
ty acres cleared; very low price for 
quick turn; investigate immedlatelv 
P. O. draver 441. Duluth. 



FOR SALE— EIGHTY-THREE ACRES 
of land In section 24. 62-12 has 
W.OOO feet of pine timber. ' EVni! 
Hollander, 208 W^est Lak e street. 

FOIl SALE---200 ACRES ON CLOQUEi 
rtver and Vermilion road: sixty acrri 
cleared with buildings, $20 per acre 

• Call Melrose 6826. * ' * " **®'^ *c*^e. 



FOR SALE— OR TRADE. 160 ACRES 
of good land In North Dakota; will 
take any kind of good property in 
»xclians«» Address T t8». Herald. 



it commodate our many desirable t* 
'V applicants. ^ 

it JOHN A. STEPHENSON CX>.. Z 

it 232 West First Street. ^ 

WANTED TO KE.NT— FOR THE SUM- 
mer. one three or four-room fur- 
nished flat in the East end, and one 
six-room furnished flat or hou^e in 
the East end. Wm. C. Sargent 
Providence Bldg. ' 



WAXTED TO RENT— ONE OR TWO 
furnished rooms with board in pri- 
vate family in East end, by man and 
wife, about April 15; best of refer- 
ences. Address S 486. Hera ld. 

WANTED TO RE.VT— SMALL FUR- 
nished house or cottage with gar- 

^^'ie?"^*"'^": m"st be reasonable, 
o 487. Herald. 



^^^7^^ '^^^ RE.VT— SMALL FI'rI 
nlshed flat. East end preferred: state 
terms. Addr ess B 608, Herald. 

WANTED TO RENT— TWO YOUNG 
gentlemen want board and room to 
private family. Address C 604. Her- 
ald. 



ORDER FOR HEARING ON PETlTIO>« 

FOR ADMINISTRATION— 
State of Minnesota, 
^ „ ^ County of St. Louis— ss. 

In Probate Court. In the Matter of tho 

Estate of Joseph LaRuffa. Decedent 

The petition of Carmela LaRuffa 
having been filed in this Court repre- 
senting, among other things, that Jo- 
aeph LaRuflfa. then being a resident of 
the County of St. Louis. State of Min- 
nesota, died intestate, in the County of 
St. Louis. State of Minnesota, on the 
21st day of October. 1913, leaving es- 
tate in the County of St. Louis, State 
of Minnesota, and that said petitioner 
Is the daughter of said decedent, and 
•^JVu"^ }^** letter.^ of administration 
of the estate of said decedent be grant- 
ed to S. AV Richardson of Duluth. 
Minnesota. It is ordered. That said 
petition be heard before this Court, at 
the Probate Court Rooms In the Court 
House In Duluth. in said Countv. on 
Monday, the 20th day of April, 1914 
at ten o'clock A. M.. and all persons 
interested In said hearing and in saia 
matter are hereby cited and required 
at said time and place to show cause. 
If any there be, why said petition 
should not be granted. Ordered fur- 
ther. That this order be served bv pub- 
lication In The Duluth Herald, accord- 
ing to law. and that a copy of this or- 
der be served on the County Treasurer 
of St. Louis County not less than ten 
days prior to said day of hearing, and 
by mailing a copy of this order to 
each heir and interested party at least 
fourteen days before the said date of 
hearing. 

Dated at Duluth. Minn.. March 24th 
1914. ' 

By the Court. 

S. W. GILPIN. Judge of Probate 
Attest: A. R. MORTON. ^*^*- 

Clerk of Probate. 

J* h' wh*itely""' ^' ^*'"'" ^''- ^*"**- 

Attorney for Estate. 
D. H., March 26, Aprtl 1, I, 1914. 



\ 






-i 




•^1 



Wednesday, 



THE DinLuUTH HERALD 



7-room entirely modern house, 
on 50 by 140-foot lot. on car line, 
III tiut; Mf ijthborhood. See us for 
prue and terms. 



FOR SALE-H USES^ 

* LAKESIDE HOME. 

* 

* 

* 
* 

^ 6-room modern house: smalt 
iC' p«yi.ient down, wiih balance like 
•1^ rent, buys It. Price only $2,000. 

■^ 7-room house on lot 3S by t2r»; 
:¥ mod»rn except he.it, stone fouiida- 
i^ lion: good barn. Trloe 12.500; $500 
^ cs-^h liHndles it; balance on easy 
iS terms!. 

* 

•>(■ We have exten.-»>ve list of fine 
t^ homes. See us before you buy. 

* NATIOXAI. CO-OrERATIVE 
i: REALTY ACEXOY, 

Room 1. :ioJ:.' West Superior St. 



PARK POIXT. 



WEST EN'D. 



i:- 

ic 

a- 

-** 
a* 

I' 



* 
'# 
« 
^ 
:ij 



FOR SALE— HOUSES. 

(Continued.) 



POULTRY AND EGGS 



FUR SALE. 



if- 

S? 

>^. $6,500 — Fine home on l-Iast Fourth #j 

^ street, near Seventeenth avenue; -^ • 

■k- T rooms, strictly modern; lot 69 ;? 

* by 150. H' 

« * 

»^ 



$3.750 — t>-room house on East Su- 
perior street, l.,akeside. near 
Fifty-fourth a.venue. 



$ 1.500- -7-room hou.se on East Su- 
perior street, Lakeside, near 
Fifty-fourth avenue; strictly 
modern; large lot. 



ANCHOR REALTY CO., 
-MS-217 Turrey Bldg. 
Melrosv 58i»0. c:rand 1142. i^ \ 







* 
■^ 



WHrr.NEY WALL COMPANY. 



•^ fireat big bargain in fine West 

■1^ end location. One of the finest 

* frame residences in DuUith, as 
•# soud &s brand new; oak and birch 
•^ liiiish. hot water heat; 13 beautiful 
i<- large ri'oms, suitable for two fam- 
•>(■ ilies; corner lot. 100 by 140 feet. 

* Could not duplicate this for $1;;.- 

* 000; price only $6,600. 

* 

i^ Fine new house. East end: six 

*■ lar^e, lijihi. airy rooms, facing 

ft lake; •>ak finish, hot water heat, 

if- full laundry; bine stone fouuda- 

^ tion; built-in buffet. Best new 

■jt home ever offered at such a price. 

Ti? Must sell quick. Only $3,600. 
* 

■if- WHITNHY WALL COMPANY. 

ii- Torrey Building. 

i(- Phones: «;rand 810; Melrose 13SS. 

■^ Nights or Sundays call Mel. 3430. 



--'•1 



* hXiW SALE. 

* Sumtner cottage- Living room 
ii- l€xl'4, open fire place, two bed- 
i<f rooms, kitchen. d»)rnniory sec- 
^ ond floor, 16.\3e; ten foot 
a screened-ln porches, water In 
ic house and hydrant on lawn. Ice- 
'^ house, full of ice; fine nelgh- 
^ bors; large oake, elms, bass- 
«• woods: fine bathing and fish- 
i(- ing; supplies cheap from farm 
f»i adjoining. 

if LITTLE & NOLTE COMPANY, 
ii' Duluth. Minn. 






(556) 

Nice live- room cottage. East 
Ninth street; hardwood floors, 
sewer, water, gas and electricity. 
Price $1,1'00. t^OT) 



>^ : 



FOR SALE — EICHT-ROOM IIOISE, 
modern except heal; hardwood floors 
throughout, hartlwood linish on tlrst 
floor; full basement, concrete floor; 
largtD lot; reached by Hunter's I'ark 
or Woodland cars; easy terma. Ad- 
dress D 407, Herald. 



F(»K SALE- THIS IS A SNAP, SEVEN- 
loom hotise, with water, sewer, gas, 
Ea.->1 Water street, flne lot: $1,150, 
$150 cash, balance monthly. $10. 
Harris Realty company. Exchange 
building. 

WILL SACRIFICE FOR QUICK SALE. 

large four-room house In good con- 
dition, fine location; call evenings. 



THE DULCTH HERALD IS RECOG- 
NIZED POULTUV MEDIUM. 
The Duluth Herald is the recognized 
poultry m»(Jium. It is the official pa- 
per of the poultry raisers of Duluth 
and Nortliern Minnesota. 

CIRCIL.^TION LARGEST 
RATES LOWEST 
The Duluth Herald has tlie largest 
circulatiou ol any newspaper in Minne- 
sota (outside the Twin Cities). Ita 
charcjes for classified advertising are 
less per thousand circulation than 
those of. any other paper in the state. 

C. WHITE LEOHORNS, YAIV.S $1.50 
and $2.60 per 15: $6 per 100. S. C. 
White Orpingtons. $2 and $3 per 16; 
bred for superior egg production; 
winners at Duluth, Superior, Sheboy- 
gan, Virginia, Two Harbors. H. J. 
Hammerbeck, Superior, Wis. Phone 
Ogden 628- V. 



S 



5:30 to 7:30. 
East Seventh 



Orand 
street. 



i274-D. or 913 



A good 6-room house. Sixtieth 
avenue west, one block from car 
line: very reasonable, oo easy 
terms. 



yy^.- 1^- 'C.j»->..- VX--i->cT»-7t fv-S ?c•T^rc■■S'r»-7f7»-M•«t'f..-K■ 
a- HOME BARGAINS. 
* 

* 

« 






-•4-?4Ji-s»-!i 



a- 

a- 

* 

ii- 

* 



FOR SALE— BY OWNER, FIRST- 
class property, central; rental $98.50 
per month, $10,000; $3,000 caah will 
handle thi.s; balance to suit. Call 
Melrose 3t>66. 

P'OR SALE — REASONABLE. NIXE- 
room hou.se: aritnK<d for two fam- 
ilies; also household furniture; must 
sell, party leaving city. 909 East 
Third street. 



COCKERELS, R. C. BUFF AND 
White Leghorns, S. C. R. 1. Reds and 
White Orpingtons, $1 and $1.5o each; 
hatching eggs, S. C. and R. C, K. 1. 
Reds and S. C. White Orpingtons, 
$1.50 and $2 per 15. Write 302 East 
Superior street. Phone Lakeside 119. 
W. \V. Seekina. 




UL 




April 8, 1914. 



','. =*-t: ^ 



TENANTS GO 



AND 



TENANTS COME 

Timely Herald Want Ads 
prevent vacancies and loss 
of rental income. 



ADDITIONAL WANTS 
ON PAGES 20 AND 22 



S. C. WHITE LE'JHORNS— CHOICE 
laying strain. Eggs. 76c and $1 for 
15 eggs, or $4 and $5 per 100. Cash 
with all orders. Mrs. T. J. Griltith. 
4309 London road. Lakeside 69-K. 



7-room house. Seventy-first ave- 
nue west, on Grand avenue car 
car line; water, gas, sewer, toilet; 
small cash payment, balance 
monthly. 



We furni.«h 
houses on the 
plan. 



money and build 
monthly payment 



GRAND AVENUE AGENCY, 

Corner tirand and Fifty-sixth 

Avenues West. 



FOR SALE OR RENT— BY OWNER; 
bv.»;ijtiful bungalow ?tyle home, 
bl >.,' V from car line; built last July; 
ilvo rooms and bath; oik woodwork; 
shule curtairis, stair carpet and gas 
ran^e. fine electric fixtures, stwer, 
ga». water and electric lights in; 
cost $3,100 to build; extra large lot 
worth 51,000. For quick sale will sac- 
riH.e fc»r $3,500; $1,000 cash and 
monthly payment.*, >30. Located In 
be-it residence district. See McDon- 
ald. 221 West Superior street. Room 
214. A bargain as owner is leaving 
city. 

FOR SALE. 
New 6-room house on Sixth avenue 
east, modern except heat, oak finish 
downstairs, tile bathroom. Price 
$3.200— $500 cash and the balance to 
suit buyer. 



FOR SALE— A SMALL CASH PAY- 
ment, balance like rent, one four- 
room cottage and large shed; electric 
light, etc.: Park Point. Edmont, 18 
Third avenue west. 

FOR S.\LE — NEW FOUK-ROOM 
house. 1209 East Sixth street. Call 
and investigate. 

FOR SALE— BY OWNER. TWO-FLAT 
building. Z 455. Herald. 

FOR SALE— NEW SIX-ROOM HOUSE. 
$816 West Fifth street. 



SITUATION WAWTED 

MALE 



SITl'ATKW WANTED — MARRIED 
man of 32 wishes change to office 
position: pres.-nt line requires ex- 
tensive traveling which is reason for 
desiring change to where he can 
be with family. Nine .v^ars' whole- 
sale hardware experience, in man- 
agement as well as traveling sale<!- 
man. Ha.s made good and can gl\e 
best Duluth referen<e. Wiillng to 
St irt where there is prospect of 
working u% to bis level. Address F 
494, Herald. 



Six-room house on Sixteenth avenue 
east, strictly modern, hot water 
heat. Price $4,300 — $1,060 cash. 



A. F. KREAGER. 
406-7 Torrey building. 



lit-" .'• .?• »»' ■.'• J- ji 
it- 



^^ii^a-i^a-iiiirii'i^ii^iia-i^ii^ii- 

NOTICE. ^ 

We would like to have our cus- i^ 
tomers and friends know that we it- 
have moved our office to 5407 if- 
Ramsey street, just a few doors 
east of Central avenue. 

WEST DULUTH REALTY CO.. 
City Property and Farm Lands. 



SITUATION WANTED — YOUNG MA.N 
desires position; have had fourteen 
years' experience at general office 
work and accounting; also credits 
and collections, and some auditing; 
Al references fumi.«hed. Address 
F 473, Herald. 

SITUATION WANTED BY YOUNG 
man as doorman in theater; can 
operate moving picture machine; 
A-1 references. Address V 436, Her- 
ald. 

SITUATION WANTED — BY YOUNG 
married man, A-1 accountant and 
collection correspondent; six year*' 
experience. Address. L 363, Herald. 






SITUATION WANTED — AS CON- 
struction foreman or stationary en- 
gineer: experienced; references; or 
will take any other kind of work. 
Melrose 3574. 



SITUATION WANTED — AS BAND 
sawyer; can give good references. 
Address William Hunt, Wlnegar, 
Wis. 



FOR SALE—STOP PAYING RENT— 
Buy modern duplex house. East end; 
make your home on one side and in- 
come from other will take care of 
expen.<?es, taxes and part monthly 
payment. Easy terms will handle 
deal. Zenota Realty company, 203 
I'rovidence building. 



SITUATION WANTED — CLERICAL 
position: references; high school ed- 
ucation; some experience; willing to 
learn. Address Z 393. 



FOR SALE— DOUBLE FLAT BUILD- 
mg with all conveniences, near Third 
street and Twenty-first avenue west- 
rents for $38; price $4,000 on pay- 
ments of $50t cash and $25 per 
month. B. F. Schwelger. 1932 West 
Superior street. 



FOR SALE — BEST MODERN SIX- 
room house. Park Point; shade trees 
high lot, concrete foundation, laun- 
drj- tubs, hot water heating plant 
bath, gas range; easy terms, small 
cash payment. Zenota Realty com- 
Pany. 203 Providence building. 

rOR SALeUbY owner. FIVE-ROOM 
cottage on large lot, fenced, in AVe.'<t 
end; easy terms. Address L 446, 
Herald. 



SlTl'ATIOX WANTED— BY YOUNtf 
man as chauffeur for private car or 
truck. Duluth license. Address M 
422, Herald. 

SITUATION WANTED— BY YOUNG 

man. out of doors, where there Is 

a chance for advancement. Address 
S 609. Her ald. 

SITUATK)N WANTED — WORK IN 
sawmill or sash and door factory by 
man with long experience. R. Michel, 
661 1 Bristol street. 

SITL-'aTION WANTED — EXPERT- 
enced bookkeeper wants position. 
Address M 486, Herald. 



YOU DONT HAVE TO KEEP TWO 
breeds to get eggs in winter if you 
get your stock from my winter lay- 
ing strain of white Orpingtons. Mrs. 
H. E. Abell, Steve nson. Minn . 

S. C. RHODE ISLAND RED EGGS 
from first pen Duluth 1914 show. 
This pen also won challenge cup for 
best pen in American class. 16 pens 
competing. T. H. Cornell, 4218 Lom- 
bard street. Old phone Lakeside 'J6-L. 

prTze-winning s. c. white OR - 

pingtons. Won 3 firsts. 2 seconds 
and 1 third, with 18 birds competing. 
at Fargo, N. D., 1914. Write for my 
1913 winnings. Eggs and cockerels 
for sale. Claude Gant. Bottineau, N. D. 

ROSE COMB RHODE ISLAND REDS; 
eggs for hatching; price winners; 
$1.50 for 15; $3.50 for 50; also cock- 
erels for sale. I. W. Gilleland, 607 
South 7l8t avenue west, vVest Du- 
luth, Minn. Zenith phone. Cole 145-A. 

FOR SALE— S. c! RHODE ISLAND 
Red eggs for hatching, pure' bred, 
well marked, free rangers, eggs arc 
fertile. G. E. Owen. Melrose 2679, 
ring 1. 

FOR SALE — UTILITY WHITf: OR- 
plngtm setting eggs, $1 per dozen; 
th>riughbred stock. Lindquist, 815 
Ea U Tenth street. 

HATCHING EGGS. S. C. BUFF LEG- 
horns; prize-winning stock; $1 for 
fifteen; postage extra. Buff Acres 
farm, route 3, Duluth, Minn. 

FOR SALE — S. C. THOROUGHBRED 
Rhode Island Red hatching eggs; $1 
for fifteen. 620 North Fifty -eighth 
avenue west. Cole 236-D. 



AUTOS & MOTORCYCLES wi^ 



WANTED TO BUY— WANT TO HEAR 
from owner who has modern five or 
six-room house for sale; hot water 
heat. Address T 474, Herald. 



FOR RENT— HOUSES 



FOR RENT. 




ALL KINDS OF POULTRY BOUGHT; 
non-laying hens wanted. Both 

fthones. H. J. KoUing & Co., Du- 
uth. 



S. C. WHITE LEGHORNS, WINTER 
layers: Ferris and Y'oung strain; 
eggs for hatching. 619 Lake avenue, 
Melrose 2816. 

FOR SALE— ROSE COxMBED WHITE 
Orpingtons, good strain; one Cypher 
incubator brooder; also Jewel incu- 
bator. Park 57 -D. 



98 PER CENT OF AUTO BUYERS 
READ THE DULUTH HERALD. 

The names in 'whicli automobile 
licenses were issued Miave been checked 
with The Duluth Herald'w subscription 
lists .ind it was found that 9S out of j 
every 100 people who buy cai"s read 
The Duluth Herald. 

If you have a car for sale or trade, 
offer it in this automobile column and 
you will reach practically every one 
who will buy. 



Second-hand motor- 
cycl^es; 2 good used 
machines at big bar- 
gains. We carry ac- 
cessories and sup- 
plies and repair all 
makes of motorcycles. Motorcycle Re- 
pair Shop, rear 312 West First street. 




DULUTH AUTO B-A-DIATOR AND 
Lamp Repair Works, Joe Gertner, 
proprietor. We repair burnt, frozen 
and wrecked radiators; also auto 
fenders and bodies straighteaed; work 
guarantejgd. 328 E. S up, st. Mel. 778. 

FOR SALE— !l«t«9 KISSEL tlOADSTER. 
$350. This is overhauled and in 
good shape. Kew tires; big bar- 
gain for quick sale. .Duluth Attto- 
mobile compajiy, 329 . East Superior 
street. 



I »Taiiicu to Buy — Second-nand furniture 
and stoves. Hagstrom & Lundquist. 
2110-12 West Superior street. Lia- 
coln 447-A; Melrose 5258. 

WANTED TO BUY— GOOD TEAM OV 
horses, weight 2,600 to 2.800 pound=: 
state ages and price. Write F 496. 
Herald. 

WANTED TO BUY — LARGE OR 
small tract of land for investment. 
Address I 69, Herald. 

WANTED TO BUY — A MOVING PIC- 
ture machine, must be In first class 
condition. Write C 483, Herald. 

WANTED — LAND ON CUYUNA 
range. Will buy or explore if .term* 
rig'it. Addret-s Y 493, Herald. 

WANTED TO BUY— SMALL HOUSE 
in W^est end; could pay $600 or $700 
cash. W. D. R., 5407 Ramsey street. 

WANTED TO BUY — LUMBER WAG- 
ons in good condition, cheap for 
cash. Address J 496, Herald. 

Furniture and stoves. Joe Popkin, 231 
E. Sup. St. Grand 2287-X; Mel. 6966. 

H. POPKIN BUYS "stoves AND FUR- 
niture. Grand 2337-A; Melrose 1482. 

WANTED TO BUY — IMPROVED OR 
unimproved farm lands. A 364, Herald. 

Furniture and stoves. Zenith Furniture 
store. 332 E. Sup. St. Both phones. 



CYPHERS AND BUCKEYE INCUBA- 
tors. brooders, poultry supplies and 
remedies. Send for price lists. J. W. 
Nelson. 6 East Superior street. 

FOR SALE — BARRED PLYMOUTH 
Rocks; cock and cockerels; eggs for 
hatching. C. E. Mace. 1631 East Third 
street. Duluth. 

S. C. REDS. SELECTED LAYERS, FIF- 
teen for $1; 100 for $5. F. L. Ober. 
6429 Oneida street; phone Lakeside 
66-L. 

Thoroughbred S. C. Rhd. Is. Red pullets 
for sale; hatching eggs, $1.25 set. Dr. 
Lee, 2304 Princeton, or Melrose 3909. 

FOR SALE— FIVE GOLDEN" WYAN- 
dotte cockerels, $1.26 each; eggs, $1.60 
per 15. T. J. Cute. Doran. Minn. 



Duluth Auto Tire Tl*'pair' company. We 
carry a complete stock of tires and 
sundries. Our valcaniEing guaran- 
teed. 813 E. Sup.. St. Both phones. 

FOR SALE— TWO-CY^^INDER FIVK- 
passenger Buick; flfst-class condi- 
tipn; $200 for quick sale. Melrosie 
6542. 



HORSESJ/EmCLES,JTC. 

FOR SALE — A LARGE SELECTION 
of draft and general purpose horses; 
good farm mares; guaranteed as 
represented; part time given, if de- 
sired. Mike Willette, 608 North 
Fifty-sixth avenue west. West Du- 
lut h. Cole 301; Calumne t 280-L. 

FOR SALE — FIVE YOUNG DE- 
livery and working horses, weigh- 
ing from 1,100 to 1,600 pounds each. 
•W'ill sell reasonable If taken at once. 
S. M. Kaner. 1217 East Seventh 
street. 

FOR SALE — HEAVY OR LIGHT 
drays, wagons, bttggies, etc., new or 
second-hand; all in first-class condi- 
tion. Melro.<3e 63^7; Grand 254. H. 
Miscampbell, 318 South First avenue 
east. 



_J;^OSTjAND^OU^^ 

FOUND— THE WATERBURY .SA vo- 
tary chen-ical indoor closet for homes 
without sewer connection; installed 
anywhere; absolutely odorless; 
cheaper to buy one than to build un 
outhouse. Write and I will call. W. 
F. Mafkus, West Duluth. 

LOST — RED CARD CASE CONTAINING 
two $5 bills and certificates for one 
preferred and two common shares of 
United States Steel No. S 37126 and 
No. T 10995. Owner James Law- 
rence. Write U 947, Herald. 



LOST — CERTIFICATE NO. 2876 FOR 
twenty-five shares of Butte-Alex 
Scott Copper company stock in name 
of Joseph L. Ruby. Return to Jo- 
seph L. Ruby. 519 Free Press build- 
ing. Detroit. 



LOST— CERTIFICATE NO. 41 FOR 
five shares of E. N. Nelson's Lumbei' 
company stock. Return to owner and 
receive reward. Ralph Norlund, 
6111 Wadena street. West Duluth. 



FOR SALE—THOROUGHBRED R. C. 
Brown Leghorn setting eggs, $2, fif- 
teen. Phone Melrose 5406. 



Poultry feeds, tonics and remedies. 
Tessman Bros. Co., 102-4 E. Mich. St, 



FOR SALE— JEAN DULUTH COTTON 
Ball Orpingtons, at Jean Duluth farm. 

White Orpington eggs, $1.50 for 15. 
Allen Forward, caro Forward & Co. 



Ff R SALE— BEAUTIFUL NEW SIX- 
room house, every modern conveni- 
ence, 50 by 140 feet, corner lot, near 
forty-seventh avenue east. Price 
$4,700; S.300 cash. (395. 

WHITNEY WALL COMPANY. 
Torrey Building. 

FOR SALE— GOOD 8-ROOMED HOUSE 
on St. Marie street. Hunter's Park, 
with four 25-foot lots and large barn 
suitable for chickens or dairy; very 
reasonable, on easy terms, from 
owner. A ddress K 502, Herald. 

OWNER wiLirTAKE~$500 CASH OR 
guaranteed mortgages or land con- 
tracts in exchange for $4,500 six- 
room hoj.^e. West end, modern con- 
veniences; good neighborhood. L 
467, Herald. 



FOR SALE— MODERN HOUSE AND 
lot between Twenty-first and Twen- 
ty-second avenues east, on Fifth 
street, desirable location. Melrna* 
2020. ..u*- 



SITUATION WANTED 

FEMALE 

SITUATION W^ANTED — WOMAN 
with three children, boy, 18; girl, 16; 
would like work on sm.ill farm; un- 
de-stHnd farm work; can t'lke r.-ire 
of stock and thickens. Address P 
491, Herald. 

SITUATION WANTED — MIDDLE- 
aged woman wants work in small 
family, in exchange for home more 
than wages. Address Z 497, Herald. 

SITUATION WANTED — BY YOUNG 
lady, general housework. 215 South 
Sixty-second avenue west, West Du- 
luth. 

SITUATION WANTED — BY YOUNG 
lady as stenographer, two years' law 
experience, and can use stenotype. 
References. Melrose 6659. 



SEED^OTATOES 

THE McKINLEY POTATO IS UN- 
doubtedly the best ylelder and keeper 
that can be grown in this section. 
Yielded 565 bushels per acre at Jean 
Du Luth Farm. Sorted seeds for sale 
at $1 per bushel, including sacks. 
Cloverdale Farm. Wrecsball, Minn. 






*<>R„ SALE on; ^.^^-^ TEHMS-OK 
^\\, J^^*^' 10 responsible people, 
niC»U**Ti 7-room house; best location in 
\.est end. Write A 883, Herald. 

For SALE— FIVE-ROOM HOUSE AND 
barn; water gas and stone founda- 
tion; lot 50 by 140; easy terms. 4410 
East Dodge street. Lakeside. 

FOR SALE — FLAT BUILDING LO- 
cated at 24 and 26 East Second 
street. Make me an offer. Apply 



SITUATION WANTED— BY YQUV^' 
woman, day work, threa.. ^^ys a 
week. 702 West Seco>*.5" street Call 
Grand 2012-r>. '** street, call 

STJ U^ TToN WANTED— by YOUxVG 
lady, general housework. 216 South 
Sixtieth ave nue west. West Duluth. 

SITUATION WANTED — BY RELIA- 
ble colored woman, bundle washing. 
Phone Melrose 4474. 



SITUATIO.V WANTED BY STENOG- 
rapher with five years' law exper- 
ience; references. B 354, Herald. 



SITUATION WANTED— PLAIN 8EVV- 
Ing to do. 429 Seventh avenue edet. 
Call Melrose 6938. 

situation" 

keepor or 
Minn. 



WANTED- 
nurse. H. 



-AS 
K.. 



HOUSE- 
Saglnaw, 



lOR SALF:— NEW HOUSE. MODERN, 
eight room.««, cost over $6,000; will 
take $5,000 for quick deal. $2,000 
cash, bilance to suit. Central Bu.-^i- 
ness Exchange. 214 Torrey building. 

Ff >R SALE— NEW SIX- ROOM MOd" 
ern house. East end: fin" view; ideal 
location. Call Melrose 6792. 1 

FOR S.ALE — HOUSE " AND IotTnI ' 
better bargain offered: must sell. 
Addre.^s E 192, Herald. 1 



WANTED -BUNDLE WASHI.NG, ALSO 
curtains and blankets. Melrose 2267. 



B0ATS3J\IDMM0T0RB0ATS 

FOR SALE— A B A R«lafr^OR''QUirK 
sale, 36-foot launch; 7-foot beam- 
glass cabin; 24 H. P. St. Paul engine" 
in good condition. Address V 4 78 
Herald. 



ii- 
it- 



ALL MINERAL RIGHTS 
DELIVERED. 



a- 

i6 

it- 
it- 
ii- 

* 



FOR SALE — A BARGAIN; $200 BUYS 
a fine team of horses weighing 
3.000 pounds, harness and wagon, 
all in excellent condition. Call 
Melrose 1999. 



FOR SALE— DRAFT. GENERAL PUR- 
pose and driving Jio'rses. Wc have a 
select bunch to <;hoose from and 
guarantee them X6' be just as repre- 
sented In every respect. Western 
Sales Stables. 26-28 East First street. 

HORSES— GOOp— HORSES, 
Large selection to choose from; buy 
from a reliable firm; fair treatment. 
Zenith Sale & Boarding Stable. 524 
West First street. 



FOR SALE — GOOD HORSE; JUST 
from the farm; weighs about 1,000 
pounds; just right for delivery; will 
drive single or double. See A. Le- 
vine, 220 Bast Second street. 



LOST— BETWEEN ELECTRIC LIGHT 
plant and Fourth a%'enue east and 
Fourth street, $15 in bills. Return 
to Welhaven, Oak Hall Clothing 
company. 



LOST— SUNDAY MORNING STRING 
of gold beads between Fifth avenue 
east and Seventh street and Ninth 
avenue east and First street. Re- 
turn to J. B. Erd, jeweler. 

LOST— BETWEEN DULUTH -EDISON 
Electric company and postoffice, $3, 
belonging to poor boy. Finder call 
Grand 2277-Y. 

LOST— VALUABLE ENGLISH BRIN- 
dle bulldog. Finder call Lakeside 
71-K, for reward. 

FOUND — TWO IRISH SETTERS^ 
male and female; owner call at No. 
1 fire hall, ask for Mcintosh. 



WATCHES REPAIRED 



Bring your watch to Garon Bros, to 
have it repaired right. 217 W. 1st st. 



RAILROAD TIME TABLES^ 

Duluth & Iron Range Rail Road. 

"VeimUI*n Rovtc.'' 



FOR SALE— DRAFT AND EXPRESS 
chunks, farm mares, at our new barn, 
near depot. Carlton Horse Market, 
Carlton, Minn. 



HVIXSTH— 



LeaT*. 



HORSES— GUARANTEED— HORSES. 
All classes of fresh country horses, 
free from exposure to the diseases 
of city markets. Twin Ports Horse 
Market, 18 First avenue west. 



* 
* 
« 
* 



320 ACRES 
IN AITKIN COUN-TY, MINN., 

4 miles northeast of Fleming Lake, 

5 miles south of Palisade, on the 

Soo Railroad. 

$12 PER AQ^J-; 

$2,080 firstj ;,^rr;ient, balance in 

three years. 

.v'hen you want good farm land 

with mineral delivered, see us or 

write. We have men In the field 

who know iron. 



Ait1t>. 

tll:30m.lll. 
• S:SSr.ra. 
fiO:i»».n. 
xl0:4dp.iii. 



Katf* Rl»«r, Two Htrborg, • 7:38«.in. 
Tower, Ely, Wliitou. Au- f 3:IS*.m, 
rora. Bhvablk, McKliUey. ill :30p.m. 
Sparta. BTeletli, Gllbeit, 
Virginia. 

•—Dally. t— Dally «capt Sunday. t— ^*timl 
train leaves dally from Fifteenth Avenue East StaUon. 
•—Mixed train arrives dally except Sunday at Fif- 
teenth Avenue IJast Station, x— Arrives Unloe Demi 
Sunday only. ^^ 



ALVORD & ALVORD, 
Superior, Wis. 



FOR SALE— CHEAP, SINGLE DELIV 
ery outfit, con.sisting of hor.se, 
sleigh, wagon, harness, blanket and 
weight. Peyton Papfif company, 22^% 
24 West M i^bigoti street. 

FOf^ SAT.e' — FARM MARE, 1,250 
pounds, wagon and harness for $150. 
Call at 115 Mi West Second street. 

FOR RENT — BARN, TWO STALLS. 
$5 per month. Call 427 East Fourth 
street. Grand 1183-D. 

FOR SALE— CHEAP, HORSE, HAR- 
ne?s and buggy. 326 North Fifty- 
ninth avenue west. 

FOR SALE— HORSES AT 906 W^EST 
Fifth street. Herb, Inch. 

FOR SALE— BARN, 30 BY «0. CALL 
1011 West Fifth street. 



DULUTH, MISSABE & NORTHERN 
RAILWAY. 

Office I 436 West Superior St., 
Phones, »69. 



UMt«. 



Anlve. 



WANTED TO EXCHANGE. 

FOR SALE OR TRADE— CITY PROP- 
erty for 320-acrc farm in Saskatche- 
wan valley, near Velfeazo, one hiile 
from school, one mile from river; 160 
acres ready for seed; good buildings. 
Inquire T. Shoveln, Proctor, Minn. 
Old phone 61 J-3. 

WANTED TO EXCHANGE — LOT 
with all Improvements on good 
street In East end for good Park ' 
Point lot or Fond du Lac. Write D 
490, Herald. 

WANTED TO EXCH.^NGE — FOrVY- 
acre tract of land near Ad(«lph as 
part payment on house In city. Call 
2122 West Fourth street. 



_JORJALE— COWS^_ 

FOR SALE— M. LEVL\'E WILL AR- 
rlve with a carlrtad of fresh milch 
cows Thur.«iday. April 9. 821 Fourth 
avenue east. GrAlid 1708-D; Melrose 
4702. 

FOR SALE— A NUMBER OF FRESH 
milch coWs just arHved. Will buy 
or exchange for beef cows. Call S. 
Wlddes, 2218 Wfest Ninth street. 
Grand 2294-A; M^lrt>sie 4326. 



•7tfMn 



*i:50pAi 



*7:S8pm 



r Hlbbtnc, ChislioUn, Virginia. ISve- 1 
• leth. Coleralne, Sharon. tMoun- *3 3lni 
tain Iron, Sparta, Blwablk. 
Uibblng, C'hisholm, atwon, 

Tlittnla, Ereleth, * 1 A •« 1 am 

Coleralne. '"-oiaw 

Virginia. Ciii»h< im. Hlb- 

Wni, EreleUi. •}6.-4«»« 

BlwaUk. 



•— DaUy. 
Blvrablk. 



t— DaUy except Sunday. t— Kxcipt 



Cafe Observation Car, Missabe Rang« 
Points, Solid Vestlbuled Train. 



OUtUTH 4 NORTHERN MINNESOTA RAILWAY 
Offleet, 510 LanMlale Bid*.. Duluth. 
Trains connect at Knife Itlvm' dally (except Sun- 
day) with D. k I. It. trains IcRvlng Duluth at 7:3* 
S m., an'iving at Duiuth at S:35 p. m. Connect M 
Cramer with Urand Marals stage when runtiing. 



Duluth, South Shore & Atlantic. 



Lear*. 



STATIONS. 




Arr lTa. 
i.30am tsTsOina 



6 rooms. 1713 Jefferson St |20.00 

7 rooms, 2009 W. 7th St l|-9? 

6 rooms, 1924 Minnesota av.... 20.00 

8 rooms, 3 W. 5th Bt 

10 rooms, 1419 W. Michigan St. 

6 rooms, 1821 W. Michigan St. . 

1 rooms, 1721 W^ 2nd St 



26.00 
20.00 
16.00 
16.00 



J. p. HOW ARP ^ CO.^ 
210 Providence Blag. 



FOR RENT— A THOROUGHLY MOD- 
ernized eight-room house at 142G 
East First street. This place is all 
newly decorated inside and out. Rent 
only $40. May be occupied May 1. 
John A. Stephenson & Co., 232 West 
First street. 

FOR RENT— BEST MODERN SIX- 
room cottage. Park Point, for summer 
or winter; rent $25. East end duplex 
nine-rooms; modern, hot water plant, 
laundry, gas range, oak woodwork; 
rent $40. Zenota Realty company, 203 
Providence building. 

FOR RENT— EIGHT-ROOM MODERN 
house, centrally located on East 
First street; will redecorate to suit 
tenant; rent $35 per month. Whitney 
W^all company, Torrey building. Mel- 
rose 1368; Grand 810. 

FOR RENT — HOUSE AT 314 SEC- 
ond avenue west, ten rooms, bath 
and garret. Lease expires June 1. 
but can vacate sooner. Inquire Fiat 
I. 222 West Third street. Melrose 
5706. 



I 



* FOJ^ RENT. 3 

* ^ it 

if- 456 Mes»l)a avenue, 7 rooms, # 

* moi^ern $26 . 00 v* 

•^ 46H"Xle8aba avenue, 8 rooms. i^ 

a modern 30.00 >* 

R. B. KNOX & CO., -^ 

No. 1 Exchange Building. # 

FOR RENT — ONE SEVEN-ROOM 
house, all newly refinished, porch 
inclosed in glass; lafge shade trees; 
also a .flve-r<»om cottage. Park Point. 
Edmont, 18 Third avenue west. 

FOR RENT— C 18 SIXTH AVENUH 
east, eight rooms and balh, hot water 
heat, newlv tenovaied and in good 
shape, $32.53. Wm. C. Sargtnt, Provi- 
dence Bldg. 

HAVE US MOVE YOU WITH OUR 
large van and experienced men. Du- 
luth Van Co., 13 Fourth avenue west, 

PADDED VANS for moving furniture^ 
West Duluth ic Duluth Transfer Co. 



FOR RENT— SIX-ROOM HOUSE, 813 
Fourth avenue east; water, gas and 
electric light; $11. Apply Henry 
Halenbeck, 429 East Sixth street. 
Grand 1970-Y. Call noons or eve- 
nings. 



FOR RENT — FOUR UNFURNISHED 
rooms downstairs; water and gas; 
good chance for garden. Sixtieth 
avenue east and Avondale street. 



FOR RENT— TWELVE-ROOM BOARD- 
ing house, 120 Second avenue west 
$10 per month. Wahl-Messer. Lons- 
dale building. 

FOR RENT— "OUR BUSINESS IS MOV- 
ing." Let us move you with our 
covered padded vans and experienced 
men. Stewart Transfer & Storage 
Co. Either phone 334. 



AGENTS WANTED 

SALEsaiEN ^camTn^i-: oCh gold 

bond polity. Pays sii k or accident 
benefits from flrst day. Guarantees 
$50 cash Hrst six years, $150 in fif- 
teen years. District manager wanted 
for Duluth. Submit references. Get 
busy. Experience not necessary. 
North American Life & Casualty 
company. Plymonth building, Minne- 
apolis. 

AGENTS — WE WILL PAY YOU $12© 
to distribute religious literature in 
your community. Sixty days' work. 
Experience not required. Man or 
wom.an. Opportunity for promotion. 
Spare time may be used. -Interna- 
tional Bible Press, Philadelphia. 



FOR RENT — SI'X-ROOM BRICK 
house, 1515 East Third street; mod- 
ern, water paid; rent $31.25. Wahl 
& Messer, Lonsdale building. 

FOR RENT — 212 EAST SECOND 
street. May 1, rooms and bath; $22.50 
per month. Little & Nolle company. 
Exchange buildin g. 

I^'OR RENT — SIX-ROOM HOUSE, 
Last end, hot water heat, S40 per 
month. Call Melrose 2656. 



FOR RENT— 2014 EAST 
street is for rent from May 
phone J. L. Th wing. 

When ready to move call McDonald 
Transfer Co., 17 Fifth avenue west 
Melro.«e 3913; Grand 1963-X. 



WANTED— SALESMAN, PKJ MONEY 
can be made by showing photo ot 
our latest 5-cent Punch Board Deal. 
Write for particulars. Interstate 
Specialty Co., 139 North .Seventeentli 
street, Minneapolis, Minn. 

FOR SALE— STOCK WORTH THREE 
times its face value; will sa«rlfice oo 
account of leaving country: this is 
not mining stock. B 458. Herald. 

FOR SALE — SHARES IN ST. LOUIS 
County Enterprise compai»y's stock. 
For literature address Room 87, 
Hotel Liberty. 

WE Bl'Y AND SELL CUYUNA STOCKS 
and lands. 106 Providence building. 



Ji'^fl ^^RENT-JCOTTA^^ 

FOR RENT^^^5l3C^ROOM^5oTTAGE^ 
Twenty-seventh street. Park Point. 
Apply at J. A. Keyes, 2029 East 
Third street. Grand 2289-Y. 




ADY REFEBEUgE FOIR 
YOUR DAILY iEEO: 

This directory is intended for th^ Qonvcnij?nce o! anyone 
desiring something a little out oi the ordinary in their 
-daily needs and requiring it in a hurry. The firms repre- 
sented below make a specialty of immediate service and 
will gladly furnish any information that is necessary. 
Remember, satisfaction is guaranteed by every advertiser. 

JUST USB YOUR TELEPHONE! 



SEE IT IN THE HERALD EVERY DAY. 



AWNINGS, TENTS, PACKSACKS. 



DANCING ACADEMY. 



POIRIER TENT & AWNING CO., 413 
Enst Super ior street. Both phones. 

DULUTH TENT & AWNING COMPANY. 
Get prices. 1608 West Superior street. 



Ljmn dancing academy, lady instructor. 
18A Lake av. n. Hall for rent. Mel 114S 



TANGO— "LEARN CORRECTLY. 
fin's academy. 



COF- 



ACCOUNTANTS. 



MATTESON & MACGREGOR, 

PUBLIC ACCOUNTANTS AND 

AUDITORS. 

Business Counselors and Systemlzers, 

700-701 Alworth Bldg. 

Phones: Melrose, 4700, Grand 71. 

F. D. HARLOW, 3 4 EXCHANGE 
building. Telephone, Melrose 3654. 



ARCHITECTS. 

W. B. Roe, architect and builder, 412 
Providence building. Grand 862. 



ASHES REMOVED. 



Ashes, cinders and manure hauled 
away; teaming done. H. B. Keedy, 
both phones. 



ASHES REMOVED, CALL GRAND 

1389-X, 415 East Sixth street. 



CARPENTER REPAIR WORK. 

Work done neatly, O. Pearsdn, 207 W. 
First St. Zenith 1274-X or Park 97. 



CARPET CLEANING WORKS. 

INTERSTATE CARPET CLEANING CO. 
L. Slnotte, Prop.; compressed air and 
vacuum cleaners and rug weavers. 
1908 West Michigan St. Both phones. 



FURNITURE. 

100 DAVENPORTS. 
Leather or imported tapestries, selling 
at our GREATER SALESROOM. 
Sale price 40 per cent less than re- 
tail prices. Cash or credit. 




CAMERON-JOHNSON-HORGAIf, 

THE Factory Distributors. 

Salesroom — 2110-2112 West Superior St. 



FLORIST AND NURSERYMAN. 

Duluth Floral Co., wholesale, retail cut 
flowers; funeral designs. 121 W. Sup. 



FURNITURE RE-COVERED. 



Let Forsell do your UPHOLSTERING, 
S34 E. Superior street. Both phones. 



Carpet and rug cleaning; naptha proc- 
ess. Zenith Dye house. Pohnes 1888. 



CHIROPODIST. 

Safe, sanitary and scientific methods 
for all foot ailments, make a spe- 
ciality of treating flat-foot and broken- 
down arches. „ 
DR. GEORGE S. SMITH. 
305 Columbia Bldg. Phone M.el. 194 



CIVIL ENGINEERING. 

Duluth Engineering Co., W. B. Patton, 
Mgr., 613 Palladio bldg. Specifications 
prepared and construction superin- 
tended for waterworks, sewerage, etc. 



CHIMNtY SWEEP. 

ED M'CARTY, chimney sweep, furnace 
cleaner, smokestack & flagpole paint- 
er. Lakesi de 46-L; Zen. Park 133-A. 

Rnudsen, chimney sweep and furn*e 
cleaner. Fire headquarters. Phones 46. 



CARD ENGRAVING AND STAMPS. 

Consolidated Stamp & Printing Co., 
Barker & Orr, Props. 14 4th Ave. W. 



CIVIL ENGINEER AND SURVEYORS 

BERT FARRELL. 414 MANHATTAN 
building. Anythin g in engineering. 

R^ S. NICHOLs! 418 MANHATTAN 
building. Anything In engineering. 



ADVERTISE II THE RERALO 



FOR SALE CARLOAD OF 


FRESH 


milch cows just arrived. E. 


Carlson, 


22<U West Twelfth street. 


Lincoln 


230-D. J, 





__JlJPHqil£rERING__ 

Furtiiture. .\utomoblTe.s. Carriages; rea- 
soudbltt prices. isit^Utit. ii'i 1st Av. W. 



H-iSVM DuUiUi .....^10. 

(800 Lino Union 8liition.) 

i6.4S?m Superior il*.«aaM |S.2ft,>a 

(Hoo Line IJiilun Station.) 

|7.0<|ipm Kuperiot 19.1 

(Union Depot.) 
5.40am... IlowKtiton ....tn. 

G.SOam ('nhunet ....{10.: 

{4.20tm... Ixhpenitiif ...112. 
t7.IOpm IS.OOam... MarQiiette ...ill. 
(10.20am. .Sault Ste. Maiie..{S.2 
|7.58am.... Monu-eal ....110.: 
H.2$pm Boston fS.a 



»«.20am 

Airly*. 
|7.5$pm 
t8.5Spm 
i«.4«-.>m 



i.stam M-IOpa 

Lett*. 
.ISpm 
.25pm 

.35am f7.20am 
■4Spm M.lSaa 
i.25pm 
SOpm 
i.SOaM 



CONCRETE AND STONE MASONRY. 



CONCRETE AND STONE MASONRY 
estimates furnished. A. T. Nelson 
Co., 5 East Superior St. Grand 610. 



Lmt*. 



{8.50i>ffl ■ 
(l.40a^. 



g 4>>H]f OKt-Wt 



.. Montreal flO.OSpm 

. . XetT York i9.40pn 



HERALD ADS AND 
RESULTS ARE TWIN 
BROTHERS. 



MUSICAL INSTRUMENTS. 

A. Haakonsen, dealer 

and expert repairing 

at J. W. Nelsons, 6 

East Superior street. 

BOSTON MUSIC CO., MUSICAL MER- 
chandlse, 18 I..ake avenue north. 




OLD MAGAZINES AND PAPERS. 

Old magazines and papers bought. Call 
Duluth Paper Slock companv, 38?-91 
South First avenue east; both phones. 



PATENTS. 

PATENTS— ALL ABOUT PATENTS^ 
See Stevens, 16 Fidelity building. 



PLUMBING. 

THE SANITARY PLUMbTnG^CO 84 
W. First St., plumbing and heating. 



PAINTING AND PAPERHANGING. 

PAINTING AND PAPE RH AiJgING-I 
Call Grand 1217-D. C. GiU. 



Painting, Paperhanglng. Interior Dec- 
or?iting. Call J. A. Selin, Met. 7078. 




PIANOS REPAIRED. 



1 call at homes to tune and 
repair pianos and organs; 
furnish new ivories, strings 
or other parts; polish ivories, 
etc. Grcgor, Kalisnik; Grand 
1940-Y or 969-D for order. 



REAL ESTATE. 

L. A. LARSEN Co.. 213 ProvidenceBTdr. 
City property, lancis, loans, fire Ins. 



SAFETY RAZORS SHARPENED. 

Safety razor blades all kinds sharpened 
and put In (Irst-class condition. 30o 
per doi^cn, L«k« U«iaMiir« dt. 



4i 



I 




liteifrriiii 



^1.*- j.iiS453afti 



iHttfitti 




Wednesday, 



THE DUIjUTHHERALD 



April 8, 1914. 



AUTOMOBILES 



AND 



MOTORCYCLES 

are sold and traded to best 
advan tage th rough THE 
HERALD WANT ADS. 



One Cent a Word Each Insertion. 
No AdvertlMOi-icnt Less Than 15 Cents. 

;¥ AN KXPEHIENCKD SALKS- -* 
^ lady for dry goods in department # 
•Ai store tn Northern MJnn.; steady ;¥• 
if- position: i?ood salary to competent -,'i^ 
if person; must furnish A-1 refer- ii- 
iC' en<'cs and speak Finnish or Scan- ^ 
;Y- dinavian languaKe. or both, pre- .If 
if- ferred: no others need apply. tJive ic 
if age, experienotj and references, rf 
■» () 445, Herald. H- 

\VA XT KD— COMPETENT GIRL FOR 
general housework; small family; no 
children. 316 Fourteenth avenue 
east, near Fourth street. 



Wanted — Girls to attend dressmaking 
school; make garments for yourself 
or others while learning. Quick and 
easy patterns drafted, any style. 
Miss Gray. 3rd floor. Geo. A. Gray Co. 



WANTED — EXPERIENCED TEI.B- 
phone operator; salary |45 per 
month, state age and experience. 
Address F 431, Herald. 



One Cent a Word Each In.sertlon. 
Xo .'Vdvertiseoieal Less Thar. 15 Cents. 

luralfiiiOyANfs^ 
jHu^AjnaiMmzi^ 

FOR RENT — WHY NOT FURNISH 
your rooms anew now, during For- 
ward's big removal sale. Prices on 
best high-grade furniture are ex- 
ceedingly low. You will get the 
money back on Increased rents from 
the room In no time. 




One Cent a Wortl Each In«*ertlon. 
Xo A«l\»rti.-4'meiU Less Tliaw 13 Cents. 

TElYPHiDNrbiRFcTORY 

OF 
BUSINESS 
HOUSES. 

Helow you will find a 
condensed list of reliable 
business firms. This is de- ■ 
signed for the convenience' 
lof busy people. A twlephone j 
•order to any one of them [ 
will receive the same care- | 
ful attention as would be' 
i^'iven an order placed in , 
person. You can safely de- 
pend upon the reliability I 
of any one of these firms. ' 
Old New j 

DRl'GfilSTS — 'Phone. 'Phone. 

Eddie Jtronimus. Ph.G.1234 10.2 

DK.XTISTS — „ ,. V ' 

Dr. F. H. Burnett,D.D.S.4608 I'U'J-X : 

LAl-MiRIKS^ .oo 

I'eerluss Laundry .... 428 428 | 

Yale Laundry 47» 4.» 

Lutes Laundry 447 447 

Home Laundry Co 478 478 

Model Laundry 2T4'J 1303 



One Cent a \Vor<l Each Insertion. 
No Adverti.-senient Less Than 16 Cents. 

MyWAI^ED^^^MALE 



WANTED — EXPERIENCED CLOAK 
and suit salesladies; must have sell- 
ing ability; good salary. T. J. Crane 
& Co., Virginia, Minn. 

WANTED— NEAT GIRL TO HELP IN 
general hou.-ework; girl from the 
country preferred; must be over 16; 
two in family. Write to L 488, Herald. 

WANTED— YOUNG GIRL TO ASSIST 
with housework, family of two, one 
who can go home nights preferred. 
Mrs. F. L. Weeks, 2U5 West Third 
street. 

WANTED— CIGAR STAND ATTEND- 
ant, thoroughly experienced girl for 
flrst-class cigar stand. Address, 
giving references and experience. 
H 48S». H erald. 

GIUL FOR GENERAL 
good place for right 
Fourth avenue east. 



FOR RENT— YOUR OPPORTUNITY TO 
furnish your xooms with some high- 
grade furniture AT LOW COST. K. 
R. B^orward & Co. are going to move. 
Select your furniture while the big 
removal sale Is on. It means a big 
saving to you. 

THiTnEW ALEXANDRIA. 
Furnished apartments and single rooms 
with bath or without; private tele- 
phone In all rooms; dining rooms In 
connection. 322 West Second street. 



One Cent a Word Each luscption. 
No Advertisement Less Than 15 Cents. 

^le3misc|l^neous 

For Sale— Typewriters — We sell the 
most visible typewriter made. o»a 
machines accepted at a good price. 
Machines rented at |1.60 to |3 a mo., 
with stand; rent applies on purchase. 
Send for list of rebuilt typewritcis, 
fully guaranteed. We repair all ma- 
chines; quick service; right ,prlc«. 
Call Mel. 719; Grand 686. L. C. Smith 
&. liroa.' Typewriter Co., 21 ith av. w. 



FOR SALE— IF IT'S A PIANO, NOW 
iB your chance. We have roark-jd 
their prices down along with every 
piece of furniture In the store. It 
would be hard to find an opportunity 
equal to this. Come in and look them 
over. R. R. Forward & Co.. Second 
avenue east and Superior street. 



TRY THE HOTEL METROPOLE. 
Rooms ?2 and up per week; free bath; 
hot and cold running water In each 
room; room and board ?6 per week 
and up; elegant accommodations. 



THE NEW MIDLAND HOTEL. 
Newly furnished, modern, light and 
cozy steam-heated rooms; rates J-.50 
and up; meals if desired, twenty for 
$5. 210 West Second street. 



WA.VTED — 
housework; 
party. 821 



Hrlficii-iiif: 



WANTED. * 
* 



EXPERIENCED 

SHOE 

SALESMEN. 



W. 



Apply 
& L. SHOE STORE, 
Thursday, not later than 8 a. 
218 WEST SUPERIOR ST. 



m. 



* 

* 

* 
if 

if 



WANTED— SEVERAL EXPERIENCED 
demonstrators for house to house 
work; salary paid. Call after 7 p. m. 
at 320 West Third street. 



WANTED— A COMPETENT COOK OR 
good general housework girl; small 
family. Call 931 East Fourth street; 
good wages. 



WANTED AT ONCE 
young girl for light 
small family. 1222 
street. 



- RELIABLE 

housework In 

East Third 



WANTED— LAUNDRESS ON MON- 
days and Tuesdays, steady work. 117 
West Third street. 

WANTED— GIRL TO DO GENERAL 
housework In family of three. 718 
East Third street. 



WANTED— GIRLS FOR BOARDING 
house. 120 Garfield avenue. Swed- 
ish preferred. 



REAL ESTATE, FIRE 

IXSL'RANXE AND 
RENTAL AGENCIES. 

L. A. Larsen Co., 214 Providence Bldg. 
Fi-'ld-Frey Co.. 203 Exchange Bldg. 
William C. Sargent, 102 F'rov. Bldg. 
G'ttv-Smith Co.. SOS Palladlo Bldg. 
A a". Fider Co., 300 1st N. Bank Bldg. 
National Co-operati\ e. 2022 W. Sup. St. 



WANTED — TAILORING SALESMEN 
to take orders in small towns; excel- 
lent proposition and liberal commis- 
sions to the right men; new idea. 
Apply In person. Manager, Glasgow 
Woolen mills. 333 West Superior 
street. 



WANTED— AT ONCE, TAVO WAGON 
salesmen for established routes; live 
men only; salary and commission; 
Ihust be neat appearing and able to 
furnish bond with good references; 
bring references and apply R. G. 
Lewis, manager. Jewel Tea company, 
109 West Fourth street, Duluth. 



WANTED — COMPETENT GIRL FOR 
general housework. Mrs. W. A. Cov- 
entry, 1427 East Superior street. 

WANTED — GIRL FOR GENERAL 
housework. Melro.=e 3449. 1531 Jef- 
ferson street. 



THE DE ANGELTERR HOTEL, 
310 East Superior street; nicely fur- 
nished, steam-heated rooms, running 
water, etc., |2 per week and up. 
Special winter Tates in effect. 



FOR SALE — SEVERAL HUNDRED 
pieces of furniture, all new goods 
from factory, are located In ware- 
rooms, 2201 West First street; must 
be sold immediately. Can you use 
anything in good furniture at fac- 
tory prices plus freight? If so, come. 



One Cent a Word Ea<'h Insertion. 
No Advertisement Less Than 15 Cents. 

^;370^RENT-:^yr[S_ 



1406 East Second street, 7 rooms; 

hot water lieat, laundry, gas 

range; J30 per month. 
1021 Jefferson street, 8 rooms and 

bath; modern. Including heating 

plant; ?25 per month. 



LITTLE & NOLTB CO., 
Exchange Bldg. 



FOR SALE — PENNANT COMBINA- 
tion gas and coal ranges; two 
stoves in one at the price of one. 
Anderson Furniture company, Twen- 
ty-flrst avenue west. 

FOR SALE— DON'T BUY ANYOxNE'S 
old furniture when you get new, 
strictly high-grade goods at R. R. 
Forward & Co.'s big removal sale, at 
unheard of low prices. 

FOR SALE— ONE-HALF PRICE FUR- 
niture. Beds, springs, mattresses, 
china closets, rocking chairs, etc. 
Boston Music Co., 18-20 Lake avenue 
north. 



ifiiifiy:t-if^.fifif^ifieif':^ifi^i^-»^i^-^-'y^'^-''^ 

FOR RENT— A SIX-ROOM. MODERN 
flat, in residence district, at 321 East 
l-irst street; handy to business sec- 
tion; heat, water and janitor service 
supplied; rent $39.50. John A. 
Stephenson 6t Co., 232 West First 
street. ^ 

FOR KENT — EIGH r ROOMS • AND 
bath. 618 Sixth avenue east, brick 
house; hardwood floors downstairs, 
hot water heat, electric light and 
gas; newly remodeled; $32.60 per 
month. W. C. Sargent. Providence 
building. 



degree. 
Nesbitt. 



SECRET SOCIETIES 



PALESTINE LODGES, NO. 7», 
A. F. & A. M. — Regular meet* 
Ings first and third Monday 
evenings of each month at^ 
8 o'clock. Next meetln*. 
April 6, 1914. Work — Second 
Henry B. Grleser, W. M.; H. 
secretary. 




FOR RENT— FiVE-KUuM CENTKAL- 
ly located flat, hardwooa lloors, gas. 
plumbing, stove heat, $i4. Massa- 
chusetts Real Estate company, 18 
Phoenix block, city. 



THE KAISERHOF HOTEL, 
10 Lake ave. north. Nicely furnished, 
steam-heated outside rooms; use of 
phones, bath. Rates 50c and up. Spe- 
cial weekly rates. C. A. Nordqulst. 



THE FREDERIC HOTEL. 
Corner First ave. west and First street, 
has all been newly decorated. Hot 
and cold running water in every 
room. Rates, 60 to $ 1.50 per day. 

FOR RENT — large! PLEASANT 
furnished rooms for couple of gen- 
tlemen; steam heated; breakfast if 
desired. 301 East Fourth street. 



FOR RENT— NEWLY FURNISHED 
room, hot and cold water, electric 
light, use of phone. 707 West Sec- 
ond street. 



FOR RENT— COZY, MODERN ROOM 
with fireplace and use of piano; 
also single rooms. Grand 1810-Y; 
313 Second avenue west. 

FOR RENT— REASONABLE, RICHLY 
furnished room with connecting 
bath; private family. Flat B, 116 
West Fourth street. 



For Rent — Excellent office space over- 
looking Superior St., next to Glass 
block; suitable for doctor or dentist; 
rent reasonable. Mel. 1917, Grand 178. 



FOR RENT — NICELY 
room, all convonlences. 
avenue west. 



FURNISHED 
329 Fourth 



WANTED 
family, 
strict. 



— HOUSEKEEPER; SMALL 
Call 416 West Superior 



WANTED — AN 
nish saleslady. 
muth's. 



EXPERIENCED FIN- 
Apply at I. Frel- 



WANTKD— GIRL FOR GENERAL 
housework; small family. 2321 East 
First street. 



PERSONAL 



"«> ir Newlvwed Outfit" con.<»ists of fine 
dignified furniture that any bride 
w ill be proud of: all the necessaries 
for four rooms at a reaiionable small I 
figure. You should not worry about | 
the pavments; we make the terms ; 
easy. * Anderson Furniture ,,Co.. 1 
Twenty-first avenue west. "The j 
Big House with t he Little Rent. I 

~ BEi 

the 

Forward 

it will quick- 



PEKSONAL — SHOULD THERE 
any «loubt in your mind as to 
genuineness of the R. R 
company's removal sale. 



ly be dispelled by seeing the price 
marks on the furniture. Big reduc- 
tions on everything. 



Personal — Ladies! Ask your druggist 
for Chichester Pills, the Diamond 
Brand, for 25 years known as best, 
safest, always reliable. Take no 
other. Chichester Diamond Brand Pills 
are sold by druggists everywhere. 

SMALL PAYMENT down and a little 
each month sends a piano to your 
home. ^^ 

HOWARD-FARWELL & CO., 
RfX Theater Building. 



WANTED— UNDERTAKER AND ALL- 

round furniture man; must be good 
framer, oC good appearance, good 
habits and good salesman, know 
how to keep store neat. Address J. 
P. Callahan Furniture company, St. 
Cloud, Minn^ 

WANTED— MIDDLE-AGED MAN AND 
wife for farm work, seven miles from 
Hibbing; good home for right party; 
all conveniences; Scandinavian or 
Polander preferred. Call at Flat D, 
30 Seventh avenue east. Call Grand 
1866-Y. 

WANTED— EXPERIENCED FINNISH 
clothing salesman; write giving age, 
number of years experience, refer- 
ences and wages required; no booze j 
fighter nor cigarette fiend need ap- 
ply. Write P. O. Box 673, Cloquet. 
Minn. 

Learn barber trade; always in demand, 
big wages, easy work; few weekj 
completes; tools given; diplomas 
granted. Meier Barber college, 27 E. 
.N'Ic. Ave.. Minneapolis. Estab. 1893. 



"U'ANTED — COMPETENT GIRL FOR 
general housework, three In family. 
2330 East Fifth street. Melrose 661. 



WANTED— EXPERIENCED MANGLE 
girl or some other experienced help. 
Model laundry, 126 East First street. 

WANTED— COMPETENT GIRL FOR 
general housework; two In family. 
Call Melrose 1 217. 

WANTED — GOOD GIRL FOR GE.N- 
eral housework at 705 Woodland ave- 
nue. Phone Melrose 705. 

WANTED — COMPETENT MAID FOR 
general housework; three in family. 
1906 East Third street. 



FOR RENT— BRIGHT FURNISHED 
room, suitable for one or two per- 
sons. 832 East Second street. 



FOR SALE — NEW HIGH-GRADE 
household outfit; the very best fur- 
niture; cheap. Call 9 to 12 and 2 to 
4 p. m. 1426 East First street. Credit 
can be arranged for if desired. 



FOR SALE— SLIGHTLY USED AND 
rebuilt typewriters, all makes, $15 
up. Machines rented, rental applied 
as payment. Send for list. Duluth-J 
Typewriter Co., 319 West First street. 



FOR RENT— A VERY PLEASANT, 
modern, seven-room flat, in excellent 
residence district, at (16 East First 
street; beat, water and janitor serv- 
ice eupplled. John A. Stephenson & 
Co., 232 West First street. 



IONIC LODGE. NO. 186. A. F. 
& A. M. — Regular meeting* 
second and fourth Monday 
evenings of each month at 
7:30 o'clock. Next meeting, 
April 13, 1914. Work— Second 

degree. Edward Armstrong, W. M.j 

Burr I'orter, secretary. 




KEYSTONE CHAPTER. NO. 
20.- R. A. M.— Stated convo- 
cations, second and fourth 
Wednesday evenings of each- 
month at 7:30 o'clock. Next 
meeting. April 22, 1914. Work — Regu- 
lar business. Charles G. Mead, H. P.^ 
Alfred Le Rlcheux, secretary. 




ADT 
S; 
m. 



FOR SALE— FRANKLIN PIANO WITH 
pianola attached and fifty-five rec- 
ords; also one medium-sized ice box. 
Call evenings, 713 ',i East Second 
street. 



FOR SALE — Second-hand woodworking 
machinery, portable sawmills, trans- 
mission appliances, pipes for steam, 
water and furnaces. Duluth Macb. Co. 



FOR SALE— GOOD SIZED REFRIGER- 
ator, one mahogany bookcase and 
writing desk combined; small writ- 
ing desk, two rockers, one daven- 
port. 1002 East Third street. Hat 1. 



For Sale — Northrup King's Northern- 
grown seeds; also garden tools and 
Implements; seed catalogue free. 213- 
216 East First street. T. A. Scarlett. 



FOR RENT — FURNISHED ROOMS, 
also rooms for light housekeeping, 
all conveniences. 707 West Second 
street. 



FOR RENT — ONE 
nlshed front room 
keeping. 26 



LARGE FUR- 
for light house- 
Second avenue west. 



FOR RENT — LARGE FURNISHED 
room with alcove, all conveniences, 
also small furnished room. 12 »i 
Chester terrace; Melrose 4061. 



FOR RENT — FURNISHED ROOM 
for light housekeeping, steam heat. 
16 East Superior street. 



WANTED — GIRL 
housework. 2135 
Hunter's Park. 



FOR GENERAL 
Woodland avenue. 



PERSONAL — IF THE SAVING OF 

dollars means anything to you, at- 
tend the big removal sale at R. R. 
Forward it Co.'s furniture store. Sec- 
ond avenue east and Superior street. 



WANTED — GOVERNMENT JOBS 
open to men and women. Thousands 
of appointments coming. List of po- 
sitions free. Franklin Institute, 
Dept. 185 L, Rochester. N. Y. 



WANTED — GIRL 
housework; small 
Third street. 



FOR GENERAL 
family. 11 East 



FOR RENT — TWO NEWLY FUR- 
nished rooms, $4 and $6 per month. 
6912 Polk street, West Duluth. 



FOR RENT — FURNISHED ROOMS 
for light housekeeping; also one fur- 
nished room. Call 415 Pioneer block. 



FOR SALE— UPRIGHT MAHOGANY 
piano; Kimball make; good condition. 
Price $125, on easy terms to respon- 
sible party. Address A 884, Herald. 

FOR SALE— PURE MARQUIS SEED 
wheat, imported from Saskatche- 
wan; grown from government seed; 
$1.35 per bushel; good sacks free. 
McCullough, Milton, N. D. 



FOR RENT— FOUR-ROOM FLAT, 309 
Sixth avenue west, upstairs, water 
paid, rent $12 per month. Whitney 
Wall Co., lorrey buiiaing. Melrose 
1368. Grand 810. 

FOR RENT— AN EXCELLENT SIX- 
loom heated flat at 416-B East First 
street. This flat is in first-class 
condition. Water and janitor service 
supplied; rents for only $39. John 
A. Stephenson & Co., 2a2 W est First 
street. . 

FLAT NO. 
harawood 
gas; only 
(14 Provi- 



FOR KENT — FOUR-ROOM 
322 East Seventh street; 
floors, water, sewer and 
$10. N. J. Upuam company, 
aence Bldg. 



FOR RENT— FOUR ROOMS, GAS 
ter, electricity, bath; $16, also 
rooms; gas, water, sewer; $9. 
West I'ifth street. . Inquire 
Fourth avenue west. 



DULUTH COUNCIL, NO. •,. 
& S. M. — Stated convoca- 
ons. third Friday of each 
month at 7:30 p. m. Next 
meeting, May 22, 1914. Worlc 
— Regular business. Frederick Hi, 
Hough, T. I. M.; Alfred Le Rlcheax, 
secretary. 

dlt:.uth commandery. no. 

18, K. T. — Stated conclave, 
first Tuesday of each month- 
at 7:30 o'clock. Next meet- 
ing, April 7, 1914. Work— . 
Regular business. Hermon L. Dresserr 
comd.; Alfred Le Rlcheux, recorder. 

SCOTTISH RIT 13— REGULAR 
meetings every "Thursday eve* 
ning at 8 o'clock. Next 
meetings, April 7, 8, 9. 1914. 
Annual reunion. Maundy 

Thursday banquet, 9th, at 6:30. 
Henry Nesbitt, secretary. 






FOR RENT — WAHLDORF, 220 FIRST 
avenue west; five rooms; front; hot 
water heat; janitor; wall beds; very 
central. ^^ ahl &, Messer, Lonsdale 
b uilding. 

FOR RENT— TWO, FOUR OR FIVE- 
room heated flat, will be vacated 
April 15; all in first class shape and 
in East end. See or call up Dr. G. 
W. Davis. 



FOR SALE— TWO ALLIS CHALMERS, 
6-horse power, three phase motors, 1 
3-horse power, 1 Western electric 
7%rhorse power sewing machine and 
labeling; can be looked over. 2110 
West Superior street. Zenith Glove 
company. ' 



FOR SALE— WALL CASES; 10-FO<JT 
or 24-foot wall case, with mirror 
center, electric fan, tables and shelv- 
ing. Apply M. Henrlcksen, 203 Provi- 
dence building, Duluth, Minn. 



FOR RENT — MAY 1— FIVE-ROOM 
modern flat, Jefferson street; $25 per 
month. Whitney Wall company, 
Torre y building. 

FOR RENT— FOUR-ROOM HEATED 
Hat with bath. No. 1826 W^est Sec- 
ond street. See N. J. Upham Co., 714 
. Providence bui lding. 

CALL THE McDonald TRANSFER 
for prompt and efficient service. 
17 5th ave, w. Mel . 3913; Grand 1963-X 

FOR RENT— ONE FOUR AND ONE 
five-room flat. 130 West Fifth street. 
Inquire In basement. , 

FO'^ RENT— SIX- ROOM FLAT; HOT 
water heat. East First street. In- 
quire Melrose 2656. 



ZENITH CHAPTER. NO. 26, 
Order of Eastern Star — Reg- 
ular meetings second and 
fourth Friday evenings of 
each month at 7:30 o'clock. 

Next meeting, April 10, 1914. Work — . 

IniUation. Alice Magie, W. M.; Eli» 

F. Gearhart, secretary. 

EUCLID~ToDGE, NO. 198, aI 
F. & A. M. — Meets at West 
Duluth second and fourth 
Wednesdays of each month 
at 7:30 p. m. Next meeting, 
April 8. 1914. Work— Second 

degree. J. O. Winton, W. M.; A- Dun- 

leavy, secretary. 




DULUTH CHAPTER, NO. 69^ 
R. A. M. — Meets at West Du- 
luth first Wednesday of each 
month at 7:30 p. m. Next 
meeting, April 1, 1914. Worlc 
— Regular business. W. H, 
Borgen, H. P.; A. Dunleavy, secretary. 




mj. 



FOR RENT 
front room 
steam heat. 



— FURNISHED, ONE 

and one smaller room; 

320 W'est Third street. 



FOR RENT— 
front room, 
East Third 



NICELY 
suitable 
street. 



FURNISHED 
for two. 119 



•OR 
flat 
day 



RENT — FURNISHED ROOM. 
4, San Marco fats. Call Thurs- 



V/ANTED — YOUNG GIRL TO ASSIST 
with light housework. Flat B, 116 
West Fourth street. 



WANTED — 
en girl in 
street. 



SCANDINAVIAN KITCH- 
hotel. 1818 West Second 



PERSONAL — REDUCED FREIGHT 
rates to Seattle, Los Angeles, San 
Francitro and other Western points. 
Duluth Van & Storage company, 18 
Fourth avenue west. 



Cancer (tumors and lupus) successfully 
treated and removed without knife or 
Pi^ln. Dr. Williams, cancer specialist, 
2?00 Inivt rsity av. S. E., Minneapolis. 



WANTED— NEAT. SOBER MAN FOR 
real estate and insurance office; must 
be a hustler; splendid chance for ad- 
vancement. Call at Grand avenue 
agency, corner Fifty-sixth and Grana 
avenue. West Duluth. 

WANTED— DRY LUMBER GRADER.S 
and lath sawyers that can pull and 
grade lath at the same time. Leech 
Lake Lumber company, Walker. 
Minn. 

WANTED— YOUNG MAN, BETWEEN 
ages of 16 and 18, to work in office 
of manufacturing concern. Address 
D 427, Herald. 



WANTED — <HRL FOR GENERAL 
housework; small flat. Mrs. H. R. 
Kohagen, 229 Seventh avenue east. 

WANTED AT ONCE — WAITRESS FOR 
Children'.^ home. Fifteenth avenue 
east and Fifth street. 



WANTED — EXPERIENCED WAIT- 
ress; no Sunday work. Vienna Cafe, 
27 East Superior street. 



FOR RENT —ONE FURNISHED 
front room. $1.60 per week. 709 West 
Third street. 



FOR RENT— FOUR ROOMS. LIGHT 
and water; downstairs. fcl8 East 
Sixth street. 



FOR RENT— NEWLY FURNISHED 
rooms; all conveniences. 21 Mesaba 
avenue. 



THE VELVIDERE HOTEL, 
1029 West Michigan street, nicely fur- 
nished rooms from $2 and up per week. 



PERSONAL— MARGARET W.. PLEASE 
let me know where you are at once. 
— Warren. Write care general deliv- 
ery, city. 

PERSONAL — Get away from washday 
troubles by sending your family 
wash to us; 5*2C per pound. Lutes* i 
la'indrv. 808 E. 2nd St. Both phones. 



WANTED— YOUNG MAN AS BOOK- 
keeper, with two or three years' ex- 
perience; must have good reference; 
good opportunity for advance. Ad- 
dress B 479, Herald. . 



WANTED — GOVERNMENT Posi- 
tions are easy to get. My free book- 
let Y 302 tells how. Write today — 
now. Earl Hopkins, Washington, D. C. 



WANTED— COMPETENT GIRL FOR 
general housework; small family. 
1713 East Superior street. 



WANTED — COMPETENT NURSE 
maid for child 2 years old. 1905 
East Third street. 



WANTED — EXPERIENCED GIRL 
for soda fountain. Address X 501, 
Herald. 



WANTED — GIRL FOR GENERAL 
housework. 14 North Nineteenth 
avenue east. Melrose 6953. 



WANTED — 
housework. 



GIRL FOR GENERAL 
314 Second avenue west. 



WANTED— A GOOD NURSE FOR TWO 
children. 2616 East Third street. 



PO^SAlt^^REAUKTATE 



FOR SALE— CHEAP, SODA FOUN- 
tain, four bar chairs, four tables 
and sixteen chairs, used one season. 
I nquire 109 West First street. 

FOR SALE— ONE ELWELL KITCHEN 
cabinet, in excellent condition; will 
sell cheap If taken at once. Call 
1229 East Sixth street , or Grand 
1863-D. 

FOR SALE— AIRDALE, REBO SOU- 
dan Senator at stud; puppies for 
sale. Irish Terriers for sale. F. L. 
Ober, 6429 Oneida street. Lake- 
side 56-L^ 

SECOND-HAND 
second-hand gas- 
708 East Fourth 



FOR RENT — FIVE- ROOM FUR- 
nished flat. 325 Eighth avenue west. 
Melrose 6388. 



LET US MOVE YOU TO YOUR NEW 
home. Duluth Van & Storage Co., 18 
Fourth avenue west. Just phone 492. 



FOR SALE— ONE 
kerosene tank, one 
oline tank. Call 
street. 



FOR SALE — GAS COOKING RANGE 
and laundry gas plate cheap, if 
taken at once. 1102 East Second 
street. 



RENT— STORES, OFFICES 



EUCLID CHAPTER, NO. SS, 
Order of the Eastern Star- 
Meets at West Duluth Ma- 
4c34\ApCk sonic temple the first and 
W third Tuesdays of each month 

^ y _ at 8 o'clock. Next meeting, 

April 7, 1914. Regular business. Grac9 
F. Murray, W. M.; Pearl E. Boerner, 
secretary. 




LAKESIDE LODGE. .NO. 281. 
A. F. and A. M.. meets first 
and third Mondays of each 
month at 7:30 o'clock, in towa 
hall. Lakeside. Next meeting, 
special. April 13, 1914. WorlK 
— First degree. James A. Robinsoxj* 
W. M.; C. S. Palmer, sec retary. 

TRINITY lodge:, U. D., A. f1 
and A. M., meets second and 
fourth Mondays at 8 o'clock* 
in Woodman hall. Twenty- 
first avenue west. Next meet- 
ing. April 13, 1914. Work — 
Second degree. Carl E. Lonegren, W, 
M.; R. E. Wheefer, secretary. 




FOR RENT. 



319 West First street, 12 by 45.. $45. 00 
1320 West Superior street, with 

rooms i*0.i)O 



J. D. HOWARD & CO., 
210 Providence building. 



* 



CHEAP LOTS. 



beautiful Fourth street lot, 
normal school district; 60-foot 
frontage, for $2,500. 



Another 50-foot front for $1,600. 



On Eighth street, Portland, one 
block from street car line, 50 by 
140, for $900 and $1,000. 



PERSONAL — BUSiNE.SS 
years of age, wishes to 
with voung lady. Write 
aid. 



MAN, 26 

correspond 
Y 472, Iler- 



Personal — The Comfort Beauty Parlors, 
20 W. Sup. St.. give treatment for 
falling hair. iJeautiful switches made 
from combings. Dr. Bahr, chiropodist. 



PE RS« )N A L — ANY 

can make $2 to 
orders. Address 
aid office. 



SMART PERSON 
$4 a day on repeat 
"Wilmington," Her- 



PERSONAL — MARRY RICH, ANY 
age, dime for sealed list. Marriage 
club, station H, Cleveland, Ohio. 



New York Feather Dyer. 13 W. 2nd St. 
Dving, cleaning, repairing; stickups 
made of old feathers. Gr and 343-A. 

PERS< )NAL — WANTED— PLACE TO 
board baby girl 3 years old. Call 
Grand 166«-D. 



MASSAGE— MARGARET NELSON, 218 
W. Superior St., room 8, third floor. 
Also appointments at your home. 



PER.«>NAL — WANTED— SOME ONE 
to board a little boy 4 years old. 
Call Melrose 2766. 



FOR RENT — ELECTRIC VACUUM 
cleaners, $1 per day. C. Moore, 319 
W. Ist St. Mel. 3248. Grand 2064-Y. 

BARKER'S REMEDY for coughs, colds 
and catarrh guaranteed at Boyce's. 

Hair, moles, warts removed; corns. bun- 
Ions treated. Miss Kelly. 131 W. Sup. 



WANTED— EliiHTHGRADi: BOY WHO 
lives in .New Duluth to take charge 
of Herald route. Apply at once, cir- 
culation department. 

WANTED — HUSTLER TO SELL 
Cuyuna range mining stock; one of 
the best propositions on the market. 
Address Y 510, Herald. 



WANTED— FIRST CLASS MACHIN- 
ist for marine gasoline repair work; 
sober; good wages. Write James Di 
Onne, Ranier, Minn. 



WANTED— A SOBER AND AMBITIOUS 
mirried man to solicit and collect on 
the range; A-1 references required. 
Address K 481. Herald. 



W A NT E D— H ALL 
hospital. 



GIRLS. ST LUKE'S 



16 lots six 
Northern 
for $650. 



blocks 
shops. 



from Canadian 
West Duluth, 



WANTED— GIRL, 
street. 



1331 E.-ist Second 



WANTED — GIRL FOR GENERAL 
housework. 1914 East First street. 



WANTED — WAITRESS. ORMONDE 
hotel. 221-223 Lake avenue south. 

WANTED — WOMAN COOK. PEOPLE'S 
hotel. Lake avenue south. 



WANTED— CHAMBERMAID. 
McKay. 



HOTEL 



WANTED— FOUR FIRST-CLASS COAT 
makers at once. C. H. Zlehsdorf. 24 
Third avenue west. 

WANTED — ERRAND BQY. APPLY 
Christie Lithograph & Printing com- 
pany. 

Wanted— FIRST-CLASS 



no other 
nue. 



need apply. 



PLUMBER: 
5602 Grand ave- 



WANTED— EXPERIENCED PACKER. 
Apply at Schulze Bros., 16 East 
Michigan street. 



Wanted — Cash paid for diamonds, 
watches revaircd, $1. E S. 5th Av. W. 



Personal — Combings and 
into beautiful switches. 



cut hair made 
Knauf Sisters. 



_PLAimW\IDJRlEES^ 

EVERY PLACE NEEDS TREES AND 
shrubbery and now Is the time to 
get your order in for spring plant- 
ing; phone our local representative, 
Melrose 6763, who will look after 
vour wants. The Jewel Nursery Co., 
Lake City, Minn. 



WANTED - 
tickets at 



YOUNG MAN 
Echo theater. 



TO TAKE 



WANTED — SHORT ORDER COOK. 
Miller cafeteria, Superior. 



WANTED — EXPERIENCED PANTRY 
girl. Apply Stewart, Spalding hotel. 



WANTED — GIRL FOR GENERAL 
housework. 1710 Jefferson street. 



WANTED — GIRL TO ASSLST WITH 
housework. 1601 East Superior street. 



WANTED — 
housework. 



GIRL FOR GENERAL 
2222 East Fifth street. 



if 
if 
* 
* 
it 
if 
if 
if 
*• 
if 
if 
if 
if 
if 
if 
* 
if 
if 
« 

a- 

ififr!fifimiM^il^i^ii^iii^ii<iyii^iiii^ii^ii^ii 

WHITNEY WALL COMPANY. 

For Sale — Fine building corner. 
75 by 140 feet, Eatt Eighth street, 
$1,300. , (403) 

Excellent 60 by 140 foot lot at 
Lakeside, street paved, cement walk, 
$26 cash. $15 per month. Price $750. 

(432) 

WHITNEY WALL COMPANY, 
Torrey Building. 



60-foot lot on upper side of the 
Boulevard, 200 feet west of 
Eleventh avenue west, worth 
$350. Make an offer. It must be 
sold. 



D. W. SCOTT, 
402 Torrey Building. 



if 

if 
if 
if 
if 

if 
if 
if 
if 

if 

if 
if 
if 
if 
if 

if 

if 
if 

# 

it 



FOR SALE— ONE BUCK KITCHEN 
range; price $20; also large size 
Radiant Home heater, $25. This is a 
bargain. Call M elrose 7009. 

FOR SALE — ONE HEAVY SPRING 
wagon; one one-horse wagon; bar- 
gain. D. J. Lewis' shop. 1922 West 
First street. ^ 

SET, 

velour 

chairs, 

carpen- 

avenua 



FOR SALE— OAK BEDROOM 
davenport, parlor cabinet, 
draperies, tables, rocking 
new gas range, high oven 
ters' bench. 129 Twelfth 
east. Melrose 1416. 



FOR SALE — HALL TREE, LEATH- 
er couch, office desk, sanitary couch, 
chairs and other household furniture, 
very cheap. 1222 East First street. 
Phone Melrose 4824. 



FOR SALE — LADY'S BLACK BROAD- 
cloth suit and dresses, 44 bust meas- 
ure. 1015 East Fifth street. Melrose 
4816. 



FOR RENT— A FINE STORE ON Su- 
perior street between Fourth and 
Fifth avenues west; good location for 
steamship, railroad or coal office. 
N. J. Upham Co., 714 Providence 
building. 



ZENITH COUNCIL, NO. 161, 
Royal league, meet* the sec- 
ond and fourth Thursdays of 
the month at 8 p. m.. K. of P. 
hall. 118 West Superior street, 
Shandoss Hoad. Kelley- How- 
Thomson, archon; collector, H. A. Uaila 
18 East First street. 




DULUTH LODGE, NO. 28. 1. O. O. F.— . 
.Meets ereri' tndii entiling «t fc o cicely 
at Odd Fellows haU. 18 Lake a^t.-ij* 
uonh. Neit meeliiig, friiUy. Aftu 

1P14. Wo!k— First degree. O. E. UnJUrs. 

A. J. ODoniieU. Kcc. Sec.; A. H. Paul. Fi::. 



N. U. 
:scc 



FOR RENT— FINE CORNER STORE 
on Central avenue, steel celling, full 
basement; also laige warehouse in 
rear; If taken soon will rent for $40 
per month. W. C. Sherwood & Co., 
118 Manhattan building. 




FOR RENT— LARGE SPACE ON SEO- 
ond floor of 24 and 26 West Superior 
street, over Leiser's; very desirable 
business location: rent moderate. N. 
J. Upham company, 714 Providence 
building. 

FOR RENT — SECOND AND THIRD 
floors, building 25 by 90. 114 West 
Michigan street. Will rent cheap to 
good parties on long lease; key at 
premises. P. Beneteau, South Vic- 
toria street, St. Paul, Minn. 



MAJESTIC REBEKAH L0DG3 
No. 60. Regular meetings first 
and third Thursdays of each 
month, at 1. O. O. F. hall. IS 
Lake avenue north. Next 
i.eeting. Thursday evenlngr, 
April 16. 1914. Regular busl* 
iiess. Matilda JuUn. N. G.; 
.itsford. secretary. 

DULUTH LODGE, NO SOs! 
Loyal Order of Moose, meeti 
every Tuesday evening at 8 
o'clock. Moose hall, 224 West 
First street. Carl Schau, sec- 
retary, 14 Third avenue east, 



K. o. T. M. 
nCLUTH TE.\T. .NO. 1. K.VTGHTS 0» 

•,'ie Macrabeee of the World. Dieets first 
liud ihlid Mondan of each montb al 
Man-abee lull. >1 Lake avenue Liorib. 
Charlea O. Futter. commander, tit 
North Fifty-seteiith aveuue west; J. B. Gelineau. rec- 
ord keeper. ofQce in liall. Uours. 10 a. m. to 1 Bk 
m. daib'. Zenith 'phone. Graud t>19-X. 




FOR SALE — ONE LARGE FAMOUS 
heater, cost $50. for $20. Emll Hol- 
lander, 924 East Eighth street. Tele- 
phone Melrose 1529 ; Gr a nd 424. 

FOR SALE— LADY'S DRESSES. SIZE 
36. Melrose 6823. Call mornings, 208 
North Fifteenth av enue eas t. 

FOR SALE— FULL BLOODED WATER 
spaniel. 6 months old; guaranteed to 
give satisfaction. Write D 469, Her- 
ald. ^ 

FOR SALE— LARGE BUFFET DINING 
room table and large child's bed. 
1214 East Fifth street. 



WANTED— COMPETENT 
East First street. 



COOK. 2232 



WANTED — 
mediately. 



COMPETENT COOK IM- 
606 East Second street. 



WANTED 
wages. 



— GOOD 
Call Grand 



COOK; 
211-X. 



GOOD 



WANTED 
porter. 



AT ONCE— A 
Rex hotel. 



WHITE BAR 



S^TOVEJEPAIRS 

WE CARRY IN STOCK REPAIRS FOR 
10,000 different stoves and rangei. C. 
F. Wiggerts & Sons, 410 E. Sup. St. 



BRAZING 



CAST IRON, STEEL, COPPER. BRASS. 
C. F. Wiggerts & Sons, 410 E. Sup St. 



WANTED TO BORROW 

WANTED TO BORROW — uIoatTi 
per cent interest; first mortgage on 
city property valued at $1,800 as 
security. Insurance, $1,250. Address 
Box 93, Staples, Minn. 



W^ANTED 
Improved 
at $6,000. 



TO BORROW- 

farm land near 

Address G 484, 



-11.500 ON 
city, valued 
Herald. 



FOR SALE— PIKE LAKE LOTS; HIGH, 
well wooded, sandy beach and next 
to the large summer homes already 
built. Low prloe and very easy 
terms. A. H. Burg & Co., 23 Fourth 
avenue west. 



FOR SALE — REASONABLE. LOT 6. 
block 25, Highland Park addition; 50 
by 140 on Eighth street and Twen- 
tieth avenue east. Address S. Gelhaar. 
Eau Claire, Wis. 



FOR SALE— LATEST NO. 6 REMING- 
ton tvpewriter; brand new, $40. W 
503, Herald. 



FOR RENT — WE HAVE LARGE 
basement room, just right for repair 
shop for electrician, locksmith or 
manufacturer. Mass. Real Estate 
Co.. 18 I'hoenix block, city. 



y^^ 



FOR RENT— THE FINEST OFFICE 
on Superior street, for real estate, 
insurance, or general business pur- 
poses. Mass. Real Estate Co, 18 

- Phoenix block, city. 



FOR RENT— SEVERAL STORES CEN- 
trally located on Superior and First 
streets. Possession now or May 1. 
See N. J. Upham Co., 714 Providence 
building . 

FOR RENT— OFFICE ROOM, 203 
Providence building, after May 1. 
Apply at office or write Morris 
Henrlcksen for information. 



meur, 
Exeter 



DCLLTH HOMFSTEAD, NO. S131 
Brolherbaad of .America Teomco neeta 
first and tliirfl Monday eTei:iuC« ot etctt 
nunth. tt Woodman hall. Twenlj-finrt 
avenue west and First street, J. O, 
Weseiiberg. foreman. Mrs. J. A. Bell* 
corresrondent. Office and residence 
street. Phone ZeiilUi 2-'9D Lincoln. 



Nc. 1 




F<^R SALE — HOUSEHOLD FURNI- 
ture. Inquire at office, 218 West Su- 
perior street. 

FOR SALE— VISIBLE TYPEWRITER, 
like new. price today, $25; worth $60. 
Apply B 600, Herald. 



FOR 



E — POPCORN WAGON; 
cheap if talte» at once. 731 Garfield 
avenue. 



IP If 



FOR SALE— OLIVER 
No. 5, good as new 
H 498, Herald. 



TYPEtrRIT£:R 
, $35. Address 



FOR SALE — EARLY ENGLISH WAX 
finish library table. 2028 W^est Sec- 
ond street. Call mornings. 



GET THAT $1,000 6 PER CENT LOAN 
from the Real Estate Securities com- 
pany, 808 Alworth building. 



_SCHOOyfENGLISH^ 

TANIS SCHOOL OF ENGLISH. SEC- 
ond floor Winthrop block, corner 
Fourth avenue West and First atreet. 



FOR SALE— WE9T DULUTH SNAP, 
fifty feet on Fifty-sixth and High- 
land; all improvements; corner lot; 
cement sidewalk; $650. Wheeler 
agency , 808 Alworth building. 

FOR SALE— 200 ACRES GOOD LAND 
with mineral possibilities, $2.50 per 
acre for quick sale. Central Busi- 
ness Exchange, 214 Torrey building. 



FOR SALE — HOUSES, FLATS. LOTS 
and land by L. A. Larsen company, 
213-214-216 Pro»*denco building. 



FOR SALE— GARY LOT. CHEAP. B. Z. 
terms; best location. Gray-Wertln 
company. Alworth building. 



Subscribe ; ftir The Heraid 



FOR SALE — LADIES' DRESSES. SIZE 
36. Melrose 6828. Call mornings. 208 
North Fifteenth avenue east. 



FOR SALE— ONE KIMBALL PIANO 
and pianola. $90; easy terms. Ad- 
dress box A 888. Herald. 



For Sale — Edison Indestructible records 
by mall, 50c. Boston Music Co., Duluth. 



FOR RENT— WILL SHARE FINE 
suite of three rooms and services of 
first class stenographer reasonable; 
an s w er quick. 209 Alworth Bldg. 

FOR RENT— WE HAVE ABOUT 250 
feet of ground floor space on Supe- 
rior street. Little & Nolte company. 

. i::et for 

be divided. 
Fireproof. 



U. W. A. 
IMPERIAL CAMP, 2206 — JIEET3 A't 
Forester hall, Fcurtb avet:u« nest and 
First stieet. second and founh Tuesdays 
of eacb muntb. I>. C. Eaglea. consul! 
Robert Raukiou clerk. car* Itai^US 
Printing company. ____^ 

CLAN iSTEWART, NO. SO. O. S. C — 

Meets first and third Wedne«<lay tacft 
month. 8 p. m.. at U. O. F. baU. ccrnat 
Fourth avenue west and First »tre«l» 
Next regular luwMng April 15. AngiM 
G. Macauley. chief; John Gow. se<.retaiy| 
John Burnett, financial Kecr eun-, 313 ToiTcy buUdlnfc 

DIAMOND LODGE, NO. 45. K. OF P. 
— Mfcts every Monday evening in Sloan's 
Iiali. corner Twentieth avenue nest an4 
Superior street, lioyd Yergen. C. C* 
S326 \Ve6t FUat strccL S. U Pierce K« 
.f K. and S. 




FOR RENT— room, 25x75 
light manufacturing; can 
Apply Christie bu ilding. 

FOR RENT 
desk room. 




— OFFICE 
23 Fourth 



SPACE OR 
avenue veet. 



FOR RENT REASONABLE — GOOD | 
office or store space. 17 6th ave. 



For Rent — From May 
Sup. J. Oreckovsky, 



• III 



DRESSMAKING 



DRESSMAKIN G— F I R S T 
dressmaking and tailoring; 
reasonable. 313 Twenty-first 
west. 




1. store. 
630'^ W. 



103% 
Sup. 



CLASo 

prices 

avenue 



DRESSMAKING 
Park 125-Y. 



WANTED. CALL 



Good Furniture 
Furniture Co.. 



at 
332 



a bargain. 
E. Sup. St. 



Zenith 
Phones. 



FOR SALE CHEAP— GOOD RANGE; 
good baker. 926 West First street. 

FOR SALE — TWO BABY CARTS. 
3805 West Third street. 



TIMBER AND CUT -OVER LANDS 
bought; mortgage loans made; John 
Q. A. Crosby. 306 Palladlo building. 

I buy standlnr timber; also cut-over 
landd. Geo. Rupley, 612 Lyceum Bldg. 




Germain, 



ORDER OP OWIwS, DULUTH 
Nest. No. 1200— Meetings >r* held 
evetr Wednesday evening at Owls 
ball, 118 Weat Superior street, 
second floor. Joseph £. Feaka. 
.secretary. 418 West Superior St 



A. O. U. W.— Duluth Lod««. No. 10— 
Meeta every aecond and fourth Tuesday 
nigbts t.i L O. O. P. hall. 18 Lake are- 
na* north. Neart meeting April 14. 8 
p. m. sharp- George E, Lindberg, M. 
W. ; R. G. Fcot*. reronler; T. J. St. 
financier, 1* West First street. 



w 



WEST DULUTH LODGE NO. 
1478, Loyal Order Moose, 
meets every Thursday at 
Great Eastern hall. 210 Cen- 
tral avenue. M. J. Roach, 
secretary, 6402 Ramsey street. 



MODERN SAXIAIUTANS. 
ALPaA fOUNClL. NO. 1 — TAKE No- 
tice: That BeneHi-enl degree m-^tt sec- 
ond and rourth Tliursda^s and the So- 
marltan dtgree the first and third TUurg- 
daya at V. O. F. ball, corner Fcurt* 

.venue we.. "Sftn fcl^J iV^ .'V- % TVa.' f 
a • w«ii>r* P WaitBlnk*. aerHje. V- •*• Nome, w, 
i': ?i«t N.lloual iai^ buUJlng. iJ* W. M. Uua- 

aitlson. La «ly O- 8. , 

DULUTH TEMPLE. NO. 18«,^ 
Camels of the World, meet* 
every Friday evening at K, 
of P. hall. 118 West Superio* 
street. Martin Johnson, sec- 
retary. muiaOon avery Frl- 
evening. . 




day 




MODERN 



or 




IIROTHEKHOOD 
AMERICA. 
Duluth Central Lodge. No. 450. me^ 
at 418 W. Suptrljr street, 8e<-cii4 
loor. secrnd Tuesday of each mnntl^ 
Neat meeting April 14. Initiation-* 
Large class. Dr. WllUam U. Konk- 
liT. pre-ident: Charlea V. Har^ei^ 
seoretar> . M, F. Orchard, treasurer. 



ROTAL ARCANUM. Din.UTH COtjIf^ 
cU, No. 148S— VIs«ts second and fourtfe 
Tuesday cvrolnts at Maccabe* hall. It 
Laks avenue north. CIIuIkd Braoks. SM* 
rctao'. 401 ColuiubU buudlafr 



i 



.-f- 



»• 



K. OF P. 
NORTH STAR LOIHIE. XO. SS. K. 0» 
iv— .ilcets t\tty Tue»day, 7:30 p. m.. »l 
Castle ball, 118 West Superior strrst. 
.N>x! meeting April 14. Work— SexrvJ 
rank. C. S. Palmer. C. C city hall; S. 
A. Beam. K. of K. and S., iS Nortli Tweaty-elgtu^ 
avenue neet; Burt A. Rows. U. of P.. 20S First .Na^i 
tlonal Hank building. 

A. O. U. W. 
FIDKUTY LODGE. NO. 105 — MKET» 
at .\Iaccabee ball, 21 Lake avenue nimli, 
every Thursday at 8 p. m. Visiting iLcm- 
bers weli-ome. J. A. Lubaiisky. .M. VV.|. 
A. K. Pterins, rccordet; U. J. Uurvolt^ 
217 East Fifth street. 



riib 



•^> 




THE DULUTH HERAL 



VOLUME XXXII— NO. 1. 

LODGE, REPUBLICAN, 
SUPPORTS WILSON'S 
PANAMA TOLLS PLAN 



THURSDAY EVENH^G; Ai^RIL 9, 1914. 



Makes Speech in Senate 

Urging Repeal of 

Law. 



URGES MAINTAINING 

OF NATIONAL HONOR 



HOROWITZ 
MAYCONFESS 

New Development Looked 

for in Case of 

Gunmen. 



NEW MINISTPR ffiOM 

CHINA le WASHINGTON 



Quotes Declaration of Inde- 
pendence on Regard 
for Opinion. 



America Too Strong for 

Any Accusation of 

"Truckling." 



TTashinKton. April 9. — Senator Lodge, 
ranking: Republican member of the 
foreign relations committee, addressed 
the senate today In. support of I'resl- 
dent Wilson's Panama canal tolls pol- 
icy. He maintained vigorously the 
legal right of the I'nited States to ex- 
empt its shipping, foreign as well as 
coastwise, frjm tolls, but declared that 
"a decent respect to the opinions of 
mankind" and the "distrust and in 
same cases dislike" with which the 
United States Is regarded abroad, de- 
manded prompt repeal of the exemp- 
tion clause of the canal act. 

"Whether we shall insist upon giv- 
ing to our ships $2,000,000 or $.1,000,000 
in a disputed way is, in my concep- 
tion, a very small question compared 

to the larger issues which are here 
Involved." said the senator. "When the 
year 1909 open-ed. the I'nited States 
occupied a higher and stronger posi- 
tion among the nations of the earth 
than at any period In our history. 
Never before had we possessed such an 
Influence in International affairs, and 
that Influence had been used benefi- 
cent Ij' and for the world's peace in two 
conripictjous instances — at Portsmouth 
and at Algeciras. 

Shadow \\m% Lifted. 

"Never before had our relations with 
the various states of Central and South 
America been io good. It seemed as If 
the shadow of suspicion which, owing 
to our dominant and at times domi- 
neering power, had darkened and 
chilled our relations with tlie people 
of Latin America, had at last been 
lifted. 

"This great position and this rom- 
maading influence have been largely 
lost. I am not In the coxjncils of the 
president of the L'nited States, but I 
believe that during the past year the 
present position of the United States 
In Its foreign relations has becomie 
very apparent to him. as It has to 
other responsible and reflecting men, 
and with this appreciation of our 
present position ha.s come the earnest 
wish to retrace some of our steps, at 
least, and to regain, so far as possl- 




Alibi Affidavit for "Dago 
Frank" Sent to 
Glynn. • 



— Copyrtghfed by atnedlnst. 

SENATOR HENRY CABOT 
LODGE, 



WRIT FOR 
AG[TATOR 

Colorado Court Issues 

Habeas Corpus for 

"Mother" Jones. 



New York, April 9. — There were per- 
sistent rumors today to the effect that 
at least one of the four gunmen who 
are to die at Sing Sing Monday morn- 
ing for the part they played In the 
murder of Herman Rosenthal, the 
gambler, would confess. The rumors 
could not be traced to their sources. 

Joseph A. Shay, counsel for Charles 

Becker, the former police lieutenant, 

convl.ted of Instigating the murder 
but saved by higher court ruling, said 
he might go to the prison some time 
today and endeavor to get statements 
from the four men, to be used by the 
defense at the second trial of Becker. 
In case the condemned men decline to 
make statements to him, he has pre- 
pared an application to the supreme 
court for an order requiring the ap- 
pointment of a commission to take 
their depositions. In either event. It 
V. as said, the execution of the sen- 
tences would not be dela.ved. 
Have Xot Lout llope. 

Although Oovernor Cllynn twice has 
refu.sed to grant a reprieve, the faml- 
lifs of the gunmen and their counsel, 
Charles G. P. Wahle, had not given up 
all hope today. Every means known 
to the law will be employed from now 
until Monday, Wahle declared. 

Today he will send a memorandum 
to (iovernor Glynn on the latter's re- 
fusal to grant a reprieve. The memo- 
randum will take the form of an argu- 
ment In answer to the governor's rea- 
sons for hla refusal. Wahle had at 
first Intended to gf> to Albany today 
to make a personal plea to Governor 
(Jlynn, but when the delegation of rab- 
bis failed yesterday to move the gov- 
ernor to reconsidering his decision, 
AVahle determined that the interests of 

(Continued on page 5, second column.) 

NO TRAGEFOUNb OF 
TEMPERANCE WORKER 




COLD HITS 
WIDE REGION 

East, South and South- 
west Feel Belated 
Winter. 



Fruit and Vegetables in Ex- 
posed Places May 
Be Killed. 




NO ADVAN 

EITHEr^lDE YET IN 
^f IPICO FIGHTING 



Co 



SHARED THE TL 4l OF 
LATE RUIER OF JAPAN 



Situation There Regarding 

Foreign Property Is 

Serious. 



— <'op3rrlgh< hy tlie n«ln News Senice. 

K. F. SHAH. 

New York, April 9.~K. F. Shah, the 
new Chinese minister to the United 
States, arrived by way of Europe on 
Sunday and stopped In New York be- 
fore going to Waahlogton. Mr. Shah 
brought Mrs. Shah and four children, 
the minister was dressed In American 
clothing and so were all the children 
except the baby. Mrs. Shah wore her 
native dress. Mr. Shah lived in New 
York for a numb«r of years as consul 
general. He speaks excellent English 
and his eldest boy also speaks our 
language. 



SUFFRAGEmS BURN 
MANSION IN ULSTER 



Washington, April 9.— W'lnter's be- 
lated touch enveloping the entire East 
ret new records at official thermom- 
eters. 

In New Orleans, straw hats and . 
spring finery were replaced with win- 
ter overcoats. Throughout the South 
Atlantic and Gulf states heavy dam- 
i age to fVults and early crops was 
1 feared. A 30 deg. drop in a few hour.q 
was recorded at Mobile. Snow flurries , 
were recorded as far south as Green- 
ville, S. C, breaking the April records 
of several years. Fruit trees In blos- 
som In the Norfolk tidewater section 
were caught in the nipping frosts. 
April snow in Richmond was recorded 
for the first time since the Spansh 
war. 

The weather bureau predicted heavy 
frosts as far south as Northern Florida 
tonight and cold weather nearly every- 
where east of the Rocky mountains. 

Partial relief is expected by Friday 
except on the Atlantic coast. 



in 



(Continued on page S. thkrd column.) 

PROHiBiTION GAINS 
GROW WITH RETURNS 



Third Petition Is Granted 

By the Supreme 

Body. 



Over Half the Counties in 

Illinois Now Bar 

Saloons. 

Chicago, April !>. — Revised returns 
from Tuesday's local option elections 
In Illinois show that more than half 

of the 102 counties in the state are 
now anil-saloon- territory. Twenty-one 
countits were added to the dry column. 
Thirty counli* s already were dry, mak- 
ing a total of fifty-two prohibition 
counties. 

Substantially complete returns from 
280 of the .100 townships which voted 
on the liquor question show that 946 
saloons were voted out. Tiiese saloons 
are In 114 incorporated villages and 
citle.<;. Tw»iity-nlne villages and cities 
which were already dry voted to re- 
main dr.v. Sixty cities and villages 
which had been wet voted to remain 
wet. llowever, the wets failed to win 
a single township which was dry 
prior to the elections. 

WOULDOIVE UNO TO 
COUNTRY TEACHERS 



Denver. Col., April 9. — The supreme 
court late yesterday issued a habeas 
corpus writ for the release of "Mother" 
Mary Jones, now held as a military 
prisoner In the coal strike zone at 
Walsenburg. The writ is returnable in 
ten days. 

The action of the court is the result 
of a petition presented last week by 
Horace N. Hawkins, attorney for the 
striking coal miners. Until yesterday 
the court had not given permission for 
the presentation of the petition. 

The petition was the third applica- 
tion for a writ. 

During the detention of "Mother" 
Jones, the 82-year-old strike leader, in 
a hospital at Trinidad, the first ap- 
plication was made to the suprenje 
! court. It was denied on Feb. 18, on the 
; ground that the lower court should 

first pass upon the case. 
I The second application was made to 
the district court of Las Animas 
county which denied the application. 
; sustaining the authority of Governor 
I Ammons to imprison "Mother" Jones, 
j under the decision of the supreme 
, court In the Moyer case. 
I It was planned then to appeal to the 
I supreme court. This plan was aban- 
doned when "Mother" Jones was re- 
j leased and brought to Denver a few 
i weeks ago. "Mother" Jones was again 
; arrested and detained at Waisenburg. 
. In the petition upon which the court 
acted it is contended that the issues 
irc identical with those upon which 
the district court had given Its deci- 
sion, and that further action before 
the district court is unnecessary. 



Church Is Ready to Spend 

Entire Resources in 

Search. 

Danville. 111., April 9. — The entire 
resources of the Church of Christ In 
the United States will be called upon. 
If necessary, to unravel the mystery 
surrounding the disappearance March 
SI of Rev. Louis R. Palmont, a "dry" 
worker at WestvlUe, a mining village 
five miles south of Danville. 

Four detectives have been employed 
by local representatives of the church, 
and every means possible will be taken 
to find Palmont, dead or alive. Not a 
single scrap of evidence has been se- 
cured concerning his whereabouts. 

Governor Dunne's refusal to call out 
the local national guard company to 
assist In the search has caused Sheriff 
Shepard to organize a posse of spe- 
cial deputies who will go to WestvlUe 
to begin an organized search. Ponds 
will be dragged and abandoned mine* 
searched, as well as the wild and un- 
even country near the village. 



Woman Uses Hatchet 
British Museum in 
London. 

Belfast, Ireland, April 9. — Suffra- 
gettes continued their firebrand cam- 
paign in Ulster today by burning Or- 
lands, an old mansion near Carrlck- 
fergus or Belfast Lough. The usual 
suffragist literature was found about 

the grounds. 

• 

Used Hatchet In IWaseww. 

London, April 9.— A militant suffra- 
gette today smashed ten cases con- 
taining (?xhib*ts in the Asiatic section 
of the British mu? ^ -.i. She tjsed a 
hatchet to commit ,.; outrage. Ee- 



CoXdent April In Yearn. 

Memphis, Tenn., April 9. — Freezing 
and near-freezing temperatures were 
reported from West Tennessee, Arkan- 
sas, Mississippi and Oklahoma by the 
local weather bureau today. At Fort 
Smith, Ark., the mercury fell to 30 
deg. At Jackson, Miss., a temperature _ 
of 36 was recorded and at Vicksburg j 
38. I 

In Memphis the freezing point was 
reached. Nashville and Chattanooga 
reported 32 dog. temperatures. Indica- 
tions are that much of the fruit and 
vegetables in exposed places has 

been killer- 
Today the sun is shining, with 
promise of a decided rise In tempera- 
ture. 

Muskogee. Okla.. reported the cold- 
est April weather in twenty j'ears. 
From Bartlesville, Okla., near the 
Kansas line, to Durant, on the Texas 
border, freezing temperatures were re- 
corded. At Westv lUe, Ark., ice formed 

(Continued on page 5, second column.) 

KING TW^iiOURS 
UNDER THE KNIFE 




Mexican Herald Admits for 
First Time Villa Holds 
. Torreon. 



Carranza Justifies Villa's 

Expulsion of the 

Spaniards. 



of 



J" 



BISHOP SCHINNER 

TO GO TO SPOKANE. 

Milwaukee. Wis.. April 9. — Right 
Rev. A. F. Schlnner, formerly bishop 
of Superior, Wis., has been appointed 
bishop of the newly created diocese 
of Spokane, Wash., according to word 
received here today. 



yond breaking ft te<, (V.-Mmens of val- 
uable porcelam,-**^ "^".1, sh«.«U«l v*yy 
little damage ei> o^'T •^» the glass cases. 
The woman was S; nested, and when 
taken to the police i<tatlon declined to 

give her name. 

. ♦ ■ 

W. A. ScHmp* Better. 

Los Angeles, Cal., April 9.— W. A. 
Scripps. the former publisher, who is 
critically 111 at his* home in Altadena, 
was said to be slightly improved to- 
day. 



$ BOY FALLS FIVE STORIE.Sj ^ 

« IS NOTJBVBN BRUISED. * 

^ New HaTen, C«Bn., Ayril •.— ^ 
^ SIx-yenr-oId MlcKael Wllk*wsky ^ 
^ lo«t hU balance while playing on ^ 
^ the roof of a flve-«t«ry bnlldlng, m 
^ turning over Heveral times dnr- ^ 
^ ing his fall, and landed anhurt ^ 
^ on a mattreHM. He was taken to ^ 
^ a honpltal where phyalelanA failed i 
^ to find even a bntlae. ^ 



Claxton Suggests That 

Ttiey Be Engaged for 

Life. 

Louisville, Ky.. April 9. — Recommen- 
dations that the rural school teacher 
be emplo/ed for life, or during good 
behavior, and that each be furnished 
with a house and a plot of land for his 
own and experimental use.«, were made 
by P. P. Claxton, United States com- 
missioner of education, at a session 

here of the conference of education in 
the South. 

This plan for the readjustment of 
the country's rural and normal schools 
Included the rearrangement of school 
terms and courses so that boys and 
»lrls forced to work can attend school 
one week and work the next, and the 
readjustment of normal schools so that 
teachers may be trained for the prop- 
er Instruction of the country youth. 

ROOSEVELT TO SAIL 

FO R HOM E MAY 12. 

New York, April 9. — Theodore Roose- 
velt Is expected to reach Manaos. Bra- 
zil, the last of this month, according to 
a dispatch from Apthony Flala, a mem- 
ber of one of the divisions of the 
Roosevelt exploring party, which the 
Times published today. The Fiala dis- 
patch dated at Manaos yesterday, says: 

"Capt. Amilcar de Magalhaes. com- 
manding the exploring party which 
started down the Ciiparano river, has 
Just arrived. Leo C. Miller, the nat- 
uralist of the American Museum of 
Natural History who accompanied the 
Roosevelt expedition, is with him. 

"Mr. Miller says he left Col. Roose- 
velt in good health on the Duvlda 
river on Feb. 27. The Colonel, he says, 
has been engaged In some diflcult ex- 
ploration, and may be expected to 
reach here late this month. There is 
some talk of bia sallios on May 12." 



REPORTS MASSACRE 
OF THE CHRISTIANS 



Official Statement Tells of 

Mussulman Outbreak 

in Albania. 

Athens, April 9. — An official com- 
munication says that Mussulman Al- 
banians on Tuesday entered Koritsa, 
In the vilayet of Monastlr, and with 
the aid of the gendarmerie, who had 
prevlou.^ly disarmed the Inhabitants, 
began yesterday a massacre of Chris- 
tians. 

A Vienna dispatch on April 3 said It 
was reported from Avlona that irreg- 
ular forces had fiercely attacked Kor- 
itsa, but were repulsed by the Al- 
banians. 






*^ *f\ ^j\ jf\ ^•j\ ^t ^^^^^ j| 



Extensive Ulceration 
Stomach Found By 
' Surgeons. 

Stockholm, Sweden, April 9. — Kins' 
Gustave of Sweden was operated on to- 
day at the Sophia hospital here. The 
surgeons found that he was suffering 
from extensive ulceration of the stom- 
ach. 

The operation, which was performed 
bjr Prof. John WUhelm Berg, a well- 
known Swedish surgeon, and Jules 
Heribert Akerman, .lasted two hours. 
It was announced aftcr*i'ard that the 
royal patient's condition was satisfac- 
tory, although his majesty was weak. 

The queen occupied an apartment in 
the hospital during the operation, and 
will stay there until the king is con- 
valescent. 

After the operation a bulletin was 
issued which read: 

"A more or less superficial ulcer was 
discovered on the left lower side of 
the stomach near the pylorus, or open- 
ing between the stomach and small 
Intestine. The ulcer showed no signs 
of being malignant. The operation of 
gastro-enterotomy then was per- 
formed." 



DOWAGER EMPRESS HARUKO 



DOWAGER OF 
JAPAN DIES 



End Comes Suddenly 
Presence of Emperor 
and Family. 



in 



Empress Had Seen 
t«catest Advances 
on's History. 



the 
in 






A WARNING! 



Tokio, April 9. — The Dowager Em- 
press Haruko died at the imperial villa 
at Namazu today. Following the usual 
custom In the case of the death of a 
member of the Imperial family, the 
official announcement of the event will 
not be made until the body has been 
transferred to the capital. This is ex- 
pected to take place tomorrow. 

Her majesty passed away suddenly, 
In the presence of Emperor Yoshlhlto, 
the empress and the other members of 
the royal family, who had been sum- 
moned from the capital. 

The Imperial patient had developed 
deceptive symptoms. She displayed In- 
creased vigor and asked for food. A 
short time afterward her majesty be- 
came unconscious. The doctors In at- 
tendance applied restoratives, but 
without avail, and she died without 
recovering consciousness. 
- Her majesty had been suffering for 
a consTderable period from angina 
pectoris, but the official diagnosis de- 
clared that Bright's disease was the 
direct cause of her death. 



SAY BANKER SPENT 
EVERYTHING IN SIGHT 



Creditors Want His Estate 

Given to the 

Trustees. 

Toledo. Ohio, April 9— Charges that 
the late (George A. Klahr. president of 
the defunct People's bank at Sycamore. 
Ohio, appropriated to his own use not 
only the original capital and a part 
of the earnings of the bank but also 
more than $200,000 of the deposits, 
were made by creditors of the bank lu 
Federal court here. 

The charges were made In testimony 
offered by the creditors In support of 
a petition recently filed In Federal 
court, in which they asked that the 
trustees In bankruptcy be given pos- 
session of Klahr's personal estate, es- 
timated to be worth 176.000. 




Dowager Empress Haruko was the 
widow of Emperor Mutsuhlto, who 
died .luly 30, 1912. She was born May 
23, 1850, and was the daughter of a 
nobleman, Ichtjo Tadao. In 1868 she 
married the late emperor, and was de- 
clared empress. 

Haruko, by the side of her husband, 
passed through the troubled period of 
the transformation of Japan at the be- 
ginning of Mutsuhito's reign. She saw 
him transfer his capital from Kioto to 
Teddo, which was later renamed Toklo. 
She watched with curious Interest the 
opening of the country to foreign com- 
merce, its departure from old world 
customs and its adoption of Western 
civilization. She waited In the Im- 
perial palace news of the Japanese 
armies at war, first with China and 
then with Rusfcia, and saw the complete 
evolution of Japan Into a world power. 
Of Simple Tastes. 

Haruko was simple In her tastes. She 
presided over court functions with great 
dignity, on most occasions wearing 
Western dress, especially when she 
came Into contact with Americans 
or Europeans. W^hen the func- 
tion was purely Japanese, she 
occasionally returned to the pic- 
turesque costume of her youth. 

The dowager empress was greatly 
affected by the death of Mutsuhito, 
suffering for many months from an af- 
fection of the heart. She died at the 
Imperial villa at Namazu, a watering 
place near Yokohama. 



Washington, April 9.— Overnight dls« 
patches to the navy department fron> 
Rear Admiral Fletcher reported fight- 
ing still In progress at Tampico, w'th- 
out advantage to either side. On ac- 
(ount ,of a heavy norther. Rear Ad- 
miral Mayo was discouraging refugee* 
from going aboard ships there. 

Admiral Fletcher sent this report, 

r>.ceived from Admiral Mayo yesterday 
afternoon: 

"Mayo reports fighting continue* 
with no change except that the gun- 
boat Zaragoza is assisting the Ver» 
Cruz in shelling Arbol Grande. On 
account, cf a norther and no advantage 
In fighting am discouraging refugrea 
from coming on board. Have received 
few on Des Moines alongside dock, u 
rebels receive artillery, which seema 
to be Improbable, conditions will b« 
more serious. Reports circulated oa 
shore that American battleships aro 
supplying arms to the rebels." 
Refage on War*hip«. 

The admiral add«:d that he had di- 
rected Admiral Mayo to give refiig* 
to Americans and other foreigners on 
Amepican vessels as far as possible. 
The department today suggested to 
Admiral Fletcher the possibility of 
taking the marines off the transport 
Prairie at Vera Cruz and sending that 
vessel to Tampico to receive the re- 
fugees who cannot be cared for on th« 
other ships without more or less In- 
con\'bnlence. It Is about settled that 
If an additional ship is sent to thtt 
east coast it will be either a navy 
transport — possibly the Hancock, now 
at New Orleans — or a commercial ves- 
sel. 

Officials here did not regard the 

shore report from Tampico that th« 

I rebels are receiving aid from the 

I American battleships as worth com- 

I ment. 

C*n«iitl»«s Im I'aM^ie*. 

'^-.ncerning conditiotiti In rniMpi'--* the 
suite department today issued ihl» 
statement: 

"From Vera Cruz wireless report* 
Indicate that the situation at Tampico 
as regards foreign property, is com- 
plicated and serious. The Waters- 
Pierce oil refineries have been occupied 
by attacking forces during the last 
two days and as a consequence, have 
been under fire from the Federal gun- 
boat In the harbor. A loss to the en- 
tire property is feared. The ware- 
houses of the Agenda Coraerclal, 4 
German property, were burned with ft 
loss of $600,000." 

From Ensenada it is reported that 
the situation at Mazatlan Is tranquil. 

Five Americans arrested at Ver» 
CruB as a military precaution were re- 
leased" today. A consular report front 
Torreon saj's "very good order" hatf 
been re-established there. 

Brig. Gen. Hugh L.. Scott at El P.iso 
today reported to the war department 
by wireless that fighting was said to 
be in progress at San Pedro and ParaS, 
but he gave no details. 

AdMlts Villa HoMm T«rr««ii. 

Mexico City. April 9. — The first ad- 
mission that Gen. Villa and the rebel 
army have occupied Torreon Is made 

(Continued on page 6, fifth column.) 

MINNESOTANlO BE 
CONSUL AT HUME 



Draper No Better. 

Greenville, S. C April 9. — No Im- 
provement was reported today In the 
condition of Former Governor E. S. 
Draper of Massachusetts, stricken 
here with paralysis. Attending physi- 
cians would make no predictions, but 
indicated they entertained grave fears 
for Mr. Draper's recovery. Members of 
the former governor's family arrived 
today from Massachusetts. 



Transfers in Service Are 

Recommended By ttie 

President. 

From The Herald Ws>Mnit»n Bureaa. 

Washington. April 9. — The president 
today made the following consular and 
diplomatic nominations: 

Thomas B. Heensn of Minnesota, 
now consul at Warsaw, to Flume, 
Hungary. 

Consul general at large — Ralph J. 
Totten of Tennessee, now consul at 
Montevideo. 

Consul general — Joseph I. Brittain 
of East Palestine. Ohio, now consul 
general at Coburg, transferred to 
Auckland, N. Z. 

Leo J. Keena of Detroit. Mich., now 
consul at Florence, transferred to 
Buenos Aires, Argentina. 



165 HUNGRY MEN 
BREAK FROM TRAIN 






THE DAY IN CONGRESS 



SENATE. 
Mot at noon. 

CaiialN romnilttee began hear- 
IngM on the Panama tolln exemp- 
tion repeal. 

St-iiator ICrnjon prepared to re- 
net« hlH movement to aboltah ex. * 
HesHion*. except for for- i 

Senator l^odge npoke »ln nap- Mft 
port of tlir Panama toll* exentp- * 
tion repeal. i 



« 

t 



^^^'^^^tM^ 



* 

4( rrntlve Hesiil 
^ elgn affaini. 

% 

jj( HOl'SB. i 

^ Met at noon. ^ 

^ Itesumed debate on tbe leglnln- ^ 
live, rxernttve and Judicial ap- 4^ 
proprlatlon bill. ^ 



Kelley Followers Demand 

Food and Pueblo Police 

Serve Beans. 



% 



% 



Pueblo. Colo., April 9. — After break- 
ing their way from box cars. Into which 
they had been locked, overpowering a 
dozen police and railroad detectives, 
166 members of "Gen." Kelley's arm 
of the unemployed left a Denver 
Rio (Jrande freight train two miles 
north of this city today and marched 
back to town, demanding food. 

The men were escorted to the city 
corral, where the police made arrange- 
ments to supply a menu of beans, bread 
and coffee. It was planned to send the 
"army" east over the Missouri Paciflo 
railroad as soon as cars can be sup- 
plied. 

When the train bearing the army- 
arrived here today the cars were 
locked, and the police planned to send 
the train on through to Denver. The 
band, however, objected to this pro- 
gram and the escape followed. 

• 

Bry^an Bark at Work. 

Washington. April 9.— Secretary 
Brvan. who has been kept indoors for 
a week by a hard cold, returned to- 
day to his desk at the state depart* 
ment. 



XC. 



DEFECTIVE PAGE 



k 



I 




Thursday, 



THE DULUJH HERALD 



April 9, 1914. 



BANKS TO AID 
DAIRYMEN 

Will Loan Money to Farm- 
ers for Purchase 
of Cows. 



era will enter Into the work with zest 
rnd will take advaritatre of the oppor- i 
ti. nlly afforded them. | 

- * — 

See the Flower Show 

at the Duliith Floral company. 

Kaster Overtoat« — The Bis Duluth. 



The Cross The Christ 
The SacrKice 

The :Ne»v TrxtMnient rrrortl of owr 
I.ord'n rrurifi.«inn mmiI nppriiprinte 
hiroinw. \o nfrmoN. So Miiiionnee- 
Mentn. Mrrvlcr «-on«lnrt4-d by Hev. 
Kobrrt lont and i-holr. TOM<;ilT. 
"* r. M. Klmt l'rt«byterian rhurrh. 



Local Agriculturists and 
Bankers Adopt the Ash- 
land Plan. 



COMING TO DULUTH 
TO FIND A WIF[ 



Tl'Presentatives of the l«-ading: banks 
of the city met late yesterday after- 
noon with O. P. Craig, chairman of 
the agricultural committee of the 
*"ommerv-lal club and others Interested 
in aKrieiiltural development. and 
*uoi>ted the Ashland plan of proniot 
ins dairyinsr in this vicinity. 

Tiie Ashland plan is simple and has 
proved very t-ffective. Uuj^iness men 
K*t Ashland, where the plan had its 
oriKin, Ruaranleed the banks 1'5 per 
v«ni of loans made to farmers for the 
purchase of cows. The banks took 
♦•ri.ittel mortgrattes on the animals 
ivlitn they adv.inct-d the money. The 
Vate of intcr«'St ^^ as made very low — 
4» per e»'nt, it is understood. Defort 
tl'e loans were made, the farmers who 
de.-iirtd to take advantage of the bene- 
fit offered them are required to rile an 
appli<-atioii with the trustees ap- 
t«^•:nted. statintr how many cows thev 
van properly take care of. This appll- 
ojition is then ttirned over to an in- 
spti tor. who not only looks into the 
applicant's reputation for honesty and 
how his credit stands, but also inve.-- 
ticates conditions at his farm to tlnd 
out if he can properly house and feed 
the cattle, whether he is slovenly or 
«.lherwise in his conduct of his farm. 
and everyihins: tliat will tend to pro*. 
nift" or retard success. 

If he is found to be .-satisfactory his 
.'application is granted and the loan ad- 
v>Ti,ed. Ill this way the Ashland 

<;u-trict has built up wonderfully as 
a dairy c»nter. and in a very short 
time: and the bankers have not yet 
. xp. rienced a loss. The matter w&s 
l.,ioached in Duluth last week, and 
yesterday culminated in the actiof. 
mf^ntioned. The trustees appointed are 
K. *'.. Ohurch, George C. Stone and W. 
G. Hegardt. 

The matter will be taken up further 
V\- the asricultural committee and it 
Is likelv that a sub-committee will be 
ji|. pointed to visit the business men of 
thf city to see about their siibscrip- 
tji^is to a puaraiitee fund. That com- 
T>leted the banks of the city will be 
vK-tdv to do their part. 

; At a hincheo" served last week at 
ttie Commercial club to business men 
aiid farm-^-rs the matter was taken up, 
tporoii£:hl.v discussed, and received a 
n*c.<^t entl^osiiistic indorsement of all 
Pfrsent. It is believed that the farm- 



_ Olaf Larson of Holland. Mich., the 
Tnan whi> wrote Mayor I'rinc*- in his 
search fur a wife, ha.s accepted the of- 
fer made the t>tlier d.a.v by Manatfer 
\V. M. Abrahamson of the Kmpress the- 
.'iter. and in a telt-jfiain received here 
this morniuK. states that he will arrive 
in Duluth tomorrow. 

Mr. Abrahamson has offered to find 
I..irs»n u wife, the only condition made 



brother-in-law. I. W. (Jerlieh, a veteran 
Montana printer, who died in a Helena 
hospital of appendicitis and hernia, 
aged b'i. Mr. Manner is taking the 
body to St. Paul. Interment will be 
made beside the mother and brother of 
the deceased. A native of Dubuque, 
Iowa. Mr. (Jerlich learned his trade in 
Wisconsin and for twenty years had 
worked in newspaper offices in Mon- 
tana. 

DROP GAMBLING'CHARGE 

Trio Dismissed on Ground of Insuffi- 
cient Evidence. 

Because evlden<'e was Insufficient, 
.TudKe Cutting dismissed the gambling 
charges against Mike Codlesky, 24; 
I'eter Mesunas, L'8. and Anton Krijua, 
39, who were arrested last evening b^ 
Detectives Toewe and Rradley. 

("lodlesky came to headquarters 

j early last evening and reported that 

he had lost $10 while gambling with 

Peter Mesunas and Anton Krijua at 

1 1:^9 West Superior street. 

Lieut. Schultz detailed Detectives 
Toewe and Bradley to investigate the 
claims of «!odlesky and they later ar- 
rested Mesunas and Krijus on a gamb- 
ling charge. Gfidlesky was also ar- 
rested and this morning the three were 
arraigned before Judge Cutting. 



active part In th£_rccent Investigation 
of moral con"3Ttions as well as In the 
recall election are«»9nid to be back of 
the pr(»po8eJlicampaien. A nufnber 
who were afl^d about It refused to 
discuss the matter at present, hut in- 
timated that«4h««4 was sttmethlng to 
the rumor. 



COUNT 




RD MEETS. 



called gas company franchise case, 

which in the di.strict court gained a 

decision that the mayor's veto was of 

no value, has been taken to the su- 

I preme court. An appeal to the su- 

I preme court has also been taken In 

' the so-called kidnaping case by two 

of the defendants, Peter Newman and 

W. J. Sullivan of Crosby. 




G. A. R. NOTICE 

All members of the Grand Army of the Re- 
public are requested to meet at Memorial 
hall. In eourihouse, on Friday. April 10, at 
2 o'clock p. ffl.. to attend the funeral of our 
fate ccmrade. Edwin B. Forco. 
E.A.TYLER. JOHN H. LA VAQUE. 

Commander. Adjt. i. B. Culver Post. 



Superior 



Old Members Turn Over Clean Slate 
t(JtSu)^essors. 

The old boaitd ■^i countr supervisors 

arc holding ttie^*!: final meeting thi.'^ 

afternoon at .tJte 4i<jurthou9e. All busi- 

I ness of the old bo&rd will be completed 

I and the metmJei'«='*xpect to turn over 

a clean' slate M tlArnew members. 

According t#,the election returns the 
following will comprise the new board: 
B'lrst ward. E. A. t^lark; Second ward, 
William A. Hagr^en; Third ward, John 
Bradshaw; Fourth ward, Joseph Mc- 
Mtiller.; Fifth ward, Peter Ackerr.on, 
Sixth ward, bimanuel Rossiter; Sev- 
enth ward, Fred S. Ijossr Eighth ward, 
Walla<e W. Andrew; .\lnth ward, Nels 
Nelson; Tenth ward, VV. R. Hallam; 
Amnicon, Oscar I/lndquist; Bennett, K. 
P. Carlson; Brule,. T. W. Jay; <;ordon, 
■William Wilkinson; Hawthorne, John 
Levlne; Highland, J. W. Connor; L,ake- 
8lde, .f. W. Lake; Maple, Aleck .\ntUla; 
Parkland, Charles Cole; Solon Springs, 
J. Llmpach; South Range, J. I'hllbrook 
or A. Olson (tied vote); Summit, Fred 
Chaffey; town of S^upenior, Bruce John- 
son: Wascott. N. A. Thompson; village 
of Lake Nebagamon, S. P. Redding. 

CITYlEGlNS 
PAVING WORK 



I OBITUARY 

Cliarlea Frederick SeyferlleJi, chief 
of the Chlcag.i fire department since 
1910, died suddenly at his home April 
8. He had been 111 only a few days 
and his death was unexpected. Sey- 



road circles of Chicago, liuffalo. Pitts- 
burg and Detroit, where he had held 
important railroad positions. The body 
will be taken to Detroit. 

Pierre Salea, one of the most popular 
French authors of stories of rofnance 
and adventure, died In Paris, April 9, 
aged CO. Originally he was a bank 
clerk, then a journalist and afterwards 
a writer of novels of peculiarly Pari- 
sian setting. 



Dr. Alexander F. CluimberlHlii, pro- 
fes.sor of anthropology since 1886 at 
Clark university, died in Worcester, 
Mass., April 9. 



OLAF LARSON. 



by the local theater manager being 
that Larson be willing to have the 
Llmprcss audience clioose for the wom- 
on who will apply in answer to the 
advertisement for a wife, the one 
whom they think will make him the 
best partrter. Larson has agreed and 
after his arrival tomorrow, arrange- 
ments will be made for the contest, 
and an tntry list will be prepared. 



BUYS CUYUNA INTEREST. 

[ Bayfield Man and Others in Hundred 
Thousand Dollar Deal. 

Frank Boutin of Liayfield, Wis., and 
several business associates this morn- 
ing closed a deal whereby, for a con- 

! sideration of $100,000 they became 
owners of a one-sixteenth Interest la 
840 acres of rich iron mining prop- 
erties on the Cuyuna range. The deal 
was closed through George O. New- 
ton's office today. 

The mining property includes some 
of the richest mines on the Cuyuna 
range. In the parcel of land is the 
Pennington mine and also 130 acres 
of property now under lease to the 
Whitmarsh Mining company. The 

; rest of the property lies adjacent to 

I these mines and is said to have indi- 

I cations of rich ore. 



Will Pave Lake Avenue 

From Can^l to Twelfth 

Street. 




Easter Suits— The Big Duluth. 

SHOLUNlTWANTC 
A "SQUARE DEAL" 

Will Ask Council to Give 

High Court Complete 

Report. 

Charles Sholund, whose saloon -li- 
cense at 101 East Michigan street was 
recently revoked by the council, served 
notice upon City Clerk C. S. Palmer 
this morning that he will ask the 
council to furnish the supreme court 
with a more nearly complete record of 
the proceedings than was forwarded 
to comply with the writ of certiorari 
issued by that body. 

Through his attorneys, Sholund al- 
leges that the return was false and 
a sham, being incomplete in many es- 
sential particulars. He asserts that 



it did not show that there was n. 
written resolution leading to the rev- 
ocation; that it did not show the ob- 
jections which were * raised; that It 
did not show that Sholund was given 
no opportunity to defend himself: that 
It did not show that petitions wen- 
presented asking a postponement an<l 
approving Sholund's moral character: 
that it did not show that Commissionei 
Hlcken said that the revocation was 
recommended under section 18 of th'- 
saloon code, and that it did not show 
that the council refused a request that 
a statement be inserted in the record 
giving the reason for the council's ac- 
tion. The notice declares further that 
the return was carelessly and negli- 
gently driwn and Is a self-serving 
declaration. 

Attorney W. H. fJurnee, police proa- 
ecutor, who has been representing the 
city in the case, said this morning that 
the notice is comparatively insignifi- 
cant as it affects the merits of the 
case. He stated that the city will pre 
sent its own defense and that the ncr 
tice is equivalent to reque.«ting th'> 
city to answer as desired by the ap- 
pellant. 

• 

To Comhine Bralnerd CinbM. 

Bralnerd, Minn.. April 9. — (.'Special to 
The Herald.) — D. A. Haggard, <). A. 
Peterson and Carl Zapffe have been 
appointed a committee of the Commer- 
cial club to confer with the Booster 
club Friday evening with the view ot 
presenting the consolidation of the two 
clubs in an effort to secure the best 
1 results along the line of boo.stlng 
Brainerd. The Commercial club has ex- 
tended to the state Sunday school con- 
' vention at Winona this year, an invl- 
I tation to hold their 1915 convention In 
; Bralnerd, the club pledging to secure a 
1 hall for the assembly. 



Easter Shoes — The Big DulutH. 



Parts Nc'o York Washington Cinctnimti Duluth 



fO* 



Montana Prlnlpr Die*. 

.Jamestown, .V. D.. April 3. — J. E. 
Manner of this city was called to 
Helena, Mont., by the death of his 



No License" Campaign. 



Superlorites who were disappointed 
at the outcome of the city election In- 
tend to start a "no license" campaign 
in the hope of placing Superior in the 
column among the "dry" cities of the 
state. 
I Several of the pastors who took an 



The public wo.r^g, division of the city 
began its actlvlti^'for the season yes- 
terday by corprnet>cinff the improve- 
ment of Lake -avenue from the canal 
to Twelfth street, which will be paved 
with concrete. 

The work is bein^r done by day labor 
and an effort will be made to push it 
through to an eafly completion. This 
will be a gFeart* convenience to tlie 
hundreds of people who go to the boat 
club during the summer. 

The estimated cost of the job is 
$20,000, of whichi the city's share is 
figured at $4,&D0. , 

The city will do more work by day 
labor this year than ever before. In 
addition to the LaJt,e avenue job it w^ill 
pave Superior jStfe'et between Fifteenth 
and Thirtieth avenues. Arrangements 
have been tlnishgq f"'' the purchase of 
most of the "^maitevial and It will be 
started within a short time. 



CHARLES F. SEYFERLICH. 



ferlich joined the flre department in 
1877 as a truck man, and served 
through the ranks of the department. 
He was born in 1852. 



MIkk Edith Eaton, writer of Chinese 
stories under the pen name of "Sin 
Sin Far," and a sister of Mrs. Bertram 
Babcock of New York, who writes un- 
der the name of Onoto Watanna, died 
In Montreal, April 8. 



Andrev%- Jaeksoii Dull, for many years 
prominent in the iron business in 
Pennsvlvania and Virginia, died at 
Harrisburg, Pa., April 8, in his 84th 
year. . 



Crow Wlag C»srm .\ppealed. 

Brainerd, Minn., April 9. — The 



so- I 



Ur.: J. F. S. GorgaK, former dean of 
the dental department of the UniVer- 
sitv of Maryland, died of paralysis at 
Baitimore, Md., April 8. He was 80 
years' old and was one of the leading 
authorities and writers on dental sur- 
gery in the country. 

\r.' "j. Hunter, division freight agent 
of the C.rnnd Trunk Pacific railroad, 
died is Winnipeg, April 8, after a short 
illness. He was well known in rail- 

— — — i^"^™'*—^'"'^^™— *"'**'^'*^~'""""*™"— "**" 



»'. 



WEATHER — Generally fair and warmer ^^-eather toni ght and Friday; moderate to fresh southwesterly winds. 



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Next Sunday is 



y''/::y.f'rX 



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Easter comes a little late this year 
right at the time when most men 

buy their Spring clothes anyway. 
It will seem as if every man you meet 
Easter Sunday is wearing a new suit. 
Why not have yours? 

If you are willing to pay a medium price, we suggest' 



?aMi 






X 



4^n 



;V 



Clothes 



$17 






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11 



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TKAOe MARK KCOftTIIfO 



"The same price the world over." 

There is a great conception J^Jimd them. One of the oldest and largest 
makers saw tne possibilities oi ; rcat savings by turning the chief aim of 
his organizjation upon a suit of 6n<i sustained quality at one known price. 

Carefully selected all-wool fabrics for $17 
Style imparted by a great designer for $17 
Workmanship including hand tailoring for $17 
Guaranteed wear and satisfaction for $17 

> 

Once you sec our great variety of new styles and fabrics you will feel 

that we have done your thinking for you. You can't go wrong — we have 

a mirror. So what's the use of waiting till after Easter? Come in now. 

Special styles for young men. Less lively styles if you refuse to admit 

yourself young. 






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OAK HALL CLOTHING CO. 

OA.K HA.L.L. BUII..DINC. 



b::V 



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"Correct Dress for Women 

The Gidding displays — Duluth's most com4 
plate exhibit of authoritative Fashions — are 
augmented daily by reproductions of the 
newest French modes, which are styles 
identical with the originals in every detail of 
model, material and trimming. 

Also splendid selections of new individual designs 
exclusive to this establishment—adapted from the 
French to gratify conservative taste, 

Tailleurand Costume Suits— $45, $55, $65, $75 up 

Misses' and Juniors' Suits, $25, $29.50, $32.50 up 

Street, Afternoon and Sports Coats— $19.50, 

$25.00, $29.50 up -M 

Trotteur Froeks, Bridge and Calling Gowns-^ 
$19.50, $25.00 up 

Dance Frocks— $25.00, $29.50, $35.00 up 

Evening Gowns— $45, $55 and up 

^i ^ Handsome Blouses — $3. 75 up i 

Hats— $7.50, $10.00, $12.50 up 

Juniors' and Girls' Coats— $6,75 up 

Juniors' and Girls' Dresses— $1.25 up 

Complete assortments of Madame Irene and Gossard 
Front Laced Corsets, $2 to $25 — complete assort- 
ments of Brassieres, Corset Covers and Accessories. 



A SXER AHEAD 

In clothes cleaning we are just a step ahead of the other fellow. Rea- 
son is per.sonal attention to all order.s. May we serve you? 

Up-to-Date Carpet and Rug Cleaning 

We have installed the largest and best carpet and rug cleaning depart- 
ment In the West. We would be pleased to have you call and inspect. 

Compre.ssed air renovating of j-ft-i _ ^ j 

carpets, rugs, furniture, -"ggflMtftfe-- Prompt service and 

pillows, mattresses ^'^^^H^^H^^SQB^^ satisfaction 

arxd wall fabrics. y'^tfB^H^H^^Bi^B^ guaranteed. 

Renovating, 
refitting, sewing, 
sizing and laying. 



CLOTHES gJLEANERS DYERS <r CARPET CLEANERSJ 




.2:30-23 2 E.SAJPERIOR ST. ;. 

^^BOTH PHOWES 1688 '. " 



^S^QI^^B 



H.L.GARBER MGR. 




Do you know why 
cows ' milk will not 
do for your baby ? 

Many mothers who cannot 
nurse their babies think that 
cows' milk is a safe substi- 
tute. But it is not. You can't 
depend on getting cows' milk 
fresh and pure. Nearly all 
milk is 30 hours old when 
you get it. There are but 8 

clean dairies in every ICO. and so 
many cows infected with tuberca- 
losis, you can't be sure that the m?lk 
you get is free from these dangers. 

Even were you sure of getting absolutely pure milk, still it would not 
do for your baby. Cows' milk is inteiwied for strong little calves, and nature 
has provided a calf with four stomachs to digest it. Your baby's tender 
little stomach cannot digest the heavy curds in cows' milk. It struggles 
under such an unfair load and finally becomes weak and ilL Give your 
baby the food nearest to mother'* milk — 

Nestle'sFooa 

The best of cows' milk from our 
own guarded Dairies, purified and 
modified with just enough wheat, 
sugar and other strength -building 
elements added — this is Nestle 's 
Food. Even the frailest baby can 
digest it. Cold water and one mln- 
ate's boiling prepares It. No fuss, 
no bother, no risk. Your baby will 
thrive on it as the babies of three 
generations have done. 

Send the Coupon for a sample box 
of Nestles and our "Batter Babies" 
Chart — FREE. This chart shows 
you how to Judge your baby accord- 



ing to modern health standards. See 
whether your baby weighs as much 
as he should, and whether bis meas- 
urements are up to the standard of a 
a baby his age. Send the coupon today 
for the Chart, our helpful Mothers' 
Book, and a big box of Nestl6's Food. 



NESTLfe^ FOOD COMPANY 

Woolworth UId(., N«w T*rk 

Please send m« FREE, your book end 
trial package. 

.\ Ci9t€ 



Address 



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/. 



^'* . 




A Fe^v Straignt 

Questions to 

Every 



FISKEH WILL AGAIN HEAD 
POLipf RELIEF ASSOCIATION 



oun 

I" 17 >'o« intended to buy a 
-«■« Diamond Engagement 
Ring at what store would you 
choose to buy it? 

If you knew of a Diamond Store, not just a Jewelry Store, 
where you could get as good a Diamond Ring or better 
for the same price would you not buy it from that store? 

Do you think that Bagley & Company could afford to 
tell you that they offer you diamond values impossible 
to smaller Jewelry Stores if they could not back up the 
statement with the goods? 

Bagley & Company lead in Diamonds, are . 
Diamond Merchants and have been since 1885 . 



« » 



WATCH OUR WINDOW FOR EXCEPTIONAL VALUES IN 

Diamonci Engagement Rings 

Priced from $25 to $125 



I 

Bagley ^ Company 

Jewelers and Diamond Merchants 

315 West Superior Street 



Capt. A. G. Fisketti^d fjieut. Frank 
Sohulte were yesterday^ afternoon re- 
elected president atfd 'secretary, re- 
spectively, of the Ddhith Police Relief 
association at the anhitat meeting and 
election held at police headquarters. 

Capt. Fiskett has held U^e office con- 
tinuously for the la*t fourteen years. 1 
He has made an enviable record as 
head of the organization and his re- 
election for the ensuing year was made 
unanimous by the members of the as- 
sociation. Next spring he will com- 
plete a round fifteen years as presi- 
dent. The office was held by Chief 
Troyer up to the time he was made 
chief. 

Sergt. A. V. Toungberg won the vice 
presidency from Sergt. David Butchart 
by the to«ts of a coin, they having re- 
ceived a tie vote at the election. Lieut. 
Schulte hae held the position of sec- 
retary for several years and his re- 
election marks the unanimous approval 
of the association of his services. Gus 
Lahti was named treasurer to succeed 
Lieut. John Drannen, who will retire 
on a pension June 1. 

During the fi.scal year ending March 
81, approximately $1,900 was paid out 
of the treasury as the result of death 
and Illness among the members, two 
of whom died. I'^are are eighty-four 
members in the asiSociation, twenty- 
five of whom are no longer in the po- 
lice department, but Who still pay the 
annual dues of $3. In the event of 
death, a member's heirs receive $500. 

Before the busiaess meeting Chief 



DEMOCRATS NAME 
COUNTY COMMinEE 



S ilberstein&Pondy 
tomoanv w t(ST6 O 



company 



Complete stocks of Kayser's 
Silk Gloves, Kayser's Silk 
Bloomers, also Lisle Underwear 
and Kayser's Silk Hose. 




The ''Silterstem Faskion 

Salons Have Made ^Von<lerful 
Preparations for Easter 

(On Second Floor) 

Hundreds of brand new Suits just off the needle, in prices 
from $25.00 to $67.50. Gabardines, Whipcords, Serges. Fancy 
Worsteds, Moires and Taffetas, in a dozen new styles; all the 
best we could pick in the New York market. 



Evening and Afternoon Dresses 

of Taffeta, Charmeuse, Meteor, Crepe de Chine, Nets and 
other lovely frocks fresh as May blossoms, at popular prices. 

A BEAUTIFUL RANGE OF 



CAPT. A. G. FISKETT. 



Established 1885 



" Trying to Get Him to Save 



J9 



THERE is a volume of sentiment back of those six simple 
words, if one but stop to consider. The mother, who can 
picture the future of her boy. is ''trying to get him to 
save." We open accounts almost daily for the boy of today 
who will be the man of tomorrow. A wife starts an account 
for her husband. She is "trying to get him to save." She has 
a vision of the coming years when the accumulation of the 
earning days will mean rest, contentment, happiness. Per- 
haps it is a vision of a little farm or a snug home. Saving will 
make it real. We are trying to get YOU to save, because we 
see the actual results of saving in the lives of others. 

AMERICAN EXCHANGE NATIONAL BANK 



Erie railroad near here was destroyed 
by Are today. 



WAGE DISPUTE ON 
RAILROADS SETTLED 



PROHIBITION CHIEF 

MAINE PARTY PLANK. 

AuKU."=ta, Maine. April 9.— As at the 
Democratic and Progrressive state con- 
Vf-ntinns held last month, the question 
of prohibition appeared likely to occu- 
py a leatllng plac*- in the discussion at 
the Republican state convention today. 
Sln<;e state official.^ are to be nomin- 
ated at the primaries in June, the prin- 



cipal business wa.s the adoption of a 
platform. Many of the delegates favor- 

; fed a plank urging national prohibition. 
An attack on President Wilson's 

I Mexican and I'anama canal tolls policy 

I was made by Congressman John A. 

! Peters "of this state in his address as 
presiding officer of the convention. 



Dies Im Toolboune Fire. 

(Ireenville, Fa., April ». — One man 
was burned to death and two others 
were injured when a toolhouse on the 



Terms of Agreement Will 

Be Given Out 

Friday. 

New York, April 19. — The dispute 
between the Eastern railroads and 
their trainmen and conductors regard- 
ing the interpretation of the awards 
made some time ago by the Federal 
board of arbitration has been settled. 
The board has been holding executive 
ses.«ions here, adjourning finally last 

night, and its decision will be made 
piiblic Friday af t« r a copy of the find- 
ings has been filed in the United 

I States district court here. 

Both sides to the dispute have indi- 
cated their acceptance, it is under- 
stood. The roads and their employes 

; were represented at the hearings. 

I CARNEGIE AT THE 

NATI ONAL CAPITOL. 

Washington, April 9. — Andrew Car- 
negie was an auditor in the house gal- 

i Icry today and applauded a speech 
supporting the Panama tolls exemption 

I repeal, by Representative Vollmcr of 
lowu, the newest member. Later Mr. 

I Carnegie visited the White House . 



Chairman Farrell Will Soon 

Issue Call for 

Meeting. 

James A. Farrell, chairman of the 
recent county conference of the Democ- 
racy, has Just appointed a Democratic 
county committee, consisting of one 
member from each wfird in the city, 
one or more from each city on the 
ranges, and ten at large. A call for a 
meeting of the committee will be is- 
sued soon. The committee consists of 
the following: 

At large — Alfred Jaques, Andrew 
Nelson, John Jenswold, Jr., C. O. Bald- 
win. John Kenny, Harris Bennett, 
Walter Gonska, E. A. Furni, Duluth; 
J. B. Connors. Hibbihg; Micliael Boy- 
Ian, Virginia. 

Duluth — First ward, T. J. McKeon; 
Second, Joseph Kreiger; Third, Frank 
Jordan; Fourth, George Neff; Fifth, H. 
C. Ribenack; Sixth, \M\x\a Irvine; Sev- 
enth, James Hart, Jr.; Eighth, P. H. 
Martin. 

Tower — J. D. Murphy. 

Aurora — Louis Tillmans. 

Biwabik — T. L. Morrison. 

Eveleth — Charles Jesmore. 

Virginia — Charles Eaton and J. W. 
Murphy. 

Hibblng — Victor Benoe and Bryan 
O'Rourke. 

Chisholm— J. H. Harrington and C. 
A. Monroe. 

Floodwood — J. W. Vew. 

• 

See the Fiover Show 

at the Duluth Flor«^jcompany. 



Trover and Capt. Fiskett conducted 
the annual inspection of uniforms. 



W. Hoffman of the Inter-church coun- 
cil- 

The committee will co-operate with 

Mayor Prince and the welfare de- 
partment. All present available in- 
formation will be collected and filed 
with the welfare department and some 
arrangement may be made whereby 
other data will be secured through 
the voluntarly services of those in- 
terested in the movement. This would 
be sorted and classified by an experi- 
enced social worker and form the ba- 
sis for the complete survey, which 
would be finished under his direction. 



CITY WISHES TO 



SELL PROPERTY 



NOTICE ! 



Good Friday being 
legal holiday, discounts 
on gas bills in district 
east of Sixteenth ave- 
nue west to Tcllth ave- 
nue cast will be al- 
lowed Saturday, i^pril 
11th. 

D. A. l^ED, 
Manager. 



^^. 



GOOD EARNINGS 

FOR SOUTH SHORE 



Merritt Would Raise Fund 

for Duplicate Force 

Main. 

Commissioner Leonldas Merritt, 
head of the division of public utilities, 
would sell some of the property of the 
water and light department for which 
the department has no use, and devote 
the proceeds toward paying for a 
right-of-way for the duplicate force 
main from the Lakewood pumping sta- 
tion. 

The department Is planning to laj' 
part of the second main this year. For 
this purpose it wishes to acquire a 
seventeen-foot easement aouth of the 
present sixteen-foot right-of-way 
through sections 34 and 35, township 
Bl and range 13. The property is 
owned as follows: Owsley estate, 260 
square feet; Norton estate, 1.35 acres; 
P.irhardson, Day & Cheadle, 2,109 
square feet, and Duluth & Iron Range, 
l,?©© square feet. The department also 
desires to purchase additional ground 
for a reservoir and pumping station 
in the Woodlaad district. 

The property which it would sell, 
is the ground that was s*cured for a 
."ite for the middle system reservoir, 
which was not used, and the house 
and lot on South street between Thir- 
teenth and Fourteenth avenues east, 
used as a residence by the engineer 
of the Endion pumping station when 
the old plant was in operation, 
«_ 

Easter Gloves — The Big Duluth. 




Easter 
Cloves 

are best from 

Gray'p. Got 

yours yet? 



THE STORE FOR SERVICE. 
113. 11.1, 117, 119 Wost Superior Street, Dululli,|Mluii, 



Easter 
Vails 

New styles 
that you'll like 
— why not to- 
morrow? 





You Want "Style" 

f You get it here— now as never before. 

1 And our assortments are so splendidly complete that you can probably be 

completely fitted out for Easter if you come tomorrow— for our size lines 

are such that many can be fitted without alteration. 

Come— in the morning if you can. Some last minute arrivals make wonder- 
fully attractive assortments for the last two days before Easter. I 



Monthly Report Shows 

Business Better Than 

Year Ago. 

Satisfactory traffic Is reported by the 
Duluth, South Shore & Atlantic rail- 
road in its statements of current earn- 
ings. The road's February report 
showed gross earnings of $237,738, or 
slightly better than last year. For the 
eight months its gross aggregated 
$2,320,166. as compared with $2,217,352 
for tlie corresponding period in 1913. 
After providing for the heavy improve- 
ment program carried through during 
the year, $481,071 was left for net 
revenue, or $22,000 better than a year 

ACTO 

With the collapse of the miners' 
strilte in the Michigan Copper country, 
offlcialB of the company expect to 
handle Increased business from now on. 
The road's bridges and roadbed have 
been brought up to standard as the 
result of liberal expenditures for Im- 
provements during the last two years, 
and it is now enabled to take care or 
its traffic at a greatly decreased oper- 
ating cost. ,i,a 

There ha.s been considerable intiux 
of new settlers already this spring 
into the farming districts along its 
system in Northern Wisconsin and 
Northern Michigan. 

ARRANGE FOR ~ 

A SOCIAL SURVEY 



SAY JUROR AGREED 
TO $3,000 BRIBE 

Larimore Man Held for Trial 

in Grand Forks 

Case. 

Grand Forks, N. D., April 9. — (Special 
to The Herald.) — The charge that 
Richard Bruyere of Larimore, a juror, 

had made an agreement with John 
Fadden. W. A. Scouten and J. C. Mahon 
to receive a bribe of $3,000 in the Mc- 
Lain Cooper murder trial, was made 
today. He waived a hearing and was 
bound over. Also waived a hearing on 
the specific charge of receiving $36. 



HURLEY RE-ELECTS 

OLD O FFICERS. 

Hurley, Wis., April 9. — (Special to 
The Herald.) — There were two sepa- 
rate tickets voted here Tuesday. The 
entire Lambrix ticket was elected as 
follows: Chairman, M. Lambrix; su- 
pervisors, R. Paul and Louis Voigt; 
town clerk, W. E. Paynter; town treas- 
urer, E. M. Reible; assessor, Fred J. Pe- 



Swell Corns? Try 
WonderfuP'GETS-IT" 

Greatest Own-Cure World Has Ever 
Known* **Gets*' G)rns Sure as Fate. 

Thousands say "GETS-IT" is simply 
magic. If you've tried nearly every- 
thing under tiie sun to get rid of those 
corns, so much the better for "GETS- 



1 



Committee Named to Out- 
line Plans and Secure 
Worker. 

Another step towarils securing a so- 
cial survey of Dulu^ was taken at a 
meeting of represexjtatJh'es of the 
Woman's Council, the Inter-church 
council and the Commercial club with 
Mayor Prince at the Commercial club 
yesterday. 

A committee of IBrec . was named 
to outline plans of procedure and to 
find an experienced worker to take 
cliarge of the surver' The committee 
consists of Mrs. Arthur Barnes of the 
Woman's Council, A.-T. JBanning, Jr., 
of the Commercial dub, and Rev. J. 




Um "GETS4T" 

and Yea Win 

Mighty Sooa 

Forget About 

Your Conw 

aBdC«Ihu««. 



IT." Com freedom is yours at last, not 
net week or next month, but right now! 
"GETS-IT" goes after corns as a crow 
does corn. There are no more thick 
plasters and greasy salves that don't 
remove, no more flies, razors and Jab- 
bers that make corns grow. Put a few 
droDS of "GETS-lT" on and tee every 
corn and callus shrivel and vanish. 
That's the new way, the painless, sure, 
safe, quick way. Only "GETS-IT" can 
do it. Apply it In 3 seconds. 

Every druggist in the land sells 
"GETS-IT," 25 cents a bottle, or sent 
direct by E. Lawrence & Co., Chicago. 



Separate Skirts 



made by America's best makers. Plaids, Mixtures, Serge*?, 
Worsteds, also Taffeta and Moire Silks, in both plain and 
tunic styles, from $6.60 up. 

Young Girls' Easter Suits and Dresses in charming models 
for dress wear and better occasions at popular prices. 



(On Third Floor) 



A Charming Display of Easter Millinery 



Just arrived— A shipment of new MOIRE SILKS worth 
seeing; come in new blues, greens, navy and black, 42 
inches wide, $3.50. 



^ 



K 



Rumford 

»^>''THE WHOLESOME 

BAKING POWDER 

It is essential in the making of raised foods 
that you choose a leavener that not only raises 
the cake, biscuit or roll just right, but also adds 
to their nutritive value. 

Rumford accomplishes this by restoring to the 
flour, in part, the nutritious phosphates of 
whicn fine white flour has been deprived. It 
will make your cake of that even texture, flavor 
and appetizing appearance sought for by all 
good cooks. Its use insures 

Successful Home Baking 

Mail^ Free.— The new Rumfonl Horn* Rcctpa 
Book, inclu<liiis Firclese and Caaaofol* C«>ok«ty. 
RUMFORD COMPANY. Providcacc. R. L 




:does not contain alum: 




terson; constables, Frank Dardas and 
Max La Fave. 

These held the same offices last year. 
They made their issue plain to the peo- 
ple before election that they would 
work together for the benefit of the 
town, morally, as well as socially. 

STEAM SHOVEL HITS 
BLAST; FOUR KILLED 

One Man Is Blown Into 

Wheel and Ground 

to Bits. 

The Dalles, Or., April 9— Three men 
were Instantly killed, one was so bad- 
ly hurt that he lived only a few min- 
utes, another's nose was blown off and 
three others were less seriously in- 
jured by an explosion of The Dalles- 
Celilo canal works, a mile and a half 
east of here, when a government 
steam shovel struck a "missed hole" 
and discharged a tremendous blast of 
dynamite. The dead: 

EDWARD KENLDER. 

ALEX LIND. 

EDWARD RYAN. 

C. A. DRICH. 

W'lth ihe exception of Kendler, the 
engineer of the shovel, all were la- 
borers, known as •'pit men." 

Arthur Eckerson, a power man, was 
the man whose nose was blown off. 
William Smith, brakeman on the work 
train, was bruised about the chest and 
hands by flying rock and D. W. Les- 
ter, cranesman, sustained slight cuts 
on the face and head. Chris Krler, the 
shovel fireman, escaped with a gash 
over the eye. ^ , 

Kcudler, th«^ engineer, was seated in 
the jn'^'ne room door. The blast hurled 
him th igh the door and Into the en- 
gine J, where he was caught In 
the 1 of a big wheel. His body 
wa." in to pleces^^ 

WANT TWO MORE 

REGIONAL BANKS 



tlonal Anti-Saloon league, 
speak with Mr. Patterson. 



will also 



CAFE IN CHIGAGO 



Western Governors Also 

Ask Slice of Public 

Domain. 

Denver, Colo.. April 9. — Seven gover- 
nors at the Western governors' confer- 
ence here went on record with a de- 
mand to congress for the establishment 
of two more regional reserve banks — 
one In the Pacific Northwest and the 
other In the Rocky Mountain states. 

This action was taken on motion of 
Governor Lister of Washington. Jind 
was Indorsed by Governors Oddle of 
Nevada, Carey of Wyoming, West of 
Oregon, Italnes of Idaho, Spry of Utah 
and Ammons of Colorado. 

Thfe governors also adopted a resolu- 
tion urging congress to give the West- 
ern states 6 per cent of the public 
domain within their boundaries, the 
proceeds to be used for road improve- 
ment. 



KENTUCKY MAN IS 

FOR PROHIBITION. 

Bismarck, N. D., April 9.— (Special 
to The Herald.) — Malcolm R. Patter- 
son, former governor of Kentucky, will 
enter North Dakota this month, 
speaking at several points under the 
direction of the North Dakota Prohibi- 
tion Enforcement league. 

Dr. P. A- Baker, president of the Na- 



Police Look for "Duffy 

the Goaf and a 

Woman. 

Chicago, April 9. — Isaac Henagow, 
a cigar jobber, formerly of San Fran* 
Cisco, who was shot and killed last 
night in a south side cafe, was idcntl* 
fled today and a mystery as to his 
identity was cleared up. Henagow for* 
merly was sparring partner for a pu- 
gilist known as "Kid Farmer," ac» 
cording to his brother, Maurice, with 

whom and his parents and two sisterst 
the victim lived here. Maurice Hena* 
gow said that his brother was known 
in sporting circles as ■William Wood." 

The police are looking for James 
Franche, alias "James Duffy" or "Duf- 
fy the Goat," who was said to have 
been drinking with Henagow and 9 
woman a few moments before th* 
shooting. 

Finding of letters and cards in Hen* 
agow's pockets addressed to pcrsoni 
in San Francisco led at first to the be- 
lief that he was "William Wood" ol 
San Francisco. 

AMERICAN MAILS 

DEL AYED B Y GALES. 

Queenstown, April 9. — The American 
mails again were marooned here today 
when the tenders were unable, owing 
(o the gale, to get alongside the Olym- 
pic outside in the harbor. The linef 
sailed without them at half-past t 
o'clock this afternoon. 



Warning by Kidneys 
Sliouid be Heeded 

Early Symptoms Cm Bt Ck^keri. 

Just because you're not incapaci- 
tated from business or pleasure, th« 
warnings of kidney disease should not 
go on unheeded, or serious results ar« 
bound to follow. A pain in the back^ 
that tired feeling, rheumatism, neu- 
ralgia and various other symptoma 
Indicate disordered kidneys which can 
be restored to their normal ci»ndiilon 
by using Warner's Safe Kidney ani 
Liver Remedy. L'nder the influence 
of its general restorative effect the 
violence of all disease symptoms rap- 
Idly subside; pains In the back dis- 
appear, disorders in the urine are 
corrected, and gradually the uric acij 
in the blood which c^tuses rheuma- 
tism Is eliminated. Warners Safe 
Kidney and Liver Remedy acts on 
the liver and kidneys. The fame ot 
Warner's Safe Kidney and Liver Rom^ 
edy has been continuous for 37 yoara 
In effectually removing kidney com- 
plaints, as thousands of former suffer- 
ers testify. It clears up the liver, 
kidneys and bladder and enables 
these organs to do their work properly 
and effectually. It will help you front 
the very first dose. At all druggists 
in 50c and $1.00 sizes. Free sample 
and other valuable information if you 
write Warner's Safe Remedies Co., 
Dept. 375, Rochester, N. Y. 



4 
i 




!/i 



V 



Thursday, 



THE DULUTH HERALD 



April 9, 1914. 




WEST DUWTH 

HB3RALD BRAKCH OFriCisit 

A. Jena^n. MO WoHh 5T«h Ave. W. J. J. Moran. SlAH^Norib Central Are. 

lt<n-al(1'a West Duluth reporter may be reacHed after 
hour of Kotnir to press at Calumet 17S-MtfkB4 Cole 247. 



PUN LIBRARY 

BRANCH FOR GARY 



Up 




The Boosters' Edition of the Herald Is Now 
Being Compiled. Please Get Photos in As 
Soon As Possible. 



Mayor Prince Takes 
Matter With School 
Board. 

The city will efltabliah a branch li- 
brary at C3ary If a room can be se- 
cured In the new school building: 
which will be built there this spring. 
Mayor Prince will take the matter up 
with the school board. He has spokon 
to several of them and as the idea 
impressed them favorably it probable 

that the room will be available. The 
mayor states that only through some 
.such arrangement could a branch be 
placed in Oary. at least for several 
years. The additional expense to the 
city win be light. 

The new school may also be utilized 
for social center purposes next year. 
Mayor f'rince states that this would 
be particularly desirable at the steel 
plant suburbs because of their isolated 
location. 

Since the West end branch changed 
its location, moving to rooms on the 
ground floor of a building on Twen- 
tieth avenue wost, the circulation has 
more than doubled. Many people did 
not know that a branch was located 
in the West end. as it was In the rear 
of the second floor of an office build- 
ing. 



ARE EAGER FOR 

BASEBALL FIELD 



City 



FURNITURE PACKING 

Estimate of cost free. 

FURNITURE STORAGE 

Fireproof and Non-fireproof. 

FURNITURE MOVING 

Covered padded vans. Experienced men. 

DULUTH VAN & STORAGE CO. 



Both Phones 492. 



18 FOURTH AVE. WEST. 



Will Be Asked to Pur- 
chase Ground Near 
Grand Avenue, 

Boys of West Duluth are wondering 
If they will have a field In this end 
of the city this coming summer large 
enough to play baseball in. With the 
leoent acquisition of the ground In the 
valley along Forty-ninth avenue by 
the Duluth Corrugating Roofing com- 
pany and its decision to build there 
tills summer, the baseball enthusiasts 
ft-ar that they will have no place to 
play. 

Efforts will be made to have the city 
purchase or lease a piece of ground 
somewhere above Grand avenue near 
I'orty-sixth avenue west. The city will 
also be asked to secure a block near 
the Fairmont school for the same pur- 
pose. 

"If some step Is not taken soon all 
available property suitable for a base- 
ball field will be taken up," said Frank 
H. Wade this morning. "The purchase 
of such a field by the city would be a 
good Investment. It would do more to 
keep the boys from loafing on the 
.'■treets and visiting undesirable places, 
than any other thing. Playgrounds 
and ball parks will keep the boys busy 
playing, and thoy can get no more 
wholesome exercise than at a game of 
baseball." 



home yesterday afternoon. A purse 
was presented td her. 



The foIlc{w4nn<.guests were present. 

John Boden, 

J. Llndstrom, 

A. Johnson, 

Bmil Nyberg, 

William Nyberg, 

W, Nicolayson, 

Norman, 

Carlson, 

Conrad Wicklund, 

J. Carlson, 

Odberg. 

J; Ronn, 

Falk. 

E. Sundholm, 

E. Norsted, 

Widmark, 

G. Anderson, 

Westln, 

Henrlckson, 

Oas. 



Mesdaraes — i- 

Alfred Carlaoq, 

P. J. BorgptTQlfi 

S. Sandbut-?, "' 

Hugo CarlsojL—, 

Sundqulst, .\r^". 

Harnell, 

Johnson, 

Dutkowski, 

Hulda Soderberc, 

Hedberg, 

C. A. Ockens, 

Beckman, 

J. Elsmaan, 

Stycket, 

Petterson, 

Olson, 

Lindberg, 

Sundens, 

A. Anderson, 

Rodberg, 

Nickelson, 
Miss Wicklund. 



CITY OFHGIALS 
WILL TALK TO CLUB 






^<^^^<^SfQ 



When You Want Something 
Particulary Nice — 

You can always depend upon K C not to 
disappoint you. The double raise makes 
doubly certain — nothing is left to "luck/* If the 
batter is a little thin, K C will raise it light and 
feathery and it will be all the better. Janing the 
stove or turning the pan around makes no differ- 
ence — K C sustains the raise until baked. 
When there's a birthday or wedding cake 
to bake, or refreshments for reception or party 
to provide, take no chances — 

65 Use K C 



JERSEY CITY AND 
PASSAIC PROnST 



CURUNG CLUB 

BANQUET APRIL 21 

Members Make Plans to En- 
tertain About 150 
Guests. 

Members of the Western Curling 
club will hold their annual banquet and 
celebration on Tuesday evening, April 
21. The date was decided last night 
at a meeting of the officers. 

The affair will be held in Dormedy's 
hall. Central avenue and Ramsey str«et. 
Plans will be made to entertain about 
150 guests. 

Among the guests to be invited .will 
be donors of various trophies, who will 
award the trophies and special prizes 
to the winners. The winners of events 
are as follow.«« W. E. Judson rink, the 
Bftgiey and Esterly trophies; Melvin 
Olson rink, the Union Match trophy; 
Charles litis rink, the Henricksen cup; 
and the F. H. Wade rink, the Burns 
and West Duluth Commercial club tro- 
phies. 

A number of the members will be 
called on for short talks during the 



Prince and Cleveland Will 

Speak on Parks and 

Tree Planting. 

Henry Cleveland, superintendent of 
parks, and Mayor W. I. Prince will be 
the principal speakers at the meeting 
of the West Duluth Commercial club 

tomorrow nightr. They will talk on 
parks and the planting of trees along 
the city's highways. 

Many home ewner.<t in W^est Duluth 
are interested In the planting of trees 
In front of their homes. The city's 
plan of planting these trees and the 
cosl Incidental to this wor)k will be 
fully explained by the officials. It is 
expected that the meeting will be well 
attended. 

It is probable that the officials will 
also speak on the work which the city 
proposes to do at Fairmont park and 
the proposed plan for establishing pub- 
lic baths at thi# point on the water 
front. li, ; 

NEARLYimOWNS 
IN SHALLOW POOL 

Aged SaMt Is Rescued 

From Perilous Position 

By Two Boys. 

An old sailor and fisherman living 
on Fifty-second avenue narrowly es- 
caped drowning this morning In a pool 
of water less than a foot deep, located 
back of the Northern Pacific railway 
station on Fifty-fourth avenue west. 
Wet goods taken internally by the 
fisherman on his visits to place along 
Central avenue proved to be too large 
a cargo i6 carry him safely across the 
pool. 

When he started to cross the slough 
he stumbled on a plank and fell head- 
long into it. His head landed under 
anotiier plank In thfe water and he 
could not get ft fl^t. Richard Schat- 
fer, a boy 13 yeSrs old, saw the acci- 
dent and with t'?«*o other boys rushed 
to the man's assistance. 

Only for the fortunate appearance of 
the boys, it is claimed that the man 
would have drowned. Wading into the 
place, the boys dragged him from un- 
der the jpilank and with great dlflficulty 
finally pulled him to the sidewalk. The 
man, was able, with the assistance o( 
the boys, to get home. 




The Center of Economy for Ttirifty People. 



Easter Sale of Dinner- 
ware, Chunay Glass and 
Kitchen Needs in the 
Popular Basement. 



"fc 



Wear Ever and 

Imported 
Aluminum Ware 




SAUCE PANS 



ftOc value 29c 
85c value 49c 
$1 value. .59c 




AlU' 
minum 
Rice Boilers 

Regular $1.95, 
special — 

$1.59 




Casse- 
roles 



$1.75 Pie Dishes 98c 

$2.50 Casseroles $1.69 

$2.25 Casseroles $1.48 

$2.00 Casseroles $1.29 

Jardinieres 

Our complete 
line of Jar- 
dinieres, tomor- 
row at 




20% Off 




Dinner Ware 

Extra specials in Dinnerware 
$12.50 Dinner Sets... $8.98 
$22.50 Dinner Sets. . .$14.98 



$25.00 Dinner Sets ... $15.98 




White 

Semi' 

China 

Cups 

and 

Saucers 

Regularly $1.75 dozen, spe- 
cial, set of 
six 



59c 



Vases 

Engraved Glass 
Vases, worth 25c, 
special, each — 

10c 

Glass Flower 
Baskets, 10c, 
25c, 59c, 75c 





Rich Cut Glass 

Values up to $4, special, $2.98. 
Cut Glass Sugars and 

Creamers $2.98 

Cut Glass Bowls $2.98 

Cut Glass Celery Trays.. $2.98 

Cut Glass Mayonnaise . . . $2.98 

Cut Glass Vases $2.98 

CutGlassWaterSets 

Pitcher and six tumblers : reg- 
ular $6.50, spe- 42^ A ^d\ 
cial at 4>4« f if 



Cut Glass 
Nappies 

Regularly $1.25 
— special — 




98c 



Star Cut Tumblers 

Regular $1.50 dozen, 
special, set 
of six 






69c\ 



Genuine 

Guernsey 

Baking Set 




Blaze in Flax Str^. 

A small blaze In a pile of flax straw 
In the rear of the Northwestern Linen 
mill at Forty-ninth avenue west and 
Oneota street irave the West Duluth 
department a run yesterday afternoon. 
The damage did not amount to any- 
thing. It is believed that sparks frofn 
a locomotive caused the blaze. 



West Duluth Briefs. 

Miss Hazel Kent returned today 
from Madison, Wis., to spend Easter 
with her relatives at 335 North Six- 
tieth avenue west. 

State Senator ^ames P. Boyle of 
Eveleth, who Is a' candidate for con- 
gress from the Eighth district, was a 
visitor In West Duluth this morning. 
He spoke last night at a large meet- 
ing at Gary, 

A large delegation of West Duluth 
Masons will attend the Scottish Rttc 
evening. The toastmaster has not yet i banquet at the Duluth temple this eve- 
bepn decided on but It Is probable this 
win be done before the annual meet- 
ing next Tuesday. The latter meeting 
will be held at the club rooms, Fifty- 
seventh avenue and Bristol street, and 
officers will be elected and plans made 
for improvements to the club's quar- 
ters. 

The banquet arrangements are under 
the chargp of the present officers. 
These are F. H. Wade, president; A. H. 
Donald, vice president; J. A. Scott, sec- 
ond vice president; E. G. Kreidler. sec- 
retary and W. B. Getchell, treasurer. 



adelphia Federal reserve district would 
result in much inconvenience," it Is de- i 
clared. ^ ' 

A similar resolution has been passed 
by the Associated Bankers of Passaic 
and vlcmity. 



Want to Be Included in New 

York Reserve Bank 

Field. 

Jersey City, X. J., April 9. — A pro- 
test aerainst excluding this city from 
the Federal reserve district of New, 
York city has been forwarded to Wash- 
ington by a committee of Hudson 
county bankers. All the large banks 
In the county are represented. The 
protest calls attention to the position 
of Hudson county as part of New York 
for banking and business purposes. 

"Including the county lb the Phil- 



"JONESY, THE BELL 

RI NGER. " IS DEAD. 

Cambridge, Mass., April 9. — "Jonesy, 
the Bell Ringer." widely icnown among 
Harvard men, died yesterday at the 
home of his son-in-law. Former Mayor 
Walter C. Wardwfll. He was 88 years • 
old. For many years Austin K. Jones 
rang the bell In the college yard for ■ 
chapel and rcltations, and his ttgure j 
was as familiar to generations of 
Harvard undergraduates as that of 
"John the Orange Man" and "Poco" 
Bennett, the "Ol* Cloes Man," both of 
whom died recently. 



WOODSMAN IS 
"SHORT 



93 



WONDERFUL STOMACH REMEDY IS 

FOUND IN TIME TO SAVE WOMAN 



Mrs. 



Williams Gets on Way 
Health After First Dose 
of Treatment. 



to 



Mrs. Peter Wllllama of 2749 Eight- 
eenth street, S., Minneapolis, was des- 
perately ill with stomach trouble. She 
faced the probability of an operation. 

After taking Mayr 's Wonderful Stom- 
ach Remedy, discovered for her by a 
kind friend, she found herself on the 
way back to health. Mrs. Williams 
wrote: 

"I have taken Mayr's Wonderful 
Stomach Remedy for the fourth time 
and 1 a.m feeling like a new woman. 
I am entirely out of pain. I hsui been 
sick for eighteen months and four of 
our best doctors could do nothing for 
me. They all agreed that an operation 
was the only thins. One day a man 
told my husband of your remedy and 



that night he brought it home to m«>." 
Mrs. Williams' letter tells an experi- 
ence like many of the thousands who 
have taken Mayrs Wonderful Stomach 
Remedy with unusual benefit. It dears' 
thf; digestive tract of mucoid accretions : 
and poisonous matter. It brings quick ' 
relief to sufferers from stomach all- ! 
ments, liver and intestinal troubles. [ 
Many declare It has saved them from 1 
dangerous operations; many are sure | 
it saved their lives. 

The remarkable merit of Mayr's ' 
Wonderful Stomach Remedy has caused i 
many Imitators, so be cautious. Be 
sure It's MAYR'S. Probably this rem- | 
edy is known among your own neigh- | 
bors; ask them. <}o to your neart-st | 
druggist and ask about the wonderful i 
results it has been accomplishing — or | 
send to Geo. H. Mayr, Mfg. Chemist, 
154-156 Whiting St., Chicago. 111., for 
free book on stomach ailments and 
many grateful letters from people who 
have been restored. Any druggist can 
tell you its wonderful effects. 



Prbves Easy "Money" for 

Two Strangers on 

Train. 

The old "short change" game found 
an easy victim in Slevert Tredahl while 
he was oamihg into the city on a Can- 
adian Northern passenger train this 
morning. Two men, whose descriptions 
are in the hands of the police, are 
said to have worked the game on Tre- 
dahl and netted |45 on the deal. 

One of the two men asked Tredahl 
if he had large bills which he would 
give in return for those of a smaller 
denomination. Pulling out a roll con- 
taining six $10 bills, Tredahl said he 
would oblige them. 

The "sharpers" then counted out $59 
In paper bills, containing ten $5 bills 
and nine $1 bills and $1 in silver. After 
counting the money they handed what 
Tredahl believed to be the roll to him 
and departed. 

As the two men got off at West 
Duluth the conductor aproached Tre- 
dahl and asked him If h« had changed 
bills for the men. He said he had and 
was told to count It. He then found 
that he had only one |5 and nine $1 
bills and the $1 In silver. Tredahl 
then got off the train but lost sight 
of the men. He made a complaint to 
Lieut. Wilcox of the West Duluth sta- 
tion and later at the Central station 
to Chief Troyer, giving a good descrip- 
tion of the men. So far the police had 
been unable to apprehend them. 

Tredahl was returning from the 
woods with the winter's savings In 
his pocket. The short change trick 
took place shortly before he arrived In 
the city. 

m ■ 

Surprised By Friends. 

A number of friends of Mrs. August 
Davis of Thirty-eighth avenue west 
and Ninth street surprised her at her 



ning. 

Forest Kent, 535 North Sixtieth ave- 
nue west. Will leave Saturday to spend 
a month's vax:«tlon visiting places of 
Interest In the West and Southwest. 

The Mothers' c;lub of the Falrmount 
school will mee.t Monday afternoon at 
the school building to make plans for 
a concert to be; given the following 
Thursday. -• , . _ . 

Good music, good service, Easter 
Sunday dinner, 35 cents, at Grand hotel. 

Watch repairing. Hurst. West Dulutb. 
_ • 

Easter Neckwear — The Big Duluth. 

GLASGOWlNEir 

WILL VISIT GITY 



Like cut, regular price $1.25, 
special, per set , 



79c 




Candle Sticks 

Complete with shade, O/^^^ 
worth 50c, special ^%fC 



Genuine 

Tungsten 

Lamps 

15 Watt at, each 30c 

25 Watt at, each 30c 

40 Watt at, each 30c 

60 Watt at, each 40c 




Security Vouchers Given Free. Why not collect them— it is as easy as finding money. 



gation In congress to work with the 
adm.inistration for the great laws yet 
necessary to be placed on the statute 
books. We should not return Senator 
Cummins, who has continuously criti- 
cized President Wilson for doing many 
of the things Senator Cummins advo- 
cated in hi.s campaign for election and 
against which he has since voted." 



Furs Stored and 
Insured 

BECKMAN'S FUR FACTORY 

1 6 East Superior St. 



OPEN IRRIGATION 
MEETING IN DENVER 



Thomas M. Mlllan, senior magistrate 
of the city of Glasgow, Scotland, and 
Alex Walker, solicitor and city asses- 
sor and surveyor of municipal rates of 
the same city, will be in Duluth about 
April 11. 

The two are making a tour of the 
United States to study some of the 
i municipal problems of the American 
cities, and Duluth Is one of the cities 
that will be closely Investigated by 
the Scots. 

Among the cities that are being vis- 
ited are Chicago,, Philadelphia, Omaha, 
Denver, St. Paul «nd Minneapolis, New 
York, Boston and- Duluth. 

MEREDITH AFTER 

CUMMINS' TOGA 



Secretary Lane and West- 
ern State Officials 
Meet There. 

Denver, Colo., April 9. — An irriga- 
tion conference called by Secretary of 
the Interior Lane for the purpose of 
deciding upon new policies for the de- 
velopment of Western lands through 

irrigation opened here today. Gover- 
nors and other officials of several 
Western states, officers of the Interior 
department and irrigation experts from 
many parts of the United States and 
several foreign countries were in at- 
tendance. 

Early in the day the governors con- 
ferred with the Federal oCCicials to de- 
t-rm'ne the program for the sessions. 
It was expected the sessions would 



Try MUSTEROLE For 
That Lame Back! 

Rub It on briskly — massage it In 
thoroughly, and note how quickly 
MUSTDROLE drives out the stiffness 

and soreness. 

It beats a mustard plaster seven 
ways, and best of all. It doesn't blister 
or burn. 

MUSTER OLE Is a clean, white oint- 
ment made with oil of mustard. It 
comes In handy white glass jars. Get 
a Jar from your druggist today. 



continue through the remainder of the 
week. 



OIL TANK GAR FOUND 
LOADED WITH BOOZE 



here that the foundations of the vast 
Weyerhaeuser fortune was laid. A 
number of his friends from Si. T'aul, 
Minn., were present at the ceremonies. 
The services were brief. 



Whisky, Wine and Beer Pos- 
sibly Intended for 
Oklahomans. 

St. Louis, Mo., April 9. — An oil tank 
car In the yards of the St. Louis, Iron 
Mountain & Southern railroad here, 
was found today to be loaded with 
whisky, wine and beer. Internal rev- 
enue officers ordered the car "held" 
for investigation. 

The car was billed to Oklahoma City 
and it Is believed the liquor was smug- 
gled into the car in an effort to ship 
liquor into the prohibition state of 
Oklahoma. 



WILL TRY NEGRO FOR 

LE EGSON MURDER. 

Chicago, April 9. — Isaac Bond, a 

negro, will be placed on trial May 6, it 

was announced today, charged with the 

murder of Miss Ida G. Leegson, white, 

a trained nurse and art student. Miss 

Leegson, who was supporting herself 
by nursing while working in a sculp- 
ture class at the art Institute, was 
found strangled to death on the prairie 
at the outskirts of the city Oct. 6, 1^13. 
It is the police theory that she '.vaa 
lured to her death on a pretext ihal 
she was wanted as a nurse. 



OMAHA PROTESTS 
BANK ARRANGEMENT 



ShIeIdH A'otes Scliool Bonilii. 

Shields. X. D.. April 9. — (Sperial to 
The Herald.) — Without an opposing 
vote the citizens of Shields indorsed 
a bond issue of $2,500 for a school 
building to be erected this year. Kven 
the most enthusiastic advocates 
scarcely hoped for a unanimous vote 
on the proposition. Plans for the 
building will soon be prepared and the 
contract let so it will be ready for 
occupancy this fall. 



Publisher Announces His 

Candidacy for Senate 

From Iowa. 

Des Moines, Iowa, April 9. — E. T. 
Meredith, twtm magazine publisher, to- 
day formally anjiounced his candidacy 
on the Democratic ticket for the j 
United States senate to succeed Sena- 
i tor Albert -B. Cummins, Republican. 
In a statement addrnssed to the "Dem- 
! ocrats of Iowa." Mr. Meredith declares 
I that lowH is. placed In the Inconsistent 
i attitude of having given Wilson Its 
electoral vote, and "having In the 
senate Mr. Cununtna, who persistently 
opposes legislation proposed by Mr. 
Wilson." 

After decterlnl* that he believed his 
candidacy was desired by Democrats 
'of Iowa regiardless of factions, Mr. 
Meredith says; ' 

"We should fiElve President Wilson 
the co-operatlou of a Democratic dele- 




MUSTER OLE Is recommended by 
doctors and nurses. Millions of jars 
are used annually for Bronchitis, 
Croup, Stiff Neck, Asthma, Neuralgia, 
Congestion, Pleurisy, Rheumatism, 
Lumbago, Pains and Ache.s of the 
Back or Joints, Sprains, Sore Muscles, 
Bruises, Chilblains, Frosted Feet, 
Colds of Chest (It prevents Pneu- 
monia). 

At your druggist's. In 28c and 50o 
Jars, and a special large hospital slie 
for $a.50. 

Accept no .substitute. If your drug- 
gist cannot supply you, send 25c op 
50c to the MUSTE ROLE Company, 

Cleveland, Ohio, and wo will mall you 
a Jar postage prepaid, 

W. H. THUUMO.ND, RockfWl. V*.. Kiy«: 

"!t[ii«t»role U tha ffieatest Ihliif I «rer got hold of 
for iiiiMioulu' rlieuiuAilBin, afTiiriJtng UisUul relief to 
■on and eUS lolau aitd muectoi." 



Objects to Being ' Part 

of Kansas City 

Region. 

Omaha, Neb., April 9. — Officers of 
the national banks of Omaha have 
drawn up a formal protest to be sent i 
at once to Secretary of the Treasury 
McAdoo, objecting to the placing of ! 
Omaha in the Kansas City district of , 
the reserve banking system. The pro- 
test is "the formal action of the Omaha ' 
clearing house. 

The burden of the protest Is that 
the selection of some of the locations 
for regional reserve banks was not 
made with a view to the customary , 
course of business, and that, therefore, 
it is not in accordance with the letter 
and Intent of the currency law. 

The protest asks that if Omaha may ; 
not have a regional bank of its own, j 
it may be thrown into the Chicago dis- 
trict as the trend of its business is In 
that direction. It asks also that Wy- 
oming, along with Nebraska, be thrown 
Into the Chicago district as is repre- • 
sented by the votes of Wyoming now 
on file with the organization commit- 
tee, i 

NEW YORK TO MAKE ! 

HIGHWAY BRICKS. 



PERUNA 

RESTORES 

A Chronic Invalid 



Albany, N. Y., April 9. — Bricks for 
use in constructing highways in Now 
York state will be made at the Elmira 
state reformatory as soon as buildings 
and apparatus aTe erected. 

Governor Glynn today signed a bill 
appropriating f75,000 for this purpose. 
The plan is the first step In the gov- 
ernor's recommendation to the legisla- 
ture that convicts be employed in 
manufacturing road material. 

John N. Carlisle, state commissioner 
of highways, said today that under 
present traffic conditions brick is the 
only material the highway department 
feels safe in using. 




BURY WEYERHAEUSER 
AT RO CK IS LAND. ILL. 

Rock Island, III., April 9. — Frederick 
Weyerhaeuser, the lumber millionaire, 
was burled here today In Chipplanock 
cemetery In a grave beside that of his 
wife. The funeral services, according 
to the rites of the Presbyterian church, 
were held at the home of Weyerhaeus- 
er's daughter. Mrs. 8. 8. Davis. Rev. 
W. B. Hill of Poughkeepsle, N. Y.. a 
Bon-ln-law of Weyerhaeuser, assisted 
in the services, 

Mr. and Mrs. Weyerhaeuser spent 
their early years in this city. It was 



Mrs. Sophia Bauer. 521 Fir.st Ave- 
North, Faribault, Minn., writes: "I 
cannot praise your wonderful medi- 
cine, Peruna, enough. It h.as don« 
much for me during the past tea 
years, and 1 keep it In the house con- 
tinually. I was In such a condition 
that I could eat nothing but bread and 
milk, and even that was too heavy 
for me at times. Now I can eat any- 
thing. I will recommend Peruna to 
all my friends." 

The effect of Peruna on digestion 
Is Immediate — sometimes wonderful, 
as In Mrs. Bauer's case. Sharpens 
appetite, quickens digestion and stim- 
ulates the bowels. A most convenient 
and valuable family medicine. In 
tablet or liquid form as preferred. 

Send for a free copy of "The Til* 
of Life." The Peruna Co., Columbui^ 
Ohio. 



1 



laiMi 



■ 



( 



Thursoay, 



THE DULUTH HERALD 



Apnl 9, 1914. 



•• »- 



TUt: ?!TORE FOR SERVICK. 

113- 115-1 17-119 Wt'st SuiH'Hor St., 
Duiiitli. Minn. 



Household 

Needs for 

Easter at 

Special Prices 



Friday and Saturday 

Handsome New 

Dinner Sets 

Just Arrived 



TRUTH ABOUT 
CANAL TOLLS 

_ V 

C.B. Miller Points Out Amer- 
icas Moral Obligation 
Regarding Panama. 



HAVE GOOD HEALTH 

Take Hood's Sarsaparilia. the Oid 
Reliable Spring Tonic. 



1 Don't let the Idea that you may feel 
better In a day or two prevent you 
from KPttlng a bottle of Hood's Sar- 

i saparilla today from any drug store 

1 and starting: at once on the road to 
health and strength. 

When your blood is Impure and 
impoverished It lacks vitality, your 

[digestion is poor, and all the func- 
tions, of your body are impaired. 
Hood's Sarsaparilia is the greatest 

1 known blood tonic. It will build you 



r» • X A lAi:iU T'..^^ U/vn ' up quicker than any other medicine 

Consistent With Time-HOn- i^j-iVcs strength to do and power tc 

ored Policy of "Free 



marine 



[i^ m 



ICE ON LAKES 

IS BREAKING UP 




Seas'' as Well. 



or ingredients. Be sure to ask for 
That many people do not understand ' Hoods, get it today, and begin lak- 

j the situation which prompted Presi- in g it at once. 

! <l«nt Wilson to demand of congress 
i that the action for free tolls for Amerl- 
! «an ships through the Panama canal 
; ne rescinded. Is the belief of Congress- 
{ man Miller. Congressman Miller, who 
support'-'d the president in his demand 



Fields Are Gradually Dis- 
appearing; Thickness 
Is Reduced. 

Ice on the Great A-.akes has been ma- 
terially reduced during the last week, 
according to the report of the United 
purifier and enrleher, tonic and appe- i Stales weather bureau. Just Issued, 
tlzer. Nothing else acts like It, for j Many of the Ice fields are breaking up 
nothing else has the same formula 1 or disappearing in the lakes and the 





jJ/Ua^ 



BASEMENT BARGAINS 



I endure. It is the old standard tried 
and true all-the-year-round blood 





.Ml open stock — you can buy 
part of set and add to it at any 
time. 10 -per cent discount Friday 
and Saturday. 

Electric Bulbs 

The Mazda is con.sid- 
ercd one of the bc-t— 
even competitors admit 
that. 

25 Watt Size 35c 

40 Watt Size 35c 

eo Watt Size 45c 

Electric 
Irons 

All the best 
makes, ^^'i^- 
iam's Periec- 
t i o n Hot 
Point. .American Beauty at $2.68, 
$3.25, $3.50 and $5.00. Every ir«.n 
N\ arrantcd. 

Cast Aluminum Spiders 

T *^. The kind that 

won't wear 
-^ ont. Xo. 8 size 
regular price 
$2.l">0; special price ^ 1 ^ C 
IViday and Saturday..^ 1 •mSt^^ 

Brooms 

Good quality, well made. Special 
price Friday and ^ ^/« 

Saturday 4&*/C 

Family Scales 

The Universal kind. 
Weighs to 24 lbs.; reg- 
ular price $1.25. Spe- 
cial Friday O^/* 
and Saturdaj*. . Tr J\^ 

Androck Gas or Oil 
Stove Ovens 






a time before he could continue his i 
di tits. I 

"That was the most difficult expe- 
1 rienre of my life," he said. 
I The clergymen are all officers or 
I members of the I'nion of Orthodox 
; Jewish Congregations of America. 



Ice In the rivers and harbors is being 
reduced in thickness and open water Is 
beginiiing to appear in places. The re- : 
port In part follows: I 

"The reports from the regular and ^ 
displny stations of the weather bureau 
and the meteorological servlco of Can-] 
ada Indicate that the Ice fields over 
West-'rn Surerjor have practically dls- 
aitpeared. There ire ftome fields over the i 
eastern portion that are broken and' 
moving with the wind*. The condl- ! 
tlons in Whitcfish bay have not , 

g the past j 
he thickness 



to quit the "sharp pra. tlce" as he : -^.^^^^ -^^^^ -^ permitted to make his ! ^-^Yng^d'matVVi^iiv " duVini 

termed it, says that the matter Is a ; plea. The govf-rnor meanwhile stood ^.gek. In St. Marvs river t.._ 

very .-simple ono, smd that the part of nervously _^wltchlng _hl8_ watch-chain, j ^f j^j^ }£.« isdecreasing and some open 

his 



the Hay-Pauncefote treaty covering His face was drawn and white, 
it Is brief and clear. The congress- i 1-PS quivered and tears were in 

man said to The Herald today: *^- *"*■.. ,_ ■ » * ^ ♦*... e«<..v«» 

"The treat v with <;r.at Britain, com- i At times he interrupted the speakers 
nionlv known as the Hay-Pauncefote ( to say that the 
treaty of 1901, under which the Pan- 



evidence before him 



For baking bread, pies, potatoes, 
etc. Also tor heating iron?. Spe- 
cial price Friday and ^t^^» 
Saturdav tF^^W 

Extra Specials 

Friday and Saturday 

Xo plione or C. O. D. orders taken 

10 bars Galvanic Soap 29c 

Clothes Pins, per doz Ic 

Sc package May's Seeds, 2 for ... 5c 
25c bottle Furniture Polish 19c 



ama canal was built by the United ; 
States, clearly and squarely requires I 
that the ships of all nations observ- | 
ing the rules of the canal, are to be i 
treated exactly alike, and that there I 
ran be no discrimination. | 

"The treaty ig one of the shortest on i 
record, containing as it does, only a i 
very few paragraphs, and of these 
one lontains and expresses the whole 
situation. It is as follows: 
Terse PhraHlng. 

"'The canal shall be free and open 
to the vessels of commerce and of 
war of all nations observing these 
rules, on terms of entire equality, so 
that there .shall be no discrimination ; 
against any such nation or Its citizens 
or subjects, in respect of the condl- '\ 
tions of charges of traffic or other- j 
wise. Such conditions and charges of | 
traffic shall be just and equitable.' 

"This, of course, is simple English, | 
clear English, «nd forceful English. It ; 
iTuans what it says. I 

"This principle also, is but a relter- | 
Rtion of the American policy respect- | 
ing navigable waters from the very 
beginning of the government. America 
has ever demanded free seas of the 
world. Many nations, particularly 
Spain, tried to divide up the sea and 
control their respective areas. "W'e 
fought it tooth and nail. European 
nations paid tribute to the BarbaiV 
pirates controlling the entrance to 
the Mediterranean. America refused, 
sent a fleet, and the deeds of our sail- 
ers at that time still thrill the youth 
of our nation. All great highways of 
commerce on the sea we had demanded 
shall be open on equal terms to all 
rhips of all nations. What we demand 
of others-, that we must ourselves ton- 
cede, 

Britain's ConeeMHlon. 

"The principle of the Hay-Paunce- 
fote treaty becomes even stronger 
when historically considered. A sea 
route was sought and people talked of 
a Panama canal. We found, however, 
that Great Britain was ahead of us. 
She had large possessions in the West 
Indies. She, by treaty, had a claim to 
the whole Mosquito coast and a right 
to build a canal. We at once negoti- 
ated and secured the Clayton-Bulwer 
treaty of 1850, which contemplated 
that private contract should build the 
-^anal. but when built It should be open 
on equal terms to the ships of the two 
nations. Ever since making that 
treaty England has, of course, claimed 
the right to have her merchant ships 
not discriminated against. England has 
conceded our right to fortify the canal, 
to use It as a military and naval base. 
In fact, the treaty has all been Inter- 
preted our way, save In the matter of 
favoring American coastwise ships — 
which is contrary to the American 
time-honored and war-enforced prin- 
ciple, contrary to our economic Inter- 
ests and squarely contrary to the ex- 
press terms of the Hay-Pauncefote 
treaty." 



water is showing. In Green bay the 
ice continues Intact over the northern 
portion and is brok**-* and moving with 
the winds over the southern portion. 
, . , , In Michigan no Ice fields have been 
did not warrant a change of his de- \ reported south of the Islands except 
clsion not to grant the prisoners' Pl^a } from St. Joseph north to Ottawa beach, 
for executive clemency. I and these fields are broken and drift- 

"If it were my heart alone that was ] j^g ^^h the winds. The ice at the 
considering this case," he said, you i straits has decreased In thickness to | 
know what 1 would do. I have spent j ^^^ inches and some open water Is ap- j 
many sleepless nights because I real- ] pearlng near Mackinaw and at Mack- I 
lied that I alone stood between the , j^gf. island. The ice fields over the 
bcvs and death. But I have made up ^Qj^^hern portion of Huron have disap- 
mv mind. It was a choice between peered; there are extensive fields re- 
sentiment and justice, and I had to ppp^^d over the southern portion, and 
.side with justice. I would have given extend beyond vision at the mouth of 
everv cent I possessed not to have to j tj,e lake. The connecting rivers are 
paes upon this case finally." 



Easter Sale of Dinnerware 

For tomorrow's selling we have a 
large table full of Haviland China Din- 
nerware, which we offer at 

Half Regular Price 

An excellent opportunity to buy fine 
china at a saving. 

Another Great Special — 100 - piece 
English Dinner Set, in white and gold ; 
regular $23.75 value, ^1 Q Aft 

special at «plJ7«^0 





Candle 
Sticks and 
Shades for 
the Easter 
Table 10c 

Large assortments 
of styles and colors. 
And many other 
Easter things for 
the home. 



For Sale or Rent! 

EAST END RESIDENCE 

150-root frontage. 

ONEIDA REALTY COMPANY 

1607 Alworth Building. 



op3n. In Erie the fields are confined 
to the eastern portion; these fields are 
broken and drifting with the winds 
and much open water is appearing. No 
field Ice is reported in Ontario and the 
harbors are nearly all open, 

"In comparison wllh the same period 
last year there Is less ice reported In 
all the lakes except Central and South- 
ern Michigan, where the conditions are 
about the same." 

ICE BREAKING^ 

BEGUN IN HARBOR 



Easter Balmacaans — The Big Duluth. 

COLD HIT S Wm rREGION 

(Continued from page 1.) 



during two successive nights. 

Much damage was reported to the 
garden truck and fruit In Arkansas. 
Farmers and orchard owners used 
smudge pots during the night In an 
effort to protect the fruit trees. 
♦ 

Kiin«a.<« Peach Crop SafferM. 

Kansas City, Kan., April 9. — The 
peach crop in Kansas is badly dam- 
aged by the unseasonable cold weath- 
er. The extent of the damage to the 
peaches and whether It IncluTies other 
fruit has not yet been estimated, ac- 
cording to Julius Wellhouse, Jr.. di- 
rector of the Kansas Horticultural 
society. Ice from a quarter to three- 
eighths of an inch thick formed in 
most sections of the state. 



DIAMONDS 

14- Karat $20.00 
i^Karat $40.00 

Diamonds Sold on Easy 
Payment Plan. 

Keystone Jewelry Co. 

22 West Superior Street. 



Damase Reported. 

Atlanta, Ga., April 9. — Extremely 
low temperatures were reported today 
over the South Atlantic and Gulf 
states. Reports say fruit and vege- 
tables in Alabama. Georgia, the Caro- 
linas and Virginia have been greatly 
damaged. 



LODGE, REPUBLICAN, 
SUPPORTS WILSON'S 
PANAMA TOLLS PLAN 

(Continued from p age 1.) 

ble, the high plane which we former- 
ly occupied. 

Now Regarded With DlxtroMt. 

"It would be an obvious impropriety 
to point out the specific conditions of 
our present relations with the vari- 
ous nations, both In the old world and pected to take place In a week or ten 
the new; it is enough to note the fact 
that we are regarded by other na- 
tions with distrust and in some cases 
with dislike. Rightly or wrongly, they 
have come to believe that we are not 
to be trusted; that we make our in- 
ternational relations the sport of pol- 
itics, and treat them as if tht-y were 
in no wise different from questions of 
domestic legislation. 

"This has not been In accord with 
our history or our position. Only once 
have we abrogated a treaty, and then 
actual, if not declared, war existed. 
We have scrupulously observed our 
international agreements, and where 
differences have arisen we have set- 
tled them, not Mith the high hand of 
power, but by negotiation and arbitra- 
tion. 

"Deeent Rexpeet." 

"I suppose that at this moment. In 
the midst of the adroitly stimulated 
passions raised against the president's 
recommendation that we should repeal 
the toll exemption, it will be thought j 
very poor-spirited and even truckling 
— I believe that Is the accepted word — 
to suggest that In deciding this ques- 
tion we should take Into considera- 
tion the opinions of the other na- 
tions. Nevertheless, I consider this a 
very important element in any deci- 
sion which I may reach, and I am en- 
couraged to believe that I am right In 
ro thinking, lecause I have the war- 
rant and authority of the author of 
the Declaration of Independence. When 
Jefferson framed that great Instru- 
ment he declared that the Impelling 
reason for making the declaration was 
'a decent respect to the opinions of 
mankind.' 

"The outcry about exhibiting sub- 
serviency to Great Britain r any 
other country because we sc . to 

repeal the tolls, seems to me hardly 
worthy of serious consideration. The 
United States Is altogether too great 
and too powerful to be subservient to 
any one, and the mere fact of sug- 
gesting It seems to me to indicate an 
uneasy suspicion on the part of those 
from whom it emanates, not only of 
the validity of their position, Ibut of 
the power and greatness of their own 
country, as to which I, for one, am 
troubled by no doubts." 

Public HcaringK Begun. 
Public hearings were begun today 
before the senate canals committee on 
the repeal of the Panama tolls exemp- 
tion. Senators who have Introduced 
bills and resolutions on the subject 
; were first heard. 

I Senator Norrls, Republican, spoke 
i on his amendment to reaffirm the right 
i of the United States to discriminate 
in favor of Its own ships If It chooses 
to do so and to direct the president to 
submit the controversy to arbitration. 
He opposed the exemption as a subsidy. 




Heavy Nickel 
Casseroles 

Like cut, with Guern- 
sey lining; extra fine 
finish — 

«7^'"'»'»»$1.59 

value at T *■ *^^^^ 



5 $1.48 Brass Jardinieres ji^ 
. j^MBfeT-' ■. • \ ^''iS^s Just what you need for JJ 
f^ liIWtlilT'i L JlO the Easter Lily; mat bra^ 91 



d 




Just what you need for 
the Easter Lily; mat braas 
flni.sh, with three ball 
feet; 10 inches in diameter 
— s e 1 1 ing regularly at 
$1.48, special for Qfi/* 
Friday, each: */01* 

Brass Baskets — Something 
regular 98c valu«^ 
Friday 7Q^ 



new; 
special 
at only. 



$1.25 Brass Fern Dishes 98c 

Very neat, with copper inset; 6 In. In diameter. 



I 




Nickel Plated 
Tea Kettles 



Special for Friday while 
a limited quantity 
lasts, at only 



95c 



Marine Men Preparing for 

the Opening of 

Navigation.; 

Marine men at the Head of the 
Lakes are slowly preparing for the j 
opening of navigation, which Is ex- | 



days If the weather is favorable. The 
inspectlcn of vessels and the breaking j 
of Ice in the harbor are the only fea- j 
tures in marine circles at present, j 

Very few large vessels docked here i 
last fall, and for that reason the In- 1 
spection work has been light this i 
spring. Several of the vessels here do \ 
not require Inspection this sea-'on. The 
local Inspectors have just looked over i 
the Minnesota and found her in good 
condition. Xo other Inspections are , 
contemplated for a time. j 

Considerable Ice has been broken j 
during the last two days, and the bar- 
bor Is pretty well opened. The Min- 
nesota and America have transferred i 
the Cuyler Adams from the Xew Ber- 
wlnd docks to the ship yards. 

Marine men say that no more ice , 
will be broken here until Saturday. The ! 
weather during the last week has not 
been very favorable for clearing the \ 
lake of Ice although conditioiis are i 
much tetter than they were. With a i 
warming up of the w>3ather marine ; 
men believe that navigation may open : 
In a week or ten days, but this can , 
be accomplished only through a big 
change for the better in weather con- 1 
dltions. j 

MISSING SAILOR I 

HEIR TO ESTATE 




John 



30. 



Freexing TeiaperatnreM. 

.^^!?fff.,Fii^V?l^„;„^PVL!:-^/^«i=»"of Ind^sTlYlTe'^dTd^norVrntTo^gTeTsTo 

\ otmstrue the treaty and foreclose the 
right of the United States to control 
the cansl. 

Senator Thomas, Democrat, made a 
statement supporting his proposal to 
make the canal free to all ships of all 



temperatures ranging from 20 to 
: deg. were reported from many parts 
I of the Southwest today. The average 
' temperature was said to be lower than 

ever before recorded so late In the 

session. 

Horticulturists expressed the fear 

that fruit has suffered severely and 

truck farmers reported serious damage 

to early vegetables. 



OIR GREAT REDICTION SALE 

We are not having a removal sale, 
but If you wish to save money, at- 
tend our Gieat Reduction Sale of 
Fine Home Furnishings. We are 
offering the greatest values In the 
city. It will pay you to investigate 
our prices. 




HOROWITZ MAY CONFESS 

(Continued from page 1.) 

his clients would best be served by 
forwarding the memorandum by spe- 
cial messenger. 

The rumors regarding the expected 
confession had It that the one gunman 
most likely to talk was "Gyp the 
Blood" Horowitz. 

Alibi for "Dago Frank." 

An alibi affidavit for "Dago Frank" 
Clroflcl, the existence of which was ru- 
mored yesterday, will be sent to the 



Sherman Bickel Is 
Sought By His 
Sister. 

Laura Bickel of 8817 Blrchdale ave- j 
nue, Cleveland, Ohio, has written to I 
L. M. WlUcuts, collector of customs, 
asking his help to locate her brother, 
John Sherman Bickel, aged 40, whom 
she has not heard from for some time. 

Their father, she says, died recently 
leaving a small estate to be divided 
between them and she desires him to 
have his share. She stated that she 
was all alone In the world and that she 
needed his protection and company. 

Miss Bickel states that she believes 
her brother to be a sailor on the Great 
Lakes, probably a stoker or a deck- 
hand. He is 6 feet tall, large boned, 
broad shouldered, has light hair, blue 
gray eyes and smooth faced. 

FIVE RESCUEDIw gale. 

Lifeboat Battles Nine Hours to Save 
Fishermen. 

Chicago, April 9. — ^The power life- 
boat of the South Chicago station of 
the United States life-saving station 
service battled the lake gale nine 



five fisher- 



hamberlain of the I ho^>" yesterday rescuing ii»c i.^..^. 
P?of S H. niebner I J"en caught <>n the government piers 
hT,.«n «-i,r. «„„^e.i-;One of the men was on the pier at 



nations, 

Commissioner Chamberlain 
navigation bureau, 

and Dr. Emery Johnson, who Investl- i "-- "■,'a"'^-^a.\* ♦««!» fKo nnwpr boat 
gated the tolls question for President |f'»'^>' Ind., and it took the power boat 
Taft, will be heard later. 

Senator O'Gorman said the witnesses 
from New Orleans and the Pacific coast 
would be unable to appear before the 
end of next week. 



Boys' Easter Suits — The Big Duluth. 

pittsburgIaniT 

soon to reopen. 



six hours to go there and back 

Th<» government pier here is one and 
a h.alf miles long. The storm waves 
broke clear over It and the four men 
at the end of the pier were helpless 
and likely to succumb from exposure. 



FALLING OFF IN ORE 
MOVEMENT PREDICTED. 



Cleveland, Ohio. April 9.— (Special to 
The Herald.) — A Cleveland vessel own- 
er vesterday took 200,000 tons of soft 
coal for delivery at a fast dock at 
Superior during the coming season at 
30 ctnts. Most shippers will not be 



Easter Glassware 

- Regular 

3c 

— Regular 

3c 

-12 inches 

10c 



Plain Wine Glasses - 
price 60c a dozen, 

Friday, each 

Plain Water Tumblers 
price 60c a dozen, spe- 
cial, each 

Colonial Glass Vases- 
high, special Friday, 



^1 OXedar Mops 69c 




Like cut; 
nothing like 
it for hard- 
wood floors ; 
polishes the 
floors at the 
same time. 



Mazda Lamps For 
Friday 

20 Watts 30c 

25 Watts 30c 

40 Watts ...30c 

60 Watts ...40c 

100 Watts 70c 



Glass Block's Special 

Toilet Paper 

25c 



8 rolls Fri- 
day for 




Galvanized Wash Tubs 



Made of- 
extra 
heai'y 
quality 
Galvan- 
ized iron 



No. 1 size, re^larly 

49c, Friday , 

Xo. 2 size, regularly 

B9e, Friday 

Xo. 3 size, regularly 
69c, Friday 




Electric Irons 

witli a lifelong guarantee, made 
of high-grade materials, with 
6-foot cord and detachable plug 

— Special for 
Friday at 



$2.39 



Galvanized Pails 



39c 
43c 
49c 



Made extra 
strong of good 
quality galvan- 
ized iron — 



10-quart size for 15c 

12-quart size for 17c 

14-quart size for 19c 




Time To Buy 
Garden Seeds 

Grass Seed, put up in 1-lb. 
packages, at 10c. Sweet Pea 
Seeds, in bulk, at 12^c per oz. 
Large assortment of Vegetable 
and Flower Seeds at 5c per 
package. These are all this 
years seeds and all fresh. 



Our Contract and Supply Departm't 

is more completely equipped thii season than ever before. 
LET US FIGURE WITH YOU. We have large quantities 
of goods' in stock to supply your needs on short notice. 

Battleship Linoleums, Inlaid Linoleums, Printed Lino- 
leums, Rubber Matting, Cocoa Matting, Brass Nosing, Brass 
Bindings, etc. Competent and obliging workmen. 

— ^Fourth Floor. 



Cbe 6la$$ Block Store 



"Tht Shopping Center of Duluth" 



NO ADVANTAGE FOR 
EITHER SIDE YET IN 
TA MPICO FIGHTING 

(Continued from page 1.) 



bv the Mexican Herald today. 

'The newspaper states that Gen. 
Aurellano Blancquet declares that Gen. 
Jose Refugio Velasco, the Federal com- 
mander, has not evacuated the city "In 
the full sense of the word." The min- 
ister of war says the Federal comman- 
der has made a strategic move which 
Is expected Jo give the best results on 
the arrival of the Federal columns now 
on their way to Torreon. 
» — 
CarranEa Uphold* Villa. 
Juarez, Mex., April 9. — Gen. Venus- 




Coraer Third Avenne Ea«t aad 
Sap«'rlor Street. 



harge of disorderly conduct, to the { depo^i•')r3 oi:d stocknolder-!. means the 
home of Dago Frank • and met "Dago i reopening of the bank within a month. 
Frank" there. It was then 1:56 o'clock ' 




THE 



BEST BUG KILLER 

on the market. Kills bedbugs, 
rooches. vermin and eggs In one or 
two applications. Get It at once. 26c 
a bottle. Special rates to hotels. 

lillDTU'C PRESCRIPTION 
WflNIn O DRUQSTORF, 

13 West $ap4'rlor Street. 



Pittsburg. Pa.. April ».— The Pitts- 
^^ „, ^, . , I burg Clearing House association has 

governor with W able s memorandum. I approved the petition of the Flrst- 
The affidavit is signed by Frederick \ Serond National Bank of Pittsburg for 

Reo, a special ofricpr in a Harlem dance .reinstatement to membership, subject to ,".: «V^V;.nrL-::*f«r another f^w weeks 
hall Reo "ays that on the night Ro- , the approval of the comptroller of the i%*^r"'r«^''ve8sel owners a?^ Tnn^^ 
senthal was killed he took a note from | currency. The action, according t., the *"^^J%^^'^"Ll!|^^lhe^ boatrfor coa^ 
a woman, who had been arrested on a ! r.nri.«n.zation cnmm.tte, of th. h«nW. Jj'r'-y ^{^o /»|f^^i^r ^hel'' ^"^ts Jm- coal 

will be able to get. 

The ore situation Is . such-jthat it Is 
Impossible to forecail ^her the 
amount of ore that will be transported 
or how soon contracts will be made. 
Estimates as low as 36.000.000 tons 
have been made for the season move- 
ment and as high as 45, 00ft, 000 tons. I 
It will probably be a late 'movement . 
and little chartering \» Jooked for un- 
til next month at tho earliest. | 

The grain shippers are not in the ; 
market for anything .liL^t now. There 
will probably be a late trade this sea- 
son as grain is not selling. 



in the morning, about the time Rosen- 
thal was murdered. 

The memorandum also calls to the 

governor's attention the fact that ten 

of the twelve jurors who convicted the 

gunmen expressed themselves in favor 

i of a reprieve. 



! Rabbis' Appeal Dramatle. 

I Albany. N. Y., April ».— An Impas- 
I sioned and dramatic appeal made by 
■ five Jewish clergymen of New York 
' for a stay of the execution of the four 
' gunm»*n who were convicted of killing 
Herman Rosenthal, was denied by 
I Governor Glynn late yesterday. 

The plea, which was made In the 

I executive chamber, was based on the 

I possibility of new evidence developing 

in the second trial of Former Police 

IJeut. Charles Becker. It so com 



Just One Application 
and Ugly Hairs Vanish 



(Modes of Today.) 

Here Is a simple treatment for re- 
moving ugly hairs. It is painless, re- 
quires little time and can be used In 
the privacy of your home: Get some 
powdered delatone and with water mix 
enough paste to cover the objection- 
able hairs. Apply for 2 or 3 minutes, 
then rub off, wash the skin, and It will 
be left soft, clear and hairless. This 
method is inexpensive and entirely 
j harmless, but be sure to get delatone 



pletely unnerved the executive that he or the result may be disappointing.- 
\ bad to retire to bis private office for j Advertisement 



Indomed for Sapreair Oourt. 

Jamestown, N. D., April- 9— Judge 
Spalding was Indorsed at a special 
] m*»etlng of the State Bar association 
I held here to recommend to the people 
I of the state a choice for state su- 
I preme Judge. There was a goodly rep- 
1 resentation of attorney* from various 
i parts ol the state. 



Resinol 

for unsightly 
skin eruptions 

PIMPLES, blackhe«d«, rashet, rine^ 
worm and, worst of all, that red, 
itching, (caly torment, eczema, van- 
ith whtn you use Retinal Ointment and 
Retinol Soap. Even though your skin is 
ao unsightly with eruption that vou shun 
your friends and your friends shun you, 
Retinol is almost sure to make it clear 
and healthy, (quickly, Msily and at trifl- 
ing cost. Retinol Ointment and Resinol 
Soap have been prescribed for nineteen 
years for just such skin troubles as yours. 

I Wherever dnun are wld you ou (tt Reainol 

I OintmenS and RetiDol Boap. For trUl fne, 

I write to Dept. 40-8. RMinol, Baltimore, Mo. 

Avoid subatltutM, they ar« NOT "Joat asfood.'! 



tlano Carranza has given out a state- 
ment on the expulsion of foreigners. 
Justifying Villa's action and declaring 
that the property of Spaniards will not 
be confiscated. He says that the Span- 
iards' expulsion was "on account of 
their active participation in the move- 
ment in favor of Huerta," and that it 
was done to keep them out of trouble 
"of a serious nature." He says that If 
It shall be found that any of the ex- 
pelled Spaniards have never meddled 
in political affairs, they will be al- 
lowed to return. 

The Spaniards, he says, "cling to their 
nationality for the protection It has 
afforded them in oppressions of our 
people. They rarely become Mexican 
citizens, although they mix actively In 
our politics." 



Villa Takea Torreon Banks. 

Juarez, April 9. — Gen. Villa yester- 
day took over the four principal banks 
of Torreon, according to a report w^hlch 
he telegraphed to this city with the 
request that it be given to the press 
of the United States. Hla prize does 
not Include money or negotiable securi- 
ties, as the bankers took the pre- 
caution of shipping these when V'elasco 
evacuated the country. He has the 
buildings and furniture, however. The 
banks affected are the Banco Naclon- 
ale, the Banco De Laguna, the Ger- 
man & South American bank find the 
Bank of London & Mexico. 

Villa's explanation is this: 

When on Oct. 18, 1913, he took Tor- 
reon the first time, friends of the 
Constitutionalist cause contributed 
2,000,000 pesos. Twenty-five per cent 
of this, Villa says, he used to buy 
drafts on London, Paris and Berlin to 
strengthen his credit. 

When he abandoned the city for the 
compaign up north, a Federal garrison 
moved in, and in January of this year, 
when he attempted to draw on his 
drafts, he found that the banks had 
stopped payment. He therefore ac- 
cuses them of having robbed him, end 
Is taking such retaliatory measures as 
are available. 



colony of Mexicans. He is the leader 
In commercial activities of the La- 
guna district, owns a number of the 
largest haciendas In the district, and 
his wealth is estimated at $17,000,- 
000 Mexican currency. He carried only 
a leather satchel, a steamer rug and 
a bag filled with his personal be- 
longings, which he gathered together 
hastily when the order was given by 
Villa for the Spaniards to leave th« 
country. 

"f am alone. My relatives and my 
possessions are all In the Laguna dis- 
trict." he safd. "I hope to be able 
to return, for I have had no part in 
the Internal politics of the country. 
For that reason I prefer not to say 
anything for fear that it might be 
misunderstood. I was not mistreated 
by anyone at Torreon, and have no 
plans for the Immediate present." 

Arozena Is said to raise 6.000 bale* 
or 2,600.000 pounds of cotton a year, 
from which the gross income Is said 
to be 1400.000. 



A CLEAR COMPLEXION 

Ruddy Checks — Sparkling Eyes 
— Most Women Can Have 



Says Dr. Edirards, a Weil-Known Ohi* 
Physlrlan. 



Rlehest Man Inpoverinhcd. 

El Paso. Texas, April 9.— Rafael 
Arozena, wealthiest resident of the 
Laguna district and reported to be 
the most extensive grower of sea Isl- 
and cotton In the world, was one of 
the Spanish refugees who rode to the 
border In a second-class coach with 
only bis personal possessions to show 
of his lifetime of struggle in the Coa- 
hulla cotton country. 

Senor Arozena Is to the Coahuila 
Spanish colony what Don Luis Ter- 
razas Is to the Chihuahua refugee 



Dr. F. M. Edwards for 17 years treat- 
ed scores of women for liver and bowel 
ailments. During these years he gave 
to his patients a prescription made of 
a few well known vegetable ingred- 
ients mixed with olive oil. naming 
them Dr. Edwards Olive Tablets, you 
will know them by their olive color. 

These tablets are wonder-workers 
on the liver and bowels, which cause a 
normal action, carrying off the waste 
and poisonous matter that one's sys- 
tem collects. 

If you have a pale face, sallow look, 
dull eyes, pimples, goated tongue, 
headaches, a listless, no-good feeling, 
all out of sorts. Inactive bowels, you 
take one of Dr. Edwards' Olive Tablets 
nightly for a time and note the pleas- 
ing results. 

Thousands of women, as well as men, 
take Dr. Edwards' Olive Tablets now 
and then Just to keep In the pink of 
condition. 

Dr. Edwards' Olive Tablets, the suc- 
cessful 8ubstlt«te for calomel — 10c and 
26c per box. The Olive Tablet Co., Co- 
lumbus, Ohio. All druKgista 




r 



Thursday, 



THE DUtLUTH HERALD 



April 9, 1914. 



WEST END 



H«i 



HERJXD BRANCHi 
!■ Otai*a, Ummmm^r* 182S W«irt Snyertov MrMt. 



resided in the West end for a period 
of twenty or more years. The total 
niember»hip has now passed the 300 
Ruurk. 



1 



FINE NEW THEATER 
FOR WEST END 



-I » 



t ' 



Emil Nelson Will Build 

Structure Which Will 

Cost $55,000. 

The West end will have one of the 
finest theaters in the city, according 
to the plans being made by Emll Xel- 

8on, propri»tor of the Star theater. 
The plans are now bein^ drawn by 
HoislfJid & Sullivan, architects. 

The building will be erected adjoin- 
ing the Nelson block now occupied 
by the Siar theater. It will have a 
frontage of titty feet on Superior 
•treet, will be 140 feet deep and two 
•torie.s high. Arra>iKenient« for a seat- 
Ins «-n parity of 1,300 will be made. 

The new building will cost about 
155.00'). It is expected that the plans 
will be ready for the contractors In 
about ten days. The contract is to 
be let as soon as possible in order that 
the building may be ready for opening 
early ir> the fall. 

OHERSON HEADS 
YOUNG OU) TIMERS 




ANDREW OTTERSON, 



and 



Association Makes Plans 

for Annual Picnic 

in June. 

The annual meeting of the Young 
Old Timers' association of the West 
end was held last night at the office 
of E. A. Thompson. 2032 West Superior 
street. Andrew Otterson was elected 
president; W. C. Burton, vice presi- 



dent; Fred S. Britts, secretary. 
William Harvey, treasurer. 

Plans were considered for holding 

j the annual picnic of the organization 
on either Sunday, June 21 or 28. Pro- 

' visions will be made to take the en- 
tire 300 members of the society to tht 

: picnic ground.^ in automobiles. The af- 
fairs in previous years has been held 
at BircH's farm on I.,ester river and it 
is planned to hold it there this year 
if the grounds can be secured for the 
day wanted. 

The general committee to have 
charge of the affair will be selected at 

; a meeting of the new officers to be 
lield at Mr. Thompson's studio on April 

'; ""The Young Old Timers' association 

was organized four years ago with its 

' membership limited to men who hav* 



GOOD FRIDAYSERVICES. 

Churches Will Hold Joint Meetings in 
West End. 

Good Friday will generally be ob- 
served with special services in the 
churches of the West end ^omoTTOw. 
The principal services will be held at 
10:30 o'clock and again in the evening. 

Joint observation of the day will be 
held by four of the churches at the 
Swedish Mission church. Twenty-first 
avenue west and Second street at 
10:30 a. ni. The congregations taking 
part In the joint services are the 
Swedish Mission. Swedish Methodist. 
Swedish Baptist and Norwegian Dan- 
ish Methodist churches. 

Ilev. H. A. Ofstie. pastor of the lat- 
ter church, will preach the principal 
sermon. Ho will be assisted by Rev-. 
J J Daniels, Kev. Swaney Kelson and 
Kev. C. W. R. Wermlne. 

Tomorrow evening communion serv- 
ices will be held at the Swedish Mis- 
sion church. 

WILL GIVE SACRED 

CONCERT ON EASTER. 



rival caippaLgp. These meetings have 
attracted large crowds to the church, 
and It is expected that many new 
members, w^l. join the church next 
Sunday. , 

"West End Briefs. 

Mrs. Inez Johnson, SOT North Twen- 
ty-third averiUe west, and two children 
have left, for'Saskatoon, Can., where 
they will vlglt relatives. 

Mrs. Milton Fish, entertained at a 
picnic for ipembers of her Sunday 
school class pf the Central Baptist 
church. The 'party was taken to a 
farm sli mflfes north of Woodland, 
where the children were entertained. 

"Personal Work" will be the subject 
of an address given this evening by 
Rev. Milton Irtsh at tlie wldweek serv- 
ices to be fi^ld thjs evening in the 
Central ^^pt^t church. Twentieth ave- 
nue weat and First street. 

F. O. Holman of Mountain Lake, 
who has been \isiting relatives In the 
West end. left for his home last eve- 
ning. 

The Sunday school of the Trinity 
English Lutheran church. Twenty- 
seventh avenue west and Third street, 
will meet at 10 o'clock tomorrow 
morning for rehearsal of its Easter 
concert. The concert will be given 
Easter evening. Rev. F. O. Hanson 
will preach in the church at 10:30 a. 
m. tomorrow. 

Communion services will be held this 
evening at the Zion Norwegian Luth- 
eran church. Twenty-fifth avenue west 
and Third street. Tomorrow morning 
at 10:30 o'clock Rev. J. H. Nervig will 
preach. The confirmation class will 
meet Saturday morning at 9:30 o'clock. 
The pastor has also arranged to hold 
■pecial Easter services on Sunday, 



A sacred concert is being arranged 
for Sunday, April 19 at the St. 
Clement's Catholic church. Twenty- 
first avenue west and Third street, to 
be given under the direction of the 
guild. A feature of the program be- 
ing arranged is a lecture to be given , __.- - ■*■■■ ■ ■flAAOE 
by Rev. Hugh Floyd of the cathedral. CHI I RIIM |IDDSE 
The musical part of the program is rVkk UVkib IflWWVki 
being arranged under the direction 
of Mrs. E. J. Borth, Miss Theresa Lynn 
and Mrs. C. B. Nunan. 



BIG CROWDS ATTEND 

REVI VAL M EETINGS. 

"What Is a Christian?" will be the 
subject of the sermon given by Rev. 
George E. Silloway. pastor of the 
CJrace Methodist church. Twenty-sec- 
ond avenue west and Third street, this 
evening. The meeting tonight is one of 
the series of revival meetings '«hlch 
has been held in the church during 
the last two weeks. ,, 

Tomorrow night the Past^r will 
speak on "The Power of the Cross 
The meeting tomorrow will be the 
closing service of the two weeks re 



TICKET FOR rOWA 



STOP 



Coffee Drinkers, 

And think a minute ! 

Some persons seem able, for a time at least, to get along with coffee, but it 
contains a subtle, habit-forming drug, caffeine, which sooner or later is pretty 
sure to rob one of health and comfort. 

If you know coffee don't harm you— if you feel prime and fit under its con- 
tinued use, well and good — stick to it. 

But— if you are sometimes a bit "off color," and .irritable nerves, disturbed 
heart action, biliousness, headache, or symptoms of liver or kidney trouble 
make you wonder what's the matter — 

.Better find out what coffee has to do with it. 

Evidently some people are learning the truth about coffee — ^listen — 

During 1913 the sales of coffee in this country 
decreased over one hundred million pounds. 

A mighty army of former coffee drinkers now use 

POSTVM 

and enjoy freedom from their old coffee aches and pains. 

Postum, made of whole wheat and a bit of molasses, is a delicious table 
beverage absolutely free from the coffee drugs, caffeine and tannin. 

If you are interested in bettering yourself — think it over I 

Postum now comes in two forms. 

Regular Postum— must be well boiled. 15c and 25c packages. 

Instant Postum— a soluble powder, requires no boiling. 30c and 50c tins. 

The cost per cup of both kinds is about the same. 

''There's a Reason'' for Postum 

— sold by Grocers everywhere. 




George White of Nevada 

Is to Run for 

Governor. 

Des Moines, Iowa, April 9.— Progres- 
sive leaders of Iowa succeeded in 
bringing out .candidates for practically 
every state office and a number of 
congressional offices yesterday. George 
White of Nevada is the party nomi- 
nee for governor. Other nominations 

for statQ ofttces were: 

H. H. B«6ty of Davenport, lieuten- 
ant governor; W. J. Sinyard of Archep, 
secretary of state; H. D. Tade of Hills- 
boro, treasurer; M. E. Weldy, Des 
Moines, attorney general, and F. H. 
Keys of Council Bluffs and L. R. Rose- 
brook of Oskaloosa for railroad com- 
missioners. 

No candidate for state auditor was 
named, but J." B. Fruden of Dubuque 
probably will get the place if he will 
accept. Carl Franke of Mason City was 
named national committeeman, to suc- 
ceed Judge J. L. Stevens of Boone, who 
resigned last fall. 

OLD RESIDENT 

DIES SUDDENLY 



A. C. Robinson, Engineer, 

Succumbs to Heart 

Failure. 

Alonzo C. Robinson, 68 years old, a 
resident of Duluth for the last thirty- 
six years, died suddenly of heart trouble 
at 11 o'clock last evening at his resi- 
dence, 1004 Lake avenue south. He 
had been in apparently good health of 
late, and his death was a complete sur- 
prise to the members of his family. 

Mr. Robinson was. an engineer at a 
local elevator and was very well known 
among the earlier residents of the city. 
He came here with his wife thirty-six 
years ago. Besides a widow, he Is sur- 
vived by four children. They are: Mfs. 
Leo Thompson, Port Arthur, Ont.; Mrs. 
Albert Fraser, Claremont, Wyo., and 
John and Ada Robinson of Duluth. 

He was a member of the local lodge 
of Odd Fellows, the Ancient Order of 
United Workmen and the National 
Association of Stationary Engineers. 

The body has been removed to the 
Grady & Horgan undertaking rooms, 
' where the funeral arrangements will 
1 be made some time today. Interment 
I will be at the Forest Hill cemetery. 



GRAN MUST PAY 

WIFE ALIMONY 



Must ATso Pay Attorney 

Who Defended Her 

During Trial. 

Pending a motion for a new trial in 

the Gran divorce case, which will be 

urged by B; M. Goldberg, attorney for 

Mrs. Olga Gran, defendant, Victor H. 

i Gran, plaintiff, will be obliged to pay 

his wife |7 a week temporary alimony. 

! according to the order of Judge Cant 

' of the trial court. The court has also 

I ordered Gran "to pay his wife's attorney 

1 1150 for kto jury ices In defending Mrs. 

' Gran. Ali 'Wmt' as formal findings In 

the divorce case are signed, a 40-day 

stay will be granted. 

BILL to" REGULATE 
i HO USE L OBBYING. 

Washington, April 9. — A bill to 

regalate lobbying in the house was 

introduced by Representative Floyd of 

I Arkansas for the Judiciary committee. 

I It would tequjre every legislative 

1 counsel and agent employed by any 

person, corporation or association to 

I promote or defeat legislation, to reg- 

I ister and to render an account of all 

j money expended by him in t-uch ca- 

! pacity. 

WILL MAKE FIGHT 

UPO N NEG RO JUDGE. 

Washington. April 9. — Southern sen- 
ator3 have indicated their intention to 
m'lke a vigorous fight against con- 
firmation of the reappointment of Rob- 
ert H. Terrell, a negro, as the munici- 
pal Judge of tl^ District of Columbia. 
Tho nomination came up In regular or- 
der on the executive calendar yester- 
day, but no action was taken. 

SYNDICATE OF 

SHOP -LIFTERS. 

Portland, Dr.. April 9 — An alleged 
BhopHfterlr *jWtMcate, led by a woman 
and composed of approximately a score 
of persons, njpstly women, has been 
uncovered tb»* police assert, following 
Ave arreSs. .^ half dozen more ar- 
rests were made later. 

A stor»*roo« In the courthouse was 
heaped with recovered loot. Virtually 
every • bte department and Jewelry 
store In Portland has suffered losses, 
and the Wot fe valued at thousands of 
dollars. , (,, 

orderspay'ment 

r BY SIEGEL bank. 



REDUCED PRDCE 




ALL 



Shoes for Easter Sunday 

AT R. IHI. L@i6'S IFi^OTGBY SIHIOE $TOIR£ 

SPRING STYLES NOW READY) 



All the Latest Styles of Fashionable Shoes for Men, Women and Boys arc 
on sale at our store. We are able, on account of fortunate purchase of leather 
in large quantities, to supply our customers with the 

MOST UP-TO DATE AND RELIADLE SHOES AT REDUCED PRICES 

Our Method of SELLING DIRECT TO THE WEARER, 
saving the profits of jobber, retailer and middlemen, also 
allows us to give BETTER SHOES at SMALLER PRICES 

WE OFFER OUR CUSTOMERS 

WALDORF Men's, Women's and Boys' $2.50 

ft^°.'.'. .'.'V'.'"'".'^. 1.07 an^i 2.17 

Men's and Women's Rubber Sole Shoes, in latest 
styles, tan, white and black calfskin, $3.50 
and $4.00 values 2.47 and 2.07 



Men's and Women's REC- 
TOR, $3.50 to $4.50 Shoes 

R. H. LONG $3.50 Shoes, our selling 
price 

WALDORF $3.00 Shoes 
at 



2.97 »d 3.47 

2.57 

2.17 a.d 2.47 







Some of the many HANDSOME STYLES and POPULAR SHAPES are i"?"*"***! ^^^^^t*;;^ 
below, but to fully appreciate our WONDERFUL SHOE VALUES you •»»o"'*LVfiJ,SSr,5ADE' 
rr^fjiv ANH I nOK THEM OVER whether von wUh tobuvornot. Our ahoe. are UIMluw mauc. 



Women's 4.00 

RECTOR 

Patent Colt 

Vamp, 
Cloth Top, 

Kidney Heel, 
Sale Price, 




Women's 3.00 Calfskin Pumps, 
Sale Price, 

2.17 




Women's 
RECTOR, 
4.00 Value, 
3ale Price, 



Women's 3.50 Colonial Pumps, Patent 
Colt Vamps, Kidney Heels, 



Ladies' Fine 
WALDORF 

Shoes, 
3.00 Value, 
Sale Price, 

2.17 






Men's Double Sole STORM SHOES, 
Black and Tan, 4.00 Value, Sale Price, 



Women's 3.50 Rubber Soles and Heels. 
Warranted. Sale Price, 




Men's Rubber Sole Oxfords, Black, 
White, Tan. 4.00 Value, Sale Price, 




WALDORF 
3.00 Oxfords 




FAMOUS RECTOR, Tan and Black, 

Calfskin Oxfords, 4.00 Value, 
Sale Price, 




R. H. LONG 3.50 
Shoe, Double Sole, 





Men's RECTOR Oxfords. All Styles. 
4.00 Value, 




R. H. LONG'S 



FACTORY SHOE STORE 

313 West Superior St 



A. J. Suthariand, 
Blanasar 



the failed bank of Henry Siegel & Co. 
He also signed an order for the dis- 
tribution to the New York depositors 
of $100,000 reported by the bond filed 
with the state comptroller. 

The $302,000 equals 11.5 cents on the 
dollar of the depositors' claims. The 
$100,000 equals 3.9 cents more on the ] 
dollar of the New York claims, so i 
that 16.4 cents on the dollar seems to 
be all that can be counted on with any 
assurance by. the depositors. 

SENATE REFUSES 

TO CONFIRM CONSUL 

Washington. April 9. — President 
Wilson's nomination of James C. Mc- 
Nally of Pennsylvania to be consul at 
Nuremberg, Bavaria, was refused con- 
firmation In the senate by a vote of 
26 to 24. after a prolonged debate. 

McNally formerly was in the con- 
sular service In China, and several 
years ago charges were made against 
him in connection with a real estate 



New T<ud£r^ April 9. — Judge Hough of 
the UnitB States district court late 
ye8terda^*«lgned orders for the Imme- 
diate distribution of $302,000 to the 
New York h.^ Boston depositors in 



Headache 

"How are your bowels?" This 
is generally the first question 
the doctor asks. He knows 
that headaches, bilious attacks, 
indigestion, impure blood, are 
often due to a sluggish liver. 
Ask him if he approves of 
Ayer's Pills. 



J. 0. AjrwOe.. 
Low*lU MaM. 



deal promoted there by an American. ^ 
The ease was twice Investigated by i 
the state department, but when Mc- j 
Nallv's nomination to the Nuremburg i 
pcst'came in Senator Williams objected ; 
on the ground that these Inquiries had 
not served to clear him entirely. 

This was the first of President ^ 11- 
srn's consular appointments to be re- 
ji-cted by the senate. Five postmasters 
and a receiver of public moneys previ- 
ously have been refused confirmation. 

"WIFE-HUNTER" HELD 
ON FRAUD CHARGE. 

Tacoma, Wash., April 9. — Everett K. 
Ellis was indicted yesterday for al- 
leged fraudulent use of the mails in 
sending from Camas, Wash., to women 
throughout the United States a circu- 
lar In which he offered them a chance 
to obtain It diamond ring and a trip 
to the Panama-Pacific exposition at his 
expense if they would aid him in find- 
ing a wife. He promised to ^ive busi- 
ness, bank and social references, and 
enlighten them further on receipt of a 
postal money order for 26 cents. 

URGE MEDIATION 

BOARD IN INDUSTRY. 

Washington, April 9. — Settlement of 
Industrial labor disputes by a media- 
tion and conciliation board similar to 
that established under the Newlands 
act for the solution of railroad 
troubles, was advocated by representa- 
titves of employers and employes here 
before the United States Industrial 
Relations commission. 

The commission heard spokesmen 
for employers and employes of the 
printing and building trade* and of 
the clothing Industry. 

♦ 

Slayer o* Two Die*. 

Chicago, April 9 Peter Welter, who 



a week ago shot and killed Mrs. Kath- 
erine Morris and Mrs. Sarah Sallans, 
neighbors, died at a hospital last night. 
Welter confessed to shooting the wom- 
en and then trying to end his own life. 
He was unable to tell why he shot th« 
women. 



COAL MAN'S AUTO 

KI LLS B ICYCLIST. 

Waterloo, Iowa, April 9. — Fred F. 
Fairbanks is dead at a local hospital 
from the injuries received yesterday 
afternoon when an automobile driven 
by Howard S. Miller, wholesale coal 
dealer, crashed Into him, causing a 
fracture of the skull. Fairbanks was 
riding a bicycle. 




Tkk% Food-Driak for all As«s 

Rich milk, malted grain, in powder form. 
For inf ants,invalid* and growing ckildren. 
Purenutrition, upbuilding tha whc^body. 
Invigorate* nursing mother* and tk« aged. 
More healthful than tea or coffee. 

TalWBosiAstltirts. Ask Im- HORUCiet 





m 








\ 
















Chicago. April 9. — Dt-claring that | 
the new women voters of Illinois dem- 
onstrated their desire to vote and 
their proper comprehension of civic 
matters at Tuesday's township elec- 
tions throughout the state, women 
suffrage leaders today began a move- 
ment for full suffrage for the women 
of Illinois. 

The women announced they would 
unite their efforts to have a constitu- 
tional oonventlon called at an early 
date. The full right of suffrage could 
only be granted through a change in 
the state's basic law. 

Under the equal suffrage act passed 
by the last legislature women cannot 
vote for state officials, members of th« 
legislature, members of congress, po- 
lice magistrates or other constitutional 
officers. The new law granted them 
the vote on questions of public pol- 
icy and for president and city offi- 
cials. ^ ,, 

"The next stop for the women of Il- 
linois." said Mrs. <.;eorge Wilbur Trout, 
president of the lllin»»is Equal Suf- 
frap*' association. "Is to agitate for a 
constitutional convention so that our 
m<.'n may give us the privilege and 
right to vote In national affairs. The 
women should agitate this every- 
wh»-re." 

"Full suffrage undoubtedly is the 
next st*p for the women of Illinois,' 
said Mrs. .Toseph T. Bowen. president 
of the Chicago Equal Suffrage a.-^so- 
claiion. "We can have no hope of 
getting it until a constitutional con- 
vention is called and the women may 
help materially in creating the sen- 
timent for such a convention by talk- 
ing and agitati ng it." 

LECTURES ON MINNESOTA. ^ 

Minneapolis Man Speaks on His- 
tory of State. 

R. Dudley I'arsons of Minneapolis 
grave an illustrated lecture on "The 
Historv of Minnesota ■ at Lakeside 
school last evening. A statement made . 
by Mr. I'arsons was that the Puritans ' 
wert- the first people to settle in Min- 
msota. "it seems strange that Puri- 
tans, who are always associated with 
the 'stern and rockbound coast' of New 
England, should have settled at St. 
Paul. Minneapolis and Sauk Center." 
th*> speaker said. The first institutions 
established at these places by the Purl 
tans were a church, a school and a 11 
brary, Mr. Parsons said. 

The lecturer told of the great lum 
bf r center at Virginia that puts out j 
1.0"">0,000 feet of lumber a year; the 
flour ••enter of Minneapolis and the or- 
chard district at Lake Minnetonka. He, 
said there are 1.000,000 cattle in the 
state now and that in ten years the 
number will be dotibled. making Min- 
nesota one of the greatest cattle states 
in the country. 

Mr. Parsons came to Duluth to visit 
the social centers, with a view to es- 
tablishing social centers in Minneap- 
olis. 



NEW GOWN WORN AT 

PARIS RACE COURSE 




will be special music. Dr. Mary Mc- 
Coy, will speak on "Why Do Women 
Vote?" and Mrs. Nellie Pomeroy will 
give a reading. 

m 

Ruc-Lohn. 

Miss Sarah Rue and Dwlght Lohn 
were married yesterday afternoon at 6 
o'clock at the home of the bride's 
sister. Mrs. J. O. Brandt of 1306 East 
Eleventh street. The ceremony was 
performed by Rev. E. Wulfsberg of 
St. Paul's English Lutheran church. 
Mrs. Brandt played the Mendelssohn 
wedding march. 

The britle wore a gown of white 
crepe meteor with shadow lace draper- 
ies. She wore a long veil and carried 
white roses. The maid of honor. Miss 
Mabel Stephcneon. wore pale blue mes- 
salino. Her ct>rsage bouquet was of 
ro^es. The bridegroom was attended 
by Leon Lohn. 

At the wedding supper that followed 
the ceremony sweet peas and ferns 
were effectively used in the decora- 
tions. The out of town guests were 
the bride's mother, Mrs. Anna Rue. 



tion with Mrs. Lutheti Hdirris of 1:203 
Bast First street. ",?C 7 

• ♦ 'V,f ,. ■ 

Mrs. G. C. Steel, who has been In 
New York about a year has returned 
to Duluth and will '.Tye. In the Henry 
Taylor house on Slxt«»nlh avenue. 

* * ..f ■ . 

Miss Emtfia Andersop, y{\\o has been 
teaching at Soudan, Minn., Is the guest 
of her mother, Mrs. H, ;U.^ Anderson, 512 
West Second street, ,']rc^>, the Easter 
holidays. 

* * • . , 

Mrs. J. M. O'Gormaq and daughter. 
Miss Loretta CGormi^n. 11^ East Third 
street, are visiting at Chicago for it 
few days. J ' . 

* * ^% ' 

Mrs. M. Poison andC; little daughter. 
Sybilla, of MinneapnllB, arrived last 
evening to be the guesta of Mrs. Pol- 
son's parents, Mr. and Mrs. P. Cohen, 
604 Fourth avenue west. 
>■ * * 

Mrs. Allen SIsson of Minneapolis is 
the gU'j.'U )f her darighter, Mrs. Stew- 
art >j. Collins, b2i Woodland avenue, 
for the Easter holidays. 

* * * 

The little daughter of Mr. and Mrs. 
R. Anderson has returned to her home 
after ner operation at St. Luke's hos- 
pital. 

* * * 

Mrs. .T. M. Rjan and son, James 
Ryan, 4101 West Third street, will 
leave this evening for Farib.iult, Minn., 
where they are called by the illness of 
Mrs. Ryan's son, Charles. 

* « «i 

Mrs. John McNaughtbn and son, Clio, 
3i9 Fifth avenue east, have gone to 



Misri Mabel Stephenson, Leon Lohn and ; M.ir'Motte. Mich., to visit Mrs. Mc- 

I C. Brandt, all of Fosston, Minn. - 

Mr. and Mrs. Lohn will be in Duluth 
until Easter Monday when they will 
go to Froid, Mont., to make their home. 



SPECIAL 



COMMUNION SERVICE 

<onunrnioraUnff the "Last Supper." 
Short .-<«rnu»n by Rev. Robert Yost, 
D.D.. this evenlnB at 8 p. m. at 
the First I»ie.sbyteriaii ehurcii. All 
are welcome. 



Xaughton's mother and sister for the 
Easter holidays. 

« * * 

Mr. and Mrs. T. J. Wakley of Hib- 
bing are guests at tlxe home of Mrs. 
Wakley's mother, Mrs. William Byron, 
2408 West First str«et. 
» • ■ ♦ 

Mrs. C. T. McKenney of the new St. 
Louis hotel left today for Minneapolis 
to spend Easter. » 

• * * 

Mr. and Mrs. Harry E. Baker of De- 
troit, Mich., came today to be the 
I guests of Mr. and Mrs. Wellington C. 
Vince of 1105 East Fourth street. 

• • • 

Mrs. H. M. Blair of 1319 East Sixth 
street has returned from a short visit 
to St. Paul and Minneapolis. 



has served In every war the L'nlted 
StateH has fought from the Revolution 
to the preeent time. She traces her 
family to Peter Brown, who was one 
of the passengers on the Mayllow^er. 
Capt. Peter Worden, who took a prom- 
inent part in the Revolution, was also 
one of her ance.stors. Miss Timmons 
is a member of the Daughters of the 
Revolution, having joined Onandagn 
chapter at Syracuse, N. Y. 

"Of course, in America," said Miae 
Timmons, "wo don't judg'e a man by 
his ancestors, and we don.'t carry the 
pride In family to the extremes they do 
in Europe, but I cannot help feeling a 
little pride in my family." , ,, , 

In spite of the fact that this Is Holy 
week, and supposed to be the dullest 
week of the year In the theater busi- 
ness, the attendance at the Orpheum 
has held up well. Next week the Or- 
pheum Road Show will be the attrac- 
tion. In addition to "Romeo the 
Great," the wonderful trained monkey 
which will headline the bill, Claude 
and Fannie U.«^her will return in a new 
play. Their sketch, "Fagin's Deci- 
sion," and Miss Usher's appearance 
with "Spareribs," her nondescript little 
terrier, were one of the most popular 
acts seen at the Duluth Orpheum last 
season. "Spareribs" is also seen in the 
new sketch. 

• 

Easter Shirts — The Big Duluth. 

WOMEJrHGURriN 
AUSKA ELECTION 



See the Flower Show 



j1ntu$ement$ 



Missionary Societies. 

At the meeting yesterday of the 
Home and Foreign Missionary Socie- nnlnth P'inrAl Pomnnnv 

ties of the Second Presbyterian church } ^l the Duluth floral com pany. 
Mrs. J. A. McGaughty reviewed part 
of "The New America," and Mrs. A. F. 
Swanstrom, Jr., read a letter acknowl- 
.■dging charitable work done by the 
i-ocieiy. In the absence of Mrs. John 
Ledingham the meeting was presided 
over by Mrs. E. G. Robinson, the vice 
president. 

♦ 

Five Hundred Party. 

Miss Marlon Aske of 5736 East Supe- 
rior street entertained four tables at 
five hundred yesterday afternoon. The 
favors were won by Miss Esther Wood 
and Miss Rowena Hanson. The other 
guests were: 



m 



Bargain Bulletin 

tor 

Friday and Saturday 

You will find it profitable to look over this Bargain Bulletin 
for Friday and Saturday. We offer the best of Housefurnish- 
ings at the lowest prices. Take note of our Special Gas Iron 
Bargain for this week only. 




cut — special 
at only .... 



Qomfortable 
—Sulky— 

Built for convenience and dura- 
bility. Spring seat, adjustable 
back; fold.s easily — just like 



$3.9S 



Can be furnished also with 
hood. 



DRESSMAKERS BUSY. 



This Is one of the latest Paris 
fashions worn by a dressmaker's model 
at the race course near Paris. 



Washington Society Expects Wil- 
son-McAdoo Wedding in May. 

Washington. April 9. — While no date 
has yet been announced for the wed- 
ding of Miss Eleanor Wilson, the pres- 
ident's youngest daughter, and Secre- 
tary McAdoo, Washington society ex- 
pects it to take place within a month. 
Dressmakers already are at the White 
House and It Is believed that an an- 
nouncement of the wedding date will 
bf made within a short time and that 
It will be some time in Maj'. 

Mr. and Mrs. Francis B. Sayre, who 
•were married at the White House last 
November, were expected here today 
from Williamstown, Mass., and will 
join the president and Mrs. Wilson, 
Misses Eleanor and Margaret Wilson 
and Miss Helena W^oodrow Bones on 
their trip to White Sulphur Springs, 
W. Va. There they will spend Easter. 
The president will return to Washing- 
ton Mondav, but Mrs. Wilson and oth- 
er members of the family may stay at 
the springs several days longer. 

Prospects are that after the family- 
returns to the White House active 
preparations for the wedding will be 
begun. That the reception after the 
-wedding may take place outdoors is 
not altogether unlikely, as the White 
House grounds are never prettier than 
In the spring. 



EASTER HAT SALE 

A SPECIAL ASSORTMENT. 
Smart, cla.ssy styles for Ladles or 
Misses. Splendid values really worth 
from 15 to |7.50, will sell for 

$3.00 

Come and See Them Tomorrow. 

filzpatrick 

502-50t East Fourth Street. 



Misses — 

Rachael Fesler, 
Lois Webster, 
M a r J o rie Web- 
ster, 
Rae Dryer, 
Venita Mason, 



Irene Johnson, 
Irma Gross, 
Bertha Blair, 
Hilda Carlson, 
Gladys Bush. 



TONIGHT'S ATTRACTIONS. 

LYCEUM— "Peg O' My Heart" 
ORPHEITM— Vaudeville. 
EMPRESS— Vaudeville. 



Amusement Notes. 

"A character of the stage is always 
In a state of growth," according to 
Miss Florence Martln^of the "Peg O' „..^„„i^„-.i 
My Heart" compan>Tf>^«e;h will open f^^f^i.°'V„, 
a four days' engagetOfrofe at the Ly- 
ceum tonight. 

"A dramatic character, if it is In- 
telligently interpreted, never reaches 
maturity, but develops and grows con- 



Farewell Luncheon. 

Mr.?. A. L. Henrlcksen of 1724 Grey- 
solon road entertained fourteen guests 
Tuesday afternoon in honor of Mrs. H. 
Hovde and Mrs. Ringsred who leave 
next month for a visit in Norway. The 
hostess was a«.sisted by Mrs. Anna Hen- 
rlcksen. Spring flowers were used pro- 
fusely about the rooms and on the 
luncheon table, carrying out a color 
scheme of pink and white. 

Saturday Club. 

The Saturday club will meet Satur- 
day afternoon at 2:30 o'clock in the 

I library club room. "Robert L. Steven- 

' son " will be Mrs. Hugh Steele's sub- _ . 

i jert. Mrs. T. W. Hoopes will speak on live alone, away from its fellows. 
"His Novels and Poetry." For the cur- There must be association, union. The 
rent events there will be individual j actress or actor who ignores this point 
topics. Mrs. A. H. Brocklehurst v. ill 
be the leader. 



Are Especially Active 
Skagway and Juneau 
Campaigns. 

Seattle, Wash., April 9.— Cable dis- 
patches from Alaska indicate today 
that the results of the elections in 
various parts of the territory this 
week were determined to a measure- 
able degree by the votes of the women, 
who cast ballots for the first time. 
Women were given the right to vote 
by the enactment of a measure of the 
first territorial legislature a year ago. 

In Skagway the familiar methods of 
campaigning brought victory to the 
feminine politicians. Electors were 
steered to polling places by women 
workers who bought cigars and lunches 
and supplied conveyances while ex- 
plaining sample ballots. They elected 
their entire non-partisan ticket in 
Skagway against the taxpayers' ticket, 
which has been in power six years. 
Bitter Fight at Juneau. 

In a bitter municipal fight in Juneau, 
in which women were particularly ac- 
tive, the Citizens' party was able to 
elect but two candidates against the 
Peoples' party, headed by Former 
Mayor Valentine. The two candidates 
were for the council. 

In Ketchikan, center of the fishing 
Industrv, the reform ticket won by 
electing five out of seven councllmen 
and the school clerk. 

The Important feature of the elec- 
tion of Fairbanks was the defeat for 
the city council of Dan Drlscoll, terri- 
torial representative, said to be Con- 
gressional Delegate WHckersham's 
choice for representative in the dls- 

In Cordova the Citizens' Progressive 
party won on a platform promising 
reforms and economy. In Valdez the 
non-partisan ticket, with a single ex- 



Well Built 
Ironing Boards 




Constructed of hard maple, well 
braced and stands perfectly solid. 
Easy to set up or 
fold — for this sale. . . 



$1.38 




We Sell the 
O-C'odar 

PolLsIi Mops — 

$LOO and 
$L50 



Jaxon Potato Baker 

will save you from burning your fingers as 

well as the potatoes. The Jaxon 

way is the most sanitary way — 

also cleanest and quickest — 

special sale • "^/l 

price #€^W 



stantly as a snow ball must which is , ^Vption. was victorious. In Seward the 
rolled over a carpet of snow. When ^Xple's ticket elected a straight slate. 
an author hands his script to an actor ^'^^p ^ Grigsby was elected mayor 
he presents him with but a skeleton , . J xV-—- «> ' 

i.pon which must be bung the flesh and 



of Nome. 



sinews and draperies. And- always the ^ ^^^^^^yt.^^^<i'^'i i±^'k^'k.'k±itit.itiLit 
artist will feed and nourish his sub- } *¥#****»***»T.-f:»»¥**'*J^'^**»^ 
ject as he would any living thing. To j * «,T«ir'ii wihttmrx * 

fail in this feeding means an emaci- * ^''**^ nHf-AAnyiP orUlTET 1 
ated character of the stage. A mere'* ORGANIZE hv.vki*.i. * 

puppet or prop, something t,o hold up | * ...on,, t\AAi^n n« tiie ■*• 

the three walls of the stage. It takes * ^ " .^*''^'','*!^ll?: w Jo? tUe f alK * 

Never does an * burning of Rome, he set tiie lasn- « 
Never ooes ^n ^ ^^^ ^^^^ ^^^ tlifv^ for proper * 



more than personalit5^ 
actor let his character mature, 
keeps it young and vigorous in his 
own mind, and in the mlndS of his au- 
dience. Nothing upon the stage can 



Holy 



Week Services. 

The Maundy Thursday service at St. 
Paul's Episcopal church will be held 
at 7:30 o'clock In the evening. There 
will be a sermon by Rev. W. E. Har- 
rnann. This service gives the holy com- 
munion some time near the hour It 
was established by our Lord. There 
w^ill be a full choral service. 

The Good Friday morning service 
will be at 10 o'clock. There will be 
a three-hour service from noon until 
3 o'clock. During the first five minutes 
there will be silence, afier that there 
will be meditations on the seven last 
words of Christ, by direction. Per- 
sons are at liberty to enter and leave 
the church at their own pleasure dur- 
ing this service. 

Missionary Society. 

Mrs. Percy Fiiller. Mrs. Ted <"ardner 
and Mrs. J. A. Davis will be the host- 
esses for the meeting of the Ladies' 
Missionary Society of the First Chris- 
tian church tomorrow afternoon at the 
home of Mrs. Fuller. 914 East Fifth 
street. The president. Mrs. Charles 
Ryberg, will be in charge of the pro- 
gram that will begin at 2:30 o'clock. 
"The Needs of Latin America" will be 
dlscus.'sed. There will be an interest- 
ing program and all who are inter- 
ested In -the cause of missions will be 
welcome. 

Mrs. LfOyhed's Son Dies. 

Mr.«i. Edgar H. Loyhed of Faribault, 
?.:inn.. will have the sympathy of many 
Duluth women on account of the death 



of her son. Thomas Loyhed. who died 
suddenly Monday noon at his home in 
Faribault. Mr. Loyhed suffered from 
a nervous breakdown following an ac- 
cident and his mother has been with 
him in Minneapolis. He seemed to be 
recovering and had been taken to Far- 
ibault, W'hen he grew worse suddenly. 
He was 27 years old and was formerly 
a student at the University of Min- 
nesota. 

Mrs. Loyhed is the secretary of the 
Minnesota Federation of Women's 
clubs. She Is prominent in the Daugh- 
ters of the American Revolution and 
was formerly state regent. Mrs. Loy- 
hed Is known personally to many 
women of Duluth. 



Luncheon for Cast. 

The Central high school cast that 
will present "The Starry Flag" April 
17 and 18 had luncheon together yes- 
terday before the rehearsal. They 
were chaperoned by the director, A. G. 
Alexander. Those present were: 
Misses — 

Lucille Bleberman 

Marie Elston, 



Priscilla Club. 

The Priscilla club met yesterday aft- 
ernoon at the home of Mrs. Elizabeth 
Blesener, 107 Mankato street. The next 
meeting will be with Mrs. Olin of 201 
Osakis street Thursday, April 23. 

Meeting Postponed 

The meeting of the Missionary so- 
] ciety of the First Presbyterian church 
that was to have been held tomorrow 
I afternoon has been postponed. 

- ♦ - 

Tea for V sitor. 

Mrs. Luther Harris of 1203 East 
First street entertained at an in- 
formal tea yesterday afternoon in 
compliment to her guest, Miss Rachel 
Harris of Clociuet. Spring flowers were 
used about the rooms. 



Irene Keyes, 
Ruth O'Brien. 



Messi 

Wailiam Craig, 
Sam\)'Gorman, 
Oliver Vivian, 
Milton Stickles, 



Arthur Spear, 
Harold Bradley, 
Samuel Kempton, 
Gilbert Denfeld. 



Lodge Notes. 



Zenith grove. No. 10, Woodman 
circle, will entertain with a card party 
Wednesday afternoon, April 15, at 
Woodman hall, Second avenue east. 



Farewell Party. 

Miss Austrie AVold of 1127 East 
Sixth street entertained T>ie«day eve- 
ning in honor of Miss Irene Johnson, 
who will leave Saturday for Racine, 
Wis. The evening was spent in music 
and games. Those pr.isent were: 
Mis-ses — 

Nancy Hanisen, Matilda Landfald. 

Me.ssrs — 

Adolph Hansen, Oscar Klovstad, 

Martin Bugge, Albert Solie. 



Central W. C. T. U. 

The Central W. C. T. U. will meet to- 
morrow afternoon at 2:30 o'clock at the 
home of Mrs. Alfred Glllon, 19 Forty- 
fourth avenue east. This meeting will 
be in the nature of a silver tea. There 



Personal Mention. 

Mr.?. F. A. Hubbs and Mrs. E. C. 
Brown of Minneapolis left today for 
i their home after a two weeks' visit 
with their parents, Mr. and Mrs. A. 
Cliusen of 215 South Nineteentth ave- 
nue ea.st. 

* • « 

Miss Irene Johnson will leave Sat- 
urday for Racine, Wis., to make her 
home. 

• * * 

Miss Rachel Harris of Cloquet, 
Minn., is spending the Easter vaca- 



will never reach the ideal in her 
or his profession. There must 
be a blending of colors if 
we want to get results, and a blending 
of harmonies and natures or indi- 
vidualities. There can be ' no war 
without a creed, no love in this world 
if there Is only one person In It. There 
must be two and threes always, and 
upon the stage. An Inspiration must 
ceme through association. A glance or 
gesture from another may bring out 
some phase in the character one is 
trying to portray." 

« # « 

An early booking at the Lyceum l«i 
"Little Women," Louisa M. Alcott's Im- 
mortal story of Meg, Jo, Beth and 
Amy, which has been dramatized by 
Marian de Forest, a ^ffalo magazine 
and newspaper writer, ^-weet, simple, 
quaint and refreshing is this story of 
a half-century ago, and the play Is as 
charming as the book, bringing very 
close to those who know and love the 
story the old friends from out of the 
covers of the book Ifeto that larger, 
more Intimate life of the stage. "Little 
W^omen" makes grown people smile 
and men and women cry as they see 
It acted out upon the stage. The play 
is a source of re^I j»y, even as the 
book has been so many years. 
• « * 

Miss Irene Timmons. who Is head- 
lining the Orpheum bill this week in 
the one-act comedy, "New Stuff," is 
able to trace her family back to the 
Mayflower — that much overcrowded 
ship. 

At least one member of her family 



^ deportment at oonflafcrationM of ^ 
^ more or \enK magnitude. As a -^ 
^ fire fighter Nero was a ptkerf but ^ 
^ hlK ninsioal plan of attack will be * 
^ embodied In twentieth centmry •* 
^ enstoms of fire flghtewi and ^ 

* to this end the Volanteer * 
^ Quartet of No. 2 department has ^ 

* been organUed. The memberH * 

* are! Haney Robinxon. baKHO pro- ^ 
-)i< fundo: Capt. Fisher, second baKs: * 
^ John FhilllpM, lyric tenor; Gerald ^ 
^ Blaek, lead. -^ 
^ "We have organized for our ^ 

* own amusement.'* sRld -Mr. Phil- ^ 

* llpn yesterday as he signaled for ^ 
^ the key to the first rehearsal of ■* 

* "Little Drops of Water." * 

expects'good season 
on th e iron ranges. 

R. W. Hitchcock of the Hibbing 
Tribune, who is a guest of the Holland 
today, Is of the opinion that there will 
be an active season on the Mesaba 
iron range, despite the fact that some 
of the independent furnace companies 
do not contemplate heavy operations 
at this time. 

"The fact that the lease of the 
United States Steel corporation on the 
ore lands owned by the Hill Interests 
will expire Jan. 1. will cause more 
than the usual activity in the mines 
controlled by the Hills," said Mr. 
Hitchcock. 

"This will offset any decrease in the 
normal activities of the range, and 
should, in the opinion of some, bring 
the total tonnage nearly up to the 
average of past years. 

"Some of the mining men are of the 



Special 

Do not fail to avail yourself 
of tl^is opportunity to pro- 
cure one of these **I-\Vaut- 
You" Gas IroiLS at this .spe- 
cial price, furnished with 




We Sell the Free Sewing Machine, $1 Per Week 




GOOD 

Established ISSU, 



First St. and Tltird Ave. West 






opinion that the demand for ore will 
increase and that there will be a strong 
close. It might be said that some of 
the independent shippers do not like 
the outlook for the season." 

SUES I ROrifO NMAN. 

Brainerd Attorney Brings Action' for 
Legal Services. 

Brainerd, Minn., April 9. — (Special to 
The Herald.) — Charles A. Ru.jsell, a 
local attorney, has con"nenced suit for 
$^,000 against' John E. Mattson, a min- 
ing man of Ironton, for legal serv- 
ices alleged to have been rendered. 
Mattson owns the ground on which 
is located the Armour No. 1 .nine and 
Russell claims that he was engaged to 
inquire Into the stripping rights of the 
Armour No. 1 mine and to examine 
into the alleged trespass of the Pen- 
nington Mining company. Papers were 
drawn up for a suit against the Pea- 
nington Mining company, but not 
served, pending settlement. Russell 
claims that Mattson is believed to have 
received $7,000 cash from the Rogers, 
Brown Ore company, or from some 



other company operating the .\rmour 
No. 1 mine and that he receiv.id front 
the Pennington Mining company J3,000 
and Mr. Russell now wants 55 oOO, the 
share alleged to have been agreed 



upon. 



LEFT ESTATE 



WORTH $9,00Q 



Charles Nohr, a resident of St. Louij 
county, who died, aged 44, on March ::S 
last, left an estate of 5y,000, according 
to a petition for administration filed <n 
probate court yesterday afternoon hy 
his sister, Mrs. Rachael Thompson, 
aged 65, who resides at Abbolsford, 
Wis. 

Nohr died posses.?ed of fB.BOO cash ii| 
a local bank and two city lots at r>ort 
Arthur, Out., said to be worth $3,500, 
Besides his sister at Abbotsford, Wis., 
he Is survived by two brothers, Mertoa 
Nohr and Theodore Torgerson, the lat- 
ter residing in Norway. 

Mrs. Thompson asks the court ta 
grant letters of administration on her 
brother's estate to her husband, Carl 
B. Thompson of Abbotsford. 



I 



A Skh> of B«mty h « Joy For«v<r, 



D 



R 



. T. FEUX eOURAUO'8 
Oriental Cream or 
Magical BeautHlor. 

Rcmores Tan, Pimplei. PrecIC* 
les. Moth Patcl;es, Ra»h and 

Sk'n DtMM«t. ml •veiy 
bl«mi»h en b«auty tad i»- 
,f ct dftrctloB. It hm tlood 
t^« t«tl oi ^ vetn, (Dd !■ m 
h»im'.f i» we tnst* It to br 
•ur« It is propcfly auda. Ac- 
cept no c«uBterf«it of tiatUar 
name. Dr. L. A. bajrr* (aid 
to ■ l»dy of tha haattoa i% 
patient,: •■Asnuladt^ wlU 
Jtc thm. f recoAmaod 
COUIIAUD'S CREAM- m 
' « IcMt hanntul of all tb« 
kin i-'re-uaiioa*." For sil« 
•jr »11 druggiiti tad Fancy 
Gooda DeO^ « !a the (.'oitcd 
'^Ute*. Cartdaand tufopc. 

Pnp.. >7Cr<aiJ«MS St.. New Ttrii 



OBSERVATIONS 



By PEGOY PEABODY- 





%h 2M nms^ 



centrals:^ 

30 East Superior Strett 

Eterj boy m<\ girl In the Public School 
itlmuUI make arraiiBrnients to take our sixirial 
Penmanship rUaaes during the l^priiig and Sum- 
mer miiiiths. 

Our renUr roursee are PfenotTpy. .''horfhand — 
both rtiaxiter and <!rrgK. Boolcke«pli>c and all 
commerdai tirai.clies : new dashes every Monday. 

BARBER 4 MePHERSON. 



Consider Your Own Views As 
Well As Others. 

I was present the other afternoon at 
a little social affair when the subject 
of current plays came up. "What do 
you think of .so-and-so in so-and-so?" 
one of the young 
women asked. "I 
find it quite bore- 
some," answered a 
young woman from 
just across the 
room. "Boresome?" 
the other cried. 
"Why, how .strange! 
It is by far the 
best show I have 
seen for years." 

The positive man- 
ner in which the 
latter utterance 
came made me rea- 
lize all of a sudden 

how very wrong the woman who flr.<<t 
spoke might be. And for no other rea- 
son that she assumed that her opinion 
was the only true opinion, and that, 
therefore, the opinion of everyone else 
should be just like hers. 

Why should you expect your neigh- 
bor's point of view to be the same as 
yours"/ Why should you assume that 
yours was the only point of view? 

Now, as a matter of fact, I had seen 
the play referred to In the above con- 
versation, and while I enjoyed parts 




of It very much, I can easily see where 
it would be most commonplace to 
many people I know. 

The first woman liked it — it appealed 
to her in every way — yet when the 
second woman remarked that it was 
boresome she marveled and wondered 
why. And that was as far as she 
went. Instead of attempting to find 
out just why the other party did not 
like it she began to argue in defense 
of her own attitude, thereby accentu- 
ating her own narrow mindedness. 

If people do not agree with you — 
try and find out Just why they do not. 
Many times I have found out by doing 
this that my original viewpoint was 
wrong altogether. We are often apt 
to assume our ideas and likes ^nd dis- 
likes are the authorities. They are not 
by a whole lot, and the more we take 
into consideration the viewpoints of 
others the greater and truer view- 
point we will get for ourselves. 

The following bit of verse touches 
upon the matter in question very 
prettily: 

Don't wrap up so much in self. 

But let your garments flow 
Around some other human need 

The world must surely know. 
The trouble Is we miss so much 

Of that which beauty gives 
By dwelling on the grave mistake 

"'Tia only me ttiat giveal" 



Why Not Choose 

Your Easter Hat 

Tomorrow at SibbitVs? 

The appreciation of this store increases daily 
among Duluth women. The hundreds of careful 
copies of Paris models, together with the original 
creations of our own designers give a wealth of 
variety in choice that includes every sort that is 
stylish — the new shapes, the new shades, the new 
trimmings. Why not choose yours tomorrow? 
Prices reasonable. 



^ihhiff^Q g WestS up eHor St. 



Vacuum Cleaners 

Don't Beat Your Rugs. We Have 
Cleaners to Suit Every Purse. 

Hand Va<'uuni Cleanors with bruslics, $8.50 to $12.50 
Small Klectric Pori«l>lo-Cleaiier.s. ...$19.75 to $30.00 
LarKc Portable MaltiinA $75.00 to $125.00 

Stationary Cleann^s for any size home or building. 
Let us leave a defter at your home on trial. 
Electric machines for rent, $1.00 a day. 

THE MOORE COMPANY 




Melrose 3248t Gran<i 8064- Y. 

MBiMaii«iHaBMaaa«iMHiBMH 



318 WEST FIRST STREET. 



r 









I 



I 



I 



Smith & Allen Co. 

Good Triday Evening 

<;amd p:oncm 

April 10, 1914, at 8:15 p. m. 

1. "Onward Christian Soldiers" Jude 

Victrola; Westminster Choir. 

2. "Hymn a St. Cecile" Gounod 

Pianola 

3. (a) "Nearer My God to Thee" Mason 

Victrola; Dixon. 

(b) '^Abide With Me" Monk 

Victrola; Mr. and Mrs. Wheeler. 

4. (a) "Jerusalem the Golden" Ewing 

Victrola. 

(b) "Face to Face" Johnson 

Victrola; Stanley. 
Accompanied by Pianola. 

5. "If With All Your Hearts". .. .Mendelssohn 

Victrola; Evan Williams. 

6. "He Shall Feed His Flock" Handel 

Victrola; Louise Homer. 
Accompanied by Pianola. 

7. "Calvary" Rodney 

Victrola; Elsie Baker 

8. "O, Divine Redeemer" Gounod 

Victrola; Olive Kline. 
Accompanied by Pianola. 

9. "Agnus Dei" Bizet 

Victrola; Caruso. 

10. "Stabat Mater," Cujus Animan Rossini 

Pianola 

11. "Stabat Mater," Inilammatus Rossini 

Victrola; Lucy Marsh. 
Accompanied by Pianola. 

12. "Der Engcl" Rubenstein 

Victrola; Homer and Farrar, ^ 

13. "Crucifix" Faure 

Victrola; Caruso and Journet. 
Accompanied by Pianola. 

14. "Unfold Ye Portals" Gounod. 

Victrola; Trinity Choir. 

15. "Lord, Dismiss Us With Thy Blessing."' 

V^ictrola; Trinity Chimes. 
Organ Accompaniment. 





I 



I 



I 









d 



r 



f 



,1 



I 



8 



TUr niTI ITTU urn AT n'^*** ba*ed on the four o'clock clos- , 
lllC UDLlllil ntKALU ing and had been for years beyond; 

count. And everybody was mad. ; 
'"Why," exclaimed a woman during ' 

a heated and exclamatory discussion 

of the new order, "It upsets all our 

arrangements!" 




Dr. Eliot's Able Editor 



AN INDEPENDENT NEWSPAPER 
rultllHhril rxt-ry evenlnjc rxrrpt Son- 
day hj The Hrraid Conp«H7* 

Both Telephones — Husinesa Office, 3-4; 
Editorial Rooms. 1126. 



Kdllorial m tli» J«ew York T1in«». 



tntered »» second claaa matter at the IHilutli p^st- 
ofUoe under the act of coiisreas of March 3. 1S70. 



OFFICIAL PAPER, CITY OF DUUITH 



SI B!tC RrPTIOX RATES — By Mall, pay- 
able its advjinoe, one month. 3& cents; 
three months. ?1: six months, i'i: 
one vear. $4; Saturday Herald. |l per. 
year"; Weekly Herald. $1 per year. | 

l>aily by carrier, city and auburba, 10 
cents a week; 45 cents a month. | 

SubxTibers wlH roafer a f»»»r bj OMikiOK krawn 

ii'.y Ci>iniljtut of wrrioc. j 

W!ien ihanjlng the address of your paper. It Is j 

ImiK-rtaiit ID ilTe both uUl and n«w adUrcaaea. | 



The news from Cambridge. Mass., that 
Wood row Wilson has presumed to re- 
vise the lines written by Harvard's ex- 
presldont. to be Inscribed on the pavil- 
That was the Washingtcm attitude ' ion» of the new poatofflce building in 
—as though "our" social arrange- Washington, will not. we believe oc- 
* . \ casion in Dr. Eliot a motnent s distress 

ments were more miportant than the ^f xnlnd. For one thing, both men are 
government's bnsiness. And that is accustomed to dli^clpllne. habitually 
, • J J r u self-imposed. Like all who have become 

what we are reminded of when we , masters of thought and expression, 
read that the reserve district plan has both have frequently sought and sub- 
i. I 1 » 1 ^ - ..- ti- ^, -» I mltted to criticism. Tf In this instance 

absolutely upset existing conditions, g^ K,i„t.^ ^tyi^. which is Justly famed 



L^ Mothers 



William Allen White In Emporia Oazett* 



The Duluth Herald accepts adver- 
tising contracts with the distinct guar- 
anty that it ha.** the largest circulation 
tts Minnesota outside the Twin Cities. 



The HeniM will be Klad to have 
Itt attention ealled to any mlMlead- 
inR vr Hntrae iitateinent which may 
appear in Its Bews, editorial or ad- 
^frtl.tinK columns. 



THE COMMERCIAL CLUB YEAR. 

Reports and di>cii>>ions at the an- 
nual meeting of the Duluth Commer- 
cial club last evening reflected a year 
of activity and progress, and revealed 
anew the coming years of greater 
prv>gress and higher achievements. 

There has been splendid progress 
in the rate fights, and while the club 
was meeting Julius H. Barnes, chair- 
n-.an of its traffic commission, was at 
Wasliington with Roy Hall, its traf- 
fic expert, continuing the fight for 
free, fair trade conditions on the 
hikes. 

Good progress was reported, too. 
in trade boosting, in local manufac- 
turing and retail and wholesale trade, > 
2nd in all the many useful lines of [ 
activity to which the club has dedi- ■ 
cated its splendid force, which is the 
static power of the public spirit of i 
Duluth made dynamic by organiza- j 
tion. 

This city has had a magnificent 
awakening in the past decade, and j 
the Commercial club has been its j 
willing and marvelously effective \ 
a^'ency in bringing Duluth into its t 
own. The community is splendidly ! 
served by this triumphantly and ag- I 
gressively active organization, \yhich j 
is striking straight to the heart of 
real problems, which wastes no en- ; 
crgy in by-play and foolish side is- \ 
sues, and which is worth to Duluth a ; 
hundred times more than it costs to ' 
riiaintain it. 

The name of the club wasn't 
changed, though most of those pres- 
ent voted for the change, because it 
takes a majority of the full member- 
ship to do it. 

We can't feel altogether sorry about 
this, for there are two sides to the 
question. The club authorities wanted 
to change from "Commercial club" 
to ".Association of Commerce," be-* 
cause the fc»rmer title is likely to give 
outsiders tUe impression that the or- 
ganization is a "club" in the smaller 
sense of the word rather than an as- 
sociation of commercial interests, 
which it is. So far as outside regard 
for the organization is concerned, it 
would have been well to make the 
change. 

But in Duluth the words "Commer- 
cial club" are a talisman of vigorous 
and aggressive and successful en- 
deavor. They spell achievement. 
Illuch of the awakening and the new 
vigor of Duluth is associated with 
the old name, which is also simpler 
and lesy stodgy. So while it may have 
been well enough to change, there is 
yet a gain in the failure of the attempt 
to change. 



Sometimes, you know, existing con- 
ditions absolutely need to be upset. 

There is such a thing as discover- 
ing, too, that long boasted financial 
and commercial supremacy has been 
quietly undermined by the country's 
growth. 

For instance. New Orleans has long 
considered itself the financial metro- 
polis of the Far South, and it is huge- 
ly indignant because the bank for that 
region went to Dallas. It forgets that 
while it has grown slowly and sleep- 
ily, the Dallas territory has expanded 
amazingly. 

The new currency system has upset 
a good many of "our arrangements," 
but they needed to be upset if account 
is to be taken of today instead of a 
generation that is past. 



for its clarity and lucidity, has ac- 
quired new luster from Dr. Wilson's 
polishing. It is because that matchless 
phrase-maker had the advantage that 
accrues to every capable rehandler of 
verbal goods. 

For the east pavilion Dr. Eliot wrote: 

Carrier of new* an«k kno«ledg». 
Instrument of trade and ciininieroe, 
Prom-ttr (f mutual acnuiiiiilaiioe 
Among raeti and nations, aud lieiiM 
Oi l>eace and Kuud-uill. 

The able editor strikes out the word 
"commerce," which repeated the Idea 
of trade, and inserts "industry" — pro- 
ducer of the means of trade. Instead of 
the hesitant and argumentative "Pro- 
moter of mutual acqualnance * • • and 
hence of peace and good will," the Wil- 
sonian mind fuses the whole in this ex- 
pression: 

Promuler of anitual amitaintance. 
Of peace and good- will 
Among men and nations. 

As Dr. Eliot wrote It. the inscrip- 
tion for the west pavilion stood: 

Carrier of love and sympathy, 
M»if;enger of friendship. 
Consoler of tl>o lotiely. 
Bond of the scattervd family, 
Enlarger of ttiv ptibUc lif». 
With all their throwing things at ..farrier." repeated from the pcevious 
the judges, it would seem safe to as- , inscription, becomes "Messenger" by 
that none of the suf fragett -"s : the schooling from the White House, 



sume 

will Imitate the example of the Camor- 
rists and begin to throw false teeth 
and glass eyes around the court room. 



SLIGHTLY IN ERROR. 

One of the self-assigned duties of 
a partisan newspaper is to pick flaws 
in the opposition, np matter how 
glorious its achievements. 

For instance, the morning paper 
says: "Unless there is an unlooked 
for change, it seems that President 
Wilson's luck or good gruiding is to 
desert him at the treasury depart- 
ment. * ♦ * Official figures show 
a deficit, after allowing fifty million 
dollars of revenues from the income 
tax, of more than another fifty mil- 
lions for the fiscal year ending June 
30 next." 



and "Sympathy" Is made to precede 
"Love" — it does that naturally — thus 
improving the rhythm; while the no- 
tion of distant friends comforted by the 
ministry of the mails more fully devel- 
ops the Cambridge composer's theme in 
this revised version: 

Messenger of .sympathy and lore. 

Servant of parted friends, 

Cons4>ler of tlie loni'ly. 

Bond of the scattered family. 

Uilarger of the comoioii life. 
And the "common life," the life of the 
people in their usual private relations ^ 
— not in their public relations — was , 
precisely what Dr. Eliot should have 
meant and the opposite of what he did 
i says. He will be grateful because his 
lines Were' well edited. 



The Coal Merchant 

and the Consumer 



New York World: Every consumer 
will sympathize with the coal mer- 
chants' acute distress in being obliged 
T., , , . , . , • once more to hoist the retail price of 

I^ow that would be rather alarming po^l. It is a familiar tale of woe 
—if it were true. The Associated ' that is repeated year after year. All 
T> 1 ^ • 1 .. r • L J .L X- I the average householder can do is to 

Press last night furnished the ^ews ' ;';;/„p f^e best he can under the 
Tribune with a statement, which it ■ dealers' sufferings and meekly pay the 

did not use but which will be found 1 ''^"- . ^^^^ „„ „_-i 

. T,, IT 11 • . , . • There has been no coal 

in Ihe Herald tonight, showing that strike this year, or increase 



customs revenues are so far exceed- 



mlners' 
in the 



miners' wages in the anthracite re- 

, . ... gion to serve as a pretext for raising 

ing the estimates made at the time ^^e price of coal. But there are other 

the new law was passed that with the > pretexts that serve just as well, as 

„, • .^ iu • the coal merchants as a body are 

revenue trom the income tax there is 

now expected to be no deficit what- 
ever. 

It is rather melancholy to see a 



grieved to explain 

The state of Pennsylvania has taxed j 

coal at the nilne about 10 cents a ton. 

The consumer will pay that. The 

coal handlers want a few cents a ton 

partisan newspaper hoping for na- I more. Of course the consumer will 

' *^ *^ " ' pay that whether the coal handlers 



tional bankruptcy for party gain; but 
how can such misstatements of fact 
be otherwise accounted for? It would 
be uncharitable to call it ignorance. 



demands are satisfied or not. The 
cost of the workmen's compensation 
law must be met somewhere. Natural- 
ly the consumer will be eager to 
shoulder that. too. 

It Is useless for him to complain. 

But there is one little grievance which 

The settlement of the dispute wlth,,^^ ^^^^^ ^e justified In expressing. 

Colombia over the procuring of the -^vhy should the coal merchants waste 

Panama canal zone ought to ftimish ' g^ much grief on themselves" 

a basis for a get-together meeting 

between Dear Will and Dear Theodore. 



They seem to be able to raise prices 
whenever they please, and sometimes 
more than is necessary to protect 
themselves against the charges of oth- 
A WRONG RIGHTED. g^s. What do they stand to lose so 

It isn't a matter that most of our long as they hold the helpless con- 
. f 11 1 . J ,. . I sumer at their mercy? Why not at 

busy folks have had occasion to both- \ f"^g^ ^.p^^e hira the pain of undergo- 
er with much, but it will be one of ; Ing their explanations and continue 

to charge him more and more every 
year for coal without requiring him 
to pay them also in pity for their sad 



the brightest of the smaller gems in 
i the diadem of the Wilson administra- 
tion that under it the wrong this na- 
tion did Colombia is to be righted. 
Under Roosevelt, we plundered Co- 



lot? 



CheapentMK PaMion. 

Katharine F. (lerould in the Atlantic: 
There was a great deal more sex. in 
lombta of her Panama territory — as .its subtler manifestations, in the old 

novels and plays, than in the new ones 



the Colonel himself said, "we took it." 
Under Roosevelt, and later under 
Taft, we turned a deaf ear to the sen- 
sitive little republic's appeals for re- 
dress. Mr. Taft saw only hopeless- 
ness in the situation. 



A high-tariff community in New 
Jersey has elected a Republican to 
congress to succeed a Democrat, and 
the Republicans are claiming that this 
constitutes a repudiation of President 
Wilson and his policies. If there Is 
anything on earth more Interesting 
than most other things. It Is the mental 
processes of the professional party 
politician. 



Not so long ago, a novel was a love 
story; and it was of supreme importance 
to a hero whether or not he coukl 
make the heroine care for him. It was 
also of supreme Importance to the he- 
roine. The romance was all founded 
on sex; and yet sex was hardly men- 
Our heroes and heroines still 



The Oswgg» mother who allowed 
her 16-year-Qld daughter to go to 
Kansas City bii a shopping trip unat- 
tended is surpfiaed that the girl disap- 
peared. I.Tjion which text we desire 
to submit a few remarks upon the 
subject of mothers. The mother busi- 
ness Is onte of 'ihe most over-advertised 
lines In the World. Whenever a sob- 
squadder deslt'es to turn on the faucet 
of our tears, he begins tremulous talk 
about moihet^ being the aacredest 
things alive. (;*od mothers are sacred; 
so are good fathers. But when you 
consider how many mean, ornery, good- 
for-nothing doless people there are In 
the world — don't forget this great 
big importaat fact: Some fool wom- 
an in the mother business, neglect- 
ing her real duty, is responsible for 
all this meanness more than any other 
one thing. A man may put the devil 
in his children. But in nine cases 
out of ten the mother can breed it 
out. or train it out. or love it out if 
she will work on the job. A lot of 
women get an Idea that they can re.st 
on the glory of merely being mothers. 
A lot of mothers think that just be- 
cause poets have had a lot to say about 
the sacredness of motherhood that 
there is nothing else to do. But fool 
people usually are the result of fool 
mothers. Charity workers in every 
town know of scores of Instances 
where men earn fairly good wages, 
and where the women by their shlft- 
lessness, laziness, and meanness have 
put the family In poverty and want. 
They can't cook; and they know noth- 
ing of taking care of children; they 
live out of sacks and cans; they gad 
the street by day, and go to picture 
shows at night; they can't sew, and 
they wont clean up the children. They 
haven't the character to make the chil- 
dren mind, and they are too thriftless 
and idle-minded to keep the house 
much better than a pigsty. 

A mother is "the holiest thing alive" 
only when she Is the embodiment of 
intelligent, consecrated love. When 
she is mer*ely a brood animal, when 
she is either a slattern — if she is poor, 
or a gadaboat and a bridge fiend If 
she is rich, she deserves no more credit 
for being a mother than she does for 
having warts or a high instep. 

The gush about motherhood be- 
ing so holy a function has fortressed 
a lot of fool females in their folly. And 
the blessed tlhie Is coming when the 
%oft pedals are going to be taken off 
motherhood, and put on womanhood 
plus horse sense. The Gazette is in 
favor of a strict law which will pre- 
vent men with communicable dis- 
eases from marrying and breeding lust 
and vice Into other generations. But 
along with that law should be a com- 
panion law which will prevent Issuing 
a marriage license to a woman who 
can't cook, can't keep a house, can't 
clean up c^hlldren's dirty noses and 
necks, and can't pass a decent exam- 
ination on the feeding and care of in- 
fants. When women know something 
about what they are going into, as 
married women — whether they are rich 
or poor — there will be more in the 
sacredness of motherhood than the 
poets ever have sung about. New 
civilization has taken women from 
^he home; It has put them Ijq stores 
and ^fices and shops and ''factories. 
Home seience now must be learned 
outside the home. But It must be 
learned and" the sooner the law cracks 
down on fool girls who go into matri- 
mony caked in Ignorance and breed 
fool children who, raise hell in the 
world, the t>ette«:>wlll this sad old 
world be. 

And further det>onent aayeth not. 



Statesmen, Real and Near 



By Fred C. Kelly. 



Duluth and The Herald 



BouaueU and BrlcklMts from the State Preui 



Twenty Years Ago 



Tnvo TTie Herald of tlila date, ltf4. 



tinned. 
But now, under Wilson, a treaty 1 marry; but when they consider sex at 



THE FLURRY. 

One of the newspaper critics of the 
reserve district plan, published in a 
city which did not land where some 
of its people wanted to land, says: 
"It has absolutely upset existing con- 
ditions!" 

That reminds us of something. 

When Theodore Roosevelt was 
president, filling out the unexpired 
term of President McKinley and 
therefore not minded to start much of 
anything. on his own hook, he discov- 
ered that while the law required gov- 
ernment employes to work seven 
hours a day, they were working only 
six and a half hours. 

They went to work at nine, took 
half an hour for lunch at noon, and 
quit at four. You had to count the 
lunch interval to make it seven hours; 
but that was what had been done for 
many, many years. 

But Col. Roosevelt believed that 
seven hours meant seven hours, and 
he ordered that the' half-hour for 
lunch be made up by working until 
four-thirty instead of four. 

Something happened in Washing- 
ton then very like what happens when 
you idly throw a stone into an ant- 
hill. Washington upheaved, and 
seethed with anger. Everything there 



has been arranged that indemnifies 
Colombia, restores its self-respect, 
and harmonizes all differences. 

Colombia is a small nation, and the 
matter may have seemed to many to ; often the pathetic spectacle of the hero 
, f _.,, . ._, r,.^i.. and heroine having no time to make 

love to each other in the good old 



all, they are apt to consider it biologl 
cally. not romantically. We. as a pub- 
lic, are more frankly Interested In sex 
than ever; but we think of it objec- 
tively, and a little brutally, in terms of 
demand and supply. And so we get 



be of small account. But Colombia 
had been unjustly treated, and to the 
Latin-American peoples whose friend- 
ship we are seeking to cultivate it 
looked as though we had played the 



fashioned way, because they are so 
busy suppressing the redllght district 
and compiling statistics of diseaser 
Much of the frankness, doubtless. Is a 
good thing; but beyond a doubt, it has 
cheapened passion. For passion among 



bully to her. We took what we wanted, civilized people is a subtle thing; it Is 

land kept it and refused payment sim- i wrapped about with dreams and imag- 

I , , r »T Inings; and can bring human beings to 

1 ply because we were strong. Now, | salvation as well as to perdition. But 

because we are not only strong but ! when it ir shown to us as the mere 

J f .1 • . • ^ r • .• I province of courtesans, small wonder 

mspired by the instinct of justice, we ^^at we turn from It to the hero who 

will have difficulty In feeling or in- 



are paying our little bill and squaring 
things with our little neighbor. It is 
well. 



A majority of the women of Spring- 
field. III., voted to retain the saloons. 
This will be a severe shock to the 



CoanterInK vn Mr. Savryr*. 

Boston Journal: Rev. Roland D.Saw- 
yer, the Democratic representative 
» saloon men who fought woman suf- from Ware, was appearing before the 



spiring it. Especially since we are told, 
at the same time, that even the cour- 
tesan plies her trade only from direst 
necessity. 



] frage for fear It would mean the end 
of their business. 



Soaiewbat Mixed. 

Philadelphia letter In the Boston 
Transcript: The recent snow, melting 

I on the just and unjust alike, played a 
mean trick on a Forbes-Robertson 

( poster, which had been stuck over a 
bill extolling the charms of a bur- 
lesque show. Half the Robertson paper 

! had been blown away, leaving the 
following amazing decoration to the 
landscape near the Wldener mansion: 

Forbes-Robertson 

Hamlet 

A show of legs and laughter. 

And from an advertisement in Chl- 



commlttee on the judiciary in favor of 
a bill to improve the morale of the 
legal profession. He was glad, he said, 
that an earnest effort was being made 
to uplift the attorneys and the profes- 
sion. Then, crossing his hands on his 
breast, he remarked with true minis- 
terial dignity. 

"You know when our Lord was on 
earth he bad serious controversies with 
the lawyers." 

"I understand, also." Interrupted 
Representative Bowser of Wakefield, 
"he had considerable trouble with the 
local clergy." 



The Road Makers. 

What is the end of the road we are 

paving? 
What of the land at th«' end of the 

ro.id, 
Trees and green meadows and rcyal 

palms waving. 
Soft sloping valleys and cool waters 

laving 
The green grassy shores of the final 

abode? 
Who kncws? Who knows? 

What of the road we are paving so 

surely? 
Slowly we pave it with stone after 

stone. 
What of the stones that we place so 

securely? 
Do we select them for worthiness 

purely. 
Footing for those who must travel 

alone? 
Who knows? Who knows? 

What of the road when we finish Its 
making? 

Shall other feet- tread In the path we 
have made? 

Silently, sflrel^, are others now tak- 
ing ;,'. 

The course wo took at the morning's 
av/aking. 

Will they stumble over the stones we 
have la"d? 

Who knowsr.*W'ho knows? 

What If wo ijAnse for a rest in the 

raaklngj'" -• 
Drowsing to sleep in the languorous 

noon? 
Dreams on our eyelids, the poppy Is 

shaking: 
Of either the sleep or tardy awaking. 
Of sins that our hands on the roadway 

has strewn — 
Who knows? Who knows? 

What l." the pay for the road we ar«* 

laying? ^ ., 
What the reward when the road is 

complete? 
Why all the planning, selecting, and 

weighing. 
Hoping, despairing and doubting and 

p:-aying? 
Of the burdens we bear through cold 

and through heat. 
Who knows? Who knows? 

This do we know of the road and it* 
ending; 

Heaven and God arc the ultimate 
gcals; 

And of the stones that we place in our 
wending. 

Sn^ootbing the way for tltose on us de- 
pending. 

The great Master Workman, the Build- 
er of 80Ul3» 

He knows. He knows. 

—Annie O'Connor In New York Times. 



TStmrly AH HI* Sli«»s On. 

Lipplncott's: Carl was going out 

with his mother one afternoon and had 

cago, where the manager of a moving ^^^^^ gent upstairs to get ready. After 



picture house carelessly followed the 
formula he had used for another sort 
of exhibition: 

InUmate rlews of ilie home life of 

Kthel Banyniore 

Kv child teu alluwwL 



a considerable wait the mother called 
from downstairs: 

"Hurry up, Carl! We're late now. 
Have you got your shoes on?" 

"Yes, mother," replied the boy, "all 
but on«." 



*1 MMHt." 

Toledo Tlme^s: "I must." said Lord 
Nelson at Trafalgar; "I must." said 
Washington at yalley Forge; "I must, 
said Lincoln at Gettysburg; "I must," 
said Mark Twain, with bankruptcy 
clutching at his heart; "I must." says 
every great man and woman, sensing 
duty, opportunity, crisis and the Larger 

success. , i - 

"I must." *8 C,od> vest pocket formu- 
la to you (Who breathe His free air 
and work li>, His workshop*. 

Dally every on* of us faces tasks that 
we didn't ej^pect^ and that we had rath- 
er not do. lit is. the order of circum- 
stance. But just the minute that "I 
must" comes along, our program clears 
up and our work proceeds plainly and 
according to plan. That man is most 
satisfied with life who is most satis- 
fled with doing what be feels is his 
best. 

"l musti" All rlKbt, proceed. 



Washington, April 9. — (Special to 
The Herald.) — Representative Simeon 
D: Fess of Ohio, who is one of the 
scholars of congress, owes much* of 
his success In life to the fact that 
the limbs of a certain tree back home 
grew in just the shape they did. 

Fess was raised on a farm, and as 
his father died when he was small, a 
great deal of work fell to his lot. But 
the more he worked the more he de- 
sired time to read. Whenever he was 
able to save a dollar or two he spent 
the money for books. Whereupon his 
brothers would jump all over him, In- 
Qulring: 

"What good will the books do you 
after you get them?" 

All his lelatlves and friends advised 
him to try to forget his frivolous ways 
and stick to work. Every time they 
caught him reading, they cited cases 
of boys who had idled away their time 
over iHioks as he was doing, and grew 
up to be poets, paupers and dress- 
makers' husbands. 

Fess then tried to read in secret, but 
there was not a place in the house or 
the barn where he could be alone. In- 
variably somebody discovered him and 
forced him to go from Milton to milk- 
ing. 

* * • 

In despair Fess looked about for a 
place to read in peace, and he discov- 
ered the maple tree that -was to be- 
come one of the best friends he ever 
had. 

It had one large limb that a boy 
could straddle and ride comfortably 
for hours at a stretch, and it grew at 
an angle that permitted the main 
trunk to serve as an excellent support 
for one's back. Moreover, there was a 
hollow place in the trunk where books 
could be kept. The foliage was so 
luxuriant that one could hide there 
with Ralph Waldo Emerson or John 
Bunyan and be effectually concealed 
from the view of those who busied 
themselves with the more routine side 
of farm life, such as throwing down 
hay or plucking potatoes from the 
warm mother earth. 

In that way and in that tree Fess 
got himself launched on his scholarly 
career as an educator and statesman. 
Except for that tree he might have 
ended up as a painless dentist. 

* * * 

Representative Denis O'Leary of 
New York ♦received a letter a time ago 
from a constituent who expressed an 
earnest desire for an assortment of 
garden seeds. O'Leary sent them, but 
there must have been a slip-up on 
the part of Mr. Burleson's postoffice 
department, for a few weeks later 
OLeary received another note from 
the man deploring the fact that the 
seeds had never reached him. 

"Why ain't I just as much entitled to 
seeds as anybody else?" the writer de- 
manded. "Two of my neighbors sent 
for seeds the same time as I did, and 
one of them has had his In the ground 
now for six w^eeks already. His plants 
is beginning to show above ground. Is 
It I'm not Just as good as my neigh- 
bors?" And so on for a couple of 
pages. Then at the bottom of the let- 
ter was this brief postscript: 

"Them dam seeds has just arrived." 

* * • 
Representative Stephens of Cali- 
fornia got a request for garden seeds 
from a w'oman in his district, who 
wished to grow things in the ground- 
Without wasting a moment, Stephens 
placed almost a dime's worth of seeds 
in a government envelope wjth his 
congressional frank in one corner and 
sent them off to brighten the land- 
scape in California. When the woman 
got the seeds she read on the envelope 
the words, "$300 fine for private use." 

So she promptly sent the seeds back 
with this note of explanation: 

"I am much obliged for these seeds, 
but I wanted them to use in my own 
private garden, and I couldn't possibly 
afford to pay a ?300 fine if I were 
caught planting them." 

* « * 

With the exception of Smith and 
Stephens, the commonest name in the 
house of representatives is Taylor. 
There are four Taylors and they hail 
from New York, Colorado, Arkansas 
and Alabama. All are Democrats. 
Moreover they are In perfect accord 
on the great questions of the day. Not 
once since the four Taylors have been 
in congress together have they failed 
to vote the same way. Every Taylor 
agrees perfectly with everj' other Tay- 
lor. 

* • • 
Representative Henry Vollmer, a 

newly arrived member of congress 
from Iowa, was in public life here In 
Washington on a previous occasion — 
some twenty-five years ago. That time 
he w^as distributing clerk in the house, 
a position that carried with it such 
duties as jabbing the various bills into 
proper pigeon holes. It was not so 
onerous a position in those days that 
one didn't have time for other things, 
and Vollnner used to sit and listen 
to the debates by tiie hour, dreaming 
of the time when he, too, would place 
remarks in the Congressional Rec- 
ord. 

When he came here recently to take 
his seat, Vollmer was escorted over to 
the house by his colleague, Maurice 
Connolly. 

"They're just finishing up the debate 
on the education bill," explained Con- 
nolly, 

"Well, rm glad they're finishing up," 
said Vollmer; "they were just starting 
the debate on the education bill when 
I left here twenty-five years ago." 
m * • 

On his return here after a quarter of 
a century, Vollmer looked all over the 
capitol for familiar faces. He found 
only three. One was Sereno Payne, and 
the others were two. colored doortend- 

ers. 

(Copyright, 1914, by Fred C. Kelly. All rights reserved.) 

• 

Hospital Sound*. 

Atlantic: Past my door the busy 
nurses flit; they do hard things to me 
with deft and tender hands. Motor 
cars roar to the unseen entrance and 
the doctors come stamping and boom- 
ing through the hall in all their pro- 
fessional cheerfulness — not profession- 
al only. big. cheer-giving boys that 
they are. Sometimes my door is 
swiftly closed, that I may not hear or 
see, but I know the sound of those 
creaking wheels and tha burden they 
carry; burden wide-eyed and fearful 
as it goes, sodden with heaviest sleep 
when it comes back. 

But my room has a window. Sounds 
float through it to me in bed, distant 
engines that shunt and call; nearer 
hens that clack Incessantly like busy 
housekeepers who never cease; the 
shrill-sweet fluting of a cardinal bird, 
highest-hearted whistling In the 
world, like a gallant fife at the lips 
of a prince; the far-away lusty crying 
of the baby boy who Is the latest com- 
er. I wonder what she lies and thinks 
about, that new-born mother; I won- 
der what he is thinking about, that 
new mall-soul who came flying 
through another hospital window like 

my own. 

— . • 

Wlna BotJa Ways. 

Richmond Times-Dispatch: It oc- 
curs to us that Mr. Wilson has it on 
that earlier statesman who would 
rather be right than president. Mr, 
Wilson iiaa copped botii pennants. 



^A>ii, !^'>»'Bt>^l'..%^ 





And Think of the Tha^! 

Gheen Record: Duluth had a scare 
for a while that the lake was going 
to be backed up on her. Just think 
of the possibilities of being the Venlce- 
of-the-North. and taking a spin dpwn 
Superior street on your skates on 
snappy mornings. 



Any Til 

Waseca Herald: The Duluth Herald 
warns Its readers to beware of an at- 
tack on the primary system. Like all 
things hum£n, the primary system has 
its faults. But from the standpoint of 
public welfare it is infinitely superior 
to the lK>ss-ruled caucus system. 



Soak 'Km. 

Hibbing Mesaba Ore: Following the 
lead taken by The Duluth Herald, the 
papers of the mining sections of 
Northern Minnesota have started a 
campaign against the gun-toter that 
should result in the abolishment of 
the cowardly and inexcusable habit of 
lugging a revolver around. — Grand 
Rapids Herald -Review. 

The habitual gun-toter is a murderer 
at heart, a cowardly, craven one, and 
he should be put out of circulation as 
fast as discovered. Many courts sim- 
ply impose a fine and confiscate the 
"gjn," whereupon the toter goes right 
out and buys another and awaits his 
victim. Soak 'em. 



•**The Davidson theater, the finest 
playhouse in Milwaukee and one of 
the handsomest and costliest theaters 
In the country, was destroyed by fire, 
which broke out between 4 and B 
o'clock this morning. The valuable 
scenery carried by the Llllputlans Is 
all gone and Manager Rosenthal of 
the company .says It was worth $25,- 
000. A score of firemen fell with the 
roof into a seething mass of flames. 
Several escaped, but the others wrero 
caught by the burning roof and 
roastf^d to death. The deaths number 
about ten. The theater cost about 
$350,000, and the loss is fully half that 
amount. 



•••The term of Julius D. Howard as 
postmaster of Duluth expires April 19 
and Maj. Baldwin has recommended 
T. M. Helinski as his successor. 



••♦The tee in the bay Is still intact 
and the cold wave of the past few^ 
days has chilled all prospect of start- 
ing up the lumber mills at West Du- 
luth for a week at least. 



•**W. J. Holmes and family have 
returned to West Duluth from a visit 
of several months in California. 



It'» Comln«r S«re. 

Willow River Farmer: It has been 
stated by men competent to Judge cor- 
rectly In the premises that within fif- 
teen, and possibly within ten years 
from now, ocean-going steamers will 
be unloading and taking on cargoes 
from the docks at Duluth. The prop- 
osition for the construction of the 
canals is being put up to the United 
States and Canadian governments and 
favorable action seems almost a cer- 1 
tainty. Minnesota in the midst of a ] 
continent and more than a thousana 
miles from old ocean's gray and mel- 
ancholy waste seems destined to give 
harbor to the merchant navies of the 
world. 



Thank Yon, Mr. Jones. 

Bagley Independent: The Duluth 
Herald is the best daily published in 
the state. The Herald is a genuint- 
booster for Northern Minnesota, reli- 
able and progressive in every respect 
and its editorials en state and national 
affairs are read from coast to coast. 
The Herald's list here in Bagley 
doubles that of any other daily that 
comes to the Bagley postoffice. 



And Wants to Help Alonff. 

Grand Rapids Herald-Review: As a 
result of the efforts of the Duluth 
Commercial club» Northeastern Minne- 
sota is receiving some very good ad- 
vertising in catalogues sent out by 
different seed houres. In quite a num- 
ber of them reference Is made to the 
soil of this section and the crops to 
which it is best adapted. Duluth has 
ap.parently awakened to the fact that 
w^ter transportation and Iron ore are 
not the only things in the world worth 
paying sonr.e attention to. 
• 

A Modern Farm Fable 



••♦Charles Canning, one of Duluth's 
best known citizens, died at Hendrum, 
Norman county, yesterday from nerv- 
ous prostration which followed an at- 
tack of the grip. He was about 60 
years of age and a native of the north 
of Ireland. He located in 1878 at 
Hendrum and his farm grew until it 
Is .now one of the finest in the Red 
River valley. In the fall of 1889 he 
came to Duluth and built a home and 
store at 931 West First street. Ho 
also established himself in the grain 
trade and, becoming a member of the 
board of trade, worked up a large bus- 
iness. He served in the legislature of 
1885 from Norman county and in 1888 
he was the nominee of the Alliance 
party and the Democrats for congres."* 
In the Fifth district, but was defeated 
by S. G. Comstock of Moorhead. al- 
though he ran more than 5,000 ahead 
of Cleveland's vote. His estate will 
aggregate $50,000 or $60,000. 



•••The BeviT Milling & Mining 
company has been organized with a 
capital of $300,000. The officers are: 
H. Bevier. president and treasurer; 
Jeff Hildrelh, vice president and gen- 
eral manager; F. S. White, secretary. 
The property of the company includes 
the Little American mine and the 
stamp mill at Rainy Lake City. 



Fred Telford in Farm and Fireside: 
Once upon a Time the Farmers in a 
Community became interested in im- 
proving their Lot. They employed a 
County Adviser to tell them about bal- 
anced Rations far the dairy Cows and 
the best Rotation of Crops and what, 
was the matter with the Soil. Half 
the Farmers owned Bulls with Pedi- 
grees that made them blush when they 
thought of their own Family Trees. 
They formed a Company and imported 
a $3,000 Stallion, and then paid an 
Expert $75 a month to take proper 
care of the valuable Animal. In short, 
this Community had its Eyes open to 
the Things that make Country Life 
worth living. 

But they carelessly stopped before 
they finished the Job. Three of the 
Members of the Horse Company were 
the District School Directors, and their 
wires got crossed when they hired the 
Teacher. They picked a Slip of a High 
School Girl who could not boll water 
without burning it. She had always 
passed in her Work with high Marks 
because her Father was President of 
the Board. She knew more about Mar- 
cel Puffs and Dlrectolre Gowns and 
dancing the Turkey Trot than about 
Reading and Arithmetic. But she 
knew how to dress, and she was will- 
ing to take the School for $30 a month. 

When the Girl came out from the 
City in September one of the first 
young Men she met was Bill, Son of 
one of the Directors. Bill was 20 and 
a Joy to his Father. He hit It off fine 
with the Girl until she noticed the 
accumulation of non-commercial Fer- 
tilizer on his Boots. Then she tilted 
her Nose at an Angle of forty-five De- 
grees and wiped Bill completely off 
the Map. And the old Man wondered 
why the young Fellow was All at once 
dissatisfied with Farm Life and want- 
ed to get a Job in the City. 

Moral: If you're going in for the 
Uplift, be consistent. 
- • 

MaktHRT n Home. 

Elisabeth Woodbridge in the Atlan- 
tic: The home is spiritual, but It 
arises through the vehicle of the phy- 
sical. We may not be able to track 
it down to any one material aspect. 
Sleeping under one roof does not make 
a home; gathering about a common 
lamp or a common fireplace does itot; 
possibly even children in a nursery 
cannot make a home. We may elim- 
inate one or another of these and still 
keep the spiritual thing that we prize. 
Sometimes we must eliminate, when 
the very multitude of its outward 
signs blur the real meaning — you can- 
not see the woods for the trees. But 
a proverb usually needs a supple- 
mentary glosij, and in this one it 
should be added that without trees 
there will be no woods. And so, in 
the case of the home, if in one ex- 
treme there Is danger of submerging 
Its significance in the mass of its 
physical expressions, there is at the 
other extreme the danger of dissipat- 
ing significance through a paucity of 
physical expression. 

• 

MThmt He Wonld Have Done. 

Youth's Companion: Ben Foster was 
noted for his shiftlessness. If it had 
not been for his wife, he would not 
have done a stroke of work on his 
little farm and garden. It was all his 
wife could do to get hira to work, for 
he preferred to sit and read all day. 

One evening, after he had been read- 
ing French history with deep interest, 
he closed the book and said to his 
wife, "Do you know, Maria, what I'd 
•a' done if I had been Napoleon?" 

"Oh, yes, I know well enough," his 
wife responded. "You'd have settled 
right down on a farm in Corsica and 
let it run to ruin, while you grumbled 
about your hard luck." 

• — 

Aatong the Idheral Arts. 

Burlington Free Press: If pitchers' 
salaries continue to mount higher, 
baseball will cease to be one of the 
professions and become one of the lib- 
eral arts. 



WTien your health seerps broken down, 
. Don't sit by to scowl and frown, 
j Pessimism long ago dropped out of 

style; 
■Let your heart give forth good cheer. 
Scatter sunshine far and near. 
For you look a whole lot better when 
you smile. 

Later on when you await 

Judgment at the heavenly gate. 

The frowns you'll find arc scarcely 

worth the while: 
Greeted now by angel band. 
i You have reached the promised land. 
And you won the good St. Peter with 
your smile. 

Hugo Hailing in Kansas City Star. 

. • 

Wasted EmmrT' 
New Orleans States: We have al- 
ways believed that the man who put 
I "p" in pneumonia and the "n" in damn 
'could have done something a dara 
sight more useful. 



AMUSEMENTS. 



I Vf^ F 1 1 BA I ^ Day* CowM w e'K 
LiTwtUlfl I TONI GHT. AFRIl. • 

Matinees Saturday and Sunday. 
Kli^hts, 35e to fl.5»; Hats., 50c to 91. 



OLIVER MOROSCO 

OFFBKft 

A Superb Prtxiuotlon of 
tfte MMt BrNliant Cwifdg 




EMPRESS Xy^ 



Vandcvllle aad Feature Pleturea. 

Rcatfek and Preeman riayerfi la the 

Playlet of the VndemorM. 



ti 



MARKED MONEY 

THB HOLDS WORTHS. 
BARBER AKD JACtCSOS, 

THE LA VOL-IS. 
And th« Two-Part Fllni, 
♦TUB TrRlVllV« POiXT." 



>» 



Sunday — Mualral Comedy. 

'•THB PARISIAN REVUE.' 



HEW Both Phouca a41« 



THi^ATER 



a>«»i>n d Ave. E. and Superior St. 
ALL THIS WEEK. " 



c 



IREXE TIMMONS 4K CO. 

— In— 

•♦NEW STUPP- 

— and — 

7 MORE FE.irrRES. 



jTeXT WT:BK — THE ROAD SHOW. 



•••John Harwick has been taken tn 
St. Mary's hospital to have several 
fingers amputated which were frozen 
several weeks ago at Mountain Iron. ,,^ 
• 

Vou Look Better When You Smile. 
When you're reeling mighty blue. 
As misfortune comes to you. 
And ill luck see.iis heaped about you 

In a pile; 
You will stand a greater show 
If you don't let others know, 
Anid besides you look much better 

- whjen you smile. 



Wl»en your business all goes wrong. 
Just keep plodding ri^ht along. 
Better times are surely coming after 

While- 
Sun is sure to shine again. 
Cheerfulness Is not In vain, 
And you look a good deal better when 

you smile. - - 









••^. 





'^Sfl 



Thursday, 



THE DULUTH HERALD 



April 9, 1914. 



-••- 



■^" 



THE OPEN COURT 

iRri.irr* nt The TUraltl ar« Iiivltf.l to make fTt* 
us« I'f iliis o>lumn lo eTpress llitit Uleas about lii« 
Ippir- i.f gvn«ral liit»rfst. but tlUi-U'wlfiia <if »«fl.iiUn 
nlJxiiMus tUtTrrrnrM are l>arre<I. l-»tter4 must i ol 
czcertl 300 words -the shorter the better. Tliey nr.ist 
be written on one tJiUf of the paper only, ami th<y 
must be ari-timiMiniei] iti eterj iioe by the name fnd 
adiirfsj of the virlttr thi'Ugh the<e ri«e«l n t be t'ub- 
IMirO. A slrieU letter Is alw«yt mure effei-tiTe, how- 
•ter.) 

THE EGG PROBLEM. 



The "egg" problem submitted to the 
re;iders of the Open Court for solution 
has afoustd considerable inttrest, and 
several correct answers have been re- 
ceived. Various prices were fixed as 
the price for the egg», but in each 
case the price for each dozen egrgs was 
one-third of the price obtained f«>r 
each egg remaining after the whole 
number had been divided by 12. Fol- 
lowing are some of the correct an- 
swers: 

To tho Editor of The Herald: 

If each man charge-* 10 cents per 
dozen and 30 cents for each remaining 
•gg. each man turns in $1. 

RAYMOND J. K1LLF:EN. 
Cathedral high school. 
♦ ♦ ♦ 

To the Editor of The Herald: 

solution of the 



SALTS FINE FOR 
ACHING KIDNEYS 



SUBSIDY IN THE SADDLE 



By SAVOYARD 



Washington, April 9. — (Special to 
We eat too much meat which r^e Herald.)— "Every true man-s Bp- 

parel fits your thief. — Shakespea 



clogs Kidneys, then the 
Back hurts. 



Most follis forget that the kidneys, 
like the bowels, get sluggish and 
clogged and need a flushing occasion- 
ally, else we have backache and dull 
misery in the kidney region, severe 
headaches, rheumatic twinges, torpid 
liver, acid stomach, sleeplesgness and 
all sorts of bladder disordelfs. 

You simply must keep your kidneys 
active and clean, and the moment you 
feel an ache or pain In the kidney 
region, get about four ounces of Jad 
Salts from any good drug store here, , 
take a tablespoonful in a glass of j enough to believe that. I..ook you 



ire. 

And a shameless and vicious subsidy 
can masquerade In many disguises 
and here Is the ship subsidy whining 
around about "national honor" and 
professing monopoly of all the patriot- 
ism that is left in the world. It in- 
sists In the name of national honor 
that congress shall not dishonor the 
nation In order to give it $2,000,000 
anpuallji I .speak of the subsidy, not 
of its supporfei's. 

What Is the proposition here? It is 
this — vote our monopoly a subsidy of 
$2,000,000 every year and we will give 
it back to the people. I am astonished 
that any man in congress is simple 



water before breakfast for a few days 
and your kidneys will then act fine. 
This famous i»alts is made from the 
acid of grapes and lemon Juice, com- 
bined with lithia. and Is harmless to 
flush clogged kidneys and stimulate 
them to normal activity. It also neu- 
tralizes the acids in the urine so It no 
thus ending bladder 



1 have tlie following .^.., -- — , , . .. . 

"egg" problem. First they sold the 1 ^^y^^^jf^^CHt^^^^ 

epg-^ at 1 cent a do^cn (just imagine i j^^ ^-^\^^ j^ harmless; Inexpensive; 
that nowadays). Then the clerk whoi^j^.^^g ^ delightful effervescent lithia- 
had the tiftecn eggs, had 1 cent and •viator drink which everybody should 
thrre eggs left. The clerk who had [ take now and then to keep their kld- 
the fifty eggs had 4 cents and two ' neys clean, thus avoiding serious com- 
eggs left, and the clerk who had the | plications 

^f\ . . ., .' ,, „ V. „. -, „^„ta on.i nnf» I A well-knoxfrn local druggist says he 

eighty-tive eggs had . ♦^t"*? ,'^"*^°"^ ! sells lots of Jad Salts to folks who 
egg left. The eggs they had left they i ^,^1,^^.^ j^^ overcoming kidney trouble 
sold for S cents apiece. (.This is more ; ^hiie It Is only trouble. Agent, Wlrth's 



like it. isn't It?) Then the first man 
had 1 cent plus 9 cents, or 10 cents; 
the second man had 4 cents plus 8 
cents, or 10 cents; and tiie third man 
had 7 cents plus 3 cents, or 10 cents. 

M. Q. 

* « ♦ 

My answer to your problem in Tues- 
day's Open Court column is as fol- 
lows: 

No. 1 had eighty-five eggs, making 
seven dozens and one egg. He sold 
the seven dozens at 3 ctnts a dozen — 
21 cents. He sold the remaining one 
egg at 9 cents. Adding, we get 30 
cents. 

No. 2 had fifty eggs, making four 
dozeri and two eggs. He sold the four 
dozens at 3 cents a dozen, making 12 
cents. He sold the remaining twc 
eg^s at 9 cents each. This gives 30 
cents. 

Xo. 3 had fifteen eggs, making one 
doz«n .ind three eggs. He sold the 
one dozen for 3 cents and the remain- 



Red Cross drug store, 13 West Superior 
stre*;t. 



ing three eggs for 9 cejits each, mak- 
ing a total of 30 cents. 

J. D. McDOXAI.D. 



TAKING ORDERS FROM SAMPLES. 



To the Editor of The Herald: 

I notice In The Herald an ordinance 
to license canvassers. Does not that 
ordinance conflict with the interstate 
commerce act, as 1 am informed the 
courts have ruled that a person taking 
orders from samples requires no li- 
cense? Thanking you for Information 
through The Herald. Signed, 

A SUBSCRIBER. 
Duluth, April 3. 



there is not now, never was and never 
will be any real competition between 
the transcontinental railroads and the 
ship trust, and the exclusion of rail- 
road-owned ships from this subsidy 
was the spawn of ignorance and cow- 
ardice. Before this debate is over I 
am going to show you about that. It 
was only a piece of cheap and low 
demagogy. And this cry against Eng- 
land Is yet cheaper and still lower. 
The railroads care not a rap about It. 
* * « 

The ship tru.st, the lumber trust, 
Tammany Hall and all the vicious 
things that Mr. Bryan defeated at Bal- 
timore in 1912 are here demanding 
that the Democratic party do what 
the Republican party never did do — 
grant a ship subsidy. The same 
agencies that opposed Wilson at Bal- 
timore arQ opposing him now. It Ig 
the same flghf, led hy the same man. 

Now everybody knew that Champ 
Clark would seek to stab the Demo- 
cratic administration as soon as he 



W. H. Taft, Theodore Roosevelt, Phi- 
lander Knox. Josepji CJ. Cannon, Joseph 
B. Foraker, Victor Murdock and James 
R. Mann. And Bc»o\jKed in with them, 
as at Baltimore in 1912, were Will- 
iam R. Hearst and Cliarles F. Murphy, 
the Tammany boi^, the lumber trust 
and the ship truat. . 

Now, take it from me — whenever a 
Democrat flnds himself in such a squad 
as that the thing for him to do is to 
take an observation and discover 
where he is at. As Mistress Nellie 
Gwynne remarked on a certain occa- 
sion; "9<i'i'£ J'*'*' ^^'hat company am 

I got Intor' 

* * * 

Republicans, Impotent themselves to 
harm Wilson, are hailing Clark and 
Underwood as more than Jefferson and 
Jackson. It is Insolence Intolerable 
for anv Republican to pick out Demo- 
cratic "worthies. As for Fitzgerald, he 
is excusable, as he was when saved 
old Joe Cannon's bacon. He has got 
but a single constituent — Boss Murphy 
—and he has to obey orders. Now 
Murphy Is not for this subsidy for his 
health. If the ship trust gets the sub- 
sidy he will strike Nixon for a divvy. 
At present Tammany is on short com- 
mons, and a rakeoff from a ship sub- 
sidy would help immeasureably. 

What is this proposition of Clark 
and Underwood, of Foraker and Can- 
non, of Mann and Murdock? Here it 

Is that the man growing tobacco In 

Kentucky, the man planting cotton In 
Alabama, the man breeding mules in 
Missouri, the man raising corn in Kan- 
sas and the man sowing wheat in Min- 
nesota shall be taxed to make up this 
deficit of $2,000,600 a year, graft the 
ship trust diverts from the United 
States treasury. That is all it is. I 
don't see how any human imaglna- 



GOOD SEASON 
IS EXPECTED 

DuluHi Jobbers Prepared 
for Activity With Open- 
ing of Navigation. 



With Few Exceptions Quo- 
tations Are Firm in All 
Commodities. 



Stnli^ht 
Bones' 

TUtGrtw 



could muster the moral courage to do i tlon can be so wild as to discover how 

any one of the classes I have named 
benefit whatever from 







Three Duluth attorneys and two Du- 
luth judges refused to give an opinion 
on the above question unless it were 
formally presented to them. If "A 
Subscriber" Is interested for business 
rensons he would do well to employ an 
attorney, give him all the facts, and 
get his opinion. — The Editor. 

•THE MONEYLESS MAN." 



To the Editor of The Herald: 

I see a man from this village is ask- 
ing for the poem. "The Moneyless 
Man.' Well, I think the following Is 
what he refers to. 

OLE ASBJEL.D. 
Nashwauk; Minn., April 7. 



so and saw what he thought an op- 
portunity to succeed. It is general 
report that Champ did not want to 
draw his dagger at this time but that 
Hearst demanded that he should. Well, 
he got but one supporter in the entire 
Democratic delegation from Missouri 
and tidings from his own district are 
ominous. He may not be a member 
of the next congress. 

* * * 

Underwood's case is different — he 
believes in subsidy and would grow a 
merchant marine In a hot-house. 

Now these two leaders revolted from 
the Democratic president on what they 
are pleased to term "national honor." 
I suppose that Is what they mean, if 
they mean anything other than that 
both are receptive candidates for Wil- 
son's Job in 1916. They got a great 
deal of applause — on the Republican 
side of the house. It was enthusiastic, 
delirious. Tom Reed never got as 
much. They deliberately put them- 
selves in the same trundle bed with 




1$ all piAf^ 

BwUs yot/ up. 

Father John'!! Medicine is for «»!« In Duluth by 
Wllll«ni A. .\bbett. 205 West Superior ttreet, 101 
W«6t Fourth street, 032 llut Second street. »Iso 
Bo>ce I»rug store. .".31 West fupwlor street; Wirth 
Drutf stor?. 13 West Superior gtreet. iml practically 
all otber flnig «ti>iTs In the city. If you hate any 
difficulty Ir. gettins Father John's Medicine from your 
4mgglst, writ* to Father Jo'm's Me<Ilclne, Ix)nell. 
Ha.';:'.. eii'-'Ioslng Jl for a large bottle by espress. pre- 
raid. 



DO YOU WANT 

Honest Dentistry 
at Honest Prices 

backed by the dentlst.s who always 
make good? Then come to the 
New Method Denti.-st.s. 




Is there no place on the face of the 

earth 
Where charity dwelleth, where virtue 

has birth. 
When bosom in mercy and kindness 

will heave, 
When the poor and the wretched shall 

ask and receive? 
Is there no place at all where a knock 

from the poor 
Will bring a kind angel to open the 

door? 
Ah! search the wide world wherever 

you can. 
There is no open door for the money- 
less man. 

Go look in the halls where the chande- 
lier's light 

Drives off with its splendor the dark- 
ness of night. 

Where the rich hanging velvet in 
shadowy fold 

Sweeps gracefully down with its trim- 
mings of gold. 

Where mirrors of silver take up and 
renew 

In long-lighted vistas the wilderlng 
view. 

Go there at the banquet and find if 
you can 

A welcoming smile for the moneyless 
man. 

Go look at your church with its cloud- 
reaching spire, 

Which gives to the sun Its same look 
of red Are, 

Where arches and columns are gorge- 
ous within. 

And the walls seem as pure as the soul 
without sin. 

Walk doTUTi the long aisles, see the 
rich and the great 

In their pomp and their pride of their 
worldly estate; 

Walk down in your patches and find if 
you can ^ 

Who opens a pew to the moneyless 
man. 

Go look in the banks where Mammon 

has told 
His hundreds and thousands of Bilver 

and gold, 
Where safe from the hands of the 

starving and poor 
Lie pile upon pile of the glittering 

ore. 
Walk up to the counters — ah! there 

you may stay 
Till your limbs get weak, till your 

hair turns gray. 
You will find in the banks not one_ of a 

clan 
Has money to lend to the moneyless 

man. 

Go look at your judge with his dark 

flowing gown. 
With scales in his hand to weigh 

equally down. 
Where he frowns on the poor and 

smiles on the strong 
And punishes right while he justifies 

wrong; 
Where jurors their lips to the Bible 

have laid . , j 

To render a verdict they have already 



marriage he commits a crime, for 
which he may be deported. Is the 
woman subject to deportation as his 
wife? 

2. If a man and wife are both of 
foreign birth and are not United States 
citizens but are parents of a daughter 
born in this country, who proves to 
be an immoral character, can she be 
deported? 

3. Is a man bom in the United 
States of foreign parents an American 
citizen? 

4. Kindly explain the nationality of 
Creoles. Have they any colored blood? 

A- T. G. 
Angora, Minn., April 7. 



can reap any 
this subsidy, even remotely, and it is 
certain that they will be taxed to 
make good to the treasury the amount 

of the subsidy. 

♦ * ♦ 

And then it is only opening to a big 
subsidy. It is absurd — it is idiotic — 
to believe that this exemption from 
tolls will build a merchant marine. 
Mrs. Partington undertook to sweep 
all the water out of the Atlantic ocean 
with a broom. 

Why be a piker? Why not make 
it what they hope to make it, and 
will make it if it becomes Democratic 
policy— ten times $2,000,000 a year, 
and that is the undertaking here — In 
the name of "national honor?" 

Of course our farmers can stand it. 
But don't forget that every egg the 
Democratic party has laid is in the 
Woodrow Wilson bas)ket and he that 
would break a single one should 
change his party. 



vorce by the supreme court in Brook- 
Ivn. Pence did not defend the suit. 
"The couple have no children. 



The answers to your questions are 
as follows: 1. No. 2. No. 8. Yes. 

4. A Creole is a person of French or 
Spanish descent, who is a native in- 
habitant of Louisiana or one of the 
states adjoining, bordering on the Gulf 
of Mexico. The term creole negro Is 
employed In the English West Indies 
to distinguish the negroes born there 
from the Africans Imported during the 
time of the slave trade. The applica- 
tion of the term to colored people has 
led to an Idea common in some parts 
of the United States, though wholly 
unfounded, that it Implies an admix- 
ture greater or less of African blood. — 
The Editor. 



BEAUTIFY 
YOUR LAWNS 

We are in a position to. fill your 
orders for LAWN FERTILIZER. 

Delivered to all parts of the city. 
CALL EITHER PHONE 618. 



SOCIALISTS HAVE 
LECTIRES SCHEDULED 



Prof. John D. Ohsol will speak at 
3101.2 West First street this evening. 
His subject will be: "The Mission of 
the Socialist Party." The meeting will 
begin sharply at 8 o'clock, and is open 
to the public. 

Prof. Ohsol will speak at Sloan's hall. 
Twentieth avenue west, next Tuesday 
evening and will address the members 
of the Scandinavian branch of the So- 
cialist party. 

Considerable interest is being mani- 
fested in the coming meeting at which 
Eugene V. Debs will speak. Socialist 
organizations in a number of towns 
have written to the local committee 
asking for reservations of as many as 
100 tickets each. 



VIEWS CHANGE 
BEHIND BARS 



Father Decides He Will Sup- 
port His Two Chil- 
dren. 



HALTS WESTERN 

UNION BUILDING, 

New Tork, April 9. — A permanent 
injunction granted by the supreme 
court may hold iip until May 1, 1918, 
the completion of the greater part of 
the new 18,000,000 building of the 
V/estern Union Telegraph company at 
Broadway and Dey street. The owner 
of a restaurant in the old Western 
Union building, which must come down 
to make room for the new structure, 
obtained the Injunction. When the 
proprietor refused to vacate, the tele- 
graph company shut off his light and 
water supply. The restaurant got these 
necessities from outside and then 
brought suit to restrain the Western 
Union from further interference until 
the expiration of its lease in 1918. 



Two days behind the bars in the 
county jail changed the views of John 
Gladora, 24, on the subject of a fath- 
er's moral obligations to his children. 
Gladora was released from custody 
yesterday afternoon after he had de- 
posited IJIOO with Humane Agent Mc- 
Kercher as a guarantee that he would 
contribute regularly to the support of 
his two minor children who are being 
cared for at the Children's home, 
(iladora was arrested by the humane 
made. . . . I agent Monday on a warrant charging 

Go there at the court room and nnd |,j,„ ^.^^ having contributed to the de- 
If you can (pendency of minor children, a proceed 

Any law for the cause of the money 
less man. 



3 



GOLD CROWN $ 
BRIDGE WORK 

PER TOOTH 

New Method 
Dentists 

25 WE.ST SUPERIOR STREET. 

(Over Bou Ton Bakery) 
Hours 8:30 to 7. 



Then go to the hovel, no raven 
frd 

The mother who suffered too long for 
her bread; 

Kneel down by her pallet and kiss the 
dead frost 

From the lips of the angel your pov- 
erty lost. 

Then look In your agony upward to 

And smile when He Bmltes you with 

chastening rod; 
And you will And at the end of your 

life's little span 
There Is a welcome above for the 

moneyless man. 



QUESTIONS ANSWERED. 



To the Editor of The Herald: 

Will you kindly answer the follow- 
ing questions in your Open Court col- 
umn? 

1. An American-born woman mar- 
ries a man of foreiga birth. After 



Ing under the juvenile court law. He 
was to have been arraigned in Judge 
Ensign's court Saturday, but when he 
v,nfi furnished the bond to the humane 
agent yesterday, the court dismissed 
the case and released the prisoner. 

Gladora and his wife, Anna, were 
unable to get along together and 
Gladora left her with two children on 
her hands, Joseph, aged 20 months, 
and John, 3. The mother placed the 
youngsters in the Children's home and 
secured employment to pay for their 
board In the Institution. She made it 
a go for two months, but finally ap- 
pealed to the humane society for re- 
lief, stating that she could not make 
both ends meet. 

Gladora's whereabouts were inquired 
into and his arrest procured. The 
father at the time of hlo arrest pro- 
tested that he did not have to support 
his children If his wlf9 refused to live 
with him. He was given two days In 
the county Jail to think It over. Yes- 
terday he was quite willing to submit 
to any sort of a compromise. 



"TIZ" EASES TIRED, 
SORE, SWOLLEN FEET 

So Tired of Burning, Sweaty, Cal- 
loused Feet and Corns? 
Use *'Tiz." 




In point of volume, business being 
taken by Duluth wholesalers and man- 
ufacturing establishments is said to be 
making a favorable comparison with 
last year. Optimism is spreading as a 
result of the exceptionally bright ag- 
ricultural outlook in this district and 
throughout the West. With favorable 
weather, it is expected that the largest 
area in several years back will be 
seeded to spring wheat. The resump- 
tion of mining operations in the ranges 
is being anxiously awaited by the busi- 
ness men In the various towns, as the 
trade situation in them is at present 
seasonably dormant. Preparations are 
being made for an active season from 
the opening of navigation till the late 
fall. 

Good Grocfrles niOTement. 
"The movement in groceries is good, 
and it is running much heavier than 
last year, " said C. R. Rust of the Rust- 
Parker-Martln company today. A 
gratifying feature he noted Is that re- 
tailers are carrying light stocks in 
most commodities, as a rule, and with 
the extra spring demand now develop- 
ing through this district, they are or- 
dering in larger quantities for the 
season than in a considerable period 
back. With few exceptions, quotations 
in edibles are firm, and- any reductions 
that have come about are merely nom- 
inal. Coffees are weaker, being oft 
^Ai&h^ cent a pound this week. It is 
to be noted that coffees have declined 
steadily since last October, when the 
high point in two years was touched. 
The main cause of the decline has been 
the heavy crop movement which has 
exceeded all expectations, and the un- 
settled financial conditions In Brazil. 
As a result of that situation, Brazilians 
have been forced to sell at concessions, 
finding themselves unable to carry 
stocks over. Sugars have dropped five 
points this week, and the situation in 
them Is still bearish, leading to the 
confining of purchases to a hand-to- 
mouth basis. A heavy sale in canned 
and dried fruits and vegetable staples 
is reported. 

Active Dry Goods Trade. 
Dry goods trade over this territory 
is being maintained in satisfactory 
volume, according to F. A. Patrick & 
Co. Mail orders in dress goods and 
accessories and In women's ready-to- 
wear garments for prompt shipment 
have been especially heavy of late. 

Some of that house's salesmen in 
mackinaws and northern wool products 
are now in from their trips after land- 
ing a record volume of trade. Future 
orders in woolens, blankets, etc., for 
next fall's delivery are said to be well 
maintained. 

Shoe Factory Busy. 
The Northern Shoe company advised 
that Its factory is employing more 
operatives at the present than at pre- 
vious periods in its history. The com- 
pany's travelers are booking substan- 
tial orders from over Northern Minne- 
sota and North Dakota, while its rep- 
resentative at Spokane is averred to 
have booked double the volume of 
business last month as compared with 
a year ago. The factory has Inaugu- 
rated a selling campaign in its "Farm- 
pruf" line of work shoes. Through 
the tanning process adopted in pre- 
paring the hide, ammonia is said to 
have no effect on the leather, which re- 
mains soft and pliable under all con- 
ditions. Hockey and skating shoes 
for next winter's use are also being- 
featured. 

Furniture Sales Expand. 
An Increase of 35 per cent in its .vol- 
ume of furniture business last week 
over a year ago, was reported by the 
De Witt-Seitz company. A good ex- 
pansion in sales was said to be show- 
ing (.rom 9vej: Nprtheirn Michigan §.nd 
N'drtnern ana western Minnesota. Or- 
ders in mattresses are bulking up 
heavily, leading to capacity operations 
at the company's factory. 

Leather Market Firm. 
The Schulze company also averred 
that its trade is bulking up well ahead 
of last year. Shipments of heavy har- 
ness for use in spring farming oper- 
ations are said to be large. The fill- 
ing of orders In summer goods wll'! be 
started next month. The market Is 
firm in all classes of leather. 

Liberal Hardware ShipmcntM. 
Apart from screws which have de- 
clined between 15 and 20 per cent, 
there have been no notable quotations 
changes In hardware staples or fea- 
tures this week. The two Duluth 
wholesale establishments, the Kelley- 
How-Thomson company, and the Mar- 
shall-Wells H.ardware company, re- 
ported liberal trade in shelf goods and 
spring farming tools. Country mer- 
chants are showing a disposition to 
order more freely than in some time 
back. 

Building Paper a Feature. 
The Peyton Paper company advised 
that its trade in March, and so far this 
month was the best in Its experience. 
Orders in building paper are the fea- 
ture, ncluding that exceptional ac- 
tlvty is expected in new construction 
through the district this season. The 
company has just added an auto- 
truck to its delivery equipment. Among 
the outside buyers at its warehouse 
today w-ere: J. Zlmple, McGrath, 
Minn.; William Millenr Drummond, 
Minn., and Axel Lyons, Two Harbors. 

QUIT PUBLISHING 

LUMBER PRICES. 



St. Louis, Mo., April 9. — The publi- 
cation of lumber prices will be discon- 
tinued by the Yellow Pine Manufac- 
turers' association, according to a res- 
olution adopted by that organization at 
a meeting here and ordered incorpo- 
rated in the bylaws. This action fol- 
lowed a threat of the Missouri mem- 
bers who recently were fined by the 
supreme court of the state on the 
charge of violating the anti-trust laws, 
that they would withdraw from the 
association unless it amended its con- 
stitution to prohibit the dissemination 
of information relative to sales and 
marketing. 




Child's 

Patent Colt 

Button 

Educator 



Your Daughter's Feet— 

WHAT will be their Future? Will they step with the 
rhythm, the grace and the poetry of a Pavio'wa or an 
Isadora Duncan? 

Educator Shoes will allow them to grow as nature decreed, 
with straight bones, strong ligaments, powerful muscles. Such 
feet can be taught the beautiful art of Pavlowa or Duncan. 

But feet deformed by pointed shoes carry the handicap of 
awkwardness. 

Get your daughter's feet into roomy, good-looking Educators 

today. For men, women and children. Prices #1.35 to $5.50. 

But see that EDUCATOR is branded on the sole. That 

{"name guarantees you the correct orthopafdic shape which lets 

your feet grow as nature intended. Sold by good dealers 

everywhere. 

Rice & Hutchins, Inc.. 15 High Street. Boston. Mass. Makers of All 
America and Signet Shoes for Men, and the Mayfair for Women. 
S TO DEALERS: You can be supplied from stock on our floor 

RICE& HUTCHINS CHICAGO CO., CHICAGO, ILL. 

^^^ RICE & HUTCHINS 

Fducatoiv 



^^^W «e6.ULS.PAT.OF» 




4 LARGEST MOVES 

TO NEW LOCATIONS: 

BAYHA & CO. 
R. R. FORWARD & CO. 
HUNTLEY PRINTING CO. 
NATIONAL RUBBER STAMP CO. 

■•'The last two establishments move 
to 25 Lake Avenue North, 



WHAT OTHER CITIES ARE DOING 




ETROIT and Grand Rapids have J sealer of weights and measures will 



had public markets for years. 
These are largely wholesale 
but a number of retail mar- 
kets are being Installed In the 
V smaller cities throughout the 
state of Michigan. These 
markets have two main objects In 
view, lower cost of living by bringing 
the producer and consumer together 
and to build up trade between the pro- 
ducer and the merchants. A city retail 
market was opened in Jackson, Michi- 
gan, last fall and so far has provn 
most successful. It )s nicely equipped 
and tne stalls are free to the sellers. 
The market is well advertised In the 
local newspapers. It is opened all 
day and Saturday evenings as well. A 



als-o be market superintendent. Stalls 
for single rigs are 10 cents. Doubl* 
rigs and automobiles, 20 cents per day, 
and the total charge by the year is |», 
Saginaw also will open a municipal 
market this year, and Battle Creek. 
Muskegon, Cadillac, Bay City an<t 
Houghton as well as other cities hav« 
plans for city markets. 

Duluth ha^ three public markets. 
One has been in operation at th« 
Armory for several years and two oth- 
ers were started at West Duluth and 
the West end last summer. All of 
them will be conducted again this sumj 
nier. They have been a success and 
the city officials are co-operating wltU 
the farmers and various civic organl- 



great variety of stuff Is sold, includ- zrtions to enlarge th^ir scope and In 



ing all farm produce, butter, eggs, 
chickens, all kinds of meat, bread, 
cake, cookies, canned fruits, pickles, 
etc. 

North Lansing has a street market 
that has also proven very successful 
and the city of Lansing is now estab- 
lishing a market with stalls which 
will be placed under a roof. The city 



crease their usefulness. 



Aviator Killed. 

Antwerp, Belgium, April 9. — A Bel- 
gian aviator, Verschaeve, was killed by 
a 600-foot fall. His machine was cap- 
sized by a squall while fiying at th4 
rate of ninety miles an hour. 



r 



I^afayette Pence Divorced. 

New York, April 9. — Mrs. Katherlne 
Pence, wife of Lafayette Pence, a for- 
mer rt'presentative from Colorado, was 
graaUd aa Interlocutory decree ot di- c«nt«. Think oi itl 



When your poor, .suffering feet 
sting from walking, when you try to 
wriggle your corns away from the 
leather oi your «V.oes, when shoes 
pinch, and feel tight, when feet are 
swollen, sore, chafed — don't experi- 
ment — just use "TIZ." Get Instant 
relief. "TIZ" puts peace In tired, 
aching, painful feet. Ah! how com- 
fortable your shoes feel. Walk five 
miles, feet won't hurt you, won't 
swell after using "TIZ.l* 

Sore, tender, sweaty, smelly feet need 
"TIZ" because It's the only remedy 
that draws out all the poisonous exu- 
dations which puff up the feet and 
cause foot torture. "TIZ" Is the only 
remedy that takes pain and soreness 
right out o£ corns, callouses and 
bunions. 

Get a 25 cent W)x Of "TIZ" at any 
druggist or departmc^rit store. Get a 
whole year's foot comfort for only 25 



I Just Love My 
^'Minnesota" Macarom 



Better 

Than 

Meat 



RECKLESS DRIVER 

GETS TWO YEARS. 

San Francisco, Cal., April 9. — "Hard- 
ly a week passes but that somebody 
is maimed or slaughtered in San Fran- 
cisco by the careless operation of au- 
tomobiles," said Judge Owler of the 
superior court. In sentencing Loui.s 
Kantor, a chauffeur convicted of man- 
slaughter, to two years In the peni- 
tentiary. Kantor killed John McDer- 
mott, toller In a national bank, Christ- 
mas morning, and fled. 

SALOONS CONTEST 

BLOOMINGTON VOTE. 



Bloomlngton, 111., April 9. — attorneys ' 
for the saloons last night filed a notice 
of contest of the election held Tues- 
day, when seventy-eight saloons were 
voted out of business by a majority of , 
sevtnty-flve. The principal contention i I 
is that all th« voters were not res:l8-|k 
tered. j 



Delicious 

^'Minnesota*' 

Macaroni 






!hj 



Thursday, 



THE DULtJTH HERALD 



April 9, 1911 



h 



"THERE'S A BIGGER AND BETTER DAY DAWNING FOR THE 
WATERPORTS." IS THE CHAIRMAN'S MESSAGE TO 400 
LEADING CITIZENS AT THE ANNUAL CLUB MEETING 1 



OPPOSED TO 
CANAL PLAN, 

I 

Lakes to Mississippi Pro-' 

ject Condemned By 

Three Engineers. 



Public Affairs Committee j 

Also Seeks Adequate 

Market Facilities. 



That Duluth will not sit supinely by 
• nd 3>-e i.;overnor Kberhart try to have 
m. ship canal constructed from Duluth 
to the Twin Cities, was determined 
last evening at the annual meetlngr of 
the puMIc affairs committee of the 
r>ululh Commercial club, held in con- 
Junction with the annual meetins of 
the club proper. 

Vice Chairman Henry Xolte brouRht 
the matter up by readinsr a newspaper 
Bccount of how Uovernor Kberhart has 
called a meeting: of governors of 
states along: the Mississippi to take ac- 
tion re^ardinsr such a canal. The mat- 
tor was referred to the committee on 
l:arbor3 and waterways which wAs In- 
structed to see to It that Duluth Is 
adeciuat-ly r.-presented at any such 

ineetius to be held. The committee 
liad referrc'i to this in its annual re- 
rort. sayinsr that de.spite the fact that 
thre*:' L ntted States engineers, Majors 
Jf^rvars and Filch and Cul. Potter, have 
t in-ltiiined such a project. It still 
comf* up as a bugaboo. 

Another special matter which came 
lip and was acted upon decisively was 
the fallowing resolution submitted, to- 
gether with a special report by C. P. 
Craig^ as chairman of the agrictjltural 
rommittee. and which was uaauimous- 
ly adopted: 

"Ce it resolved by the Duluth Com- 
mercial club, in annual meeting this 
«th day of April. 1914, that we call to 
the att-ntlon of the city commission 
the pressing need for adequate, attrac- 
tive pabiic marltet facilities, to the end 
that th.- asrlciiltural development of 
the surrounding country be furthered 
and the cost of fresh garden produce 
be ri.-duoed to our citizens; that we 
rei^pe. tfully request the city coni^nts- 
3ion, and especially Hon. W. I. Prince, 
riiyor and coinnjissloner of public af- 
fairs, in whose division falls the con- 
trol ot public buildings, to devote to 
the purpose for which it was orig- 
inally intended, a public market, the 
entire lower floor of the Armory, and 
th.*t the s-aid snact be cleared this year 
and made sanitary and attractive." 

At the close of tlie annual report of 
Vi -e Chairn an Henry Nolle, which was 
the fiist report read following the din- 
ner, to which about 400 members of 
th' <A\\h sal down. Mr. Nolle read the 
following telegram from Julius H. 
iJarnes. chainnan of the public affairs 
troiiiniittce, who is at present in Wash- 
ington, D. C. appearing before the in- 
t'-rstHte commerce commission: 

•"Statemerts submitted by carriers In 
the lake and rail advance cases re- 
QMlrinjiT careful analysis, have occupied 
jny time so fully that I have been un- 
able to prepare an annual report. I 
Vill present the chairman's report 
later. Including Important develop- 
rient=< here. There's a bigger and bet- 
ter day dawning for the water ports." 

Excerpts of the various reports made 
At the public affair^ committee last 
ev.jning follow: 

GREAT YEARToR CITY. 

Vice Chairman of Public Affairs 

Committee Says 1913 Was 

Productive. 

In the a»><>ence of Chairman .Julius 
H. Barnes of the ptibllc affairs «om- 
mittee. Vice Chairman Henry NolK 
ti:ade a report, which was, in part, at 
follows: 

"The last year has brought devclop- 
rnents of the greatest importance to 
our city. The decision of the interstate 
commerce commission In the lake-and- 
tail case stands out above all other de- 
Vtloi>ment9. as indicating the progress 
We are making in furth*rlng the com- 
mercial and industrial growth of the 
community. Other transportation 

change.*? will exert a strong influence 
In our future. 1 

"That our market Is developing iJ 
Irdi' ated by statistics on immigration i 
Into Northern Minnesota. Men quall- 
11. d to speak say that the settlement of I 
the territory directly around us is \ 
^oing forward more rapidly than in ! 
any district In the United States. The] 
•leel plant is nearing completion, and 
%■*» are informed that it will be In oper- j 
arifii within a year. Several new In- i 
dustries have been brought to Duluth 1 
and sr-me of our old-established in- 
dustries have made notable extensions. 

"The public affairs committee, on bo- ' 
balf of the club, has maintained close ; 
relations with the chamber of com- ' 
tneroe of the I'nlted States. Matters i 
submitted on referendum by that body I 
bave been considered by the committee | 
as a whole or by the executive com- | 

{[iittee. and the will of the club was 
hus recorded on each subject so sub- 
initted." 



are yet to be done* and commend them 
to the careful consideration of our 
»x;ccessors; 

"First — Carry out the usual exhibit 
at the state fair on a non-competltlve 
basis. Give study to new ways of pre- 
senting In a more impressive way the 
old fact that St. Louis county is the 
best agricultural, livestock and dairy 
county in this or any other state. 

"Second — Put on an agricultural and 
livestock exhibit in co-operation with 
the industrial exposition, if that is to 
be an annual affair, and if It Is not, 
put one on Independently, making it 
bigger and better than the one last 
year. 

"Third — Co-operate in a live, active, 
encouraging and thoughtfull.v con- 
structive way with our agricultural 
school, its advisory board, our district 
supervisor of agriculture, our agricul- 
tural agents, and the agricultural 
agents of adjoining counties. 

"Fourth — Wage a relentless cam- 
paign until up-to-date, adequate pub- 
lic market facilities are a part of our 
municipal equipment. 

"Fifth — Publish an important, up- 
to-date bulletin on "Facts Proven" 
with respect to the incomparable adap- 
tation of St. Louis and adjoining coun- 
ties for dairying. 

"Sixth — Compute the work under- 
taken bj- this committee for the es- 
tabii-shment of a credit enabling 
neighboring farmers to buy dairy cat- 
tle. 

"Seventh — There should be close re- 
lationship between this committee and 
the homecroft committee. 

"Eighth — Urge the establishment In 
Duluth In 1915 of a two months' per- 
manent summer school for teachers 
and to be in the nature of a continua- 
tion school for everybody." 

EDUCATIONAL CO-OPERATION. 



^>»t Duluth club, in endeavoring to 
have matters settled satisfactorily." 



AGRICULTURAL WORK. 

Follow Up Work Has Engaged Com- 
'inittee's Attention During Past Year. 

C. p. Cralflr. chairman of the agri- 
cultural committee of the club, made 
the following report: 

"Our activities for the year have 
been more In the nature of follow up 
y-ork, encouraging and assisting 
those agencies which we have started 
on an independent basis. 

"Briefly recounting In detail some 
Of the specific acts of this commit- 
tee, we beg to advise you that we have 
held sixteen meetings, and secured 
from St. Louis county an appropria- 
tion of $1,000 for county agent work. 
In co-operation with the homecroft 
committee we carried out an agrlcul- 

{ural and livestock exhibit In connec- 
lon with the industrial exhibition at 
the Duluth Curling club last Septem- 
ber; obtained material Improvement 
Of public market condition at the Ar- 
mory and have the promise of Mayor 
frlnce that this year the Armory will 
be cleared entirely for the use of a 
market and the establishment upon 
the old courthouse site of a hay, wood 
and general wagon sales market, to- 
gether with stabling facilities. We ar- 
ranged the usual attractive exhibit 
at the state fair and made many 
friends. The exhibit was not entered 
In a competitive way. 

"By insistent urging we. In co-oper- 
ation with this advisory committee, 
succeeded In having a short course 
held In our new school the past month. 
This we count one of our greatest 
achievements. 

"We cite a few of the things which 



Committee Helps in Organizing and 

Promoting Educational Work 

Generally. 

E. C. Wade, chairman of the com- 
mittee on educational co-operation 
makes the following report: 

"Tour committee has not accom- 
plished all it hoped to but has been 
helpful in organizing, promoting or 
stimulating educational work, or In- 
terest in It, In several quarters. We 
co-operated in promoting attendance 
of business men at the annual exhibit 
of the manual training high school 
Iflst summer. We have played an ac- 
tive part In organizing, advertising, 
securing enrollment and in some cases 
instructors for the state university 
extension work. This has been prac- 
tically the first year of this work in 
Duluth and your committee and the 
university management feel gratified 
at the number of courses organized, 
the numbers enrolled and the general 
results obtained. Already plans art» 
under way looking toward new classes 
and larger enrollment for next year. 

"Your committee also played an In- 
conspicuous though prominent part In 
the organizing of the Duluth Office 
Men's association which has met with 
srch spontaneous success from its very 
inception and which promises to be a 
stronger and helpful factor in the 
building of a bigger and better Du- 
luth. 

"Tour committee has gathered con- 
siderable Information on the work of 
the St. Paul institute, the principal of 
which. In a recent letter, recommends a 
study of the Minneapolis plan where 
all instruction is free. Our commit- 
tee has not worked out details of a 
program for Duluth sufficiently to 
make definite recommendations but 
we believe that with a splendid man- 
i^al training high school which is not 
in use evenings, with a public school 
board, superintendent and department 
hfads all anxious to see it used to a 
larger extent, and teith a sympathetic, 
aggressive community a program can 
be arrived at which will mean the 
opening of the manual training build- 
ing for night school work next fall. 

"We further recommend to our suc- 
ce.^sors* as fono\fs: 

"First, that they consider Inviting a 
representative of the National Society 
for th-* Promotion of Industrial edu- 
cation to visit Duluth and advise both 
«s to Immediate and future policy for 
the development of vocational train- 
ing In this city. 

''Se'^ond, that they «arly plan to 
get out a large attendance of busi- 
ness and professional men to the an- 
nual exhibit In the manual training 
building. 

"Third, that they continue the co- 
oi-eratlon of this club with the state 
university ettenslon department." 

GOOD ROADpEPORT. 

Much Done in Past Year and Much 
still to Be Done. 

H. J, Mullin, chairman of the com- 
mittee on good roads, made an en- 
thusiastic report, which was greeted 
by hearty applause. He said In his re- 
port that much missionary work has 
been done and a great deal of valu- 
able Information has been obtained. 
Manv roads and proposed routes were 
Investigated and hearty indorsement 
was given the proposed Farrell cut- 
off road. The report says that while 
the progress on the Duluth-St. Vin- 
cent road is very slow better work 
has been done than on any other road 
In the state started under the Elwell 
law. He says that under that law not 
a mile of Inter-county road has been 
built yet although the law has been 
in force five years. He reported on the 
appropriations made by the county 
board for the Miller trunk road and 
for the opening of the Vermilion road 
to run north from Island Lake to Bl- 
wabik. 

Mr. Mullin also said that so far as 
the Duluth-Port Arthur road Is con- 
cerned there is good progress with the 
Canadians working faster than those 
at this end. He reported unfavorably 
on the proposed .<»cenlc highway from 
Fond du Lac to Thomson because of 
the exorbitant cost that will be neces- 
sary to put it into shape. He also 
urged attention for the proposed Twin 
Cltv route, and appealed for early ac- 
tion, . 

BRIE F REP ORT. 

Municipal Committee Urges Road Im- 
provement and Passes on Coun- 
cil's Action. 

The report of the municipal com- 
mittee, Frank Crassweller, chairman, 
which follows, is brief and to the 

point: 

"Vour municipal co-operation sub- 
committee would respectfully report 
that their labors have not been very 
arduous during the past year. They 
have held six meetings, and, among 
other things, have taken up and 
urged the completion of the grouping 
plan on congress and the city gov- 
ernment by the erection of a new 
Federal building and a new city hall 
upon the grounds already reserved 
for those purposes. 

"The new water rate schedule was 
discussed and the city commission 
commended for considering a matter 
of such vital importance to the citi- 
zens and as a legislative rather than 
an administrative measure, 

"The committee also met with dele- 
gates from the West Duluth Commer- 
cial club and took up the question of 
road Improvements and subways un- 
der railroad tracks, and also met with 
the city representatives, representa- 
tives of the Duluth, Mlssabe & North- 
ern Rallwax company and of the 



HOMECROFT WORK. 

Chairman Colman Reviews Work of 
Past Year and Makes Recom- 
mendations. 

C. F. Colman. chairman of the home- 
croftlng committee, suggests that the 
Commercial club take, several impor- 
tant actions, which he describes in 
his report as follows: 

"Our work has largely been In the 
creating of interest throughout the 
city In gardening and in the canning 
of vegetables so raised for winter con- 
sumption. S. L. Potts was engaged 
during the summer months to give ad- 
vice to gardeners, stimulate interest, 
and render aid to any In need of his 
services. 

"We recommend the following: 

"That prizes, aggregating $100 be 
offered by this club within the next 
thirty days for the best display of out- 
door grown vegetables (canned ani 
fresh) and flowers, exhibited at the 
Industrial exposition next fall. That 
a portion of this prize money be of- 
fered for the best written statement 
from any person residing In Duluth 
as to what benefits they have derived 
from gardening. 

"That a plot of ground be procured 
by the new committee, and the com- 
mon vegetables planted therein, with a 
view of their ripenlhg at about the 
date of the Industrial exposition; to 
be used during the exposition, for 
the purpose of demonstrating the can- 
ning method. 

"That the city be divided into four 
or more districts; that a competent 
and enthusiastic gardener, living in 
each district, be appointed by the new- 
committee to encourage the raising of 
vegetables and flowers in his district, 
to be dl?played at the fall exposition 
in competition with the other districts 
of the city." 

IMPROVEMENTS IN HARBOR. 



Committee on Harbors and Water- 
ways Transact Most Impor- 
tant Business. 

F. B. Spelman, chairman of the com- 
mittee on harbors and waterways, re- 
ported one of the busiest years the 
committee has ever had, as follows: 

"In my report a year ago, outlining 
the different subjects to be taken up 
for discussion, was the boundary line 
between Wisconsin and Minnesota 
through the St. Louis bay. The court 
of appeals has decided that the old 
natural channel close to the Minnesota 
side Is the boundary between the two 
states. An appeal has already been 
taken to the United States supreme 
court, and we expect a decision from 
the highest authority In the land. Com- 
missioners have been appointed by the 
legislatures of Minnesota and Wiscon- 
sin to fix the boundary line. As It Is 
an Important question for taxation of 
riparian rights, we believe the supreme 
court decision will be necessary to de- 
termine the point. 

"The Lake Superior and Mississippi 
canal scheme bobs up occasionally, 
although Majors Sears and Fitch and 
Col. Potter, army engineers in charge 
of this district, have at various times 
reported unfavorably. The legislatures 
of Wisconsin artd Minnesota appointed 
commissioners to Investigate and make 
a report to their respective legisla- 
tnres at the next session. The last 
heard of it was that Attorney Sullivan 
of Stillwater, Minn., and an attorney 
of Chippewa Falls, Wis., were appoint- 
ed to prepare A case before the army 
board. We will no doubt be given an 
opportunity to be heard In opposition. 

"The improvements in our harbor to 
facilitate the handling of our large 
Increasing commerce requires the serv- 
ices of an expert in this line. The 
railroads are already complaining of 
the delay In getting into our city over 
the interstate and Northefn Pacific 
bridges, while the vessel interests 
would be seriously affected provided 
they could not have the right-of-way 
In our channels. It Is rather aheftd of 
the time to talk about a tunnel from 
Rice's to Conner's Points and do away 
with both bridges, but the time will 
soon come when this will have to be 
seriously considered. 

"We can get a large amount of 
dockage on the harbor side of Minne- 
sota Point, and for the railroad to 
reach it a tunnel will be built under 
either the Minnesota or Wisconsin en- 
try at some future time. At the next 
bession of our legislature we hope to 
obtain a lease for twenty-five years 
from the state for a city dock at Thir- 
ty-eighth avenue west. 

"The sewage disposal of our lake 
cities is a very important matter for 
us, particularly at the West end, which 
is being built up very fast. The only 
outlet Is in our river and harbor. A 
large number of cities in the country 
are successfully using a filtering sys- 
tem, and plans should be determined 
at once for the West end. 

"The International joint commission 
has employed experts to investigate 
the pollution of our (Jreat Lakes, and 
It will not be long before a full report 
will be made on this subject, and the 
government may compel the cities to 
filter the sewage. Milwaukee. Wis., 
and Rochester, N. T., are already In- 
stalling filter systems, and the time has 
come for Duluth to set the example to 
other cities on Lake Superior. 

"A report was made by this commit- 
tee In the matter of the application of 
the Michigan Northern Power company 
for the construction of compensating 
works at Sault Ste. Marie. This 
brought up the question as to th« 
maximum level for Lake Superior. 
The mean level of the lake for the 
last forty years is •02.27 feet above 
mean tide at New York, and all the 
improvements in our harbor have been 
adjusted accordingly. This application 
Is to be passed on by the international 
joint commission, whose decision is 
final, A meeting was held in Detroit, 
Mich., last month. A, H. Comstock rep- 
resented this club, and D. A. Reed, 
superintendent of the water and light 
department, the city. At said meeting 
a maximum limit of •04.1 was sug- 
gested. This was opposed by our rep- 
resentatives with others, for the reason 
that great damage w^ould result at this 
end of the lake, but as the opposition 
was not prepared to present expert 
testimony as against the testimony of 
the experts for the power company, a 
continuance was granted to April 7, 
at Washlngtln, D, C, 

"Since the Detroit meeting a tenta- 
tive draft of the regulations control- 
ling the operations of the compensat- 
ing works was received, which fixes the 
maximum limit at 803.€. This, we be- 
lieve, is too high, and at times during 
serious easterly storms will cause 
great damage to our Improvements 
and to Minnesota Point. The commit- 
tee on harbors and waterways has 
gone on record as recommending that 
not higher than 602. 7& be fixed in the 
regulations." 

CITY WELL ADVERTISED. 

Publicity Committee Puts in Active 
and Fruitful Year. 

That Duluth has been given some of 
the best publicity work of Its history, 
and that fruit has resulted, Is shown 
In the report made by Alfred Hanchett. 
chairman of the publicity committee, 
which follows in part: 

"During the past year your publicity 



committee has carried on three kinds 
of work: Press bureau work, .whlcii 
consists of the writing and getting 
published without charge and for the 
news value, of newspaper, magazine 
and trade paper articles; an informa- 
tion bureau, constructed and managed 
under the direction of the publicity 
committee at the corner of Fifth ave- 
nue west and Superior street; the 
writing, designing and supervising of 
publications, advertising Duluth and 
the Duluth Commercial club. 

"By far the most important accom- 
plishment of your committee during 
the past year has been the press bu- 
reau work. Many thousand dollars' 
worth of free advertising has been 
gained for Duluth. Through such press 
bureau work, many publicity articles, 
a number of them illustrated in im- 
portant national magazines and other 
periodicals, have told Duluth's story. 
Your entire committee has worked 
with enthusiasm and industry on the 
preparation and distribution of this 
press bureati copy, but the great pre- 
ponderance of this work has been done 
by the club's expert publicity man, Mr. 
McCarthy, His thorough and success- 
ful newspaper experience has given 
him the press agent's most needed 
qualification — a knowledge of what 
will and what wtu not get over the 
desk of the city editor. 

"Your committee believes that the 
value of being organized to get press 
bureau publicity has been demonstrat- 
ed, and now earnestly points out the 
necessity of taking one more step dur- 
ing the coming year to put Duluth's 
publicity, as conducted by the Com- 
mercial club, on the same substantial 
and permanent basis as you have put 
other departments. We recommend 
most heartily that you gentlemen 
should treat the publicity arrange- 
ment for Duluth with the same con- 
sistency and foresight that you would 
treat such publlcfty arrangement for 
your own private enterprises. There- 
fore It Is necessary, in the opinion of 
your committee, that a publicity cam- 
paign be at once outlined for the next 
four years. 

"Without going into the details of 
what such campaign should be, your 
committee believes that Duluth's ad- 
vertising in Northwestern papers to 
her Northwestern sister communities 
should be carried on seadlly. We be- 
lieve that Duluth is now a candidate 
for election as metropolis for the 
Northwest. We all knoW there are 
other candidates, but Duluth has a 
reputation, a prestige. Important qual- 
ities of strength and possibilities for 
the future that she should not 'hide un- 
der a bushel,' They should be taken 
out and given publicity before the 
communities of the Northwest, that 
hold power to make Duluth their me- 
tropolis," 

does"goodwork. 

Committee on Neighborhood Clubs 
Finds Closer Feeling Is Created. 

One of the most interesting and- sig- 
nificant reports made last night wa* 
that of Bentley P. Neff, chairman of 

the neighborhood clubs committee. It 
follows: 

"Your committee has endeavored to 
carry out the spirit of its Ipstructlons 
at the time of Its inauguration and 
has discharged its duty io the best of 
its ability. 

"Its ambition has been to carry to 
the various neighborhood clubs of the 
city that spirit of friendly interest and 
goodwill, the ineeption of which was 
In the public affair* committee. 

"Several meetings of representatives 
of the various neighborhood clubs were 
held at the Commercial club, and your 
committee visited several of the clubs 
on their regular meeting night. Time 
would not permit of our visiting the 
entire list but through correspondence 
and verbal assurance they khew they 
could call upon us for any assistance 
and that we were theirs to commano 
when needed. 

"Duluth today is one great united 
body and the splendid work done by 
the neighborhood clubs In promoting 
the interests of their various localities, 
together with the backing they have 
given the larger organization In alT 
efforts for the Welfare of Duluth, has 
made this forward, aggressive move- 
ment a solid unit for greater accom- 
plishment. 

"Never before have the people of thi* 
city been so nearly in accord with the 
golden rule, and never before have so 
many men and Women been willing to 
labor for the common good. This is 
the spirit of co-operation (engendered 
by the excellent work done by the 
many different civic clubs of the city) 
that your connnlttee has tried to em- 
phasize, and thoush It ma.v not solva 
all the problems of the city, it will 
"sweeten the waters of human life and 
pluck many a tbora from the pathway 
of mankind." 



WORK OF SMOKE PREVENTION. 



Committee Meets With Encourage- 
ment and Offers of Co-operation. 

Chairman J. B.. Crane of the smoke 
prevention committee made a very in- 
teresting report of efforts made dur- 
ing the past yekj'loward stopping the 
smoke nuisance. It was as follows: 

"The smoke prevention committee 
made a preliminary report on smoke 
conditions in the city and sent this to 
all the organizations in Duluth, asking 
for suggestions and their co-operation. 
Later, with a committee appointed by 
the local association of stationary en- 
gineers, the committee made a thotr 
ough investigation of methods used 
in handling the smoke nuisance in 
other cities, and a final report on this 
proposition with recommendations was 
made to the commissioners of the city 
of Duluth. 

"The commissioners accepted one of 
the recommendations, namely, that 
some local man be appointed and this 
man be sent to Chicago or some other 
city, to become acquainted with their 
methods of handling this problem. J. 
W. Schneider was appointed to this 
work and after spending four weeks 
in Chicago, has been working on this 
problem for the past two months. 

"He appears to be going at the prop- 
osition in a workmanlike manner and 
has drafted a suitable ordinance and 
Is making daily observations of chim- 
neys which are not complying with 
this ordinance, and sending letters to 
such violators as he finds. 

"Most of the railroads entering Du- 
luth had already appointed smoke In- 
spectors for their systems and these 
men had started in working In Duluth 
before the city appointed their man." 



"BOOSTINGLY YOURS." 

Frank X. Gravel Ttlls of Trade Ex- 
tension W,prk of Past Year. . 

The chairman of the trade extension 
committee, Frank X. Gravel, made an 
enthusiastic report on the work of the 

committee as follows, signing himself 
"boostingly j'ours": 

"Our rrst work was the organizing 
of a trade excursion, which lasted sev- 
en days, June 1 to 8, 1913, covering 
that part of North Dakota north of the 
main line of the Oreat Northern rail- 
road, from the Minnesota boundary and 
west to MInot. In our lineup of sixtjr 
men on this tflp Were all classes of 
business and Irt-ofepslonal men. We 
made 148 towns, and on a conservative 
estimate our boosters met about 45,000 
North Dakota f>eop!e, and wo are 
pleased to state that our boosters were 
not at all backward In spreading the 
gospel of "A Gfeattr Duluth" at each 



stop, and to all of those they came In 
contact with. This trip covered 2,300 
miles, 

"Our committee also lined up over 
100 boosters, who had been out on dif- 
ferent trade extension trips to take 
part in a parade for the "Lark o" the 
Lake" entertainment on the evening 
of Saturday, July 2«, 1913; also for the 
parade Inaugurating the industrial and 
agricultural exposition on Monday 
evening, Sept. 2, 1913. 

"Wo also arranged for a special 
train over the D., M. & N, to Hibblng 
for Duluth day at St, Louis county 
fair, Aug, 30, 1913, We judge the num- 
ber attending by our special train, 
regular trains and by automobiles 
amounted to 700. 

"Our committee also got together a 
party of twenty business men to at- 
tend a banquet at Bralnerd, Minn,, as 
guests of the Bralnerd Commercial 
club on Nov. 25, 

"The chairman «f our pommlttee vis- 
ited several county fairs during Au- 
gust, September and October, 1913, and 
has twice been the guest of the Bau- 
dette board of trade, as the repre- 
sentative of the Duluth Commercial 
club. 

"We believe that trade extension or 
booster trips are beneficial to Duluth's 
business interests, and recommend 
their continuance during the coming 
spring or summer. One more six-day 
trip would cover the remaining tribu- 
tary towns not already visited up to 
this time. 

"Our committee is pleased in re- 
porting that we were successful in 
financing all our trips without draw- 
ing on any reserve of the Duluth Com- 
mercial club in any way, and we re- 
port a balance on hand of $12,46 and 
no outstanding bills against our com- 
mittee," 



NO CHANGE IN 
CLUrS^NAME 

Many Favor It But Vpte 

Falls Short of 

Majority. 



DR. TUO HrS R EPORT. 

Health Committee Makes Recom- 
mendations to the Commercial Club. 

Dr. E. L. Tuohy, chairman of the 
committee on public health, in his re- 
port last night, which is in part as 

follows, makes several recommenda- 
tions: 

"Briefly summarized, our work may 
be divided as follows, as well as our 
recommendations : 

"First — We have stood for the devel- 
opment of a department of public 
health, headed by a health officer, de- 
voting his entire time to the work. 

"Second — We have taken the stand 
relative to garbage collection, that 
this is a sanitary problem akin to 
the cleaning of streets, and the abate- 
ment of nuisances, and not in a vital 
sense, a health problem. The city 
should undoubtely control all the gar- 
bage wagons much as they do the 
mechanical street sweeper. 

"Third — Your committee has taken 
a stand relative to obnoxious medical 
advertisements as well as other 
frauduleiTt advertising, in the newspa- 
pers, 

"Fourth — A sub-commlttee has been 
formed to confer with a committee of 
the Women's council regarding the 
steps to be taken to establish a city 
and county hospital. This meritorious 
project is receiving consideration at 
the present time, and at the coming 
session of the legislature, the proper 
enabling legislation will be secured." 

PARKS AND PLAYGROUNDS. 



Five New Directors Elected; 
Retiring President Pre- 
sents His Report. 



Soda Relieves 
Indigestion or 
Acid Stomach 



^ 4 



The annual meeting of the Duluth 
Commercial club was held last eve- 
ning at the clubrooms, jointly with 
that of the public affairs committee, 
the club taking the meeting after the 
public affairs committee had finished 
its business. 

Aside from the announcement of the 
tellers of the result of the annual elec- 
tion, the chief business before the 
meeting was the proposition to change 
the name of the organization from 
"Duluth Commercial club" to "Duluth 
Association of Commerce," This at- 
tempt was defeated owing to the fact 
that the by-laws of the club require 
that a majority of the members of the 
club cast their votes in such a case 
and two-thirds of such a majority fa- 
vor It, 

The number present, together with 
the proxies -sent in last night, fell 
.«short of the required number, and al- 
though a large majority of those vot- 
ing were in favor of the change, the 
attempt was declared lest, A num- 
ber of other changes were made in 
the by-laws, all of them being simply 



Bishop McGolrick Reports on Work 
Dene By His Committee. 

Bishop McGolrick, chairman of the 
committee on parks and playgrounds, 

reported in part as follows: 

"Our commissioners have taken due 
precaution for the coming spring as to 
the care and development of public 
parks and squares. The planting of 
trees and native shrubs goes on as 
usual, and those who have a special 
interest in the beautifying of the city 
are furthered in that direction by the 
well-established nurseries now in good 
working order. •» 

"The opportunity of boulevarding 
Fourth street from Sixth avenue east 
to the normal school should be prompt- 
l.v discussed and put into operation. It 
seldom happens within the city limits 
that the streets are found wide enough 
to admit of a beauty spot lengthened 
out several blocks and planted with 
shrubs and flowers. We have at least 
one such strip of street, and we should 
utilize it. 

"As a metnber of the Humane society 
I would point out the utility of an 
addition to our drinking fountains, of 
a lower basin for the use of dogs. The 
addition would not cost much and 
would be in the right direction." 



URGES HOME TRADING. 

Chairman of Retail Co-operation 
Committee Makes Plea to Club. 

George A. Gray, chairman of the re- 
tall co-operation committee, praises 
Duluth stores in general and asks lo- 
cal support, in his annual report, 
which is, in part, as follows: 

"Owing to the fact that the retail 
stores of Duluth are working through 
their own organization, there have 
been comparatively few meetings of 
our committees during the past year. 
Nevertheless the committee has not 
been asleep or unmindful of its du- 
ties. 

"I want to ask the support of every 
member of the club for the retail 
stores of our city, I could say much 
here regarding the advantages to our 
city and to our stores if every mem- 
ber of the club would himself patron- 
lee the stores of Duluth and urge his 
family and friends to do so, but I will 
spare you. Tou know as well as I 
that thete are very many excellent 
stores in Duluth, each one carrying 
large assortments of the best mer- 
chandise that money and brains can 
bring together. I honestly believe that 
there is hardly a city in the United 
States having the same volume of re- 
tail business where there are so many 
first-class stores as there are here. 
Personally, I have no fault to find. I 
do not ask you to trade at our store, 
but I do ask you to trade at some Du- 
luth store, and in that way do much 
to build up Duluth in every way." 

TRAFFJCli/iATTERS. 

Commission Reports on Achieve- 
ments of Past Year in Rates. 

The traffic commission reported on 
business done for the past year, the 
report being made by C. F, Rowe. vice 
chairman of the commission in the 
absence of Chairman Julius H. Barnes. 
The commission expresses the belief 
that permanent relief has been given 
Dvluth in view of the ruling of the 
interstate commerce commission has 
said: 

"We therefore find that any scale of 
rail and lake rates to Duluth in excess 
of the rail and lake rates to Chicago 
from trunk line territory is, and for 
the future will be. unduly discrimina- 
tory against Duluth and thertKore un- 
lawful." 

In reciting the accomplishments of 
the year the commission's report deals 
with the establishment of a throturh 
passenger service from Duluth to Pa- 
cific coast points; the arrangement 
made to have through transcontinental 
tickets issued routing passengers via 
Duluth with stopover privileges; the 
publication of tariff by certain roads 
making changes In freight rates to 
points In Wisconsin which are ad- 
vantageous to Duluth manufacturers 
and jobbers; changes in rate basis to 
points in Kansas; the securing of bet- 
ter rates on heating apparatus, horse 
shoes and toe calks from Duluth to 
Chicago: the adjustment of rates on 
cotton linters from Texas points to 
Duluth: better rates on log loading 
and hoisting machinery from Duluth to 
points in Louisiana. Texas, Arkansas 
and Oklahoma; the securing of refrig- 
erating equipment on lake boats for 
the shipping of dairy products; the 
victory In the famous lake and rail 
case, and that of th« Duluth grain 
rat« c•>^ 




Few Stomach sulterers know that 
Indigestion, Sourness and Gases are 
not caused by a lack of digestive 
Juices, but result always from acidity, 
meaning there is an excess of hydro- 
chloric acid In the stomach, which re- 
tards digestion and promotes food fer- 
mentation. Everything eaten sours in 
the stomach like garbage sours in 
a can, forming acrid fluids and gases 
which inflate the stomach like a toy 
balloon. Then we get a heavy, lumpy 
feeling in the chest, we belch gas and 
eructate food or have heartburn, 
water-brash, bloating and nausea, 

A well-known authority states that 
a 10-grain Sodagen tablet taken any 
time, followed by a tumbler of water 
Instantly neutralizes these stomach 
acids; stops fermentation, absorbs the 
gases and sweetens the entire diges- 
tive tract. He says any pharmacist 
can supply a package of 10-grain So- 
dagen tablets as they are constantly 
prescribed for stomach acidity because 
of their harmlessness to the digestive 
organs, being composed of Soda, Cal- 
cium Carbonate and Magnesia U. S. P. 



report. Regarding the matter of mem- 
bership, he said: 

"The membership ledger on April 1, 
1913, showed 889 resident members and 
156 non-resident members. During the 
year w-e have taken in 168 resident 
members and thirty-one non-resident 
members, making a total of 199, We 
have lost by death, 6; on account of 
removal, 28; resignations. 29; and sus- 
penslon.s, 43; or a total of 106, leaving 
the membership March 31, 1914, 983 
resident members and 155 non-resi- 
dent members, or a total membership of 
1,1338. This is the largest niember.^hip 
the club has had since its existence," 

Further, he spoke of the develop- 
ment of agricultural work and the as- 
sistance given not only the surround- 
ing country but the whole of Northern 
Minnesota in development; commended 
the very effective publicity work done; 
commented favorable on the advertis- 
ing buyers' committee, showing that 
over $30,000 has been saved during the 
past year; and suggested a similar 
committee to pass on requests for sub- 
scriptions and sort out the worthy 
from the unworthy. 



R. B. KNOX, 
Retiring President of Duluth Com- 
mercial Club. 



In the way of codifying them, as th'ey 
have been amended from time to time 
until they have become patchwork. 
The amendment of last evening 
straightens this out. 

The directors elected at the annual 
election which took place yesterday, as 
announced at the meeting last night, 
are. they being elected to serve two 
years: 

David Williams. J. B, Crane, J. R. 
McGlffert, D. B. McDonald and John A. 
Stephenson. 

The directors who hold over for an- 
other year are A. H, Crassweller. A. 
M, McDougall, J. W. Lyder, Jr., Hans 
B, Haroldson and Watson S, Moore. 

The retiring directors are R. B. 
Knox, George A. French, J. O, Lenning, 
H, R. Armstrong and George A. Sher- 
wood. 

The directors will hold a meeting 
next week at which time they will 
elect a president and other officers. 
Appreciate Barnes* Work. 

When the club took the meeting 
ovet. President R. B, Knox introduced 
W. A. McGonagle, who. in a brief ad- 
dress, declared that as good as work 
of past committees and officers have 
been the year Just ending show^s that 
during 1913 the most efficient and 
fruitful work of the club has been ac- 
complished. He declared that it is now 
assured that Duluth has arrived and 
that no more worrying about what 
may be will be necessary, Mr. Mc- 
Gonagle applauded the work of Chair- 
man Julius H. Barnes of the pub- 
lic affairs committee in behalf of the 
city, and suggested that, in appre- 
ciation of it, the members present 
should give him thanks by a standing 
vote. The result was spontaneous, 
every man getting to his feet withoxit 
further formality and applauding the 
chairman to the echo. 

President Knox then gave his an- 
nual report, which was, in part, as 
follows: 

"The work of the club is done by 
men whose services we could not buy 
at any price, but who give unstinting- 
ly of their time in order that this or- 
ganization may be a power for good 
in this city. I draw your attention to 
the work of the public affairs commit- 
tee as shown in the reports of its vari- 
ous sub-committees as made tonight, 

"The traffic branch of that commit- 
tee has devoted years of earnest hard 
work to the task of having Duluth's 
natural position as a shipping point 
recognized by the common carriers of 
thi^ country, and success has crowned 
its efforts. No greater boon has come 
to the business interests of Duluth 
since its incorporation as a municipal- 
ity than the readjustment of freight 
rates brought about by this traffic 
bureau and the self sacrificing men 
who have worked for and with it to 
accomplish this great result. If I were 
to attempt to draw your attention to 
the special i»rork of these subcommit- 
tees I would need to mention every 
one, and you have heard tonight Just 
what each has done. 

''This club is doing a really marvelous 
work in Duluth and the surrounding 
country, and to carry it on to even 
greater success than heretofore we 
must have money. This is your work 
and, whether a member of the club or 
not, every business man in Duluth 
should subscribe as large an amount as 
is possible to the public affairs com- 
mittee fund. It is spent wisely and 
every dollar so far used in the work of 
that committee lias brought to our city 
a return of many times the original in- 
vestment. Look on it as an invest- 
ment only aind the certain profit to 
come from it should Justify every one 
of you in urging upon all of your bus- 
iness friends and associates the wis- 
dom of investing largely in this work. 
We need and could make the best sort 
of use for your Immediate and certain 
profit of J60.000 a year. Get it for us, 

"The secretary of the club and the 
secretary of the traffic bureau earn 
and should receive larger salaries. We 

must pay the market price for men 

if we don't someone else will, and men 
such as these two are hard to get. 
Neither one has any Idea that I am to 
say anything about this tonight. I be- 
lieve that it would be money well spent 
to Increase their salaries materially. 
You will never get two more devoted, 
able and energetic men no matter what 
you pay. The value of their services 
cannot be measured in dollars and 
cents." 

Secretary** Rep«vt. 

Secretary H. V. Eva then made hl« 



STREET IMPROVEMENTS. 

Committee Reports a Busy Year With 
' Some Good Results. 

The committee on street improve- 
ments, of which H, J. Atwood is chair- 
man, held ten meetings and "did 
things," The report follows in part: 

"The committee held ten meetings, 
but that is not a fair indication of the 
time and effort given to the work. 
Numerous inspection trips were made; 
members of the committee devoted a 
great deal of time to the study of 
street improvement methods in this 
and other cities, and took a keen and 
constant interest in the work being 
done by the division of public works, 

"The commissioner of public works 
In Duluth has a herculean ta.sk. Es- 
pecially during the last j'ear his posi- 
tion was difficult, as the old adminis- 
tration left to the commission a heri- 
tage of a street improvement fund 
obligated to the last penny. The year's 
work was laid out before the commis- 
sion took over the government and 
there was little opportunity for dis- 
cretion In the program. 

"Your committee offered some criti- 
cism on the methods of inspection dur- 
ing the season. We feel that the city's 
inspection service was not properly 
organized, nor the inspectors properly 
instructed. We feel that there has 
been too great a disposition on the 
part of the city engineer and the com- 
mirsionor of public works to allow 
deviation from specifications. We be- 
lieve that when specifications are 
drawn, and bids received on them, 
they should be adhered to. Mistakes 
might result from that method, but we 
do not believe the mistakes would be 
as serious or productive of as great 
harm to the city generally as the prac- 
tice of allowing modifications Irr speci- 
fications after the contract Las been 
let. 

"Our efforts all through the season 
have been along the line of construc- 
tive criticism. We find that our atti- 
tude on many subjects is confirmed by 
the report of Prof. L. S. Smith of the 
University of Wisconsin after a visit 
to Duluth and an examination of speci- 
fications, 

"People who show a disposition to 
resent the slow progress of street Im- 
provement work in Duluth should re- 
member that the city is working with- 
in limitations. The street intersection 
provision of the charter limits the city 
to a certain amount of work each year, 
and the commissioner of public works 
must use his best judgment as to the 
work which should be given preced- 
ence. The commissioner is sincerely- 
endeavoring to do what is best for the 
city as a whole. Last year he had no 
discretion as to what work should be 
done; this year he must disappoint 
many people on account of the strin- 
gency in the funds for street improve- 
ment purposes. 

"Your committee recommends that a 
similar committee be named as a part 
of the public affairs committee for the 
next year and that this work be con- 
tinued. This committee has issued a 
card on which reports of street condi- 
tions may be made. We urge citizens 
to use these cards that the committee 
may be informed of work it should 
do." 



WATCH FUL W AITING. 

State and County Committee Chair- 
man Says Committee Has Adopted 
National Policy. 

John H, Hearding, chairman of tha 
stata and county committee, reports 
the year's work in part as follows: 

"With good roads, legislation and 
taxation referred to other committees, 
your committee on state and county 
co-operation has been unable to dis- 
cover many very important subjects 
demanding its attention. Accordingly, 
only a few meetings have been held, 
and the committee lias emulated our 
national administration in a policy of 
watchful waiting." 

• 

WIlaoB Indomed. 

Raleigh, N. C. April 9. — Resolutions 
urging a state-wide primary law for 
state, national and other officers and 
indorsing the administration of Presi- 
dent Wilson were adopted at a mass 
meeting here last night, which was 
featured with addresses by Secretary 
Daniels of the navy department. Sen- 
ator Pomerene of Ohio and Governor 
Craig, all of whom spoke on progres- 
sive Democracy. 



D. D. D. 

Prescription 

*_for 15 year* the standard »kin rem- 
edy—a liquid used externally— ins tani 
relief from all kinds of itch. 

D. D. D. Soap 

the mildest of cleansers — keeps the 
skin always clean and heakhT. 

William A. Abbett, druggist. 201 
West Superior street. 101 West Fourtk 
street. 9t2 Kast iiscoBd strsst. 



.'V 



liMHV 




Thursday, 



THE DULUTH HERALD 



April 9, 1C14. 



U 



-»■ 




Cbi$ Oleck's Sunday School Cmon 

ffUTTWN rOR Tl« NKAALO lY M^ J. »• IC*Tl<»Y. A. ^ 



SL.NUAl SCHOOL LESi^OXi APRIL 12. 

I,ak« xxiv, 13-35: The Journey to Km- 
maaii. 



CO>XECXIOX. ' 

W« go forward in th*' story of Christ 
In order to get a lesson for the Eas- 
ter day. It is not about the resurreo- 
tlon Itself but about one of the mant- 
fesiatlons of tho risen Christ the very 
day He arose. ThU incident is re- 
ported only by Luke. 



THE LESSOX. 

I. 
Th« I.OS4 Faith of the Dinelyles, l.t-24. 

"And behold, two of thorn were go- 
ing that very day to a village named 
Enimaua, vihi>.h was threescore fur- 
longs from Jerusialera. And they com- 
muned with each other of all these 
things which had happened. And it 
came to pass, while they communed 
and questioned together, that Jesus 
Hiinself drew near, and went with 
thtm. But their eyes were holden that 
they sh.nild not know Him. And He 
said unto them. What communications 
art- these that ye have one with an- 
other, as ye walk? And they stood 
still, looking sad. And one of them, 
named Cleopas. answering said unto 
Him. Dost thou alone sojourn in .leru- 
£ialem and not know the things which 
are c«»nie to pass there in these days'." 
And He said unto them. What things? 
And they said unto Him, The thinss 
concerning Jesus the N'azarene. who 
was a phophet mighty In deed and 
word before tJod and all the people: 
and bow the chief priests and our rul- 
ers delivered Him up to be condemned 
to death, and crucitied Him. But we 
hoped that It was He who should re- 
deem Israel. Yea and besides all this. 
It is now the third day since these 
thintrs came to pass. Moreover certain 
women of our company amazed us, 
having been early at the tomb; and 
when they found not His body, they 
came, saying, that they had also seen 
a vision of angels, who said that He 
was alive. And certain of them that 
were with us went to the tomb, and 
found It even so as the women had 
said; but Him they saw not." 

1. DESPAIRING. — These two were 
not of the twelve, but of the great 
multiltide who had followed the Mas- 
ter. Their home was only sixty fur- 
li>ng3. or seven and a half miles, from 
.ftrrusalem and they gave up hope oV 
i^eeing Him again and went on back 
home. Truth is. there was nothins; 
else to do. If they had only under- 
stood the Scriptures better! But they 
didn't. They could hardly be blamed 
either. They had waited around all 
day for some word and then quit. As 
they told Jesus Himself "this is now 
the third day," which indicated that 
they had heard what He had said 
«bout the third day, arid as nothing 
took place they gave up. But they 
thought nnno the less of Jesus. 

2. COMML'XIXG. — They held on to 
each other. That wa.'? the saving clause. 
Moreover they talked to each other 
about It, which showed that He had 
possession of their whole beings. He 
was planted in their hearts. They 
"questioned together" but didn't que.«- 
tion His goodness. Though their 
thoughts were on Him they didn't reg- 
ocniie Him when He made one of their 
company, bec.-\use they were so ab- 
sorbed in their grief and He was so 
changed that'll was easy for Him to 
prevent recognition till the right mo- 
ment. 

They not only communed with each 
other In talk and mutual sympathy 
but with this gentle, benignant 
straneer who joined them and asked 
two question.-". "Why are ye sad?" "You 
must be the only person living In 
Jerusalem or near there who ha.« not 
heard of it." "Of what?" Then theif 
plaint follows. Notice the state of 
mind that they disclose — unlmp.-^lred 
lonfldence in the character and works 
of Jesus the orophet; wonder and con- 
fusion at the "strange things" that 
had happt-ned; worldly view of the 
Mes.-lah as one who should "redeem 
I-;rael," meanine "from Roman bond- 
age;" utter inability to see that the 
emoty tomb r- ported by the women 
was fulfillment of the words of 
prophets and of His own words. Their 
cipltal mistake was that they didn't 
wait for further light from the empty 
tomb. But He Is coming to their aid. 
II. 
Their Faith Recovered. 25-31. 

"And He said unto tht-m, O foolish 
men. and slow of heart to believe 
In all that the prophets have 
spoken: Behooved it not the Christ 
to suffer these things, and to enter 
Into His glory? And beginning from 
Moses and from all the prophets. He 
Interpreted to them in all the scrip- 
tures the things concerning Himself. 
And they drew nigh unto the village, 
whither they were going; and He made 
B3 though He would go further. And 
they con.<;trained Him, saying, abide 
with us; for It is toward evening, and 



the day Is now far spent. And He 
went in to abide with them. And It 
came to pass, when He had sat down 
with them to meat. He took the bread 
and blessed; and breaking It He gavw 
to them. And their eyes were opened, 
and they knew him; and He vanished 
out of their sight." 

We note Stven steps by which the 
Master led them out of their gloom of 
doubt Into the joy of faith. 

First, He got them to express them- 
selves, as we have seen, and that did 
them good. To put our doubts into 
words Is often to see their Inslgnlfl- 
canee and to rise above them. He 
drew them out in such a tactful way 
that they knew they were talking with 
a friend. 

Second. He rebuked them for their 
misconception of their own Messiah — 
foolish ones and slow of heart to be- 
lieve not only what their own Scrlp- 
ture.s. but what that same Jesus had 
taught them. Two arguments are In 
that rebuke— that the Old Testament 
had taught both His death and resur- 
rection, and that there was on Him, 
holy as He was. an obligation to do 
this. Jt was necessary In order to the 
expiation of their sins that an offering 
be made and, once He took up the 
work of the Messiah and entered Into 
human life with all Its relationships. 
He was under obligations to keep His 
word and to serve those with whom 
He was bound by ligaments of life. It's 
a wonderful truth He confesses. 

Third, He Instructs them, carefully 
quoting the passages they were prob- 
ably familiar with. That put rock 
under their feet. 

Fourth. He excited their desire for 
His further help when they reached 
their destination, for He would surely 
have gone on If they had not had 
enough Interest to request Him to go 
in with them. 

Fifth, He made a very subtle and 
powerful appeal to their memory. They 
have their faith In Him restored by 
this time and are to be rewarded by 
an actual sight of Him. In the giving 
of thanks He appears for the first 
time as His old self, as they had often 
seen Him — same looks, same tones of 
voice, same words of thanksgiving, 
and perhaps the prints of the nails In 
His hands. 

Sixth, at the same time an opening 
of their eyes by means of this revela- 
tion of His old self and by an inner 
illumination which He gave them, a 
thing He knows how to do to this day. 

Seventh. His sudden departure was 
a confirmation of It all. In an ordin- 
ary guest that sudden withdrawal 
without a word would have been gross 
discourtesy. Only one person could 
do that without giving offense. It 
surely was Jesus. 

ITT. 
Their MinUtry to the Other*. .32-35. 

"And they said one to another. Was 



not our heart burning within us, while 
He spake to us In the way, while He 
opened to us the scriptures? And they 
rose up that very hour, and returned 
to Jerusalem, and found the eleven 
gathered together, and them that were 
with them, saying. The Lord Is risen 
Indeed, and hath appeared to Simon. 
And they rehearsed the things that 
happened In the way, and how He was 
known of them In the breaking of the 
bread." 

1. JOT. — Their joy was very great 
and It had several enduring elements 
In It — the recovery of something lost, 
the answer to elemental and conscious 
and cultivated needs In finding Jesus 
as their own forever; the completeness 
of their confidence. Intelligent, har- 
monious with their scriptures, con- 
firmed by sight of Him, a new vision 
of the spiritual rather than worldly 
character of the Messiah. They traced 
their joy back to His talk and the 
scriptures. 

2. MESSAGE. — It was the normal 
Christian Impulse to go right to the 
others with the news they had in or- 
der to relieve them as well as relieve 
their own pent-up fellngs. Others had 
seen Him by this time and all were 
telling what they knew and were anx- 
ious to know more. There was a dis- 
tinct need for what these two could 
tell and the telling of it kept them 
from ever relapsing into doubt. 



WHAT THE IWASTKRS S.VY. 

Christ's risen body was a spiritual 
bodv; and yet it was endowed with 
Immanent physical potentialities, be- 
ing capable of Investing Itself 'with 
phvsical aspects and qualities. And 
this Is Just one of the differences be- 
tween what St. Paul, in his great ar- 
gument for the resurrection, calls the 
natural body and the spiritual body. 
If the risen Lord ate. It was not be- 
cause He yielded to a physiological 
nec*ssity; it was because, as in the 
case of the three angelic visitors to 
Abraham by the oaks of Mamre, He 
chose to exercise an imminent poten- 
tiality. — Boardman. 

The Master, In whom these two dis- 
ciples had trusted for Israel's redemp- 
tion, had made provision for that re- 
demption by His death and resurrec- 
tion, and even then was alive and walk- 
ing by their side. Thus often in our 
experience when we have been most 
down-hearted we have afterward found 
that the Lord was preparing to spring 
upon us some sweet surprise. — Henson. 

PERTIXEXT dl'ESTlOXS. 

1. Has Jesus any difficulty in get- 
ting vour attention? 

2. How have you taken His relMikes^ 

3. On what conditions may you have 
His continued presence? 

4. What good will It do to tell oth- 
ers what you have learned about Him? 



TO EDUCA TE CRIPP LED CHILD 

State Public School Is Expected to Accept Fern Dud- 
ley, Aged 1 0, Despite Her Deformity. 



Although 10-year-old Fern Dudley i 
will hobble through life as a cripple, 
she will not be denied the advantages 
' of an education. 

Fern is the oldest of a family of 

, five children who were turned over 

; to the poor commission last January 

I by a mother, who declared that pov- 

! ertv had forced her to give them up. 

! On Jan. 8, Mary Dudley, aged 30, 

; mother of five, walked Into the office 

of Clerk Charles Shogran of the poor 

commission and announced that she 

had four children to give away. 

I Mrs. Dudley carried one of the can- 

; didates for adoption in her arms. The 

\ other three trudged along. Fern, a 

little crippled girl, with whom the 

■ mother did not wish to part, hobbled 

; In with the rest. 

Deported Froai Canada. 
The entire family had been deported 
from Canada and were stranded in Du- 
luth without either money or friends. 
They had been sent out of Canada 
because they were likely to become 



public charges there. John Dudley, 
father of the children, had deserted 
them while they were living at Maple 
Creek, Sask. 

The clerk of the poor commission 
had the children cared for temporarily 
at the county home for dependent 
children conducted by Mrs. Margaret 
Finkle at 16 West Fifth street. In 
JuvenUe court soon afterwards they 
were made wards of the state. 

Myrtle, aged 5. and W^lUard, 3, who 
were made wards of the state, were 
placed in Duluth homes and the other 
two. John, a bright-eyed lad of 10, 
whose only weakness is that he is 
terribly addicted to stuttering, and 
Richard, aged 1, were taken to the 
state public school at Owatonna dur- 
ing the latter part of January. 

The mother and the oldest daugh- 
ter Fern shortly afterward went to 
the range, where Mrs. Dudley sought 
work to support herself and child. A 




MRS. 6EIDEL 
TELLS WOMEN 

How Lydia E. Pinkham's Veg- 
etable Compound Kept Her 
in Health for 14 Years. 



Doctor 

H ELPS 

By Donald McCaskey, M, D.^ 

Utmbv o( Staff. General Hospital. Lancaster. Pa»: Fallow mt th%, 
H»w Tork Academy ot M«4ielnjl 





f RtSHLY BAKED BREAD SHOULD BE ALLOWED TO 

COOL BEEORE EATEN. 




Shippensburg, Pa.—" It was several 
years ago that I started taking Lydia E. 
Pinkham's Vegeta- 
ble Compound. I 
then suffered terri- 
J bly every month. My 
husband bought me 
a bottle of it and it 
helped me right 
away. Then after 
my second child was 
bom I had a female 
trouble very badly 
and I used Lydia E. 
Pinkham's Vegeta- 
ble Compound and In a short time was 
cured and have been in excellent health 
since. I always praise the Compound 
whenever I have an opportunity as I 
know it helped me and will help others. 
Lately I have given the Compound to 
my daughter and I wish all suffering 
women would take it and be convinced 
of its worth."— Mrs. James A. Beidbl, 
113 N. Penn Street, Shippensburg, Pa. 

Lydia E. Pinkham's Vegetable Com- 
pound, made from native roots and herbs, 
contains no narcotic or harmful drugs, 
and to-day holds the record of being tJia 
most successful remedy for femala ills 
we know of, and thousands of voluntary 
testimonials on file in the Pinkham 
laboratory at Lynn, Mass., seem to 
prove this fact. 

If you have the sligrlitest docbt 
that^Lydia K. Pinkham's Vegeta- 
ble Com pound will help yon, write 
to Lydia E.PinkhamMedicineCo. 
(confidential) Lynn, Mass,, for ad- 
Tice, Your letter will be opened, 
read and answered by a woman« 
*nd held la strtet confidence* 



An Inquirer asks: "Is It best to let fresh bread get cold before we eat It. 
or is it just as healthy to eat It warm?" 

By all means permit your freshly baked bread to get cold. This gives th« 
action of the yeast cells the best chance to divide the tiny particles of flour, 
rendering them more easy to digest. If you eat the freshly baked bread when 
it is still warm, you are eating to a certain extent the raw dough. This Is not 
healthy The bread should be permitted to stand until cold. 

THIS CHILD HAS WORMS. 

A mother asks me about her boy, aged 3 years?, who has been troubled with 
worms "We have tried," she says. "Jayne's Vermifuge and several other 
prescriptions from a local physician, but these give only temporary relief. Will 
you kindly suggest a medicine or treatment which will have a permanent cure 
for my boy? He Is otherwise In perfect condition, fleshy and healthy, btit we 
cannot get hltn to take castor oil. At times he has spells, whereby he Is all 
but In a stupor, and we bathe and hold him for hours. We give him hot water 
injections with soap, and he cries and complains of hlij back aching whenever 
we resort to this method of hurried relief. Glycerine suppositories give some 
help but we find we are almost getting him where we have to resort to some 
method to get a freely bowel movement, and we consider It unwise. The 
Doctor's Helps Department In this paper has been a great source of useful 
Information to as along the general lines of health, and my husband and I 

wish to thank you." ^ ,w ^ . . tn 

The treatment of worms In children has been described In a previous Doc- 
tor's Helps article. Your letter does not say what particular type of worms 
your boy is suffering from, yet I presume that you mean the ROUND WORM. 
If this is the case, no treatment will avail, unless the eggs are killed. Briefly, 
your boy should get a one-tenth grain dose of calomel, until two grains have 
been taken, and this should be followed in two hours by two tablespoonfula 
of a saturated solution of epsom salta. This will sweep out the entire bowel. 
both of worms, of food and of mucous. Nothing should be eaten by the child 
once you start this treatment. As soon as the bowels begin to move the boy 
should be given, on the back of his tongue, a one-grain dose of powdered 
Santonin. This should be wa.«hed down with a glass of hot water, and this 
dose should be repeated In one-half an hour, washed down with another glass 
of hot water. The Santonin acts as a poison to the eggs of the round worm, 
and four to six hours after the last dose of Santortn has been given the entire 
bowel should be again swept out with a two-tablespoonful dose of castor oil. 
This treatment may be a little severe. It will usually, however, bring the 
result. By all means let me urge the necessity of having your child placed 
under medical observation. It will be necessary to starve the child and like- 
wise give the latter several rectal Injections after the Santonin has begun to 
take effect, otherwise many of the eggs will remain lodged within the lower 
bowel. 

TROrei.ED WITH HER NAILS. 

A New York state lady writes: 

"The nails of my fingers and toes are like tissue paper, and for the last 
few years, when I am In the bathtub, they deliberately fall off, and I do not 
know when they are gone until afterward. Can you give me any advice on 
this matter?" 

There is some very radical disorder with your nutrition. Have your urine, 
blood and your bowel movement carefully analysed and studied. It may be 
that your diet needs to be radically changed, particularly with regard to fruity 
acids and cereal grains, such as malt, barley, corn, wheat, etc. All the local 
applications in the world applied to your finger and toe nails will not restore 
them to normal until your blood Is brought to Its proper state of nourishing 
power. 



•-•■■■.■-..^j;«vr- 



» * 



^^0M 



£f«Ki 



^IM^^ 



Who Bakes Your Bread? 

Did you ever visit the shop where your bread is baked? Are you 
sure it is clean and sanitary ? Do you know that the baker selects 
pure materials of highest quality ? You run no risk if you make 
your bread 

Shredded Wheat 

It is the real "staff of life," being made from the whole wheat grain, 
steam-cooked, shredded and baked under conditions that insure its 
absolute purity and trleanliness. More nourishing than meat or 
eggs, costs less and is much more easily digested. Supplies the 
warmth and strength that are needed for chilly days. 

Always heat the Bbcuit in oven to restore crispness. Two Shredded 
Wheat Biscuits with hot milk or cream will supply all the energy 
needed for a half day's work. Deliciously notirishing when eaten in 
combination with baked apples, stewed prunes, sliced bananas or canned 
or preserved fruits. Try toasted Triscuit, the Shredded Wheat waf er, 
for luncheon with butter, cheese or marmalade. 

Made only by The Shredded Wheat Company, Niagara Falls, N. Y. 



I 



charitably inclined family took in the 
little cripple for a time. 
Ward of State. 

Fern, however, wants to go to school 
and the mother has consented that her 
eldest child also shall be made a ward 
of the state and committed to Owa- 
tonna, where she will be given the 
advantages of a schooling. Humane 
Agent R. D. McKercher left last eve- 
ning for Virginia to bring the child 
to Duluth. 

Fern's case will be taken up Sat- 
urday in Juvenile court. It Is expected 
that she will be committed to the state 
public school at that time. It is a 
rather unusual thing for the state 
public school to accept a crippled 
child, but It is understood that the 
school authorities have agreed to ac- 
cept the ward In this case. 



r 



MAY SE LL PR OPERTY. 

T. Gordon May Act Without Consent 
of Insane Wife. 

Because his wife Is Incurably insane, 

Thomas Gordon has been given the 

right In district court to sell and dis- 
pose of his real estate without her sig- 
nature to the deeds conveying the 
property, as If he were unmarried. 
Gordon's right's in this particular were 
established In a decision handed down 
by Judge Bert Fesler yesterday. 

Josephine Price Gordon, to whom he 
was married at Madisonvllle, Ohio, 
June 10, 18«7. has been an Inmate of 
Longvlew hospital for the Insane at 
Carthage. Ohio, since Sept. 7. 1874, and 
depositions from her attendants state 
that she Is Incurably Insane. 

Gordon applied to the court for per- 
mission to sell certain real estate in- 
dependently of Mrs. Gordon's statutory 
Interest. 



U. C. T. 

All persons holding ticlw^s for 
the Minstrel Show, April 18th, can 
exchange same Saturday morning, 
April 11th, at the Lyceum theater. 
Box Office. 



ENGRAVERS SUE 

FOR BOYCOTT. 

New York, April 9 Action for a 

permanent Injunction for the alleged 
blacklisting and damage to the amount 
of $50,000, has been brought In the 
United Btates 'listrict court under the 
anti-trust law of the state of New 
York by the American Anti-Boycott 
association against the New York En- 
gravers' Union No. 2. The order was 
made returnable April 17. The suit 
was brought In favor of the Gill En- 
graving company of this city, conduct- 
ing what Is known as an "open shop" 
plant. 

It Is alleged In the complaint that 
the union had forbidden Its members 
to do work for any firm having part of 
Its engraving done by the Gill com- 
pany. 

m — ■ 
Socialist Beaten. 

Hartford, Ark., April 9. — Peter Stew- 
art, the first and only Socialist mayor 
In Arkansas, wfts defeated for re-elec- 
tion by John Conroy, Progressive party 
candidate. The most of the other city 
offices went Democratic. 



Simple Rtlen for W. C. T. fJ. Leader * 

Portland, Maine. April 9. — A brief 
and simple funeral service. In accord 
with her expressed wish, was held 
yesterday for Mrs. Lillian M. N. Stev- 
ens, head of the National Woman's 
Chri.stlan Temperance union. The body 
will be taken to Boston and cremated. 



Good News for 

Eczemk Sufferers 



(From the Easterh Drug Reporter.) 

"Retail druggists everywhere report 
continued and growing demand for 
quintone, the new home treatment for 
eczema, salt rheum, tetter, ringworm 
and other Itching eruptions of the skin 
or scalp. 

"The new drug quintone is different 
from other eczema cures, and pur- 
chasers report that 'ttaey can feel it 
heaL' 

"The treatment i$ simple and Inex- 
pensive. The first application, it la 
said, win Instantly stop the most an- 
noying and Intense itching. 

"To prepare, gejt two ounces o! 
quintone and dissolve In a half pint of 
hot water. Apply this solution to irri- 
tated surface twion a day." — Adver- 
tiaemeuL 



on Your 

Dental 

Work 



Save One-Half 

By coming to us you not only save one-half the usual charge, but you get a 
10-year guarantee that the work will be satisfactory. Our plan of filling, extract- 
ing and crowning teeth has built up the largest dental business in Duluth. Don't 
wait, come now and have us estimate your work. Examination and advice free. 

15,000 pleased patients will testify as to our 
reliability. We give you absolutely high-grade 
dentistry at a saving of more than half. 

317 West Superior Street 

Remember the number; be sure you find our 
office. It's the largest in Duluth. 

vilV9r rllllll^ price in city or elsewhere 9 v€ 

Whalebone PlafeirsF'"'^-'^' W.OO 




Gold Crowns SJ'«^.^^!^"/^pr!!^|3.00 

■k " I Ul I t^*^t '°^ weight, »eau- ^tk fkm 

Bridse Work Sv.\"i.e'„°*ii,f.u!:i* .. ♦a-BO 



V 



We spectalize in Gold Inlays, Gold and Alominiun Plates. 

UNI ON PAI NLESS DENTISTS .,.?'«St''^;^.SoS s^i; Srr.t?„. 

■■■■MHiHflHi Ovea from 8i30 a. 



t« 7 9. m. Saadays. 10 to l.| 



CUSTOMS REVENUE MAY NOT 
SHRINK, AS WAS PREDICTED 



Treasury Department Is- 
sues Statement on Tariff 
Operation. 



Indications Are That Over 

$270,000,000 Will Be 

Received. 



Washington. April 9. — Figures have 
been made public In a treasury depart- 
ment statement showing that the rev- 
enues from the customs during the 
fiscal year which ends June 80, 1914, 
almost certainly will meet and prob- 
ably will exceed the estimates mad* 
when congress passed the new tarltt 
law. 

The statement prepared by Assist- 
ant Secretary Malburn, In charge of 
customs, said: . , ^ 

"It was estimated that the receipts 
from customs for the fiscal year 1914, 
which included tht-ee months under the 
tariff act of 1909 and nine months un- 
der the present tariff act, approved 
Oct 8, 1913, would amount to |2<0,- 
000.000, resulting In a loss of $49,000,- 
000 from the customs receipts of the 
previous years. . __ . 

lilkely to Rxeeed Bstlaaate. 

"The total customs collections for 
the nine months Just ended amounted 
to 8226.600,000. sfiowlng a loss for the 
nine months previous of $24,750,000 as 
compared with the collections for the 
same period during the fiscal year end- 
ed June 30, 1918. As this loss is only 
one-half of the estimated loss for the 
whole year. It la probable that the re- 
ceipts for the fiscal year ending Jund 
30. 1914, will exceed the estimate. 

"It 1« to be noted that the loss in 
revenue during the months of Janu- 
ary and Februarj-, 1914. amounted In 
round numbers to $«,000,000 and $10,- 

000 000 respectively. This was caused 
by the falling off of the duties paid on 
sugar, as that commodity WsiS re- 
tained In bonded warehouses pending 
the reduction of sugar duties on March 

1 1914 The customs receipts for 
these two months amounted to $28,- 
600 000 and $17,600,000. respectively. 

"The cuatoms receipts for the month 
of March Just closed were nearly $26.- 
000.000 as against $27,600,000 for the 
corresponding month of 1913. showing 
a loss of but $1,500,000 and a recov- 
prv of receipts compared with Febru- 
ary of this year of over $8,000,000. 
Good Margin of Safety. 

"In view of the above figures. It 
now Appears that a monthly averas« 



of less than $15,000 000 for April, May 
and June, the remaining three montna 
of the present fiscal year, would bring 
the total of customs receipts up to 
$270,000,000, the original estimate for 
this fiscal year. It is probable that 
receipts for the three remaining 
months will exceed this average of 

? 15, 000, 000, and that the total receipts 
or the fiscal year will run over the 
estimate of $270,000,000." 

NO TIME GUAfiANTEE 

ON WATC H CASES. 

St. Louis. Mo., April ».— Atlantic City, 
N. J., was choj«en for the 1916 conven- 
tion of the National Wholesale Jewel- 
ers* association, which closed Its sev- 
enth annual ses.«ion here. LK)uts Sick- 
els of Philadelphia was elected presi- 
dent. The jewelers agreed to dlscon- 
tltnue the time guarantee on watch 
cases. 



show that A. V. Fawcett polled a plu- 
rality of 2,468 votes over F. W, V. 
Stover, a clergyman, in the mayoralty 
race. Homer T. Bone, Socialist, was 
third. Fawcett, who polled the high 
vote, was recalled three years a^o 
from the mayoralty. 
» 

See the Flower Show 

at the Duluth Floral company. 

$750,000 PROMISED 

TO WELLESLEY. 

Wellesley, Mass.. April 9. — Wellesley 
college has received a gift of $750,000 
from the Rockefeller foundation to- 
ward restoration of facilities lost In 
the recent destruction of College ball 
by fire. 

In announcing the gift, the board of 
trustees said it was conditional upon 
the raising of $2,000,000 before the first 
of next January. The plan of the trus- 
tees is to spend $1,500,000 for n«w 
buildings and (260,000 for endowment. 
Seven new buildings will be reQulred 
to do the work formerly done by the 
single great building burned. 

The trustees explained that the rala- 
ing of $1,000,000 endowment fund, 
which was well under way, and al- 
most half of which h^d been pledged 
before College hall burned, is now 
merged In the large plan. 
* — 

Saves tlOtMO fn TIm- 

St. Ltouls. Mo.. April 9. — John M. 
Green, head usher at the St. Louis 
union station, has saved $10,000 which 
he received Ih tips during the last 
Tacoma, Wash., April 9. — Complete ! ten years, he told his fellow usher* 
returns from the municipal primary i when he announced his resignation. 



RECALLED MAYOR 

POLLS HIGH VOTE. 




tor Infants end Chfldr^n, 

Cast4»ria is a harmless snbstltatd for Castor Oil, Pare- 

f-orio» iDrops and Soothinip SyrmM. It is pleasant, 
t contains neither Opium, Morphine nor other Knr- 
' ootio substance. It destroys Worms and allays Fever- 
ishness. It relieves Constipation^ "Wind Colic, all 
TeetMng Troubles and Diarrhoea* It regulates tlio 
Stomach and Bowels, giving healthy and natiiiul sleep. 
- The Children's Panacea— The Mother's Friend* 

I The Kind You Eaye Alwavs Bought 

Bean the Signature of 







\ 




n 



Thursday, 




THE DULUTH HERALD 



April 9, 1914. 



COURT NOT 
SATiSFiED 

Finds Accounts of Estate 
Administrator Not Ac- 
cording to Law. 



l/kTE DON'T USE a Library Table, or a 
Bed, or any other article as a bait-- 
That is misleading advertising. 



A CfiCAT 



History of Poupore Estate 

Not Closed—Appeal 

to Be Taken. 




Another chapter in the interesting^ 
story which e»nttrs around the double 
life history of Antoine Poupore, a 
wtrll-known character about t'loquet 
for many years, wlio died in Septem- 
b«rr, l?09. may be written before the 
affairs of iiis e&tate are brought to a 
close. 

The estate has been Involved in liti- 
gation of one kind or another «!nce 
tlif death of Poupore and from pres- 
ent indications the f-nd is not yet. 
Judge S. W. iiilpin of the probate 
«'v>urt is not salistled with the rinal 
accountinK of the fund? of the estate, 
wliich has bton submitted by J. H. 
Whitlev, attorn*-y for O. K. Knisley. 
admiiiistratt>r, and has refused to al- 
low it. 

Yc.^terdMV .Fudse <:ilpin made an or- 
dfr dircciim? Knisley lo turn over 
$913 to creditors of the estate in pay- 
ment of claims which have been al- 
lowed bv the court and distribute the 
residue of the estate, amounting to 
$47.65 among tho heirs, according to 
law. This order was made after the 
court had adju.<ted the account sub- 
mitted by Attorney Whitley and had 
found that th«» administrator had 
failed to acount for all of the assets 
of the estate. 

Thr Final Arronnt. 

In the final account tiled by Attornej 
V. hitelv. the total receipts of the es- 
tate Were given as $1,334.05 all of 
■which it was claimed had been ex- 
pended except the sum of $220.29 which 
was claimed to be exempt under the 
rights of his widow. The court, after 
adjusting the account, charged the ad- 
niinistrator witlx receipts amounting to 
$l.J»y7.0t» and with expenditures 
amounting to $1,036. leaving a balance 
of $960.55. The court holds that the 
claim.-i amounting to $913 agal?ist the 
estate should be paid before a deduc- 
tion of the $500 exemption allowed by 
law to tlie widow was made, on the 
grounds that the law provid- s that the 
widow shall make her selection oV 
erenipt'd property before the estate is 
administered and not after the final 
account hr»s be^n filed. 

Objection to thf» allowance of the 
final account as submitted by the ad- 
ministrator, through his attorney, J. H. 
"Whltf'lv. was made by Courtney A 
Tourtnev. attorneys for the Ftone- 
Ordean-Wells company and oth*>r cred- 
itcrs of the estate whose claims have 
not yet btsen paid, although thev have 
bf'en allowed by the court. In the 
I'ourfs readjustment of the account 
the administrator is charged with cer- 
tain property which his attorney, Mr. 
T\'hitelv. claimed had been stolen from 
the estate after Knls^ly had been ap- 
pointed administrator but before he 
took active charge. -,,. .^ 

It is understood that Attorney w hite- 
lv on behalf of the administrator, will 
ap'peal the case to the district court. 
It is also understood that Courtney & 
("ourtnev. attorneys for the creditors, 
will urgV further objections to the ac- 
count as it now stands, claiming that 
attorney's expenses in connection with 
litigation with which the estate has 
been involved have been improperly 
charged to the e«tate. thf claim being 
made they should have been borne by 
the widow for whose benefit action was 
brought. 

Knisely is a Minneapolis newspaper 
man who was formerly connected with 
the Duluth Daily Star during the ex- 
istence of that publication in this city. 
At a recent hearing on the allowance 
of the final account before .Tudge Gil- 
pin, he testified that he had been act- 
ing as admini.<trator only in name and 
that he had left the entire estate In 



To Core Corns, Callouses, 
Bunions and Aching Feet 

The following is absolutely the sur- 
est and quickest cure known to science 
for all foot ailments: "Dissolve two 
tablespoonfuls of Calocide compound 
In a basin of warm water. Soak the 
fe»-t in this for fully fifteen minutes, 
gently rubbing the sore parts. The ef- 
fect is really wonderful. All soreness 
goes instantly and the feet 
feel <lelightful. Corns and 
callf:uses can be peeled right 
off. It gives immediate re- 
lief for sore bunions, sweaty, 
sm.elly and aching feet. A 
twenty-five cent box of Cal- 
o.ide is said to be sufficient 
to cure the worst feet. It 
works through the pores 
and removes the cause of 
the trouble. Don't waste time on un- 
certain remedies. Any druggist has 
Calocide compound in stock or he can 
get it in a few hours from his whole- 
sale house. Prepared only by M'dical 
Formula Co., Chicago, 111., and Day- 
ton, Ohio. 



All we ask is this — Come, get our prices, examine the goods, 
then go as far as you like and see if you can beat them. We 
know you will buy here. 




OUR PRICES h(we always been fair — your com' 
mon sense will tell you that— no one can handle 
goods in retail quantities at wholesale prices 
as they try to make you believe. 



l.^^" 



ALL our goods — all, we say again — are priced at real Re- 
moval Sale Prices. You can see your saving at a glance at 
this Removal Sale. 



THE ONLY REAL REMOVAL SALE NOW ON! 

ipir' AFTER MAY 1st Wc WILL BE LOCATED at 226 and 228 WEST SUPERIOR STREET 

Where you get what you pay for and more— Good furniture is not hard to find but you can't easily get furniture that is just right for the spot in which you want to put it. You may want a) 
chair, table, mattress, spring, bed, desk, buffet or anything for your home, we can furnish it and at any price you care to pay. No store can serve you more completely. Credit if you want it. 

There is a law prohibiting fake, misleading or misrepresentation in advertising, but it hasn't been enforced in Duluth as yet. 



^ 



Not a piece in the lot that will not stand critical examina- 
tions — not a piece that was unworthy of the regular first price, 
not a piece unworthy of presentation on our fine furniture 
floors — all at reduced prices. 



COMPLETE HOUSEFUfiNISHERS 




DULUTH, MINNESOTA 




IT WILL PAY YOU TO COME FIVE HUNDRED MILES 

TO BUY AT THIS SALE. 

New Goods that were in transit when we decided to move being put on 
our floors daily — all at real Removal Sale Prices. • 




the hands of his attorney, Mr. AVhitely. , 

The Poupore double-e.xistence story 
is recalled In connection with the mat- I 
ter. Antoine Poupore, for several '. 
years prior to his death, was a resi- 
dent of Poupore's Siding, this county, i 
where he conducted a small store and I 
a lumber business. After his death In | 
1?09 it developed that he had been 
leading a double life and that he had 
a wife and a family living in N'ew 
York state, whom he had deserted 
years ago, and another wife and fam- 
ily In this county. 

After Poupore's death, both widows . 
and families claimed the estate. The j - - , , n/»«i:.«*v« ^.^ On^rtll 

court decided In favor of the -New ! Market Declines Oil Small 

York family. 



some -of them just before the first ses- 
sion began this afternoon. 

Representatives from exchanges f(' 
Duluth, Minneapolis, Kansas City, 
Omaha, Chicago, St. Louis and Dcs 
Moines are here. The attendance av" 
proximately is 300. 

LIGHT TRlinNG~ 
IN COPPER ISSUES 



THK BAI-I. OF THi: HOI R — The 

dancing season of Duluth will be 
ushered in with a 

GRAND EASTER BALL 

MONDAY EVENING, APRIL 13ib 
IN THE AUDITORIUM 

—given by — 

DULUTH AERIE, N«. 79, FRATERNAL 
ORDER OF EAGLES 

Music will be furnished by Duluth's 

most popular musical organization, 

THE THIRD RECHMEST BA.\0 

with 30 pieces. 

Door Rightti Renerved. 

AdmlsMlon fH.OO. 



Buying By Investors in 
Ail Quarters. 

"While there was no special break in 
any issue, the market in mining stocks 
was weak at Boston today and de- 
clines were general through the list. 

The volume of business put through 
was small with absence of buying 
power in any quarter. 

Butte & Superior closed 25c off at 
$34.50; Calumet & Arizona 50c off at 



$68: North Butte 25c oft at 



.25; 



NO CHANGE IN 
SITUATION 

Master Painters Hold a 

Meeting But No Action 

Is Taken. 



Building Owners and Man- 

agers Declare for 

Open Shop. 



SAYS SOME ADS ARE 
NOT MARKED AS SUCH 








Until April 17tli 

IXITIATIoX IS ONLY 

S5.00 

After April 17th it will be $30 00. 
i'all or write to \V. R. Hampton, 
national organiser, 610 Alworth 
building. 



Washington, April 9. — Representa- 
tive Barnhart, D'r-mocrat, of Indiana, 
author of the newspaper publicity 
section of the p^stoffice law, told Post- 
master Ceneral Rurleson today that he 
oeHeved ctrtain newspapers were vlo- 
I'lting its provisions by not marking 
is advertising certain matter attack- 
ing the repeal of the Panama canal 
tolls exemption, whii-h, Mr. Barnhart 
alleges, he has reason to believe is be- 
ing furni.<hed by a shipping trust. Mr. 
llurleson told Mr. Barnhart he was 
.•»ady to receive any evidence of viola- 
lion of the law. 

"The postmaster general has infor- 
mation that certain newspapers, some 
i.f them the largest and most influ- 
ential in various cities from coast to 
coast, are printing articles for the 
shipping trusi in th? agitation against 
the tolls repeal bill," said Barnhart 
today. 

"These articles according to Infor- 
mation before the department, are 
printed as bona fide news articles, 
without the slightest indication that 
they are advertisements. Newspapers 
and their editors "and owners, if in- 
vestigation discloses that they are 
acceptilng pay for the so-called news 
articles, may be fined by the courts 
and their newspapers barred from the i 
second-class privilege." 



t^ranby 50c off at |88; Franklin un- 
changed at J6.12; and Amalgamated 
Copper 50c off at $75.87. 

In the Duluth curb list, Calumet & 
Corbln sold at 29 -g 30c, closing at the ; 
former figure bid. Keating was In de- j 
mand at $1.50, but no stock was of- 
fered on that basis. 

• * « 

The Shattuck Copper company's pro- 
duction in March was reported at 287,- 
980 pounds of copper. 
« « * 

Directors of the Wolverine Mining 
company, according to information re- 
ceived by Gay & Sturgls, have decided 
to omit the dividend usually paid in 
April. The October dividend also was 
not paid, for the same reason that the 
dividend now due is omitted — practical 
cessation of operations because of the 
strike in the Lake Superior mining dis- 
trict. 

' * • * 

A wire received by Gay & Sturgls 
from Boston today reported that the 
board of directors of Inspiration Con- 
solidattd Copper company have au- 
thorized an Issue of $4,500,000 five-year 
6 per cent debenture bonds. The en- 
tire Issue of bonds has been under- 
written by a syndicate headed by J. P. 
Morgan & Co. 

These bonds are issued to provide 
additional funds necessary on account 
of enlargement of the company's plant 
to 10,000 tons per day to pay for ad- 
ditional development and for pur- 
chases. 

The company's annual report will 
show a total developed ore area of 89,- 
643,000 tons, of which 73.320,000 tons is 
sulphide ore averaging 1.71 per cenS. 
copper. 

• • • 



STOCKS — 



Bid. 



Asked. 



HUNDREDS KILLED 
BY CHINESE BRIGANDS 



THE PALM ROOM 

AT THE SPALDING 

MOST DELIGHTFUL AND LUX- 
URIOUS RESTAURANT IN 
DTLUTH. 



Pekin, April 9. — Brigands under the 

notorious "White Wolf" today killed 

hundreds of inhabitants of the towns 

of Huhslen, Chowchih and Meihslen, 

i the vicinity of Slan Fu, capital of 

i Shersl province. They looted the three 

' towns and are sweeping the entiri 

country. 

All foreigners residing at out-sta- 
tions have been ordered to Sian Fu, 
where a column of 1.500 regular troops 
has arrived. Further reinforcements 
I have been Sf'nt. 

! COAL operators' 

i T O PLA N ACTION. 

[ Columbus. <")hio. April 9. — Coal r>por- 
! ators will meet here tomorrow after- 
noon to discuss terms they will offer 
I to the miners at a joint conference to 
I be held probably Friday or Saturday, 
] April 17 or 18. according to announce- 
ment made here today by operators. 



Rutte-Alex Scott | 

Calumet & Mont. Cons. 

Calumet & Corbin 

Calumet & Sonora 

Carman 

Cuyuna-Mllle Lacs.... 
Chief Consolidated.... 

Cliff Mining 

Denn- Arizona • 

Florence 

Keating 

Rainbow Dev 

Red Warrior 
San Antonio 

Savanna 

bicrrA •■••••« 
Warren ..... 
Warrior Dev. 



• • • • • I 






I • • • • • • 



I • • • • • 



6.00- 
.20 
.29 

• « • » 

.2« 
2.2E 

.92 

.46 
7.76 

.10 
1.60 



.60 

6.00 

.76 



No new developments were reported 

today in the painters, decorators and ' 

paperhangers' strike. The master j 

painters held a meeting at the St. Louis ' 

hotel at noon but no definite action had 

been taken when The Herald went to 
press. j 

The Herald was Informed yesterday 
by the strikers that six of the mas- , 
ter painters had agreed to their terms, 
but this was denied today by several 
of the master painters. The men re- , 
fused to give out the names of those ! 
who, it was claimed, had agreed to the i 
strikers' terms. j 

The Duluth building owners and I 
managers have gone on record as "un- • 
alterably opposed to a closed shop in ' 
this city." Their views were set forth | 
in the following resolutions: 

"R?solved that the Building Owners 
and Mana..?ers Association of Dtiluth, 
representing aboist 40 per cent of the 
improved property in the city, Is un- 
alterably opposed to any movement 
looklni^' toward the closed shop in Du- 
luth. 

"Resolved further that the assocla- | 
tion believes at this lime all owner" 
anl citizens desiring the best welfare 
of the city, should assist at this time 
In every way possible, these controll- 
ers and firms who steadfastly main- 
tain the opon shop principles and 
treat fairly both union and non-tmlon 
men, willing to work side by side. 

"Rasolved further, a copy of these 
resolutions be sent to the Duluth 
Commercial club and the Duluth Build- 
ers' exchange. 

"Passed unfi-nimoi.sly at the April 
meeting. 

"STEWART G. COLLINS, 

Secretary." 



M 



Spcciar 



Pre-Easter Hat Sale at $5 

Trimmed Hats $ 





VALUED AT $10 

Go in This Sale at Only 

A real opportunity for those who have not yet pur- 
chased their Easter hat. Our window full of these hats 
is attracting crowds of eager buyers. See them. Com- 
pare these hats with those shown elsewhere and you'll 
agree with us that we save you $5.00 or more, or return 
the hat to us. 

SEE THESE HATS BEFORE YOU BUY 



COME EARLY OUR ADVICE! 



Crowds ol Ha! Bpyers Throng Our Store Daily 
WE TRIM HATS FREE 



Hand Blocked 

Hemps and 

Milans 

The hit of the 
season — and 
other popular 
shapes, $1.95. 
$2.95, $3.50. 



NO APPROVALS— NO LAY AWAYS. 



105 and 107 West Superior Street 



Flowers, 
Fancies, 
I Pompoms 

! All the latest 

I novel ties to 

trim your hat, 
19c, 59c, up. 



5.12 
.30 I 
.80 
.TOt 
.28 ' 

2.7K1 
.95 
.60* 

• • ■ • t 

.16 i 

1.76 1 
9.00 ! 

.60 '■ 
2.00 
1.60 i 

.70 ; 
6 50 

.90 



Easter Monday Ball. 

Duluth Aerie Xo. 79, Fraternal Or- 
der of Eagles, will usher in the danc- 
ing season in Duluth with a grand 



Easter ball to be given at tlie Audito- 
rium Monday evening. The music will 
be furnished by thirty pieces of the 
Third Regiment band. 

The committee in charge has planned 
a number of interesting features for 
the gusts and the members expect a 
large crowd of Duluth as well as out- 
of-town people at the affair. The 
dancing will begin at 8:30 o clock. 
— • 

Though Uncle Sam has been giving 
away land ever since the passage of 
the original homestead act, just half a 
century ago, he still has about seven 
hundred million acres left. 



BURGLAR WILL 

BE SENTENCED 



Fred .Tack.son, SO, who is -reported by 
the police to have confessed to eleven 
burglaries which have taken place in 
this city since Dec. 18, 1812, witl be 
arraigned for sentence at 5 o'clock 
this afternoon before District Judge 
Dancer. 

The prisoner Is expected to plead 



guilty to the one specific charge of 
having on March 10 last burglarized 
the hardware store of A. C. Geise, 103 
Wift First street, and stolen |26 in 
cash, a revolver, several razors and 
watches and other valuables. At the 
time of his arrest Jackson was living 
at 2:'4 Kast First street. 



Kansas City Star: The Chanute Trib- 
une tells of a local chlgger, which, 
while searching for its supper among 
the young women at a recent lawn 
party, got caught in one of the nfew 
skirts and its young life was cruelly 
crushed out. 



D. H., 4-9-14. 



NO EXTRA SESSION 

AT M ADISO N LIKELY. 

Madison, Wis., April 9. — From the 
generally unfavorable tone of the town 
meeting replies, it is believed Governor 
Mc<Jovern will refuse to call a special 
session of the legislature. Although 
no word of the executive's intention 
is forthcoming, opinion is general that, 
the rural voters having spoken plain- 
ly against an extraordinary session, 
the governor will >ield to their de- 
sires. 



BLOOD POISON 

Pimples, si>oU oo tb* ikln. tana iu iA« mouUi. 
alccij. faUlng iialr. bona pains, catarrh, (tc act 
■jiDptoins. Dclaya ire Uargeroiia. Send ai one* l« 
Dr. Bro-.TD. f'33 Arch St.. Philadelphia, .'or UV.OWN <i 
BUiOD TUIC^TMIC.NT. CooTlacliif proof la ft tS.M 
battle— !aita a moDth. 

Bold In Ouiuth b^ ^(ax WirtlL U WMt SuMtiM 
Krcct tnd br til drig«Mfc 



CJCH|„^T|I; 

yyCK L«4l«al Aakjrvnr 




l>roi 

IManoii , 

IMIU In Ke4 aaa t)«ld o««anic 



CkWka^tM^ i 



S PILLS 

KB BBAND, 

• IfrommUl f 




boies, sealed with Blue RU>boa. 
Taka ao stkar. Sar mfTwrnr 

uiaVo.nd brand riULA, forls 

yaan kaown as Best, Safint. Alwaya RellabI* 

SOLO BY ittlQGlSTS EVERYWHEfif 



IllrinK and Firing. 

Des Moines. Iowa. April H. — Revision 
of the rules regulating the hiring and 
discharging of coal miners by oper- 
ators, on demand of President W. H. 
Rodgers of District No. 13, United 
i Mine Workers of America, was before 
1 the joint wage conf»^reDC^-rotTrmitfOfi hr 
I operators and miners today. 

■GRAIN DEALERS 

OPEN SESSIONS. 

Cedar Rapids. Iowa, April 9. — Dele- 
gates to the Western tirain Dealers' 
association which opened its annual 
convention here today were expected to 
voice hostilities to the growing co- 
operative marketing movement among 
farmers, according to statements of 



PROBE THEFT OF 

LIQJJOJR^ BALLOTS. 

r>ecatur. 111., April 9. — Leading citi- 
zens «>f Pana today were summoned to 
appear before the grand Jury and tell 
what they knew of the holdup of 
Town Clerk Walter Lester, early Tues- 
day morning. Sensational testimony 
regarding th^ «»^l3ure of Jhe ballot's 
from Heftier may be gTven. . 



Save Sic knessj 

The prompt relief given in acute stom- | 
ach. bowel and liver Ills, has created an 
annual sale of over six million boxes of 

Beecham's Pills 

Sold T:\trjnhtre, In boxes 10c aad.t8«. |, 




^WCB 



Easter Bonnets for Men! 



Some hats this season! You can find any of the new things here at $3. 
That is the popular price. 

From Knapp-Felt, Schoble, Stetson, Heid, Gordon and other makers. Stiff Hats, $1.50 to $6. Soft Hats;, $1 to $8. The 
new Balinacaan Cloth Hat, $2. 



Duluth, 
Minn. 



lEe Columbia 



At Third Ave. 
West 



♦rt 



ttiiiilil 



•• 



» «. 



iV 





Thursday, 



THE DULUXjH HERALD 



April 9, 1911 




I nN THF. IRON RANGES i l oiffici '^ l m ap o f the w eather 



TWO HARBORS CITY QUINT 

CLAIMS TO BE CHAMPION 



STATE APPEAL BOARD 
!S URGED BY PREUS 

state Insurance Commis- 
sioner Outlines Need for 
Legislation. 

Hibbinff, Minn.. April ».— (Special to 
Th« Herald.) — Strongly recommending 
legislation that would provide for « 
state board of appeals to which com- 
plaints reirardinff fire insurance rates 
could be made. J. A. O. Preua. «tnte 
tire Insurance commissioner, reviewed 
the situation In the country at large 
and in Minnesota in particular In an 
Interesting addreM before the Com- 
mercial club last evening. ^ ,, . . 

That the present system failed to 
provide a proper Incentive for Indi- 
vidual work In the reduction of the 
Are hazards and that the overhead 
expense of doing ^slness was entire- 
ly too large weie the two main rea- 
sons given for the general dissatisfac- 
tion that existed. Numerous amend- 
ments to the workmen's compensation 
act. which Mr. Preus predicted had 
come to stay, were also forecasted. 
Caaac* of Bis Lo«9#». 

Carelessness, over Insurance and ar- 
pon were the three great causes of 
the high losses, according to Mr. 
Preus, and of these the heaviest was 
cart.lessn»-ss. The various methods 
that could be employed by munlcipal- 
Itlea to reduce this hazard were care- 
fully explained In an Interesting man- 

''^PractlcRllv all of the business that 
would properly have come before the 
dub la»t evening was postponed until 
next Wednesday evening when a 
special meeting will be held. ine 
annexation of an adjoining town so 

that the Sturgeon lake road mlgnt oe pors cu "«»» ..nricr 

properly Improved and the construe- i ^„^pi,ted a very «"^««««'"l,r,t Oratft 
tlon of a potato warehouse are among ^^^ ^^le management of Arctiie ^.rai^i^ 





^. I- o».,„^;««T Filiatrault Guard Woodward. Center, (Captain); 
Manager; Freeman, Forward. 



TWO Harbors. Minn.. April 9.— (Spe- 
cial to The Herald.)-The Two Har- 
bors city basket ball team has just 



the more important subjects. 

virbinTa books^ 

POPULAR 



Q UITE 

Nearly 5,000 People Pa- 
tronized Public Library 
Last Year. 

Virginia. Minn.. April 9.— (Special to 
The Herald.) — That the local public 
library Is a very popular Institution 
Is evidenced by the annual report of j 
Mi.^s Mabel Newhard. the librarian, [ 
there being 1.203 new borrowers reg- 
istered during the twelve months. 
There are 4.744 borrowers, of whom 
thirtv live In the country. ^^^ ^ , 

During the last year «0.8i2 boo 's 
were loaned for home use. Fiction 
leads in popularity among the patrons 
of the library. 34.824 books of fiction 
being loaned. Fiction appealed to 
children as well as adults. 15.»»- 
voung.«ters taking books of nftlon, 
while the older readers read 18,93^ 
books of fiction. 

l«on-FletloB Bookn P»p«l«r. 
That there are many students In tne 
citv Is demonstrated by the fact that 
26.048 



and 



the able management „-nies 

The team has won eight ^^^^^^^^^ 

ITre^^^tfffrtT^'at ^ h n^d. of the 

\'^A^\ 'rTea^m o^Tup^rlor^^as 'fhl 

ineir iiuu the r oponents ^5. 

I scored 3t» poinis »•"":"''- Jfr #„_ tw( 
This was an average of 35 J^^ / J^^^ 
Marhora oer game and -3 tor ineir y>v 

l?onent".Nhl ^am^B Played ^r 

.ear^and -or-,--\ru/^ilumnl. 
""^^n.^fo.-HUh'school. 14; Two Har. 



for Two 
op- 
the 

16; 



^'^Jan.^T.-Blwablk. 22; Two Harbors. 

*'jan. 24.— Aurora. 16; Two Harbors. 

^^jan. SI— Y. M. E. A. (won by Supe- 

""'Fib. 14.— Kelly Hardware. 1«; Two 

"Feb"7.-Bemldjl. 27; Two Harbors. 

^'*Feb. 28.— Bemldjl, 29; Two Harbors, 

"\arch 14.-C. A. C. of Duluth. 23; 

'^"larih'''2r-l-Duluth Universal, 16; 

J"M"ar'?r^2'6'"lBl'dgers. 19; Two Har- 

1 **°The '\ocal team claims the chanipion- 
1 ship of Northern Minnesota. 



FORECAST TIM. 7 P. M. 
FRIDAY 

Kor I>uluth, Stipertor aiul Tldntty. 
iin-ludinc the Mfsalj* «ndi VenniUiti 
Iron migai : Geti*rall,r* f «lr and 
waniier weather toiilght and Fridajr; 
lone<jt leiuperatwre toD^Ki't atX'Ut 25 
<lec. at Duluth-.Supertor tiid 20 dec. 
on tb« Iron rauges; niodenUB to 
fresli soutbtyisterly breeaea. 



WIND SCALE. 

. MOM 

• Per Hour. 

Calm « J« ' 

I^lRht ■•••••, ^° « 

Moderate -15 to Z5 

Brisk 25 to 35 

Hl«h 35 to 50 

Gale 50t««5 

Hurricane 65 and above 

H. W. RICHARDSON. 



GERMS MADE HARMLESS 

Rich red blood 1» the power that 
keeps the human body in order. Every 
(Jay many germs of disease enter our 
bodies but they are made harmless 
and passed ofC if the fighting force* 
of the body are In good condition. Dr. 
Williams' Pink Pills build up the 
blood, enable it to absorb more oxy- 
gen, the agent which burns up the 
body poisons. In this way Dr. W il- 
llams' Pink Pills are not only a tonlo 
but a specific for the host of diseases 
that come as a result of thin blood 
and that can get a foot-hold only 
when the tone of the body is low. 

Dr. Williams' Pink Pills make the 
blood rich and red, and strengthen 
the nerves. 

Try Dr. Williams' Pink Pills for 
anaemia, rheumatism, neuralgia, 
nervousness, sciatica. Build up your 
blood and note how the purer and 
richer blood fights your battle again-it 
the disease. Take Dr. Williams' Pink 
Pills as a tonic if you are not in the 
best physical condition and cultivate 
a resistance that with the obser\'ance 
of ordinary rules of health will keep 
you well and strong . Get a box from 
the nearest drug store and Iregin this 
treatment now. 

A booklet, "Common Ailments, How 
to Treat Them," Is free for the asking. 

Address: The Dr. Willams Medicine 
Co., Schenectady, N. Y. 



Local Korecaatw 
... ^^.. .. EXPIANATORY NOTES. ^ ,,. ., 




a fine highway from Grand Raplds to 
Bemldji. Bejeeted. 

The conTmisloners rejected all bid^ 
for the contemplated road Jf^^^*^ 
Deer River and ^^^^ome « <1'«1;^^^^ 
of about thirty miles, and the ^orK 

^lUer wife ^an 'rn'the^nll^^hSorhood 
S S50 000 and It Is the opinion of the 
county e'ngtneer that the cost of con- 
structlon should not exceed $3^^000 

A laree number of contracts for 
brfdge"'.^o%kVere also let today. Chief 

amontr these was a bridge across vii'o 
Pop^le river in the northern part of 
Che county, which Is ^'^ ^l.\f\h?il 




Cheer up — cher- 1 extreme west portion; cooler In east 
rles will soon be portion Friday. ,^„^„ 

ripe: At least fair I Lower _Mlchigan_Partly cl_oudy 



to- 



Fife Either Heel 



Changed by the wearer period- 
ically, it always stays level. Prevents 
run-over heels, slipping, strain on 
ankles. Guaranteed not to work loose. 



feimbachs 



. night and Friday; warmer Friday 
and Mpmer weath- j Upper Michigan — Partly cloudy 
er Is d^omlsed for] night and Frid ay; warme r Friday 
tonight and Friday 



to- 



Thls >aO helps a 
good dtal In view 
of the i^ct that the 
highest > tempera- 
ture jrifiorded yes 



terda:f '''' was 



the 



Temi^eraturc**. 

Following were the highest temper- 
atures for the last twenty-four hours 
and the lowest for the last twelve, end- 
ing at 7 a. m,:. . ^^^^ 



HlgliLow 



Al>llen« 



....44 



freezing point. To- Alpena .'...23 

day iSriS^ilftid at all, 1 Amariiio 

being fair with a nice tan? 1ft the air. 
A year ago today was coid and dusty. 

The sun rose this morning at 5:31 and 

will set this evening aJ. ^:i&. giving 

thirteen hours and sevflji»en minutes 



The Herald.) -"A bas ^Pl^ing on side- 
walks" win be the slogan here If the 

village adopts the recommendation or, x^.^~.»B yncludring^'ivunessee. Ar- 
V'h^'pY-^slsf ^1f ^^a\tng^"a4'ars I kan%s.%rxis and^ Ne^w ^.^Jeo^. Kill- 



of sunshine, four mlnufejn njore than 
yesterday. . ^- ■ 

Mr. Richardson makee* the follow- 
ing comment on weather conditions: 

"Freezing weather pr»\-«ll8 south- 



spitoons. The council 
ter under advisement. 



has the mat- 



demonstrated by the fact that g^^^'' ' company of Des Mo nes. lowa. i 
books of reference were iMu^d. . {lV**f3^g74.4i The Hennepin B'ldge 
•n taking 1«.656 books. while J^^'any secured the contract for a , 

1 .-«« .:.H Q 3f»9 hooka. coiiipauj^ TTork rtver, in 



• hildren laKiiiK f.'!""" ""V""' ' " company oxrv-v..-v. ---- 

adults borrowed 9.392 books. bridge across the Big Fork 

The average daily attendance^ in th« f^^^^^e^.* ^f Wirt, for Sl-^^l- ,. , ..._. ' 
reference and reading room Is 30?- j ^^he Duluth Corrugated Roofing com 
«>ne hundred periodicals are on n'®- L,-n" was given the contract for fur- 
whtle thirty-two newspapers ««;«/«; 1 Prg^hTn^he county with 175 culverts, at 
reived daily and weekly. The average i ^''^•^y^Vf $2630.58. 

number of Sunday readers is 300. • a cosi. * „ i 

Miss Newhard-s assistants are Miss 
Stella M. Stebbins. first assistant li- 
brarian and Misses Ethel C Wright 

int Mattson. Ruth McNlckle and 

Wheelock Sherwood, page. 
Balance on Ha««. 
The total receipts for the past year 

anSunt'd to' $11,600.25 $7,800.80 being 

received from the city. The unex- 

perded balance is $3,508.90 Member- 
shin fees fines, lost and damaged 

boo'ks amounted to $283.04. Power 

light and water, books, servoes and 

other expenditures to^^^^? ,'J,"^;^^'-*/; 

leaving the present balance at 

^^A^ present there are 10.860 books 
on hand. During the year 699 books 
were added by a gift. By purchase 
and otherwise the volumes 
creased by 3.iiOT books. 



were In- 



BRAZICH WITNESS 
TO BE PROSECUTED 

_ , , . $900. The report states that the 

Admits Swearing Falsely in j-?=,i;,-\„"'SkV",'brr.;'e'^ 
Case of Convicted 
Nastiwauk Man. 



GLOQUET MAN IS 

GIVEN CONTRACT 

Will Build Twenty Miles of 

Duluth-St. Vincent 

Road. 

Grand Rapids. Minn.. April 9. — (.Spe- 
cial to The Herald.)— Itasca county » 
big 1914 campaign of road building is 
advancing rapidly. The county board 
has Just authorized the expenditure of 
approximately $125,000 for roads. 

Loula Leimer of Cloquet was given 
the contract for building twenty miles 
of the Duluth- St. Vincent highway, 
from this village to one mile west of 
Swan River station for $32,019. 
Dtilatlilan Given Job. 

.Tames Dowling of Duluth will be 
paid $23,940 for building seventeen 
miles between Blgfork and Alvwood. 

The Taconite-Relief road contract 
calling for twenty-eight miles of con- 
struction was let to Arthur Mitchell of 
Bovey for $29,430. 

Three mile.* of road construction on 
the west end of the Marcel-Third 
river road which connects with the 
lilackduck road on the boundaries of 
Beltrami county was let to Johnson & 
Reardsley of Alvwood, for $2.94 (.3.. 
This road will, when completed, give 



Grand Rapids. Minn.. April 9.— (Spe- 
cial to The Herald.)— Bozo Brazich, 
whose trial commenced Monday on the 
charge of murdering Policeman Kokko 
at Nashwauk on Feb. 10 last was 
found guilty of murder In the first 
degree yesterday a"^^"°°"- ,,.30 a 
, The Jury went out fbout 11.30 a 
m and returned a verdict about -^'J 
' in the afternoon. Sentence was lin- 
iposi5 by Judge Wright, giving the 
UonvTcted man the sentence provided 
I bv law of Imprisonment for lire. 
I V» Karakus. the witness whose tes- 
timony was mostly responslb e for 
• th? conviction of Brazich. will prob- 
ablv have more regard for the truth 
while under oath If the Plans of 
county Attorney McOuat. r«|ard»ng 
his case are carried out. ^,f^*'^*'l"^. *^ 
one of the men inducted with Bra^lcn 
and four others charged with the mur 
der of Policeman Kokko. At tjie pre 
flmlnary hearing Karakus testified 
that he had not seen any one with a 
gun. and that particularly he had not 
seen Brazich with a gun. 

AdnltN Perjurlmc Self. 
In the trial here he testified that he 
had not only seen Brazich with a gun 
hut that he' had seen hi^n shooting a 
the policeman, and admitted that he 
, had testified falsely at the coroner s 
inauest Now the state proposes to 
p"^secute him for perjury and teach 
him and his kind It does "ot pay to 
clmmit perjury, a P'-ac"ce which has 
been all too common In this country 
in the past. 



EVELETH WILL 

TRY TO COLLECT 

Going After Restitution of 

Money Alleged Due the 

City. 

Eveleth, Minn., April 9.— (Special to 
The Herald.)— In speaking of the er- 
rors and discrepancies shown in the 
auditors' report made at the last meet- 
ing of the council. Mayor J. J. Gleason 
states that the council will a«k for 
restitution In aome Instance*. ■ --^ 

The report showed that contractors 
had paid nothing for water used on 
city Jobs. This Item amounts to at 
least ?150 for the two years which the 
investigation covers. The largest item 
is water abatements amounting to over 
$900. The report states that the city 

ithority was 

c%r^i »..^.. .- --- abatements. 

Errors, minor discrepancies and over- 
charges "bring the total loss to the city 
close to $2,000 exclusive of fees which 
the auditors claim were not accounted 
for. ^, , 

The council is holding an adjourned 
meeting this afternoon to consider bids 
received for several city contracts. 



Ing frosts occurred last ^ifht In Ten- 
nessee, Kentucky, Illlnorls. Missouri. 
Kansas. Oklahoma and Central an<^ 
Northern Texas. During the last twen- 
ty-four hours rain or snow fell over 
Atlantic and Pacific states, the lake 
region, Colorado and New Mexico." 




SCARLET FEVER'S 

SECOND VICTIM 



NOT REVE!\IUE MEASURE. 

I Preus Discusses Charges About Non- 
Collection of Claims. 

Hlbbing, Minn.. April 9.— (Special to 
The Herald.) — That the law referred to 
has never been considered a revenue 
measure by him or his predecessors and 
that the claims referred to can only be 
collected by civil action started by the 
attorney general, was the statement 
made by J. O. A. Preus, state Insur- 
ance commissioner when Informed that 
B. F. Ward, an Insurance expert of 
Minneapolis had filed charges thaV 
Preus had permitted $40,000 worth of 
claims to become outlawed and had 
failed to press demands for $131,500 
more. Ward further said that Preus 
had never required the annual report 
of these companies and had failed to 
exact the penalties for the failure. 

Mr. Preus when shown the dispatch, 
said: "The law referred to has never 
been considered a revenue measure. It 
Is a part of the statute merely for the 
purpose of enabling the Insurance com- 
missioner to compel companies derelict 
to file their annual statements. In fact 
the Insurance commissioner is not em- 
powered under the statute to collect 
these claims. On the contrary the law 
provides that they must be recovered 
In civil suits started by the attorney 
general. When the attorney general 
has acted In regard to these claims It 
will be seen whether the policy of the 



General For*<'a«t«. 

Chicago. April 9. — Forecast.? for the 
twenty-four hours ending at 7 p. m. 

Wisconsin— Fair tonight and Friday; 
rising temperature. ^ t. j 

Minnesota— Fair tonight and Fridarji 
warmer tonight and In east portidil 
Frlda V 

Iowa— Fair tonight and probably 
Friday: rising temperature. 

North Dakota— Generally fair to- 
night and Friday; warmer In east and 
south portions tonight; cooler 1< rlday. 

South Dakota— Fair tonight and 
probably Friday; warmer tonight 

Montana — Generally fair tonight and 
Friday, except possibly unsettled in 



insurance departtnent has been justi- 
fied." ^ 

SOCIAfCENTER P'OPULAR 

Two Harbors Plan for Girls Over 16 
Meeting With Success. 

Two Harbors. Minn., April 9.— (Spe- 
cial to The Herald.)— The social center 
for girls which was organized here on 
March 17 is meeting with success and 
the promoters are very much pleased 
with the interest and enthusiasm 
shown by the members. The total en- 
rollment has been growing steadily and 
the number of girls actually present 
has reached the hundred mark. 

The class la open to every girl In the 
city over 16 years of age who does not 
attend the public schools. The instruc- 
tion Is free to every member but each 
girl must bring her own material from 
which she may make whatever she 

c °.°s|^-^jgQ ^i^g intention of the mem- 
bers to have several social Pa«Ves aft- 
er the lenten sea.son as the real object 
of this social organization is to pro- 
mote recreation and clean amusement 
among the young people of this cit>. 



BatUeford 50 

Bismarck 40 

BoiM 64 

Boston 50 

Buffalo 34 

Cairo 

Calgary 50 

Charles City 

Charleston T4 

Chicago 32 

Concordia 

Davenport 

Denver SO 

Dei Moines 36 

Devils Lake 36 

I>t)dgB 40 

nubuqno 32 

DULUTH 32 

Edmonton 52 

Escanaba 24 

yort Smith 

Galveston 64 

Grand Haven 28 

Green Bay 24 

Harre 48 

Helena 6* 



20 
14 
30 
30 
20 
i|4 
40 
20 
28 
26 
20 
58 
22 
20 
24 
22 
24 
22 
20 
22 
20 
30 
IS 
30 
40 
20 
20 
26 
32 



Houghton 24 

Huron 38 14 

Indianapolis 22 

Jacksonville 85 64 

Kamloopa TO 38 

Kansas ClU 40 28 

Keokuk 24 

KnoxvllI© 14 30 

La Cross© 22 

Lander 20 

liOUlsvlUo 38 24 

Madison 26 20 

Mar-iuetM 20 

Medicine Hat 62 84 

MemphU 42 82 

Miles City 48 26 

Milwaukee 28 20 



Mlnnedosa 36 18 

Modena 56 32 

Montgomery 82 36 

Montreal 34 32 

Moorhead 36 18 

NaahvlUe 26 

New Orieana 68 44 

New York 58 34 

North Platte ....40 22 

Oklahoma 42 24 

Omaha 38 28 

Parrv Sound ...32 12 

Plutenlx 84 64 

Pierre 42 22 

PitUburg 34 22 

Port Arthur 32 18 

Portland. Or ....68 52 

Prince Albert . . 44 26 

Qu'Appelle 38 24 

Raleigh T4 30 

Hapid City 36 18 

Roseburg 70 50 

Roswell 30 

St. LouU 36 20 

St. Paul 34 22 

Salt Lake City... 50 42 

San Diego 68 56 

San Francisco. ... 60 54 

Sault Ste. Marie.20 10 

Seattle 64 46 

Sheridan 38 24 

Shrevepnrt 52 36 

Sioux City 38 22 

Spokane 64 36 

Sprlngflcld. HI 24 

SprlngfleUl. Mo.... 24 

Swift Current ...48 24 

Tampa 78 68 

Toledo 32 20 

Valentine 20 

Washington 6« 30 

Wichita 28 

WlllLston 42 24 

Wlnnemucca ... .62 36 

Winnipeg 34 20 

Yellowstone 42 24 



posts are to be used in Bennett park 
which is rapidly nearing completion. 

AURORAiTE BREAKS 
ARM WHILE DRILLING. 

Aurora, Minn.. April 9. — (Special to 
The Herald.) — Victor Llna broke his 
arm here yesterday when he became 
caught in the rigging of a drill. He 
was taken to the Lenont hospital, 
where he was given medical treatment. 

VIRGINIA ELK 

LIFE MEMBER. 



Virginia, Minn.. April 19. — (Special 
to The Herald.) — The local lodge of 
Elks installed new officers at the 
home last night Past Exalted Ruler E. 
F. Johnson conducting the exercises. 
Adolph Braa. a prominent member 
who worked hard to bring about the 
fine new temple was honored by being 
made a life member. 



ner by local publishers. A member 
from the Ben Franklin club of Minne- 
apolis will spe ak. 

VIRGINIA SCHOOL 

BI DS AR E INVITED. 

Virginia. Minn., April 9.— (Special to 
The Herald.)— The board of education 
will open bids April 27 for the pro- 
posed J60.000 school building for which 
Carl Nystrom prepared plans a.nd 
which he will supervise. The board de- 
cided to that effect last njght. 

J. J. Phllbrick asked for the ap- 
pointment of a supervisor of the school 
plavgrounds and the matter was re- 
ferred to Supt. Colgrove. with the 
purpose of jrovldlng the necessary 
supervision asked. 

HIB6ING GARDENERS 

WILL BE AIDEP. 

Hlbbing, Minn., April 9.— (Special to 
The Herald.)^— Pwules and regulations 
for the care of the garden plots laid 
out in Bennett park, to be given to 
forty-four local people for cultivation 
during the coming summer, were 
adopted by the park board. It was 
decided that the plots would be al- 
lotted by lottery, each person applying 
being entitled to an equal chance as 
the names would be drawn from a hat 
and assignment made as the. drawings 
took place. 

The lots may be used to grow vege- 
tables or any small fruit or flowers 
and the rules are strict In forbidding 
trespassing, the planting of trees and 
the growing of w eeds. ^ 

HIBBING SOLDIERS 

WILL BE IN SPECTED. 

Hlbbing, Minn., April ».— (Special to 
The Herald.) — The local militia com- 
pany will be Inspected this evening 
by Maj. H. H. Nuenberg of the Third 
battalion and all expect tQ make an 
excelU^nt showing. The men have been 
working for the Federal Inspection 
which Is to be held on April 15. so that 
the«s\idden notice of toiays inspection 
did not catch them unawares. 

— . « 

Finn Bowlers Best. 

Hibbing. Minn., April ».— (Special to 
The Herald.) — The Finns took two out 
of three games from the All Nations in 
the new village bowling league after 
an interesting match. Booth rolled the 
high average with 187 and Joe Maros 
the high score with 215. 

■ — » ■ 

Heads KltavUle Board. 

Hibbing, Minn., April 9.— (Special to 
The Herald.) — The appointment of a 
village marshal was laid over at the 
first meeting of the new village coun- 
cil of Kitzvllle. when the board was 
organized. Robert Stratlon was re- 
elected to the position of village attor- 
ney and the bonds for the various of 
flcials of the village were properiy 
fixed. 



Is made of best resilient live rubber: 
extremely durable. Greatly minimiees 
wear on ^oes and hose. Bottom smooth, 
free from nails or nail holes. Can't mar 
the finest floor.nortrackindirt and water. 
For men, women and 
children. Try them 
yourself and have 
your family fitted 
out. 



At Your 
Dealer's 

Heimbach * 
RnbbcrHeclCo. 

DaliA, MBu. 



50^ 



Electric Repair Shop 

We have the leading Shoe Hos- 
pital of the city. R«"h Order, and 
waiting jobs a pleasure. 

POPULAR PRICES. 

ORENSEN 

SHOE STORES 

■AINT INWUL.-MINNEAPOLIS-DUUjrM 

The Bis Shoe Store — At the %\k^ o« 

the Dove*. 

123 ^'EST SUPERIOR STREE5T. 





TWO DEAD AND THIRH 
INJURED AT TORONTO 

Sixty-Foot Wall of Burned 

Building Falls on 

Men. 

Toronto. Ont., April 9.— Two labor- 
ers were killed and thirty Injured laat 
night by a fall of a sixty- foot wall of 
a building previously destroyed by 
fire. 



goy or 6irl? 

Great Question! 

Thl3 brings to many mind* an old and 
tried family remedy — an external ap- 
plication known aa 
"Mothers Friend." 
During the period of 
expectancy it la ap- 
plied to the ab- 
dominal muscles and 
is designed to soothe 
the Intricate network 
of nerves Involved. 
In this manner it 
has such a splendid 
Influence as to Justi- 
fy Its use in all cases of coming 
mother-hood. It has been generally rec- 
ommended for years and year!» and those 
who have used It speak In highest praise 
of the Immense relief It affords. Partlcu- 
Lirly do these knowing mothers speak of 
the absence of morning sickness, absence 
of strain on the ligaments and freedom 
from those many other distresses usually 
looked forward to with such concern. 

There is no question but what 
"Mother's Friend" has a marked tendency 
to relieve the mind and this of itself In 
rddltlon to the physical relief has given 
It a v^TT wide popularity among women. 
Tou can obtain "Mother's Friend" at 
j»lmo«t any drug store. It has helped & 
};if«it of mothers to a complete recortrr. 

It la prepared only by Bradfleld Reg- 

i:Iiitor Co.. 801 I^mar Bldg., Atlanta. G«. 

A\oId tb« manr worthlMS BabatltutM, 



Two Harbors Girl of 12 

Succumbs to Dread 

Disease. 

Two Harbors. Minn.. April 9.— (Spe- 
cial to The Herald.)— Sigma Falk the 
12-year-old daughter, of Mr. John 
Falk, died this morning at her home 
«2« Ninth avenue. She had scarlet 
fever in one of Its worse forms. The 
first symptoms of the disease appeared 
on April 2 and the doctor was sum- 
moned on April 8. On account of the 
seriousness of the case a nurse^^ was 
Immediately called In. The condition 
of the girl rapidly changed from bad 
to worse, until her death this morn- 
ing. Mrs. John Falk. mother of the 
deceased. Is a widow and ha« lived In 
this city for a number of years. There 
is also another case of scarlet fever in 
the same family. 

Seeond Fev*r Death. 
This is the second death from scar- 
let fever since the epidemic startud 
about three weeks ago, Roy Bjurman 
dying on March 19. The number of 
In the city seems to be gradu 



Eczema 
Stopped 

ZEILO Proves a "Wonderful Saoocss- 

Stops Itching Instantly and 

Brings Permanent Eeinlta. 

Get a 26c Bottle Today and Frer* It. 

Don't think that eczema, that nearly 
drlve.i yoa wild, cant be gotten rid of. It 
can— and ZEMO Is all you need to do It 

This clean, anti- 
septic solution goes 
to the very root of 
ec^etna and con- 
quers It af it does 
other skin alTeo> 
tlons. Its relief Is 
immediate and Ite 
reflult.s lasting. ZE- 
MO has oft'^n been 
ca8e.<« m the city seems lo oe sraau- imitated but posl- 
ally Increasing, although everything Is i tirelynevoroqualed. 
being done by the authorities to rem- i u will surprise you. 
edy conditions^. Several new cases have | „ it bas so many 

been reported In the last twenty-four , others, by l^ivlnt-^-lio wm «•— All 
hours. The nurse employed by the city your sklnas cleor as 5.^ "1" ''*' '1 ?*?* Vi 
and school board has thirty suspects | t hou g h you had Thb Torm«t tostaatiy 
all of whom have certain symptoms i never hud eczema In jrour life. You will 




ELY MO THERS ^ CLUB. 

Organization Chooses Delegates to 
Women Meet at Ctot^uet. 

Ely. Minn., April 9._(Special to The 
Herald.)— The Mothers club met yes- 
terday afternoon at the Central school, 
and a program of music, readings and 
a folk dance was given, after which 
refre.^hments were served. 

The club decided to send delegates to 
the Federation of Woman's club that 
meets next month at Cloquet and Mra. 
HE. White and Mrs. Peter Schaefer 

"¥his wfl^be the first time the local 
club has been representedvM the con- 

^^The"club will give a musical enter- 
tainment m the near future, and mem- 
bers are now trying to arrange for this 
event The club will also give a 1>- 
ceum course during the coming winter 
instead of giving the home talent en- 
iSriafnment as has been their custom 
during the past t wo y^&t^- 

FLUE PLUGG ED UP. 

Eveleth Family Has Cloi Call From 
Gas Asphyxiation. 

Eveleth. Minn,. April 19.— (Special to 
The Herald.)- The family of Domlnlck 
Je'TTrae had a narrow escape from 
asphvxiatlon when several bricks were 
dislodged at the top of the chimney, 
plugging the flue. Mr. Jerome was 
Sroused by the falling brick and vis- 
ited the rooms occupied by h s wife and 
children and found them aleeplng all 

'l-eeling uneas?y he »"^*Jtwo other 
trips to their rooms aiSr-on tne lasi 
vl«»lt found them nearly unconscious. 
They were taken into the open air and 
a physician summoned. If Mr. Jfrome 
had not been awakened V- l«^ probable 
that there would have been a tragedy 
m the home. 

HIBBINOyARK " 

BOARD'S PURCHASE. 



RANGE PRINTERS TO 

ME ET AT VIRGINIA. 

Virginia. Minn., April 9. — (Special to 
The Herald.) — The range printers and 
publishers will meet here April 20 to 
discuss range matters, printing mat- 
ters. They will be entertained at din- 



THROW AWAY YOUR 
EYEGLASSES! 

A FREE PRESCRIPTION 

Yo« Can flare Filled and Use at Home. 



of the disease. Among new cases re- 
ported are Ralph and Helen Dwan. 
children of City Attorney John I>wan 
and Virginia Hayea. daughter of D. J. 
Hayes. ^ 

After Bxpeetwratvra. 

Hlbbing, Minn., April 9.— (.Special to 



Set this rell'f Instantly by getting a 26o 
ottle of ZRMO right away— now. There's 
no more excuse for enduring such misery 

guarantaed by 
Dnluth 



Hlbbing. Minn.. April 9.— (Special to 

The Herald.) — One hundred and ninety 

nine light posts, built to hold but the 

single Tamp, were purchased yester«lay 

ZEMO I., sold and guaranteed by afternoon by the park board fro^ 

druggists everywhere, and In Dtiluth mar P. Morris of ^^J J^^^i^^tlr^^ 

?ror%*i^ """' "'""• '' ""'"' '"^^i^^Bu'tJr'tle wStiwar^trnilJn'-J^^^^ 



Do you wear glasses? Are you a 
victim of eyestrain or other eye weak- 
ness? If so, you will be glad to know 
that there Is real hope for you. Many 
whose eyes were failing say they have 
had their eyes restored through the 
principle of this wonderful free pre- 
scription. One man says after trying 
It: "I was almost blind; could not see 
to read at all. Now I can read every- 
thing without any glasses and my eyes 
do not water any more* At night they 
would pain dreadfully; now they feel 
fine all the time. It was like a miracle 
to me." A lady who used it says: "The 
atmosphere seemed hazy with or with- 
out glasses, but after using this pre- 
scription for fifteen days, everything 
seems clear. I can even read fine print 
without glasses. It is believed that 
thousand^ who wear glasses can now 
discard them in a reasonable time and 
multitudes more will be able to 
strengthen their eyes so as to be 
spared the trouble and expense of ever 
getting glasses. Eye troubles of many 
descriptions may be wonderfully bene- 
fited by following the simple rules. 
Here 1p the prescription: Go to any 
active drug store and get a bottle of 
Optona, fill a two-ounce bottle with 
v;arm water, drop In one Optona tablet, 
and allow to dissolve. With this liquid 
bsthe the eyes two or four times daily. 
You should notice your eyes clear up 
perceptibly right from the start and 
Inflammation will quickly disappear. 
If your eyes are bothering vou even a 
little take steps to save them now be- 
fore It is too late. Many hopelessly 
blind might have been saved if they 
had cared for their eyes in time. 



Eveleth Militia Inspected. 

Eveleth, Minn.. April »;— (Spec'»J., t° 
The Herald.)— Company F of the Third 
infantry M. N. G., was inspected and 
put through the drills last night for 
MaJ. Neulnberg. Federal Inspection 
will take place April 17. 

• 

Eveleth Spinster Die*. . , .^ 

Eveleth. Minn.. April 9.— (Special to 
The Hera d.)— MIPS Gusta Peteri. aged 
66 died yesterday at the home of 
Peter Peterson from pneumonia. Miss 
Peteri had lived here for ^^"V >'^^.;«3 
An estate estimated at $8,000 >* as 
willed to a brother in Finland. 

— -• 

Parole Breaker Senteneed. 

Virginia. Minn.. April »;— Theodore, 
son of Jacob Stubler. a former Vir- 
ginia saloonkeeper, who broke his pa- 
role by becoming intoxicated and en- 
gaging in a fight in a local saloon, in 
district court yesterday was sentenced 
to serve four months at the comity 

"^He '^'J^ntly pleaded guilty to a 
charge of selling liquor to minors and 
was place d on parole by Judg e Hughes. 

Get Mountain Iron •'•?>■• „,, 

Mountain Iron. Minn.. April 9—71^.^ 
new village council has made the fol- 
Towing appointments: Chief of police, 
lowing a'y;^^^,.gon: night patrolman. 

CharlVs Murphy; «"»«"" t*"J*^°;^h?l.f2s 
trie light and water plant, Charles 
Walke?" street commissioner Matt. 
Pecalfa health officer. Dr. I^arsons: 
cltv engineer, Charies Doorway: Jus- 
tices of the peace. F. R. Stephan and 
r Webb Appointments were also 
made on the committees of health 
mfance.^'Sollce. w*ter and light, street 
ind alleys, and the "brary noara. 
George Elllertson was appointed clerk 
for the w ater and light de partment. 

•Drys" «• 0««tlnne Ptcht. 

T'lv Minn April 9— (Special to The 
He'^aVd.V^Aitho^lgh they lost the fight 
Tgalnst the saloons In Tuesday's elec- 
tion the local "drys" will n°t d«f»«V* to 
may organize a permanent .^ody to 
^nUnue the fight. It is Maimed the 
vote of only seventy against no license 
showed a gain I n sentiment. 

Ylridnla Conrt Case 

Virginia. Minn.. April 9--(SP^claJ to 
ThV Herald.)— The case of Uahlberg 
T« Edwards Is on trial in district 
cour? h^?e in-whlch the plaintiff seeks 
to recover $1,000 for the keep of de- 
fendant's wlfi. the plaintiffs daugh- 
Rr and Plalntifrs son. The grand Jury 
Is expected to report late this after- 
noon. 

VlHiting in Anrom. 

Aurora. Minn.. April 9.— (Special to 
The Herald.) — Misses Coffin and Mon- 
roe of Minneapolis, who formerly had 
charge of the kindergarten department 
of the local schools, have been vlsit- 
Inv here this week. 

-• 

Special values In blue serges at $S.J8 
and |4.»6— The Big Duluth. 



IS A BOWER 

OF LOVEUNESS 

J. J. Le Borious' Greenhouse 

Is Filled With Easter 

Flowers. 

J. J. Le Borious' greenhouse at 921 
East Third street, with its thousands 
and thousands of home-grown flowers 
and plants, is a veritable bower of 
loveliness at the present time. Flowers 
of all kinds are In bloom and visitors 
are surprised at the size of the green- 
house, and the extent of the stock. 

Mr. Le Borious is especially featur- 
ing the Easter lily and hundreds of 
these beautiful flowers are growing 
In the greenhouse, under the care of 
nearly twenty men. who give their 
constant time and attention to tli« 
blooms. . , . 

Mr. Le Borious reported this morning 
that there is an exceptional sale of 
lilies this week, and he accounts for 
this record-breaking sale by the fact 
that the price of the Easter flower 
is within reach of all people and In 
comparison Is lower than other flowers. 
They are selling at 25 cents a bloom 
and from 60 cents to $1.5v a pot. the 
price depending on the number of 
blooms to a pot. 

Plants of many kinds, all grown at 
the local greenhouse, are blossoming 
and Duluthlans are afforded the op- 
portunity of purchasing home-growa 
flowers for Easter. Mr. Le Borious takes 
great pride In his greenhouse, and 
nothing apparently delights him mor« 
than to show a visitor through th« 
long rows of flowers and plants. 




ASmU ^COUGHS 
CAXAIIB COLDS 







nrraausHco isrs 
A simple, safe and effective treatment tor 
bronchial troables,avoiding drugs. Vapor- 
ized Cresolene stops the paroxysms of 
Whooping Cough and relieves Spasmodic 
Croup at once, It is a boon to bulTcrers 
from Asthma Thoaircarryingtheanti. 
septic vapor, inspired with every breath, 
makes breathing easy; soothes the so rs 
throat and stops uie cough, assuring rest- 
ful nights. It Is invatoable t o mothers 
with young children. — 

Send us fostai for 
descriptive bookM. 

AIX »Rir««I8TS 
Try <3nmA0o» Antlwptio 
TbroM 1M>>c«sforthe tr- 
r!t«t»d thr«Mt. They are 

idlinplA, efferUys sad •ntt- 
aepuo. Of ytmr dninitt 
or (rom ««, Mo In iltf^ 
VAfOjn»HMCt. 




I 
I 






14 



Thursday, 



THE DULUtH HERALD 



April 9, 1914. 



V 



! i 

f 



Watch The Herald for 
Baseball News 





O 




f ■ 1 






The Herald Sporting 
Gossip Is Reliable 



LIVE SPORTING GOSSIP 

By BRUCE 



D 



NU'RISARIO Mike Lollins ' ciuni, Westergaard Mauds 
ot the new Hudson Athletic , among two or three as the logical 
olnb has been a visitor in contender for the title. 

No wrestler has come to the front 
so fast as large and open faced Jess, 




DEFEATS GIANT DE ROUEN 



nur tair midst during the 
last two days. The impend- 



inK business of bringing visitors to the ! and if the day comes that he will be 



W olgast- Fillman setto was one of the 

matters discussed during the stay- : 

over of Michael. ! 

D.own in the vicinity of the Twin ; 
Cities, it the sentiment wafted higher | 
by Mons. Collins is correct, they be- i 
lieve that Wolgast is going to have | 
a stiff argument in the person of John j 
Tecumseh Tillman, with the Cadillac , 
youth riding triumphantly in the ulti- 
mate role ^>f conqueror. 

Being the promoter of the coming 
contest. Mike Ccdlins very wisely re- 
frained from expressing an opmion 
as to the outcome of the bout. 

Here is the idea, expressed in one 
of those nutshell surroundings: 

Wolijast is fast, if not the finished 
boxer/ He has two very e.xcellent 
hands. He can flail away with that 
left with excellent effect, and if he 



listed in the tournament for the high 
est title of the world, for the throne 
that has been vacated by the perma- 
nent retirement of the great Gotch, 
this big and rangy Swede will have 
the following of a lot of the fans 
throughout the length and breadth of 

the country. 

* ♦ « 

The Lavish Spender. 
|1w111:N N. E. McKride of Chicago 
I4J was in Colombo he had a long 
conversation with Sir Thomas Lip- 
ton. The tea man informed the visi- 
tor from the midst of Chi that he had 
expended something over $1,000,000 
in the efforts to lift the cup. This 
would indicate that in prodigal meth- 
ods at least the Sir Thomas man is 
one of the real sports of the world. 
It might be interesting to some to 



f learn that'when a boy of 15 tender 



succeeds in landing in the kitchen o. ; _^ Thomas worked in a livery 

the Tillnum emry several ^^^''nf , ^,f^'i,7e ot Xew York. Let us hope he 
from positions outsule the ropes are siaoic 01 1 «- i 

liable to be exhorting John Tecum- i 
seth to rise from a prostrate position 



ftn to nsc irom a pru>i.aic py..t.^... Omaha and in tl 

Be that as it may. the commg »»* ■ ^^.J^^'^own got the start that lat^ 

^!Yr"J !!;-.:,!r;^" t!:: ^r;;:- "n^ enable! him t^ amass sufficient co 



most spectacular battles of this coun- 
tr>- and the embryo Tillman is very 
liable t'i break all of the attendance 
records under the Hedman law — out- 
side of Milwaukee. 

\\ olgast is a card, one of the great- 
est in the pugilistic game, and Till- 
man being a Minneapolis boy. the 
interest in the bout was engendered 
some time before the signing of the 

articles. 

* • * 

The Ever Aftermath. 
'.A. thiiijis have an attcrmath — 
wen the faded romance of the 
maiden aunt. The scrap of Tuesday 
e\ening will therefore arise and stand 
attention. 

For one we can understand how 
tho«e who slipped the man in 



was kind to the horses. 

Later the builder of disappointed 

the 

er 

in 

of the realm to fwrnish us with some 

of the Very best international sport. 

Just so long as Sir Thomas does 

not lift the cup. just so long will the 

people of the .American refuse to be 

worried over the amount of money 

he has spent for yachts. 

• ♦ ♦ 

Come and Get Them. 

ni!H day before yesterday some 
kind friend in the western section 
of our city sent in four likenesses of 
oi\,e George Chip of Newcastle, Pa. 
Said kind friend can come and get 
the four likenesses of G. Chip. Like 
the rest of the people of this sordid 
world we are for the winner and 
hastily and with ruthless disregard of 
tl^'e past performances cast the face of G. [ 




DULUTH VISITUR TELLS 
OF TRIP AROU ND WORLD 

N. E. McBride Made Historic Tour With White 

Sox and Giants— Nearly Drowns in Pacific 

and Receives Blessing of Pope. 



ninety-nine miles per hour. Tliis is 
official. 

"We were 18% days in this storm. 
Imagine it! All of us fond of life. 

ten commandments came to our mind« f^^wlnf ^^'a'^'ToWZg'^nte^est\^^ll!'e 



BY BRUCE. 

"When we came within sight of 
Mount Sinai the sacred memory of the 



AMERICUS. 



box office some good money for a 
paste)>oard should be peeved at the 
resuit. .\t the same time the most 
philosophical thing to do is to look 
squarely at the facts of the case. 

Kelly was injured and the accident 
was imavoiflable — especially from the 
standpoint of the promoters. Some 



Chip away. 



BOWLING SCORES ~] 



As the season draws nearer to Its 
close Interest in the bowling races In 
the two leagues of Duluth increases. 
Some close and interesting games arc 



people may hold accidents of like na- ' toeing played in botli of the leagues, 
ture against the boxing game, but aland many of the contests have a dia- 
little cool and sane reasoning -should I tinct^bearing on the deciding of the 
convince anyone of the utter lack of j ^j^^ following games were played in 
fairness in condemning anv sort of ! the Major league and on the <;rand al- 
.port bocau,. of uccijen.s .ha, -cur j .«;.^.as^t^eve„ln.. and .rou.M out .o,n, 

now and then, | Columkia Clothlnjr Co 

Kellv is a professional pugilist who ! Michalek 



SNOW STORMS AND COLD 

PREVENT MANY GAMES 



and sins and commissions smote us 
with battering force, for it seemed 
that we saw — at least some of us — 
those tablets emblazoned forth In fiery 
protest." 

This is not the story of a crusade, 
dear readers, but rather of the trip 
around the world of the White Sox 
and Giants, and particularly of N. E. 
McBride, a business man who is very 
well acquainted with scores of Du- 
luthians, who makes Duluth and 
clothes, both very frequently. 

Mr. McBride is of Chicago. He was 
a baseball fan when Al Spalding was 

Fetching that peculiar underhand de- 
ivery that was in vogue in the days 
of — let us see — oh, It was years ago. 

"Mac" was just a kid then; a wild- 
eyed kid, crazy about the game. But 
his fanhood started right there. 

He is a personal friend of Fred 
Pfeffer. the wonderful second base- 
man of the old Chicago White Sox, 
and William.son and Anson. He Is 
also a staunch friend of Charles A. 
Comiskey and when the Noblest Ro- 
man of them all strolled into the Mc- 
Bride place of business one day last 
spring that was filled with the joy of 
the golden universe, and said: "Mac, 
I have framed a trip around the world 
with the baseball boys; will you go?" 
McBride's brother answered right off 
the reel: "He will." 

When that memorable trip around 
the world was taken years ago, when 
Spalding and Tener and Anson and 
the other who's who in baseball gir- 
dled the globe, Mr. McBride wanted to 
go. He could not make the grade, 
but figuratively leaped at the oppor- 
tunity of last November. 

As most of you are aware, the Sox 
and Giants sailed from Victoria, B. C. 
on Nov. 19 last. On Nov. 29 the ship 
carrying the world tourists ran into 
one of the worst storms in the history 
of the usually pacific Pacific. 

"The ship became unmanageable," 
said Mr. McBride yesterday. "The 



dear old U. S. a; Imagine over 18 days 
when you said goodbye to friends at 
night with an especial fondness in 
your voice and a hard grip of the 
hand. 

"Yokahama! My boy, what memories 
It brings back. What poet dealt with 
these fleeting memories? He was a 
regular big leaguer. 

"It was in the morning. The sun was 
shining and the mist was ju.st raising 
from the sea and land. The vivid fo- 
liage of the land of Nippon mingled 
witri the golden sunlight and gave an 
exquisite coloring. 

"Off in the distance loomed Fuji- 
gama, the sacred mountain of Japan, 
with its majestic peaks blending In 
the blue of the sky line. Let me tell 
you some of us will never forget the 
picture of Yokahama. 

"Listen, the Japanese don't know 
anything about the fine points of the 
game of baseball. We beat Tokyo by 
the sweet and Inspiring tune of 17 to 
1. We would wait — I am an American, 
you know — till they pitched an easy 
one and then hit it over the fence. It 
wa.? all very simple. 

"The Japs are fast and agile, but 
compared to the baseball knowledge 
amassed down the lane of the years 
by the players of this country, they 
are mere tottering Infants In the 
game." 

Olrdlins: the Globe. 

From Japan the tourists sailed to 
Hongkong and from China set sail for 
Manila. From the possessions of the 
United States the trip was continued 
on to Australia, the never never land 
giving tourists one of the most de- 
lightful sojourns of the trip. From 
Australia the tourists continued on to 
Colombo, to Egypt, to Nice, to Paris 1 
and to London 

"More than 3.000 people met the ship 
at Sydney," said Mr. McBride. "We 
played at the cricket grounds at 
Sydney and a vast assemblage was on 
hand. 

"Over there the cricket club has so- 
cial features; club house?, cafes, and 

, other things, most of them extremely 

The delig-htful. The ladies were dined and 



Chicago. April 9. — Snow storms 1 Schang^ Ra^an, Allen, 
throughout the Central West yester- Fischer, 
day caused a score of exhibition games _ | 

scheduled for American and National 
league teams to be called off. The fol- 
lowing games were canceled: 

Detroit Americans at Cincinnati, Chi- 
cago Nationals at Dayton. Ohio; Min 



Pfeffer and 



i. M 



I emergency crew was mustered. 

lifeboats were made ready and we i after the game we were given a mag- 
' prepared to meet our doom. Booms j nlficent dinner at the hotel. Then we 
1 were carried away and It looked like , went to the theater and afterward the 
i '30 • as you folks say. I rude and brutal men attended a prize 

"Some Storm." I fight at Rush Cutters' bay. 

i "From the official log 1 learned that | "Hugh Mcintosh took us to one of 

the engine traveled 269 knots in a | his theaters and gave a private per- 

certain number of hours and in reality 1 formance and treated us in rogal man- 
I the ship traveled 106 knots. This was ner. We will always remember Hugh 

caused, understand, by the fact that ■ Mcintosh. 

the screws were out of water a lot of I "At Melbourne the lord mayor en- 
Some waves, my boy. At 1 tertalned us — and It was some enter 



Omahii. N^. April 9.— Pitcher Stev- 



Te#ke 
Walls . . . 
McKenzie 
Otterson 



cams his li\ elihood from the ring. It 
is rather absurd to believe that a 
tried veteran of his standing would 
nuit unless he was too severely in- 
jured to continue. The crux of the 
whole matter is that an accident cut 
!,hort the bout and gave it to Ferns, 
and while those present have the 
right to feel that through an accident 
ihey did not receive the worth of 
their monev, it is hardly fair to con- 
denm the fight game in general or . F^^ter^^'^ • 
the promoters of the affair m par- ^ McFariane 
tictilar for something that was en- ^ oppel 



161 
202 
95 
122 
191 



160 
125 
130 
167 
145 



Totals ""1 

UermattM. 



156 
155 
13S 
192 
178 

"819 



won the plaudits of 1,500 shivering 
fans yesterday when he struck out 
Honus Wagner, with a man on third 

neapolis American as.<^ociation team at ' base and two outs. Pittsburg won the 

St. Joseph, Mo.; Cleveland Americans . game, 13 to 3. Score: R. H. L. 

at Indianapolis; Chicago Americans 1 pittsbur^ .' 13 13 

first team at Topeka. Kan.; St. Louis 

Americans and St. Louis Nationals at 

St. Louis 



of the party will never forget the stay 
there. 

Met the Po»e. 

"We met the pope. Listen, when 
the parly was ushered int^ the room 
where his holiness had consented to 
give us an audience it was a svght to 
make you think. Most of the tP®** 
were in dress suits and most of ttte^ 
women In black. When the pope ap- \ 
peared most of those baseball player* 
had relics of some sort that they 
wanted the pope to bless. His holi- 
ness made one grand sweep by bless- 
ing every member of the party and all 
their possessions. 

"I met one of the cardinals and he 
asked me if I was not an umpire, owing 
to the fact that I am large and wear 
a grave expression. 

"At Colombo Sir Thomas Lipton en- 
tertained the world tourists. His head- 
quarters are at Colombo. He is a real 
gentleman and one of the finest 
sportsman of the world. As we went 
to our cabins that evening each man 
and woman found a five-pound pack- 
age of the finest Lipton tea, with the 
compliments of Sir Thomas. 

"We went through the Suez canal, 
through the Red sea and Indian ocean. 
We visited Cheops, you know he is a 
pyramid, one of the big league kind, 
451 feet high, 766 feet on the longest 
side and occupies an area of 536,824 
square feet. Some pyramid'. We played 
two games in Egypt. 

"Itfi.ly is a moss covered ruin, su- 
perstitious and credulous, with «. 
shrine -every few feet it seems. 

"We visited Monte Carlo, one of the 
greatest business institutions of the 
world, by the way — never mind how 
much some of us lost— -I said it was a 
wonderful business institution, did I 
not? We visited Paris and were dined 
and wined by some great man whose 
plate was solid gold and silver. 

"We went on to London and I sat 
as near the king during that now his- 
toric game as 1 am to you right now. 
Excuse me, he looks as cold as a. 
mackerel, 

"You know someone told the king 
that baseball was the national game 
of the Americans and that he should 
not by any means miss the chance of 
paying the Americans a compliment 
by lending his presence to the game. 
So the king was there, with regal at- 
tendance, and whether the king un- 
derstood the game or not, he saw with, 
some 30,000 of his subjects one of the 
gre.itest games that it will ever be 
the lot of mortal man to see. 
\%'ake the Briton* Up. 
"Right at the startoff some one hit 
a ball that looked good for all of the 
bases on that historic old football field. 
Steve Evans went back like a deer 
and then in ."^udden desperation leaped 
and came down with the ball. It was 
a marvellous catch. Just after that 
someone else hit one on the nose and 
old Sam Crawford made another won- 
df^rful catch. 

"That sort of woke up even the 
plegmatic Britons and they followed 
the game with more than the ordinary 
interest. It so happ«:-ned that we gave 
the English one of the greatest games 
of baseball that ha.s ever been played. 
"One Englishman sitting next to me 
wondered why nine men played 
against one. You see he figured the 
nine men in the field against the one 
man at bat. They couldn't get the idea 
of the coachers. calling them the 
'barriers.' 

"It was a grand trip, a wonderful 
trip. We saw the poverty of the old 
world in all its startling ugliness, and 
it is indeed impressive. It makes a 
man think to behold thousands of 
people who go to bed at night won- 
dering Vkhere they are going to get 
anvthing to eat the next day. We be- 
held a civilization, centuries oW. 
reeking with superstition, in some 



one tlmt. I shal! n'^verquYt^ fo7get Tt J taFnment. "The 'Australia''ns TrcatVd"iu^ j case.^ "and '"ore cynical than the 
thi wind registered a velocity o^ in such a manner that the members i philosophy of our country. And that 



Sehultz 

Mitchell . . . 
Van Hoven 
Stauss . . . . 
Deller 



Totals 



HaJiiTist. 



Pinney 



m 



This Osman Chap. 



>35 
161 
189 
159 
203 

947 

160 
173 
173 
130 
168 



Rain caused a postponement of the 
game scheduled between the New York 
Americans at Philadelphia and the 
Boston Nationals at Baltimore. 



139 


166 1 


146 


196 


197 


167 


^63 


177 


168 


166 



813 8 



tirely unavoidable 

Totals 804 

BlK noliithM. 

)\viNGgos.ip Of Syracuse univer- ^^^-^ ::;;:;::;::: ; III 

sity gives lavish praise to the Du- ^^jrphy 201 

luthian. Art Osman. Arthur is at the ; Trevillion !«« 

freshman Stiegler ^'" 

Totals 983 

S-Winuers. 

Berini 215 

Hilber 16; 

Brown 168 



present time stroking the 
eight at the school Ten Eyck Pere 
presides over in the mere matter of 
rowing, and according to the reports 

that drift back home, the Duluth _ 

Youngster is one of the finds of re- Montgomery 
cent rowing years. ' ^^»«" 



171 

141 

209 
146 
220 

887 

168 
150 
166 

177 
206 



Brooklyn, N. Y., April 9. — Two runs 
behind at the end of the seventh, the 
Brooklyn Nationals won in the last 
two innings against the Philadelphia 
Americans yesterday, scoring twice in 
the eighth and once In the ninth. The 
score was 3 to 2. 

For five Innings Bush held the lo- 
cals to one scratch hit. Burning re- 
lieved him and was wild, passing three 
batters and hitting anotlier, which, 
149 I with a sacrifice fly, enablt'd Brook- 
161 I lyn to tie the score in the eighth. The 

. I winning run came with one out. Smith 

singling, stealing second, and coming 

home on Stengel's smash to center. 

Score: R. H. E. 

Phladelphia ....000001100—2 3 

Brooklyn 00000002 1—3 3 6 

Batteries — Bush, Durnlng and 



Omaha ^. u • ~ ' ^^ I 

Batteries — Mammaux, Duffy and 
Brenegan, Coleman; Stevenson, Clos- 
man, Ormsby and Shestak. 



IIS 
17c. 
141 



78C 



Tffobile. Ala., April 9.— The New York 
Giants defeated the Mobile team, 3 to 
0, yesterday. The game was called at 
the end of the seventh owing to the 
cold weather. Score: R. H. E. 

Mobile 6 1 

New York 3 8 2 

Batteries — Keeley, Cullom. Williams 
and Schmidt; Demaree and McLean. 



St. Joseph, Mo., April 9. — Yesterday's 
game between the Minneapolis Amer- 
ican association team and the St. Joe 
Western league club was called off on 
account of cold weather. The same 
teams play here today and tomorrow. 



ir& 

231 
171 
145? 

193 



816 9ie 



172 
169 



220 
213 
170 
170 
171 



172 
151 
196 
179 
14b 



After looking Osman over in the 



Totals 866 944 843 



junior eight bo"at of the Duluth Boat ^,^^^^^Dalnth Brg. « M.ltln^ Co. 

club, the elder Ten Eyck declared the , jjurke '.'.'.'. 163 

boy was. one of the most promising Ferguson 163 

oarsmen that he had ever rested his ^ Kohnen M? 



well trained eyes upon. 

In the collegiate world there, ap- 
pears to be a bright future for the 
oarsman who is one of the greatest 
ever turned out at the Duluth club — 
one 111 the boys who assisted valiant- 
ly in making Duluth one of the ama 

teur rowing centers of the world. 
* • • 

Jess After the Big Ones. 

JF.STI.RD.AY a letter from Oscar 

Thorson found its way thither. 

According to the message from dis- 
tant Des Moines, Te«;s Westergaard, 
the gigantic Swede of the Iowa platte, 
is after the scalps of the best of the 
heavyweights and figures to wrestle 
for the world's heavyweight cham- 
pionship before the season has closed 
the curtains on the game of grapple. 

Of the .American wrestlers in the 
basking limelight of the national cal- 



Mausolf 167 

Totals ''83 



168 
•-•01 
155 
149 



15? 
220 
146 
14t 
208 



M9 87€ 



Amateur Boxers Compete. 

Boston, Mass., April 9. — .Sectional 
titleholdcrs from various parts of the 
I'^nited States and Canada have been 
entered for the national amateur box- 
ing championships here on April 17-18. 
Toronto, Can.. St. John. N. B., New 
Orleans, Cleveland, St. Louis and New 
York are among the cities represented 
In the entries a